IRISH NATIONAL MARITIME SEARCH AND RESCUE _SAR_ FRAMEWORK by fdh56iuoui

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									              IRISH NATIONAL MARITIME


              SEARCH AND RESCUE (SAR)

                          FRAMEWORK




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Foreword
Search and Rescue (SAR) comprises the search for and provision of aid to persons who are,
or are believed to be, in imminent danger of loss of life. The two operations – search and
rescue – may take many forms, depending on whether they are both required or not, on the
size and complexity of the operation and on the available staff and facilities. Search and
rescue does not include salvage or the saving of property except where the action is
indivisible from that of safeguarding life.

Dedicated SAR assets are limited in Ireland and when necessary, other government, private
and commercial assets are diverted from their primary function in order to provide support. It
is necessary that the available resources are organised and coordinated so that effective and
expeditious search and/or rescue operations can be assured. This National Maritime Search
and Rescue Framework is the standard reference document for use by all Irish Search and
Rescue authorities working in the maritime domain and promulgates the agreed methods of
coordination through which search and rescue operations are conducted within Ireland’s SAR
Region.

The Framework is supplemented by various informative and instructional documents,
procedures, understandings and agreements used within and between organisations concerned
with search and rescue. The manual is consistent with the relevant International Conventions
to which Ireland is a party. It has been developed with due regard to the International
Aeronautical and Maritime Search and Rescue Manual (IAMSAR). For more detailed
information on land SAR operations, readers should refer to the Major Emergency
Framework Document on www.mem.ie.

In providing a search and rescue response, nothing in the content of the Framework precludes
properly qualified officers from using their initiative in providing a SAR response in
circumstances where these procedures are judged to be inappropriate. In so doing, however,
officers’ actions should conform as closely as possible to those instructions contained in the
Framework most closely pertinent to the circumstances and they should keep all other parties
involved informed.

When developing Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) at the organisational level, care
should be taken to ensure that procedures are written in accordance with this Framework.
Should an SOP be identified that would benefit the SAR community it is recommended that
the issue is raised with the National Maritime & Aviation Emergency Advisory Committee.

This manual will be promulgated on the Internet for the use of all search and rescue
practitioners. The Internet version on the Department of Transport web site is the controlled
document and is the latest version of this manual. It should always be referred to as it contains
the most up to date information.




Noel Dempsey T.D.
Minister for Transport


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Contents
           Part 1
         Irish National Search and Rescue Framework

         1.1.       Introduction

         1.2.       International Obligations

         1.3.       Purpose

         1.4.       Scope

         1.5.       Objectives

         1.6.       Participants

         1.7.       Irish Search and Rescue Region (IRSRR)

         1.8.       Division of SAR Responsibilities within the IRSRR

         1.9.       Irish Aeronautical & Maritime Emergency Advisory Committee

         1.10.      Irish Marine Search and Rescue Committee

         1.11.      Other SAR Committees

         1.12.      SAR Functions covered by this Framework

         1.13.      SAR Functions Not covered by this Framework

         1.14.      Charging for SAR services

         1.15.      Overarching Principles

         1.16.      Coordination of Operations

         1.17.      Marine Operations Centre, Rescue Coordination Centres and Sub
                    Centres

         1.18.      SAR Management

         1.19.      SAR Mission Coordination

         1.20.      On Scene Coordinator

         1.21.      Incident Manager

         1.22.      Mass Rescue Incidents


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         1.23.        Aviation incidents in the marine environment

         1.24.        Media


               Appendix 1.1          Irish Search & Rescue Region (SRR)
               Appendix 1.2          Irish SRR Divisions
               Appendix 1.3          Irish EEZ (Pollution Responsibility Zone)



         Part 2
         2.0       Irish Search And Rescue Organisation


         2.1         Irish Coast Guard

         2.2         SAR Helicopters

         2.3         Irish Aviation Authority

         2.4         An Garda Síochána

         2.5         Royal National Lifeboat Institution

         2.6         Community Rescue Boats of Ireland

         2.7         Irish Mountain Rescue Association

         2.8         Civil Defence

         2.9         Dublin Fire Brigade

         2.10        Health Service Executive

         2.11        Harbour Authorities

         2.12        Air Accident Investigation Unit (AAIU)

         2.13        Irish Cave Rescue Organisation

         2.14        Lifeguards

         2.15        Additional Resources

         2.16        Craft of Convenience

         2.17        Legislation

         2.18        List of Liaison Agreements / Memoranda of Understanding


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         2.19     Glossary of Abbreviations

         2.20     Glossary of Terms



         Appendix 2.1    IRCG Communications Network
         Appendix 2.2    IRCG Coastal Units
         Appendix 2.3    Helicopter, RNLI & CRBI Stations
         Appendix 2.4    On Call and response structure
         Appendix 2.5    Garda Divisional Areas
         Appendix 2.6    Map of Mountain Rescue Teams
         Appendix 2.7    DF/IRCG SLA’s Schedule of Services




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               IRISH NATIONAL MARITIME
            SEARCH AND RESCUE FRAMEWORK
Amendments record Sheet

This is a controlled document. IRCG HQ will issue amendments as approved under signature
by the Director of the Irish Coast Guard. The SAR Operations Manager, Irish Coast Guard
will maintain the original and true draft.


Date         Section       Page No.     Summary of Changes




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                             Part One


                   Irish Maritime
           Search and Rescue Framework




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            Irish National Maritime Search and Rescue Framework

     1.1    INTRODUCTION

    1.1.1   Search and Rescue (SAR) comprises the search for and provision of aid to
            persons who are, or are believed to be in imminent danger of loss of life. The
            two operations – search and rescue – may take many forms, depending on
            whether they are both required or not, on the size and complexity of the
            operation and on the available staff and facilities. Search and rescue does not
            include salvage or the saving of property except where the action is indivisible
            from that of safeguarding life.

    1.1.2   The purpose of this ‘National Maritime SAR Framework’ is to provide a simple
            and clear guidance document for Irish Marine Search and Rescue (SAR) and is
            divided into the Framework and the Organisation of maritime SAR in Ireland at
            Part one. This framework section provides the overarching principles, scope and
            purpose of the Framework and should be read in conjunction with all IRCG
            operational memoranda and inter-service agreements. Maritime SAR covers
            emergency events occurring in the Irish Search and Rescue Region up to the
            high water mark, within ports as applicable and on the inland waterways as
            agreed with An Garda Síochána. Part two provides details of the organisation of
            search and rescue in Ireland.

    1.1.3   Where applicable this Framework encompasses the national aviation SAR
            Framework where the aircraft frame lands into the sea or a major inland lake.

    1.1.4   The requirement for this Framework is encompassed in the International
            Convention on Maritime SAR 1979, as amended, Annex Chapter 2.1 and by the
            International Aviation and Maritime SAR Manual published jointly by the
            ICAO and IMO.

    1.1.5   Every state recognises the great importance of saving lives and the need to be
            directly involved in rendering aeronautical and maritime search and rescue
            (SAR) services to persons in distress. The most effective and practical way of
            achieving this goal is for nation states to co-operate in a worldwide system of
            search and rescue so that wherever people travel, SAR services will be available
            if needed.

    1.1.6   A basic practical and humanitarian characteristic of the global aspect of SAR is
            that it eliminates the need for each state to provide SAR services for its own
            citizens wherever they travel worldwide. Instead the globe is divided into
            internationally agreed search and rescue regions (SRRs), each region with its
            own associated SAR services, which assist anyone in distress without regard to
            nationality, status or circumstances.

    1.1.7   This National SAR Framework will provide guidance for the implementation of
            a comprehensive set of standards and guidance that build on the base line
            established by the International Aeronautical and Maritime Search and Rescue

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            (IAMSAR) Manual. Both the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO)
            and the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) publish the IAMSAR
            manual jointly.

    1.1.8   In providing a search and rescue response, nothing in the content of the
            Framework precludes properly qualified officers from using their initiative in
            providing a SAR response in circumstances where these procedures are judged
            to be inappropriate. In so doing, however, officers’ actions should conform as
            closely as possible to those instructions contained in the Framework and their
            SOP’s most closely pertinent to the circumstances and keep all other parties
            involved informed. When developing Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) at
            the organisational level, care should be taken to ensure that procedures are
            written in accordance with the National SAR Framework.


     1.2    INTERNATIONAL OBLIGATIONS

    1.2.1   The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) and the International
            Maritime Organization (IMO) coordinate, on a global basis, member States’
            efforts to provide search and rescue (SAR) services. Briefly, the goal of ICAO
            and IMO is to provide an effective worldwide system, so that wherever people
            sail or fly, SAR services will be available if needed. The overall approach a
            State takes in establishing, providing and improving SAR services is affected by
            the fact that these efforts are an integral part of a global SAR system.

    1.2.2   The objectives of the Maritime Search and Rescue Convention are to standardise
            SAR worldwide, facilitate intergovernmental direct contact, ensure co-operation
            between surface and air SAR units, and provide guidance where needed for
            development of national SAR services.

    1.2.3   The Irish National SAR Framework is derived from the ratification by the
            Government of Ireland to the Convention on the High Seas (1958), the
            Convention on the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) (1974), the Maritime Search
            and Rescue Convention (1979 ratification published by the IMO 29.11.93), the
            International Convention on Civil Aviation (Chicago 1944), SI 171 and 172 of
            1995 in respect of aviation SAR and by Government decision. In Ireland the
            Merchant Shipping (Salvage and Wreck) Act, 1993. Furthermore Ireland has
            ratified International Conventions on the law relating to vessels in distress.

    1.2.4   This Framework deals exclusively with search and rescue in the Maritime
            domain.

    1.2.5   Search and rescue services are defined as the performance of distress
            monitoring, communication, coordination and search and rescue functions,
            including provision of medical advice, initial medical assistance and medical
            evacuation, through the use of public and private resources, including
            cooperating aircraft, vessels and other craft and installation




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     1.3    PURPOSE

    1.3.1   As an island nation, the sea is very important to Ireland, comprising a marine
            territory of approximately 350,000 square miles, which has strategic economic,
            social and environmental value for the Nation. The sea, for all its riches and
            potential for development, can be one of the most hostile and dangerous
            environments on the planet.

    1.3.2   The SAR Framework further aims to support the safe use of inland waterways in
            Ireland in its wide range of activities, from inland shipping to pleasure cruising,
            towpath walking and other recreational use.

    1.3.3   The Irish National Maritime Search and Rescue Framework is intended to
            provide an overall context within which responsible parties can work together to
            provide effective and efficient maritime and aeronautical SAR services, which
            meet domestic needs and comply with International commitments and to
            document related national policies. Furthermore detailed plans and arrangements
            for Irish National SAR are contained in Liaison Agreements and Memorandum
            of Understandings with different Organisations, Departments of State, and
            Official or volunteer Groups and in Coast Guard Operational Memoranda.


    1.4     SCOPE

    1.4.1   This Framework is not intended to conflict in any way with SAR responsibilities
            agreed by contracting states of the Convention on Civil Aviation, the
            International Convention on Maritime Search and Rescue or other appropriate
            international instruments to which Ireland is, or may become a party.

    1.4.2 No provisions of this Framework are to be construed in such a way as to
          contravene responsibilities and authorities of any participant as defined by
          statutes, executive orders or international agreements or of established
          responsibilities of other agencies and organisations that regularly assist persons
          and property in distress.

    1.4.3   Implementing guidance for the execution of this Framework is provided in the
            International Aeronautical and Maritime Search and Rescue Manual
            (IAMSAR Manual).


    1.5     OBJECTIVES

    1.5.1    To provide a national Framework for co-ordinating maritime, and where
            appropriate Aviation SAR services, which will meet domestic needs and comply
            with International obligations.

    1.5.2 To set down overall priorities and performance expectations for search
          and rescue services in Ireland.

    1.5.3. To provide a National Marine, and where appropriate Aviation Search and
           Rescue planning framework.

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    1.5.4 To determine what equipment compatibilities should exist amongst and between
          SAR service providers.

     1.5.5       Provide an overall Framework for:
             •    Co-ordination of SAR operations.
             •    The effective use of all available SAR resources.
             •    Mutual assistance between national and international agencies.
             •    Continue efforts to improve such cooperation and services.
             •    Integration of available SAR resources into a cooperative network for the
                  greater protection of life and to ensure greater efficiency and economy.
             •    To provide national guidance for development of SAR related systems.
             •    Assist determination of what equipment compatibilities should exist amongst
                  and between SAR service providers.
             •    To have as a primary concept, cooperation for overall and continual
                  development and improvement of SAR services.
             •    The ability to account for all SAR operations up to and including providing
                  initial assistance to survivors (food, clothing medical etc) and delivering
                  them to a place of safety.


    1.6          PARTICIPANTS

    The participants to this Framework: -

    1.6.1        The Department of Transport (DoT) exercises overarching responsibility for
                 maritime and aviation SAR services and for maritime and aviation safety
                 through its Divisions, agencies, the IAA, airport, port and harbour authorities.

    1.6.2        The Irish Coast Guard, as a Division of DoT, has responsibility for the
                 24/7/365 coordination of maritime SAR emergency response at sea and along
                 the coasts and cliffs of Ireland, and on major inland lakes. It maintains a its
                 Coast Guard national Maritime Operations Centre (MOC) incorporating
                 Irelands Marine Rescue Co-ordination Centre (MRCC) at Dublin and Marine
                 Rescue Sub-Centres (MRSC) at Malin Head in Co Donegal and Valentia
                 Island in County Kerry. It has a comprehensive Marine Communications
                 Network covering Irish offshore and inland waters. It maintains a network of
                 strategically located Coastal Units equipped to deal with local marine
                 emergencies.

    1.6.3        The Irish Aviation Authority (IAA) is a semi state agency responsible to the
                 DoT for the provision of Air Traffic Services including Air Traffic Control
                 and the coordination of Aeronautical SAR emergency response. The IAA
                 maintains an Aviation Rescue Co-ordination Centre (ARCC) at Shannon
                 Airport and an Aviation Rescue Sub-Centre (ARSC) at Dublin Airport. The
                 Safety Regulation Division of the IAA is the body responsible for the
                 regulation and oversight of aircraft operations, including aeronautical Search
                 and Rescue, within the State.

    1.6.4        The Department of Defence through the Irish Air Corps and the Irish Naval
                 Service provide resources in support of the Irish Coast Guard’s SAR
                 emergency response capability.
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     1.6.5     The Department of Justice through the Garda Síochána and its command
               infrastructure coordinates land based SAR operations in each Garda Division.

     1.6.6     Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) is a voluntary organisation
               dedicated to the purpose of promoting the saving lives at sea (and in certain
               cases on inland waters). The RNLI provides and maintains a fleet of inshore
               and all weather lifeboats at strategic locations in Ireland which are declared to
               the Irish Coast Guard as Search & Rescue Units (SRU’s).

     1.6.7     The Fire Services and Planning Directorate in its role as Chair of the National
               Steering Group on Major Emergency Planning exercises an role in the
               development of land based emergency management and response.

     1.6.8     The HSE through Medico Cork in Cork University Hospital provides Irelands
               24/7 Radio Medical Advice Service to seafarers through the Coast Guard radio
               network to sick or injured seafarers on a 24-hour basis. The HSE also provide
               a Marine Ambulance Response Team for major emergencies. If medical
               advice requires the casualty to be taken off the vessel then the MRCC/MRSC
               providing the link will arrange for the casualty to be transported from the
               vessel to a hospital.

     1.6.9     The Irish Mountain Rescue Association (IMRA) is an all Ireland volunteer
               organisation comprising twelve specialist teams trained in the provision of
               mountain rescue services throughout Ireland.

     1.6.10    The Irish Cave Rescue Organisation (ICRO) is a volunteer organisation
               providing Cave rescue services and covers the whole Island of Ireland.

     1.6.11    Local Authorities of Ireland through the provision of Lifeguard services at
               certain times of the year.

     1.6.12    The Harbour Masters of the ports and harbours established under Acts of the
               Oireachtas, through being responsible for the safety of vessels and persons
               thereon within the ports and harbours.

     1.6.13    Irish Water Safety has a statutory responsibility for lifeguards and standards
               under S.I. No 389 of 2006. It states “The Body shall provide the following
               services; the promotion and efficiency and standardisation of the Lifeguard
               Service; the establishment of national standards for lifeguards, lifesaving and
               water safety,” this among other responsibilities.

     1.6.14    The Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland provides advice and assistance
               in the event of a maritime SAR incident involving nuclear materials.

     1.6.15    Dublin Fire Brigade maintains a team of offshore Fire Fighters trained to fight
               fires on board vessels at sea.

     1.6.16    Community Rescue Boats of Ireland (CRBI) is a scheme for organising
               community based volunteer inshore rescue boats at locations around the coast
               and on the inland locations for Ireland. These Rescue Boats are declared to
               the Irish Coast Guard as SRU’s subject to satisfactory assessment. Irish Water
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              Safety has a responsibility for these services for refund of tax (No 18) Order
              1985 – Department of Finance

    1.6.17    The UK Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA), with its close co-operation
              and mutual agreement provide assistance as may be required. Her Majesty’s
              Coastguard (HMCG) is a constituent part of the MCA.

    1.6.18    The Civil Defence objective is to promote, develop and maintain Civil
              Defence as an effective volunteer based professional organisation providing
              emergency response and community support services.

    1.6.19    The Commissioners of Irish Lights are the General Lighthouse Authority for
              Ireland. The Commissioners have a Service Level Agreement with IRCG
              which allows IRCG to avail of CIL assets including ILV Granuaile and
              Helicopter refuelling facilities

    1.6.20    Each Airport is required as part of its IAA licence to have an emergency
              response plan and sufficient resources. Additional measures are provided for
              airports close to water.

    1.6.21    The Air Accident Investigation Unit (AAIU) of the Department of Transport is
              responsible for the investigation of aviation accidents that occur in the State of
              Ireland.


    1.7      IRISH SEARCH AND RESCUE REGION (IRSRR)

    1.7.1 The Irish Search and Rescue Region (IRSRR) is established in co-operation with
          neighbouring nations and is internationally recognised and described in relevant
          documents of IMO (IMO SAR plan) and ICAO (Regional Air Navigation
          plans). The Irish maritime and aeronautical SRR boundaries are coincident with
          the Shannon Flight Information Region (FIR) determined by ICAO.

    1.7.2 The Irish SRR is contiguous with the UK SRR and in fact is bounded on all sides
          by the UK region. Mutual co-operation and assistance will be provided and the
          existence of SRR Limits should not be viewed as a basis to restrict, delay or
          limit in any way, prompt and efficient action to relieve distress situations.

    1.7.3 Within the boundaries of the Irish SRR, Ireland accepts primary responsibility
          for co-ordinating and providing SAR services.

    1.7.5 For maritime SAR co-ordination, the Irish SRR is subdivided into three divisions
          The internal boundaries are outlined in Appendix 2.1 along with each associated
          co-ordination centre at MRCC Dublin, MRSC Valentia and MRSC Malin Head
          at Appendix 1.2.

     1.7.6    For pollution, ship casualty and environmental response the Irish Coast Guard
             has responsibility within the Irish EEZ as shown in Appendix 1.3. It is common
             practice that if a SAR incident occurs in the Irish EEZ coordination may be
             transferred to IRCG Coordination from the UK Coastguard.


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     1.8       DIVISION OF SAR RESPONSIBILITIES WITHIN THE IRISH SRR

       1.8.1 Maritime SAR

               Within the Department of Transport (DoT), which has overall responsibility as
               Lead Government Department for maritime and aviation SAR. Primary
               responsibility has been delegated for Marine Emergency Management within
               Irelands various responsibility Regions to the Irish Coast Guard. The Coast
               Guard, co-ordinates maritime SAR services within the Irish SRR and will lead
               and co-ordinate national participation in the SAR and safety related initiatives of
               the International Maritime Organisation (IMO).

       1.8.2 Inland SAR

               In general An Garda Síochána is responsible for land based SAR. The Irish
               Coast Guard in co-operation with An Garda Síochána, co-ordinates SAR
               services on inland lakes and rivers. An Garda Síochána may hand over a SAR
               incident on the inland waterways for Coast Guard coordination if appropriate.
               The Garda Síochána is responsible for mountain search and rescue co-ordination
               in Ireland. The Defence Forces, in aid to the civil authority or power, may
               engage in SAR services on land, mountains, inland lakes or rivers.

       1.8.3    Aviation SAR

               The Department of Transport (DoT) while retaining overall responsibility for
               Aviation SAR has determined that the Irish Aviation Authority shall operate the
               ARCC requirements of ICAO Annex 12. The Safety Regulation Division of the
               IAA is the body responsible for the regulation and oversight of aircraft
               operations, including aeronautical Search and Rescue, within the State.


     1.9 THE IRISH AERONAUTICAL & MARITIME EMERGENCY ADVISORY
          COMMITTEE (IAMEAC)

     1.9.1     The Irish Aeronautical & Maritime Emergency Advisory Committee, which is
               based on the requirements of a national committee required by IAMSAR, is an
               advisory group to the Minister for Transport on maritime and aviation SAR
               emergencies and is chaired by the Director of the Irish Coast Guard and consists
               of senior officers from maritime, aviation and land based emergency services as
               follows:

                     Assistant Director IRCG, General Officer Commanding the Air Corps,
                     Manager General Aviation Standards of the Irish Aviation Authority,
                     Manager Shannon ARCC, Flag Officer Commanding Naval Service,
                     Assistant Commissioner Garda Síochána HQ, Director of Fire Services
                     and Emergency Planning Dept. of Environment HLG, A/National Director
                     of the Ambulance Service, HSE, RNLI Director of Operations and the
                     Department of Transport.

             IAMEAC acts as an advisory service to the Minister and inter alia may advise on
             plans, resources, equipment and the efficiency and effectiveness of maritime and
             aviation SAR services.
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      1.9.2    The Terms of Reference of IAMEAC require it to:
               • Ensure that an appropriately trained and resourced aviation and maritime
                  emergency management team, reflecting the Committee members mandates1,
                  can assemble as a crisis management committee at the IRCG marine
                  emergency room2 during major emergencies to advise the Director and/or the
                  Minister on the appropriate response.
               • Provide a standing national forum for co-ordination of administrative and
                  operational SAR and emergency management matters;
               • Provide an interface with other national and international organisations
                  involved with the provision of emergency services;
               • Oversee the National Maritime and Aviation SAR Framework for Ireland,
                  and develop and maintain a national SAR Manual(s);
               • Promote effective use of all available facilities for SAR;
               • Serve as a co-operative forum to exchange information and develop positions
                  and policies of interest to more than one Party to the Framework;
               • Promote close co-operation and co-ordination between civilian and military
                  authorities and organisations for the provision of effective emergency
                  services;
               • Improve co-operation among aeronautical, maritime and land SAR
                  communities for the provision of effective emergency services; and
               • Determine other ways to enhance the overall effectiveness and efficiency of
                  SAR services within the State and to standardise SAR procedures and
                  equipment where practicable


    1.10       IRISH MARINE SEARCH AND RESCUE COMMITTEE (IMSARC)

      1.10.1 IMSARC was established in 1978 as a consultative committee whose function is:
             • to keep under review Marine SAR in Ireland, and to make recommendations
                for any improvements considered necessary.
             • to consider the implication of any changes.
             • to make recommendations on how the users can take action to improve the
                prospect of successful SAR.
             • The committee also provides membership of many of the committees and
                working groups of the Department of Transport.

       1.10.2 The membership of the committee is drawn from the users and providers of
              SAR and from the Department of Transport.

    1.11       OTHER SAR COMMITTEES
       1.11.2 The Aviation Forum which is tasked with reviewing technical and operational
              aspects of marine emergency and training missions involving helicopter assets;
              Exchanging information on new techniques and equipment; highlight and report
              on areas of specific joint operational problems to IMSARC; and exploring areas
              of commonality and share information on landing sites, Fuelling arrangements
              etc.

1
 Whilst retaining individual organisations distinct roles and chains of authority and command
2
 A large-scale aeronautical or maritime incident may require the activation of the NECC and the Department of
Transport as Lead Government Department.
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     1.11.3 The Marine Safety Working Group (MSWG), which has responsibility for the
            promotion of marine and inland water safety awareness produces public safety
            advice, booklets and posters entitled "Safety on the Water". The aim of the
            “Marine Safety Working Group” is “To use its collective expertise and experience
            to create and communicate marine safety information and messages to endeavor to
            reduce accidents and to prevent the loss of life in Irish Waters”. Its objectives are
             • To establish strong working relationships with other National and Local
                 Organisations to create/promote accident prevention programmes
             • To establish cause and trends in accidents at sea
             • To develop accident prevention programmes
             • To measure effectiveness of prevention programmes
             • To provide a coordinated approach to the dissemination of safety information
                 in response to individual enquiries

     1.11.4 The Irish Sea Working Group (ISWG) that deals with international plans and
            exercises within the Irish Sea area and its northern and southern approaches.
            This Committee has a rotating Chair.

     1.11.5 The Coast Guard chairs a number of other committees that advise and assist the
            Minister in managing search and rescue in Ireland. These Committees include:
            • The Coastal Unit Advisory Group (CUAG) and Technical Commissions
            • Community Rescue Boats of Ireland (CRBI) Committee and Technical
               Commissions
            • The National Coordinating Committee on Mountain and Cave Rescue
               (NCCMCR)


  1.12       FUNCTIONS COVERED BY THIS FRAMEWORK

     1.12.1 The efficient operation of the Maritime components of the co-ordinated SAR
            system.

     1.12.2 The provision of SAR services for aircraft at the request of the IAA or An
            Garda Síochána.

     1.12.3 The establishment, maintenance and operation of a maritime operations centre
            and maritime rescue co-ordination centres capable of adequately discharging
            the responsibilities for the efficient detection, co-ordination and rescue of
            persons in distress or potentially in distress and that have adequate and resilient
            means of communications, equipment and properly trained and resourced staff.

     1.12.4 The provision of assistance to the relevant authorities in the event of natural
            disasters.


  1.13       FUNCTIONS NOT COVERED BY THIS FRAMEWORK

     1.13.1 Air Ambulance service not resulting from maritime or aeronautical SAR
            operations.


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     1.13.2 Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS)

     1.13.3 Civil Disturbance, insurrection, terrorist or other emergencies, which endanger
            citizens or property.

     1.13.4 Salvage and aircraft recovery operations.

     1.13.5 Pollution operations.

     1.13.6 Ship Casualty incidents where live is not at risk.


  1.14       CHARGING FOR SAR SERVICES

     1.14.1 Each Participant will fund its own activities in relation to this Framework
            unless otherwise arranged by the Participants in advance, and will not allow a
            matter of reimbursement of cost to delay response to any person in danger or
            distress.

     1.14.2 The Participants agree that the SAR services provided to persons in danger or
            distress will be without subsequent cost-recovery from the person(s) assisted. In
            certain circumstances cost recovery may be appropriate if the service extends
            beyond SAR; for example if a Harbour Authority, following on from a place of
            refuge request, incurs clean-up costs.

     1.14.3 In accordance with customary international law, when one-nation requests help
            from another nation to assist persons in danger or distress, if such help is
            provided, it will be done voluntarily, and the Irish Authorities will neither
            request nor pay reimbursement of cost for such assistance.


  1.15        OVERARCHING PRINCIPLES

     1.15.1 All SAR personnel should be generally familiar with the International
            Conventions on Maritime Search and Rescue of the IMO, the Convention of
            International Civil Aviation Annex 12 of ICAO, and the joint ICAO – IMO
            IAMSAR Manual.

     1.15.2 The SAR principles and procedures of relevant customary international law and
            international conventions and the IAMSAR Manual, will serve as the
            framework for co-ordination of any SAR operations.

     1.15.3 Assistance will always be provided to person(s) in distress without regard to
            their nationality, status or circumstances.

     1.15.4 Close co-operation will be established between services and organisations,
            which may support improvements in lifesaving.


  1.16        CO-ORDINATION OF OPERATIONS


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     1.16.1 Each participant responsible for operations under this Framework will keep
            information readily available on the status and availability of key SAR
            facilities.

     1.16.2 Each participant will promptly respond to requests for assistance when required.

     1.16.3 The Coast Guard, in consultation and approval from the Department of Foreign
            Affairs, may grant permission for military SAR facilities from other countries
            entry into Ireland when required. Such permission may include over-flight or
            landing of SAR aircraft for fuelling, medical or other appropriate operational
            support. The Defence Forces will be advised of Foreign Military Aircraft or
            Naval Movements – especially when aircraft are landing at unsecured sites.

     1.16.4 The Coast Guard may grant permission for non-military SAR facilities from
            other countries, entry into Ireland when required and will thereafter advise the
            Department of Foreign Affairs as necessary. Such entry may include over-flight
            or landing of SAR aircraft, for fuelling, medical or other appropriate operational
            support.

     1.16.5 No provision of this Framework is to be construed as an obstruction to prompt
            and efficient action to relieve distress whenever and wherever found.

     1.16.6 SAR Co-ordinators shall arrange for the receipt of distress alerts originating
            within the Irish SRR, and ensure that the MRCC/MRSC can communicate with
            the persons in distress, and with the SAR facilities.

     1.16.7 To optimise delivery of efficient and effective services, all available resources
            will be used for SAR.

     1.16.8 On-scene coordination may be delegated to any appropriate unit participating in
            a particular incident, under the cognisance of the incident SMC.

     1.16.9 The suspension or termination of operations will be the responsibility of the co-
            ordinating MRCC/MRSC when it is decided that all reasonable hope of
            rescuing survivors or victims has passed.

     1.16.10The Framework should be exercised at national SAR exercises to test
            organisations ability to respond, and local SAR exercises will provide
            familiarity with elements of the Framework.



     1.17    MARINE OPERATIONS CENTRE,                      RESCUE       COORDINATION
             CENTRES AND SUB CENTRES

     1.17.1 MRCC Dublin is the national rescue coordination centre for the Irish Search &
            Rescue Region. MRCC Dublin is an integral part of the Coast Guards national
            Marine Operations Centre (MOC) which, as well as providing maritime search
            and rescue response services, is also the centre which co-ordinates the response
            to marine casualty incidents within the Irish EEZ and provides a variety of other
            services listed in the glossary. MRSC Valentia and MRSC Malin Head are


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            Divisional 24/7 Centres coordinating SAR response in their areas of
            responsibility (AOR).

     1.17.2 The Marine Rescue Sub Centre (MRSC) Valentia is the contact point for
            routine operational matters in the area between Ballycotton and Clifden. MRSC
            Malin Head is the contact point for routine operational matters in the area
            between Clifden and Lough Foyle. MRCC Dublin is the contact point for
            routine operational matters in the area between Carlingford Lough and
            Ballycotton.

     1.17.3 Each MRCC/MRSC broadcasts Maritime Safety Information (MSI) on VHF
            and, in some cases, MF radio in accordance with published schedules. MSI
            includes UK Hydrographic Office navigational warnings, Irish marine Notices,
            Gale Warnings, Shipping Forecasts, Local Inshore Forecasts, Strong Wind
            Warnings and Small Craft Warnings as issued by the Irish Meteorological
            Office. The Coast Guard is also responsible for NAVTEX broadcasts.

     1.17.4 The Centres are connected to their own communications network of 19 VHF
            sites, MF & HF and digital paging system. The MRCC/SC organisation is based
            upon a continuous communications watch on VHF, VHFDSC, MF and
            MFDSC, which provides radio coverage of Irish coastal and offshore waters out
            to 150+ nautical miles. This communications watch includes a distress watch on
            the international VHF & MF distress frequency. In addition to radio and
            satellite communications, MRCC/MRSC’s keep a constant emergency
            telephone watch. MOC Dublin acts as a single point of contact for satellite-
            derived alerts.


     1.18    SAR MANAGEMENT

     1.18.1 There are three levels of management within the SAR system. Overall
            management by SAR Authorities, management of individual SAR incidents by
            SAR mission coordinators (SMCs), and direction of SAR activities at an
            incident by on-scene coordinators (OSC’s) specifically designated by the SMC.
            This section outlines, in general terms, the management and coordination
            actions required when a decision is made to implement procedures in
            prosecuting a SAR.

     1.18.2 Once it is decided to proceed with the action, plans should be enacted for the
            commencement of search activity with a minimum of delay. Coincident with
            progressing search activity, is the development of a rescue plan and obtaining
            and deploying rescue resources to minimise time between survivors' location
            and their recovery to a place of safety.

     1.18.3 SAR Authority

        1.18.3.1     A SAR Authority is the authority within a national Administration with
                overall responsibility for establishing and providing SAR services and
                ensuring that planning for those services is properly coordinated. The
                national SAR authority in Ireland is the Irish Coast Guard in respect of
                maritime SAR and the IAA in respect of aviation SAR. The SAR Authority

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                takes on the roles of the SAR Coordinator as described in the IAMSAR
                Manual.

         1.18.3.2      A SAR Authority shall ensure that a SAR operation can be promptly
                 initiated and prosecuted with the efficient use of available SAR resources,
                 until rescue has been completed or until chance of success is no longer a
                 reasonable possibility. An operation may thereafter continue if appropriate
                 to effect recovery of deceased persons.

         1.18.3.3      The Coast Guard on behalf of the Department of Transport has the
                 overall responsibility for establishing, staffing, equipping and managing the
                 SAR system, including providing appropriate legal and funding support,
                 establishing RCC’s, providing or arranging for SAR assets, coordinating
                 SAR training and developing SAR policies. The SAR authority, where
                 applicable, shall:
                 • establish a Rescue Coordination Centre (RCC) to coordinate all
                     participating search and rescue assets and facilities;
                 • ensure that the RCC conforms to the SAR procedures contained in this
                     manual or local SOPs and manuals;
                 • establish close liaison and formulate agreements with other authorities
                     and organisations having SAR potential;
                 • establish liaison with SAR authorities of adjacent areas to ensure mutual
                     cooperation and coordination in combined operations;
                 • ensure that a comprehensive and current SAR Framework is prepared
                     and distributed;
                 • establish and supervise communication facilities and assign SAR
                     frequencies from those authorised to assets designated for SAR tasks;
                 • establish communications with adjoining RCC’s and appropriate
                     organisations to ensure two-way alerting and dissemination of SAR
                     information;
                 • ensure immediate action is taken to provide assistance, advising the
                     appropriate SAR authorities and passing all information received
                     concerning the distress incident and any action taken;
                 • ensure that the operating authority or agency of any craft, aviation asset
                     or land party in need of assistance has been advised of initial actions
                     taken, and they are kept informed of all pertinent developments;
                 • designate an SMC for a specific SAR incident;
                 • ensure that each incident is prosecuted until assistance is no longer
                     necessary, rescue has been completed or chance of success is no longer a
                     reasonable possibility;
                 • ensure that if the scope of the operation exceeds the authority’s capacity
                     to plan and execute the operation, it shall seek advice and assistance
                     from, or by mutual agreement, hand over coordination, to an appropriate
                     authority;
                 • maintain and preserve adequate records; and
                 • develop new and improved techniques and procedures.


  1.19        SAR MISSION COORDINATION


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      1.19.1 The staff of a RCC performs duties in the conduct of search and rescue events
             and in addition they have responsibility for maintaining the RCC in a
             continuous state of preparedness. The RCC staff consists of personnel who are
             experienced and/or trained in SAR operations. When a period of heavy activity
             is anticipated or during major SAR incidents, the regular staff may be
             supplemented as required or workload may be shared between Coordination
             Centres. Each centre will be able to link landline or marine communications in
             and out of the Tetra network.

      1.19.2 Each SAR operation is carried out under the coordination of a SAR Mission
             Coordinator (SMC) designated for the purpose by the Coast Guard. The SMC is
             responsible for efficiently prosecuting a SAR incident using the assets
             available. The SMC is responsible for all stages of the SAR system. Their
             responsibilities include the prompt dispatch of appropriate and adequate SAR
             assets and the prosecution of SAR operations until rescue has been completed,
             or chance of success is no longer a reasonable possibility. The SMC is
             responsible for ensuring that the following duties are carried out depending on
             the SAR incident and local circumstances:

             •   Obtaining and evaluating all information pertaining to the incident,
                 including emergency equipment carried by the person or craft in distress.
              • Classifying the SAR incident into the appropriate emergency phase
                 (Uncertainty, Alert/Urgency, or Distress).
              • Alerting appropriate SAR assets and SAR organisations that may be of
                 assistance during the incident.
              • Conducting a risk assessment.
              • Dispatching initial SAR Units if situation warrants.
              • Conducting initial communications checks. If unsuccessful, making an
                 extended communications search to obtain additional information on the
                 incident, personnel involved and equipment carried by the vessel, aircraft or
                 party in distress.
              • Calculating the search area. Preparing optimum plans and promulgating
                 attainable plans;
              • Obtaining past/present/forecast weather, drift information and
                 oceanographic conditions if applicable
              • Providing for SAR crew briefing, dispatching of appropriate SRU’s, or
                 other assets.
              • Organising logistical support for all SAR assets including fuel, food and
                 accommodation, through to the completion of the incident.
              • Making arrangements for appropriate communications.
              • Maintaining a continuous, chronological plot showing sighting and hearing
                 reports, DF bearings, air plot, radar plot, fixes, reports of debris, areas
                 searched or not searched and other intelligence.
              • Maintaining a continuous, chronological record or log of the search effort,
                 including actions taken in relation to intelligence, SRU’s employed, sorties,
                 hours flown/underway, sightings, leads, results obtained, message traffic,
                 briefing notes, telephone calls, daily evaluation of progress and probability
                 of detection.
              • Initiating marine distress broadcasts or marine information broadcasts and
                 initiating the alerting of enroute aircraft.
              • Arranging communication schedules when and if needed.
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            •   Requesting additional SAR assets, as required.
            •   Exercising overall coordination of SAR assets.
            •   Maintaining liaison with the next of kin, owner, agent or management of the
                missing craft or persons.
            •   Liaise, and brief as appropriate, the Minister for Transport and the
                Government Information Service.
            •   Keeping all authorities involved fully advised of SAR incident progress
                with timely and regular situation reports (SITREPs).
            •   Making recommendations and decisions in relation to the continuation or
                suspension of searches.
            •   Issuing news media releases on the progress of incidents in accordance with
                the procedures and policies.
            •   Providing debriefs of SRU’s, cancel alerts, release SAR assets and
                organisations involved, and issuing the final SITREP to all concerned.
            •   Acting as required coping with any unique, unusual or changing
                circumstances of the emergency.

     1.19.3 Where a maritime incident requires an aviation response, the Coast Guard shall
            liaise directly with agencies that may supply such resources. IRCG’s
            MRCC/SC shall be responsible for the provision of such services as fuelling,
            accommodation, security and any such additional services. Where aviation
            resources are required in response to an aviation incident, the IAA’s RCC shall
            be responsible for the provision of resources and any such support services as
            are required. Where airport facilities for marine related incidents are required
            outside the normal hours of availability of such facilities, MRCC/SC shall be
            responsible for the call-out of such services as required.


  1.20       ON SCENE COORDINATOR

     1.20.1 When a number of SAR assets are working together on the same SAR mission
            in the same location, there may be an advantage if one unit is assigned to
            coordinate the activities of all participating assets. The SMC will designate this
            role to a On Scene Coordinator (OSC – previously called On Scene
            Commander), who may be the person in charge of a ship or aircraft
            participating in the search or someone at another nearby facility in a position to
            handle OSC duties. The OSC should be the most capable person available,
            taking into consideration SAR training; communications capabilities of the
            asset; and the length of time that the asset the OSC is aboard can stay in the
            search area. An OSC (sea) and/or OSC (shore) may be appointed by the SMC if
            required for a major incident. The OSC (shore) is usually the Coast Guard
            Incident Manager/Controller. Frequent changes in the OSC should be avoided.
            Duties that the SMC may assign to the OSC, depending on needs and
            qualifications include:

            •   assuming operational coordination of all SAR facilities on scene;
            •   receiving the search action plan from the SMC;
            •   modifying the search action plan based on prevailing environmental
                conditions and keeping the SMC advised of any changes to the plan (in
                consultation with the SMC when practicable);
            •   providing relevant information to the other SAR assets;
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             • implementing the search and rescue plan where required;
             • monitoring the performance of other assets participating in the search;
             • developing and implementing the rescue plan (when needed);
             • providing regular Sitreps to the SMC;
             • In the case of aviation accidents liaising with the AAIU Investigator In
             Charge (IIC).
             • In the case of maritime accidents liaising with the MCIB Investigator
             assigned.

   1.21       INCIDENT MANAGER

      1.21.1 After considering how best to exercise control over SAR assets in remote
             sectors of an SRR or where communications, administrative or political factors
             impact on operational efficiency, a SMC may recommend to management to
             establish a Coast Guard Incident Management Centre (IMC) close to the
             incident. The degree of delegation attributed to the IMC and its actual
             responsibilities shall be at IRCG SAR Operations Managers or on call Officers
             discretion, bearing in mind the need for:

             •   a clear understanding of respective responsibilities;
             •   an optimum response to the operational and administrative features of the
                 current situation e.g.: location of search area and availability of staff.
             •   In the case of aviation accidents assisting and advising the AAIU IIC in the
                 planning and execution of the aircraft wreckage recovery

      1.21.2 An orange and white chequered vest will identify the Coast Guard Incident
             Manager. The functions of an IM throughout a particular SAR action shall be
             delegated by the SMC and may include:

             •   Planning of operations and responsibility to brief and debrief search crews
                 close to the search area;
             •   Establishment of a base;
             •   coordinating, as required, the provision of safety, survival and SAR
                 equipment to participating SAR assets;
             •   collation of information and provision of logistical support;
             •   liaison with relatives, family, media, volunteers and the public, Gardai and
                 emergency services;
             •   supervising the allocation of observers, and ensuring they obtain adequate
                 rest;
             •   making arrangements for food, accommodation and transport for search
                 crews and observers when required
             •   Maintaining full records for the incident file.


   1.22       MASS RESCUE INCIDENTS

      1.22.1 Passenger ships of more than 12 passengers shall have onboard a plan for
              cooperation with appropriate SAR Services in the event of an emergency. The
              plan will be developed in cooperation between the ship, the Company and the
              SAR service. The plan will include provision for periodic exercises to be
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             undertaken to test its effectiveness. The plan shall be based on the IMO
             Guidelines as contained in Chapter V Regulation 7.3.

      1.22.2 A mass rescue operation incident is one where immediate assistance is required
             for a large number of persons in distress. It is likely that normally available
             resources will be inadequate to deal with the response if the numbers involved
             are large. The nature of such incidents can differ greatly; they could occur on
             land or sea and involve a wide variety of response agencies. It could be floods,
             fire, building collapse, aircraft accident, terrorist activity, and collision. If a
             mass rescue situation develops at sea, another dimension is added.

      1.22.3 It is reasonable to expect that all casualties recovered in a marine mass rescue
             operation will require some form of medical or personal attention once they are
             landed ashore due to the significance/drama of the event.

      1.22.4 Although rare occurrences, the potential is always present in areas where large
             numbers of persons travel by sea or air. The Ireland-UK-France air and sea
             routes, aircraft crossing the North Atlantic and routing overhead Irish airspace
             and, some passenger ferries operating to offshore islands and in other areas
             around the Irish coast could qualify in this regard.

      1.22.5 The risk for disaster on busy routes can come from bad weather and sea
             conditions, collision, engine or structural failure and in recent years from
             terrorism. The Air India Boeing 747crash off the west coast of Ireland and the
             passenger ferry Estonia sinking in the Baltic are examples of such disasters.

      1.22.6 The response to an incident such as this in the Ireland/UK SAR area would
             involve all available declared and additional SAR resources along with vessels
             of opportunity at sea. It could also involve SAR resources from other European
             countries.

      1.22.7 Existing marine emergency plans and operational procedures cater for the
             tasking and co-ordination of the response to marine emergencies. In a major
             marine emergency situation, perhaps involving a large passenger vessel with up
             to 2,000 persons or more on board, in bad weather conditions, it is likely that
             the system will overload. This is particularly so with a prolonged incident
             response taking place over a number of days. Resource exhaustion, staff
             shortages in all areas, the interface between sea and land, communications
             system, hospital bed availability etc will be factors for detailed attention in
             major emergency plans.

      1.22.8 There will be very high volumes of communications at many levels in a mass
             rescue operation. Radio communications between co-ordination centres and
             search and rescue units, on-scene with the various assets air and sea, phone
             communications, Ire/UK, MOC/MRSC, Harbours & Ports, inter agency,
             Hospitals, Ambulance, Fire Service, Police/Garda, Air Traffic Control, families
             of passengers and crew, press, etc. Communications systems may become
             overloaded.

      1.22.9 Unless some catastrophic failure has occurred on a passenger vessel, or any
              other surface vessel, it is generally best practice to remain on board until
              rescued. Abandoning passengers to liferafts in bad weather/sea conditions can
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             be a very difficult and risky procedure. Winching survivors, some may be
             injured or elderly and infirm, there may be young children, from a rolling/
             pitching vessel can be equally risky and, a very slow process.

      1.22.10Large aircraft ditching at sea, although very rare, will usually necessitate
             immediate abandonment to liferafts and a mass rescue effort.

      1.22.11Use of other vessels at sea can be an essential element of major emergency
             response. They can be used as a base for SAR helicopter operations to reduce
             transit times when long distances are involved. They can accommodate large
             numbers of survivors depending of the type of vessel and can provide a lee to
             reduce the effects of wind and sea on the casualty. Large passengers vessels
             may be well suited for this purpose.

      1.22.12The response to marine emergencies is co-ordinated by a SAR Mission Co-
             ordinator (SMC) usually based at the nearest Marine Rescue Co-ordination
             Centre or Sub-centre (MRCC or MRSC). On scene co-ordination of the SAR
             assets on scene is usually passed to a vessel or aircraft first to arrive at the
             location of the incident. The On-scene Co-ordinator (OSC) role is best suited to
             a unit that can remain on scene for longer times, have emergency trained crew,
             good communications equipment and possibly, treat casualties on board if
             necessary. Large passenger vessels can provide a stable platform for this
             purpose and could accommodate large numbers of survivors in certain
             situations. Naval vessels may be suited for this role also. The OSC will report
             directly to the SMC and implement the rescue plan. Fixed wing military top-
             cover aircraft suitably equipped and trained can provide co-ordination of air
             assets.

      1.22.13The response to a major emergency involving mass rescue operations will be
             multi-agency and perhaps international. Although the SMC remains in charge
             of the SAR co-ordination response, it is likely that in major emergencies, a
             Marine      Crisis    Management     Team     will     be   established   to
             advise/liaise/administer/manage the emergency at a very senior level
             comprising of the relevant members of IAMEAC.

      1.22.14The Department of Transport should keep under review the necessity of
             activating a pan-Government response and the activation of the National
             Emergency Coordinating Committee.

      1.22.15Assistance in the form of a Coast Guard Liaison Officer or Fire Service Officers
             could be placed on board the casualty in certain situations. Fire Service
             personnel can provide fire fighting to assist the distressed vessel crew and can
             provide triage for injured persons prior to evacuation by lifeboat or helicopter.
             A specially trained marine fire response unit is based at Marino Fire Centre
             Dublin.

      1.22.16The various aspects of major emergency response and mass rescue operations
              require careful planning and regular exercise. The realistic exercise element is
              essential but very difficult to provide. SAR authorities will not normally
              encounter mass rescue operations since they are rare occurrences. Check lists
              designed for use in mass rescue operations can assist the SAR authorities with
              tasking records, weather/sea conditions, event times, vessel details, survivor
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            number accounting and other issues should be used and amended following
            assessment during exercise scenarios. Shortcomings identified in mass rescue
            exercises should be remedied without delay.

     1.22.17Although Ireland has a well developed and equipped SAR organisation, given
            Ireland small size and therefore resource stock it is not expected that it could
            deal with a major marine incident involving mass rescue without assistance
            from its neighbours and from, where available, other vessels at sea.


  1.23       AVIATION INCIDENTS IN THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT

     1.23.1 During aviation SAR alerts and rescue co-ordination, communications will be
            affected electronically or verbally, between the ARCC/ARSC and
            MRCC/MRSC as appropriate. Shannon ARCC may delegate all or part of its
            responsibilities for rescue co-ordination (usually for incidents in the Dublin
            area), to it ARSC

     1.23.2 The Department of Transport while retaining overall responsibility for Aviation
            Search and Rescue Operations (ICAO Annex 12) has determined that the Irish
            Aviation Authority (IAA) will operate the ARCC requirements of ICAO Annex
            12 as an agent of the Department of Transport (Ref. ICAO Annex 12; S.I. No.
            171 of 1995; S.I. No. 172 of 1995). The Aviation Search and Rescue Region
            covers an area coincident with the Shannon FIR/UIR

     1.23.3 In the event of an aviation emergency over a maritime or littoral area,
            ARCC/ARSC will co-ordinate the incident in close liaison with MRCC/MRSC.
            Should an aircraft force land in a maritime area, ARCC/ARSC will be
            responsible for determining the initial search area, but co-ordination will then
            transfer to MRCC/MRSC with continued close co-operation and back-up
            services from ARCC/ARSC.

     1.23.4 In the event of an emergency meeting at the Marine Emergency Room,
            requiring an aviation input, the Head of ARCC Shannon will decide on the
            appropriate representation. The AAIU may also consider a need for
            representation at this meeting where appropriate or where requested by the
            IRCG.

     1.23.5 Routine communication shall take place by means of documentary, electronic
            or verbal transfer. ARCC/ARSC will be included as information addressee in
            routine Sitreps issued by MRCC/MRSC where the incident may require or
            include an aviation response. The AAIU will be included as information
            addressee in routine Sitreps issued by MRCC/MRSC where the incident may
            require a response and investigation by the AAIU.

     1.23.6 Where a maritime incident requires an aviation response, it is the
            MRCC/MRSC who will liaise directly with agencies, which may supply such
            resources. MRCC/MRSC are responsible for the provision of refuelling,
            accommodation, security and any additional related services.



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     1.23.7 Where aviation resources are required in response to an aviation incident,
            ARCC/ARSC is responsible for the provision of resources and any such support
            services as are required.

     1.23.8 Where airport facilities for maritime related incidents are required outside the
            normal hours of availability of such facilities, MRCC is responsible for the call-
            out of such services as required.
     1.23.9 Maritime SAR services will remain, at all times, under the operational direction
            of IRCG. Where an aviation incident requires a maritime response
            ARCC/ARSC is responsible for requesting from MRCC/MRSC such maritime
            resources as may be available to MRCC/MRSC. There will be direct
            ARCC/ARSC/MRCC/MRSC contact for the purpose of agreement on the level
            of response required.

     1.23.10 COSPAS/SARSAT
            • The Mission Control Centre (MCC) at RCC Kinloss will advise MRCC of
               all relevant COSPAS/SARSAT reports related to Irish Airspace.
               ARCC/ARSC is responsible for initial co-ordination of Aeronautical
               COSPAS/SARSAT and ELT type incidents.
            • Transfer of co-ordination to MRCC will take place when the location as
               calculated by merged solution as offshore or in the littoral area (i.e. coastal)
               and all aircraft in the vicinity have been accounted for.
            • MRCC may transfer coordination to MRSC Malin Head or Valentia as
               appropriate.
            • Subsequent to transfer of co-ordination MRCC or MRSC will keep ARCC
               informed of all Mission Control Centre (MCC) reports and Sitreps.
            • ARCC/ARSC ensure relevant aircraft reports are communicated to MRCC.

     1.23.11 Temporary Restricted Areas Established For Sar Purposes
            • ARCC/ARSC is the co-ordinating agency for establishment of Temporary
               Restricted Areas when so required for SAR purposes or protection of
               aviation accident site from over flights of non-SAR related aviation assets.
            • Clearance to enter, operate in or leave any of the above mentioned areas
               must to be obtained from the appropriate ATS units.

  1.24       MEDIA

     1.24.1 Search and Rescue operations for missing aircraft and vessels generate
            considerable publicity. By virtue of its nature, an RCC is a source of news and
            this is especially true during SAR incidents. The public should be informed
            during SAR operations, within the limits of confidentiality, of SAR actions. The
            potential benefits of early release of information include:
            • additional information from the public, leading to more effective use of
                SAR resources;
            • fewer time-consuming requests from the news media; and
            • reduction in inaccurate public speculation about the SAR mission.

     1.24.2 RCC staff should be governed by Department of Transport and IRCG’s public
            relations procedures when dealing with the media. It is important that a
            relationship between the media and an RCC is established such that:

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            •   the media's legitimate interest in an incident of concern and the public's
                “right to know” is respected;
            •   information reaching the public is factual and as complete as possible;
            •   the operational functioning of an RCC is not prejudiced; and
            •   benefit is derived from publicity of an incident and from media broadcasts
                for information made at the request of SAR staff.

     1.24.3 The early release of information will frequently aid in preventing time-
            consuming requests from news media concerning the operation. In cases where
            extensive searches are being conducted release of information to the public may
            bring important leads to the SMC.

     1.24.4 News releases should be written following the time-proved format of who,
            what, where, when, why and how. In drafting a release all six of these items
            should be covered in paragraph one. Subsequent paragraphs can provide
            additional detailed information concerning one or more of these questions. By
            drafting releases in this fashion the news media will be able to chop portions of
            the release in order to meet their space requirements without damaging the
            overall story.

     1.24.5 The Press Office of the Department of Transport should keep the Government
            Information Service advised as appropriate.

     1.24.6 SAR officers and Officers of declared or coordinated resources or formally
            associated with a rescue operation shall not disclose to the media:
            • the names of any crew or other missing persons;
            • any personal judgments pertaining to any persons involved in the incident;
            • any comments on the judgment, experience or training of persons involved
                in the incident;
            • degrading opinions on the conduct of the SAR operation or personalities
            • involved;
            • personal opinions and theories;
            • names of those associated with the search;
            • names of persons who have given information relating to the incident.
            • comment on behalf of other SAR Authorities or organisations.

     1.24.7 Media releases may include the following information:
            • type of aircraft, factual detail of the flight, details of the vessel
            • reason for the SAR operation, e.g. aircraft/vessel overdue, report of
              impending crash landing; weather situation; beacon activation
            • owner of the aircraft/vessel (subject to consent)
            • operator of the aircraft/vessel
            • number of missing persons
            • area being searched
            • number and types of assets engaged in the search;
            • arrangements for the search;
            • details of other authorities participating in the search; and/or
            • reinforce the positive aspects relating to safety and survival.



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   IRISH SEARCH AND RESCUE REGION

                                                                   Appendix 1.1




                                                       55 20N
                                                       006 55W




                                                                                      53 55N
                                                                                      005 30W
                                                                 MALIN HD
                                                                 MRSC
           54 00N
           01500W




                                                         MOC DUBLIN




                                                                                      52 20N
                                                                                      005 30W
                         VALENTIA MRSC




                                                              51 00N
 51 00N                                                       008 00W
 015 00W




                     55 20N 006 55W      -   55 25N 007 20W
                     55 20N 008 15W      -   54 45N 009 00W
                     54 34N 010 00W      -   54 00N 015 00W
                     51 00N 015 00W      -   51 00N 008 00W
                     52 20N 005 30W      -   53 55N 005 30W
                     54 25N 008 10W      -   55 22N 006 55W




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     Irish SRR Divisions                                   Appendix 1.2




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    Irish EEZ (Pollution and casualty response zone)         Appendix 1.3




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                                  Part 2


                 Irish Search and Rescue
                       Organisation




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         2.1       IRISH COAST GUARD (IRCG)

               2.1.1       The Irish Coast Guard (IRCG), as a division of the Department of Transport
                           (DoT), has responsibility for the co-ordination of maritime SAR emergency
                           response in the Irish Search and Rescue Region. It maintains a Maritime
                           Operations Centre (MOC) incorporating Irelands Marine Rescue Co-
                           ordination Centre (MRCC) at Dublin and Marine Rescue Sub-Centres
                           (MRSC) at Malin Head in Co Donegal and Valentia Island in County Kerry.
                           It has a comprehensive Marine Communications Network covering Irish
                           offshore and inland waters. It maintains a network of strategically located
                           Coastal Units equipped to deal with local marine emergencies. Core
                           activities of the IRCG relevant to this Framework include:
                       •     To provide a national marine search and rescue service;
                       •     Provide an emergency and humanitarian response service3 to the off-shore
                             islands;
                       •     To provide an offshore, coastal, inland and, where appropriate, mountain &
                             cliff emergency response service;
                       •     To provide a search and rescue service for aircraft at the request of the
                             Irish Aviation Authority;
                       •     To manage, train, equip and provide for the health and safety of a national
                             Coast Guard volunteer service on the coast and inland waterways of
                             Ireland.
                       •     To provide, on request, helicopter search and rescue services in the UK
                             Search and Rescue Region
                       •     To provide search and rescue services over land in aid to an Garda
                             Síochána;
                       •     To assist the Health Service Executive (HSE) in remote area patient
                             transport and life support;
                       •     To assist other primary emergency agencies and services during major
                             emergencies;
                       •     To provide a maritime safety communications and paging service.

               2.1.2       IRCG provide medical link calls from ships at sea to the vessel’s national
                           medical centre and evacuation of the casualty from the vessel by helicopter
                           or lifeboat if required. If medical advice requires the casualty to be taken off
                           the vessel then the MRCC/MRSC providing the link will arrange for the
                           casualty to be transported from the vessel to a hospital. IRCG Responders or
                           aircrew dealing with patients in remote locations can be linked live through a
                           Coordination centre on marine communications to Medico Cork or any
                           foreign Medico Centre.

               2.1.3       The IRCG maintains 54 Coastal Units, trained and equipped to deal with
                           local marine emergencies. All units are trained in search techniques while 20
                           are trained in cliff climbing and 16 are equipped with boats Volunteer Units
                           are all equipped with search vehicles fitted with blue lights, all-terrain
                           vehicles (Quads), first aid equipment and training, generators and area
                           lighting, search equipment, marine radios, pyrotechnics and appropriate PPE.

3
    This includes medical evacuation.
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                  Each team is trained in search skills, first aid, setting up helicopter landing
                  sites and a variety of maritime skills. Certain Units are also equipped and
                  trained as cliff rescue units and can either respond locally or be air lifted to
                  an incident. Other teams strategically located along the coast are equipped
                  with either rescue, patrol or transport inshore craft in the 4 – 9m range.

             Expected performance criteria (dependant on local conditions)
             • Achieve a 90% response time of 10 minutes for an initial response team
                departing the Stationhouse from notification by an MRCC/MRSC during
                daylight and 20 minutes at night.
             • Achieve a 90% response time to the scene of the incident in less than 60
                minutes from notification by an MRCC/SC during daylight and 75 minutes
                at night subject to geographical limitations.


    2.2           SAR HELICOPTERS

          2.2.1   This service is currently provided under contract to provide, maintain and
                  operate a 24/7 search and rescue helicopter service, from four airport
                  locations in Ireland – Dublin, Shannon, Waterford and Sligo. The helicopters
                  are designated wheels up from initial notification in 15 minutes during
                  daylight hours and 45 at night. One aircraft is fitted and its crew trained for
                  under slung cargo operations up to 3000kgs and is available on short notice
                  based at Waterford.

          2.2.2 Expected performance criteria
              • Achieve 95% launch time of 15 minutes on urgent calls from normal ground
                readiness between 0700 – 2100
              • Achieve a 95% launch time of 45 minutes on urgent calls from normal
                ground readiness between 2100 - 0700.
              • Achieve a 95% availability of all weather SAR (AWSAR) aircraft at each
                base.
              • Achieve a 97% availability of AWSAR plus limited SAR (LIMSAR) aircraft
                at each base.

          2.2.3   These aircraft respond to emergencies at sea, inland waterways, offshore
                  islands and mountains of Ireland (32 counties). They can also be used for
                  assistance in flooding, major emergencies inland, back up to the Aer Corps
                  for the provision of intra-hospital transfers, pollution, and aerial surveillance
                  during daylight hours, lifting and passenger operations and other operations
                  as requested by the Coast Guard and authorised or approved by the Irish
                  Aviation Authority in accordance with the appropriate aviation regulations.
                  The Coast Guard can contract specialised aerial surveillance or dispersant
                  spraying aircraft at short notice internationally.

          2.2.4   Helicopter tasks include:

             •    The location of marine and aviation incident survivors by homing onto
                  aviation and marine radio distress transmissions, by guidance from other
                  agencies, and by visual, electronic and electro-optical search.

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             •    The evacuation of survivors from the sea, and medical evacuees from all
                  manner of vessels including high-sided passenger and cargo vessels and from
                  the islands.
             •    The evacuation of personnel from ships facing potential disaster.
             •    Search and/or rescue in mountainous areas, caves, rivers, lakes and
                  waterways.
             •    The transport of offshore fire fighters or marine ambulance teams and their
                  equipment following a request for assistance.
             •    The provision of safety cover for other SAR units including other Marine
                  Emergency Service helicopters.
             •    Inter-agency training in all relevant aspects of the primary role.
             •    Onshore emergency medical service, including evacuation and aero-medical
                  tasks carried out with specific Approvals issued in accordance with Joint
                  Aviation Requirements JAR OPS 3.005(d).
             •    Relief of the islands and of areas suffering from flooding or deep snow.

           The secondary roles of the helicopter include:
            • The exercise of the primary search, rescue and evacuation roles in adjacent
                Search and Rescue regions.
            • Assistance to onshore emergency services in accordance with IAA
                approvals.

          2.2.5   IRCG provide aeronautical assets for Search and Rescue in the Mountains of
                  Ireland. Request for IRCG assets are made to the Marine Rescue Centres.
                  Requests are accepted from An Garda Síochána and nominated persons in
                  MR Teams.


    2.3            IRISH AVIATION AUTHORITY (IAA)

          2.3.1   The IAA is a semi state agency responsible to the Department of Transport
                  for the provision of Air Traffic Services (ATS) including Air Traffic Control
                  (ATC). This includes the provision of an Aeronautical Rescue Coordination
                  Centre (ARCC) at Shannon Airport and an Aeronautical Rescue Sub Centre
                  (ARSC) at Dublin airport. The Aviation Search and Rescue Region covers
                  an area coincident with the Shannon FIR/UIR.

          2.3.2   ARCC/ARSC shall be the co-ordinating agency for establishment of
                  Temporary Restricted Areas when so required for SAR purposes. Clearance
                  to enter, operate in or leave any of the above mentioned areas should be
                  obtained from the appropriate ATS units.

          2.3.3   Where aviation resources are required in response to an aviation incident,
                  ARCC will request resources and any support services as are required.

          2.3.4   The Safety Regulation Division of the Irish Aviation Authority has the
                  function with regard to aviation legislation and regulatory oversight of all
                  civilian aircraft operations, including in this case Search and Rescue.



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    2.4            AN GARDA SÍOCHÁNA

          2.4.1   The mission of An Garda Síochána is: ‘Ag obair le Pobail chun iad a
                  chosaint agus chun freastal orthu - Working with Communities to Protect
                  and Serve'.

          2.4.2   An Garda Síochána, the Irish police service is responsible for land based
                  search and rescue in Ireland. They co-ordinate searches and investigations
                  for missing persons.

          2.4.3   The country is divided in 26 Garda Divisions. Each Division is responsible
                  for co-ordinating searches in their own area. (See appendix 2.6)

          2.4.4   The Garda Divers are a resource that the Irish Coast Guard may request for
                  assistance with under water searches.


    2.5            ROYAL NATIONAL LIFEBOAT INSTITUTION (RNLI)

          2.5.1   The RNLI is a voluntary organisation dedicated to the purpose of saving life
                  at sea, and in certain cases on inland waters.

          2.5.2   The RNLI’s Concept of Operations is to save lives at sea by providing:

             •    A fleet strategic located all weather lifeboats that are available at all times
                  and tactically placed inshore craft, which are subject to weather limitations.
             •    In the UK area a beach Lifeguard service on a seasonal basis where
                  appropriate
             •    Safety education and accident prevention

                   to a defined standard of performance, commensurate with the resources
                   available, using trained and competent people who, whenever possible, are
                   volunteers.

          2.5.3 Strategic Performance Standards:
              • achieve an average launch time of 10 minutes from notification by the IRCG
              • reach all notified casualties where a risk to life exists, in all weathers, out to a
                maximum of 100 nautical miles
              • reach at least 90% of all casualties within 10 nautical miles of lifeboat
                stations within 30 minutes of launch in all weathers

          2.5.4   A Lifeboat Operations Manager (LOM) is vested the power to authorise the
                  launching of the lifeboat. Although all RNLI boats are collectively described
                  as “lifeboats” they fall into two categories: -
             •    All-weather Lifeboats (ALBs), which are under the command of the
                  Coxswain, or in his absence the Second Coxswain.
             •    Inshore Lifeboats (ILB’s) which are less than 10 metres in length and which
                  are under the command of a Helmsman are subject to launching limitations
                  dependent upon weather conditions.



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            2.5.5   For Lifeboats in the Republic of Ireland the responsibility for coordination
                    rests with the Irish Coast Guard. Any request for a lifeboat launch should
                    always in the first instance be routed through a Coast Guard Coordination
                    Centre who will page the crew directly and request a launch. The RNLI
                    reserves the right to direct its own assets, coordinated by the Coast Guard.


      2.6           COMMUNITY RESCUE BOATS IRELAND (CRBI)

            2.6.1   The CRBI are a community based volunteer inshore rescue boat service.
                    They are declared facilities to the IRCG as part of the Irish SAR
                    Organisation. The Rescue units are composed of trained personnel and
                    provided with equipment suitable for the expeditious conduct of Search and
                    Rescue operations. They are community based and located at a number of
                    locations around the coast of Ireland. These locations are listed in Appendix
                    2.3.

            2.6.2 It is the responsibility of the CRBI station to
                • declare the standard of capability of their declared facility;
                • maintain the declared facility to the declared standard;
                • inform the Irish Coast Guard immediately there is a change in the declared
                  facility;
                • advise the Irish Coast Guard when the declared facility is launched on
                  operation response or exercise and once launched place it under the Co-
                  ordinating Authority of the Irish Coast Guard. Advise the Irish Coast Guard
                  when the facility returns to station.
                • allow inspections when requested by the Irish Coast Guard or the Irish Water
                  Safety.
                • provide when requested financial estimates for the coming year and receipts
                  from the past year if they wish to apply for any grant aiding that may be
                  available.

            2.6.3 IRCG responsibilities
                • MRCC/MRSC’s are responsible for maintaining local liaison with CRBI
                  station. Voluntary Services and Training Division of the Irish Coast Guard
                  will nominate an Coastal Unit Sector Manager (CUSM) to maintain liaison
                  with HQ.
                • Meetings with the Station Coxswain/Helmsman are held six monthly, one at
                  the MRCC/MRSC and one at the CRBI station.
                • It is the responsibility of the Irish Coast Guard to assess the standards of
                  performance of the declared facilities of the Irish SAR Organisation.



      2.7           IRISH MOUNTAIN RESCUE ASSOCIATION (IMRA)

                The Irish Mountain Rescue Association, is an all Ireland volunteer
            2.7.1
                organisation comprising specialist teams trained in the provision of mountain
                rescue services throughout the country. Each Mountain Rescue Team (MRT)
                has a primary response area within which they are the recognised first
                response for mountain search and rescue incidents in that area. The MRT
                will also respond on a National basis if required. (See Appendix 2.8).
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    2.8           CIVIL DEFENCE

          2.8.1   Civil Defence is a national organisation that includes a Local Authority
                  Structure to provide support and assistance to the Primary Emergency
                  Services and to the local communities particularly in times of emergency or
                  distress. The organisation aims are to promote, develop and maintain Civil
                  Defence as an effective volunteer based professional organisation providing
                  emergency response and community support services. It has a number of
                  developmental programmes and can provide a corps of trained, uniformed
                  voluntary members with vehicles and equipment and supported by its own
                  communications system. The Civil Defence volunteers assist the Coast
                  Guard during prolonged searches for missing persons, (see appendix 2.7).


    2.9           DUBLIN FIRE BRIGADE

          2.9.1   The Dublin Fire Brigade have declared a capability for Marine Emergency
                  Fire response to the Coast Guard. They have sufficient trained personnel to
                  provide two teams, of six persons ready to respond and deal with fire in a
                  marine environment at any time.


    2.10          HEALTH SERVICE EXECUTIVE (HSE)

          2.10.1 The HSE is responsible for operating the Ambulance service in Ireland. The
                  HSE is divided into regions for daily operations. Each region has its own
                  control centre. The Ambulance service can be alerted by calls to their
                  respective control centre.

          2.10.2 Medico Cork, as part of the HSE is the national medical centre for dealing
                 with medical emergencies at sea. It is based in Cork University Hospital and
                 is available on a twenty-four hour basis to seafarers via the Irish Coast Guard
                 marine radio communications network.

          2.10.3 The HSE through their Maritime Ambulance Response Teams (MART)
                  provide medical assistance on land or sea for major emergencies. They are
                  declared to the Coast Guard, and can be called out at 30 minutes notice day
                  or night.


    2.11          HARBOUR AUTHORITIES

          2.11.1 Harbour Masters are responsible for the safety of navigation within their
                  Harbour Authority defined areas of jurisdiction under the 1996 Harbours
                  Act, the 1946 Harbour Act, Fishery Harbour Centres Act 1968, local
                  authority harbours and in the case of a Harbour under the management of
                  Iarnroid Éireann – Irish Rail, with specific powers to regulate the control and
                  movement of all Vessels, Shipping/Boat movements in the Harbour and its
                  approaches. The Department of Transport has an overall oversight function.

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        2.11.2 Sect 8 of the Merchant Shipping (Wreck & Salvage) Act 1993 defines the
               role of the Harbour Master in relation to vessels in distress and the saving of
               persons onboard.

        2.11.3 The Coast Guard may exercise the SAR function within Harbours in
                accordance with the 1993 Act. Harbour masters provide assistance to the
                emergency services where possible for dealing with marine emergencies that
                may involve rescue. The Coast Guard will advise Harbour masters of any
                SAR mission within their harbour limits.

        2.11.4 The coordinating authority may appoint an on scene coordinator (OSC) for
               the execution of a SAR mission within a Harbour area after consideration of
               the person who is best suited in terms of capacity and ability to perform that
               function. The OSC may therefore, in harbour areas, be the Harbour Master
               or his Deputy. If a Harbour Master or his Deputy considers that a particular
               incident warrants an OSC then they should relay this opinion to the
               Coordinating Authority.


     2.12       AIR ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION UNIT

        2.12.1 The Air Accident Investigation Unit (AAIU) of the Department of Transport
               is responsible for the investigation of aviation accidents that occur in the
               State of Ireland. In addition, the AAIU is also responsible for the
               investigation of accidents to Irish registered or operated aircraft that occurs
               in international waters. Such air accident investigations are conducted in
               accordance with ICAO Annex 13, EU Directive 94/56/EC and S.I. 460 of
               2009.

        2.12.2 The AAIU maintains a 24/7 immediate response for all aviation accidents
               and has agreed procedures with the Coast Guard in relation to aviation
               accidents at sea.

        2.12.3 The AAIU will assist the OSC during the SAR phase of an aviation accident.

        2.12.4 The planning, management and control of the recovery of aircraft wreckage,
               including flight recorders, will be conducted by the AAIU in consultation
               with the IRCG.

        2.12.5 The international responsibilities of the AAIU, with respect to wreckage
               access, recovery and preservation, are laid down in Annex 13 and EU
               Directive 94/56/EC, as transposed into Irish law by S.I. 460 of 2009.
               Currently EU Directive 94/56/EC is in the process of being transposed into
               an EU Regulation, which may require changes to the Merchant Shipping
               (Salvage and Wreck) Act 1993 regarding the powers and responsibilities of
               the Receiver of Wreck.


     2.13       IRISH CAVE RESCUE ORGANISATION (ICRO)

         2.13.1 The Irish Cave Rescue Organisation is a volunteer organisation providing
                cave rescue services throughout the whole of the island of Ireland.
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    2.14      LIFEGUARDS

       2.14.1 This Framework does not supersede the existing liaison agreements between
              the Coast Guard and certain local authorities with regard to lifeguard
              services. Included in these Liaison Agreements the following has been
              agreed:
          • Local authorities that allow their lifeguards to be designated as a declared
              facility will develop and make available to IRCG written operating
              procedures, which will include a full Normal Operating Policy and
              Emergency Action Plans.
          • All lifeguards will have available communication equipment to maintain
              contact with the MRCC/SC in the event of an emergency. Local authorities
              will submit to IRCG all telephone numbers of their Lifeguard Units at the
              commencement of the season.
          • Local authorities will ensure that their lifeguards are trained in the correct
              procedure for contacting IRCG in the event of an emergency.
          • Where lifeguards are provided daily or on weekends, precise dates, times,
              number of lifeguards and limits of patrolled areas are to be notified to the
              relevant MRCC/SC.
          • Lifeguard Units will be equipped with appropriate, well-maintained
              equipment, a list of which will be made available to IRCG.


    2.15      ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

       2.15.1 Department of Defence resources are available to the SAR Authority within
               the terms of a Service Level Agreement, (SLA). A full range of the services
               provided by the Defence Forces to the IRCG under this agreement is listed at
               Annex 2.7.

       2.15.2 As the State’s principle seagoing agency, the Naval Service maintains a
              constant presence in Ireland ‘s Search and Rescue Region and is therefore
              positioned to contribute in many SAR activities. Government has given the
              Naval Service the role “to contribute to the maximum to all the State’s
              requirements in the maritime domain”. The Naval Service has expertise and
              experience in dealing with the most demanding SAR operations and in
              accordance with the agreed SLA, Naval Service personnel may be appointed
              by the IRCG as on-scene co-ordinators during a SAR operation . All
              personnel on Naval ships are trained and often engage in SAR Operations
              that involve fire fighting at sea.

       2.15.3 The Naval Service Divers are available to the Irish Coast Guard and are used
              for under water searches, recovery, ROV, survey, training, hyperbaric
              facilities and advice.

       2.15.4 The Irish Air Corps provide CASA fixed wing aircraft to act as top cover for
              SAR operations. This aircraft is a Maritime Surveillance Aircraft, ideally
              suited for maritime search operations and with the capability of dropping life


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              rafts. The Air Corps fleet of helicopters may be used as additional resources
              if available.

       2.15.5 The Defence Forces also provide Critical Incident Stress Management
              services to IRCG personnel on request from the IRCG.


    2.16      CRAFT OF CONVENIENCE

       2.16.1 Any craft at sea may be required to be used as a ‘craft of convenience’ and
              are obliged under international law (SOLAS V Regulation 33) to respond to
              a distress call until released by the coordinating Authority. Additional
              powers are available under the Merchant shipping Salvage and Wreck Act
              1993 and under EU VTMIS Directives as amended.

    2.17   LEGISLATION

       Various aspects of legislation and Government decisions underpin the provision of
       SAR services in Ireland. Particular reference is made to the following Legislation:

       Merchant Shipping (Salvage & Wreck) Act (MSA) 1993
       2.17.1 An authorised Officer may take such actions as the authorised officer thinks
              fit for the saving of the lives of the shipwrecked persons and the vessel and
              the cargo and apparel of the vessel which may include;
          • require assistance from such relevant persons as that officer thinks necessary;
          • require the master of any vessel near at hand to give such aid with that vessel
              and the crew thereof as may be in that master's power;
          • demand the use of any vehicle, vessel (except Naval vessel and lifeboat) or
              aircraft suitably equipped for the purpose required that might be near at hand.

       2.17.2 Whenever a vessel is in distress, any person may, for the purpose of
              rendering assistance to the vessel, saving the lives of the shipwrecked
              persons or saving the cargo or apparel of the vessel, pass and repass, either
              with or without vehicles, over any adjoining lands, unless there is some
              public road equally convenient, without being subject to interruption by the
              owner or occupier, so that as little damage as possible is done, and may also,
              on the like condition, deposit on those lands any cargo or other article
              recovered from the vessel.

          The Maritime Safety Act 2005
       2.17.3 Securing safe navigable routes. Under Sect 38 of The Maritime Safety Act
              2005 an authorised Officer may for the purposes of securing the safety and
              security of vessels, persons on vessels or persons or property adjacent to
              Irish waters, securing the proper operation of a port or harbour (including
              access to and from it and movement within its confines by vessels), securing
              safe navigable routes, securing that search and rescue and search and
              recovery operations can be conducted safely or providing for the protection
              of a natural heritage area may give directions to the owner or master of a
              vessel or a person who reasonably appears to him or her, to be in charge of
              the vessel, in Irish waters.


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       2.17.4 If a direction is not being complied with, the authorised Officer, may take
              such action and do such things, in relation to the vessel concerned or the
              stores, equipment or cargo of the vessel as appear, having regard to all the
              circumstances, to be necessary and reasonable for the purposes of enforcing
              subsection which may include all or any of the following—
          • the movement of a vessel in, out of, or beyond, the limits of Irish waters or to
              a specified place in such manner as may be specified,
          • the restraint or control of a vessel or its movements and the attendance on the
              vessel of such tug-boats or other vessels as may be specified,
          • the boarding of the vessel for the purposes of giving advice or assistance in
              relation to the movement, restraint or control of a vessel, or to assess any
              damage to the vessel which may prevent the carrying out of the movement,
              restraint or control of the vessel, and to take any measures deemed necessary
              to repair such damage,
          • the temporary prevention of or restriction on the navigation of vessels within
              a specified area or specified areas, or the establishment and maintenance of a
              temporary exclusion zone around a vessel, structure or other thing that is
              sunk, wrecked, damaged or in distress, for the purposes of allowing any
              directions or actions under this section to be carried out safely,
          • the unloading of the stores, equipment, cargo or any other substance on a
              vessel, and the specification of the type or class of vessel by which any such
              operation of unloading is to be carried out.

       2.17.5 The Naval Service has powers in relation to SAR under the MSA 1993 and
               the Maritime Safety Act 2005. Its Officers are also authorised under the
               MSA 1992 (safety of passenger ships, fishing vessels and pleasure craft)


    2.18      List of IRCG Agreements and Memorandum of Understanding

    2.12.1      Civil Defence
    2.12.2      Commissioners of Irish Lights
    2.12.3      Community Rescue Boats of Ireland (under review)
    2.12.4      Department of Defence
    2.12.5      Department of Environment, heritage & Local Government (Maritime
                protocol) (under consultation)
    2.12.6      Dublin Fire Brigade (Fire response at Sea)
    2.12.7      An Garda Síochána (under consultation)
    2.12.8      Inland Authorities (Lifeguards – various LA’s)
    2.12.9      Irish Aviation Authority
    2.12.10     Marine Institute (under consultation)
    2.12.11     Air Accident Investigation Unit (under consultation)
    2.12.12     Oil Spill Response UK.
    2.12.13     Royal National Lifeboat Institution RNLI
    2.12.14     Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland
    2.12.15     Health Services Executive, National Ambulance Service (under
                consultation)
    2.12.16     Health Services Executive, Marine Ambulance Response Team MART
    2.12.17     UK Coastguard (under consultation)



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     2.19       GLOSSARY OF ABBREVIATIONS
Abbreviations are as defined in the International Convention on Maritime SAR, 1997 Annex
Chapter 1.

ALRS          Admiralty List of Radio Signals
ATC           Air Traffic Control
ATD           actual time of departure
ATS           Air Traffic Services
CRS           coast radio station
CSS           coordinator surface search (maritime)
D             datum
DF            direction finding
DR            dead-reckoning
DGPS          Differential GPS
DSC           digital selective calling
dwt           dead weight tonnes
E             East longitude
ELT           emergency locator transmitter
EMSA          European Maritime Safety Agency
EPIRB         emergency position indicating radio beacon
ETA           estimated time of arrival
ETD           estimate time of departure
F/V           fishing vessel
Fig           figure
FIR           flight information region
FLIR          forward looking infrared
FM            frequency modulation
GHz           GigaHertz
GMDSS         Global Maritime Distress and Safety System
GPS           Global positioning system
GS            Ground speed
gt            Gross tonnes
HDG           heading
HPA           Hectopascals
HF            high frequency
IAA           Irish Aviation Authority
I/B            inboard motor
ICAO           International Civil Aviation Organization
IFR            Instrument Flight Rules
IMO            International Maritime Organization
Inmarsat       International Maritime Satellite Organisation
INTERCO        International Code of SIGNALS
JRCC           joint (aviation and maritime) rescue coordination centre
KHz            kiloHertz
kt             knot (nautical mile per hour)
LKP            last known position
M              degrees magnetic
M/V            merchant vessel
MEDEVAC medical evacuation
MF             medium frequency
MHz            megaHertz
MMSI           Maritime mobile service identity
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MSI        Maritime safety information
MTS        Mean track spacing (sector search)
NACGF      North Atlantic Coast Guard Forum
NAVAREA    Navigational warning area Navigation warning area
NECC       National Emergency Coordination Centre (Kildare Street, Dublin)
NM         nautical mile
MOC        The Coast Guards National Maritime Operations Centre
NOTAM      notice to airmen
NVG        night vision goggles
O/B        outboard motor
OSC        on-scene coordinator
PIW        person in water
PLB        personal locator beacon
POB        persons onboard
POD        probability of detection
RCC        Rescue Coordination Centre
S/V        sailing vessel
SAR        search and rescue
SART       search and rescue transponder
SITREP     situation report
SMC        Search and rescue mission coordinator
SOLAS      International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea
SOPs       Standard Operating Procedures
SPOC       search and rescue single point of contact
SRR        search and rescue region
SRS        single raft system
SRU        Search and Rescue Unit
SURPIC     surface picture
TCA        time of closest approach
TELEX      Teletype
UHF        Ultra high frequency
UTC        coordinated universal time
VFR        visual flight rules
VHF        very high frequency
VLR        very long range




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        2.20    GLOSSARY OF TERMS

Aircraft Coordinator (ACO)     A person who coordinates the involvement of multiple
                               aircraft in SAR operations.
AIS                            Automatic Identification System. A ship borne
                               mechanism that automatically provides for the
                               exchange of information between ships as well as the
                               provision of such data to coastal stations. Information
                               includes identification, position, speed course and
                               certain other items about the ship and its cargo. S-AIS
                               is AIS derived from receipt of signals by satellite i.e.
                               space AIS.
Alert Phase                    A situation wherein apprehension exists as to the safety
                               of an aircraft or marine vessel, and of the persons on
                               board.
Alerting post                  Any facility intended to serve as an intermediary
                               between a person reporting an emergency and a rescue
                               coordination centre or rescue sub-centre.
Awareness stage                A period during which the SAR system becomes aware
                               of an actual or potential incident.
Captain.                       Master of a ship or pilot-in-command of an aircraft,
                               commanding officer of a warship or an operator of any
                               other vessel.
Coast earth station (CES)      Maritime name for an Inmarsat shore-based station
                               linking ship earth stations with terrestrial
                               communications networks.
Coast Guard functions (CGF):   Coast Guard functions are the different responsibilities
                               held and, activities performed, by organisations
                               operationally involved in the maritime domain, in
                               accordance with national legislation.
Conclusion stage               A period during a SAR incident when SAR facilities
                               return to their regular location and prepare for another
                               mission.
Coordination                   The bringing together of organisations and elements to
                               ensure effective search and rescue response. One SAR
                               authority must always have Overall coordination
                               responsibility and other organisations are to cooperate
                               with this agency to produce the best response possible
                               within available resources.
Coordinated search pattern     Multi-unit pattern using vessel(s) and aircraft.
Cospas-Sarsat System           A satellite system designed to detect distress beacons
                               transmitting on the frequencies 121.5 MHz, 243 MHz
                               and 406 MHz.
Coverage factor (C)            For parallel sweep searches, Coverage Factor (C) is
                               computed as the ratio of sweep width (W) to track
                               spacing (S). C = W/S.
Craft                          Any air or sea-surface vehicle, or submersible of any
                               kind or size.
Crisis                         Ongoing, often unplanned event
Datum                          A geographic point, line, or area used as a reference in
                               search planning.

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Datum area                        Area where it is estimated that the search object is most
                                  likely to be located.
Datum line                        A line, such as the distressed craft's intended track line
                                  or a line of bearing, which defines the centre of the area
                                  where it is estimated that the search object is most
                                  likely to be located.
Datum point                       A point, such as a reported or estimated position, at the
                                  centre of the area where it is estimated that the search
                                  object is most likely to be located.
Dead reckoning (DR) Determination of position of a craft by adding to the last fix the craft's
                                  course and speed for a given time.
Digital selective calling (DSC)   A technique using digital codes which enables a radio
                                  station to establish contact with, and transfer
                                  information to, another station or group of stations.
Disaster:                         An event that overwhelms resources
Distress Phase                                     A situation wherein there is reasonable
                                  certainty that a vessel or other craft, including an
                                  aircraft or a person, is threatened by grave and
                                  imminent danger and requires immediate assistance.
Drift                             The movement of a search object caused by
                                  environmental forces.
Emergency                         An event that requires immediate response
Emergency Phase                   Emergency phases are based on the level of concern for
                                  the safety of persons or craft that may be in danger. The
                                  three levels of emergency are classified as Uncertainty,
                                  Alert, and Distress.
Fetch                             The distance over which the wind blows in a constant
                                  direction, without obstruction.
First RCC                         RCC affiliated with the shore station that first
                                  acknowledges a distress alert, and which will accept
                                  responsibility for all subsequent SAR coordination
                                  unless and until coordination is transferred to another
                                  RCC.
Forward-looking infrared (FLIR) An imaging system, mounted on board surface vessels or
                                  aircraft, designed to detect thermal energy (heat)
                                  emitted by targets and convert it into a visual display.
GIS                               A Geographic Information System (GIS) is any system
                                  that captures, stores, analyzes, manages, and presents
                                  data that is linked to location. Technically, a GIS is a
                                  system that includes mapping software and its
                                  application to remote sensing, land surveying, aerial
                                  photography,          mathematics,        photogrammetry,
                                  geography, and tools that can be implemented with GIS
                                  software.
Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) A global communications service
                                  based upon automated systems, both satellite-based and
                                  terrestrial, to provide distress alerting and promulgation
                                  of maritime safety information for mariners.
Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Worldwide position and time determination
                                  system that includes one or more satellite constellations
                                  and receivers lies in a plane that intersects the sphere's
                                  centre.
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IMS                           Integrated Maritime Surveillance (IMS) is a process
                              that provides for a common information-sharing
                              environment that would enable Member State (MS)
                              Authorities and Commission Agencies to access,
                              maritime surveillance and monitoring data generated by
                              different sectors of activity, deemed necessary for the
                              performance of their duties.
Initial position error (X)    The estimated probable error of the initially reported
                              position of a SAR incident.
Instrument flight rules (IFR) Rules governing the procedures for conducting
                              instrument flight. Also a term used by pilots and
                              controllers to indicate type of flight plan.
Irish Maritime Domain         That part of the maritime domain encompassed by
                              Irelands Territorial Waters, Exclusive Economic Zone,
                              Continental Shelf, and Search and Rescue Areas, as
                              defined by UNCLOS/SOLAS, together with all cargo
                              and vessels flagged, beneficially owned by, or bound
                              for Ireland, as well as any Area of Operations outside
                              the above that has been declared for an Irish Maritime
                              Operation.
Irish waters                  includes the territorial seas, the waters on the landward
                              side of the territorial seas, and the estuaries, rivers,
                              lakes and other inland waters (whether or not artificially
                              created or modified) of the State
Knot (kt)                     A unit of speed equal to one nautical mile per hour.
Last known position (LKP)     Last witnessed, reported, or computed DR position of a
                              distressed craft.
Leeway (LW)                   The movement of a search object through water caused
                              by winds blowing against exposed surfaces.
LRIT                          Long Range Identification and Tracking (of Ships).
                              Long range vessel-monitoring system introduced by the
                              International Maritime Organisation in 2006, requiring
                              the periodic transmission of the identity and position of
                              vessels. Transmissions are via satellite to LRIT Data
                              Centres. Only the flag state, plus the contracting (port)
                              state of the ship's destination and the coastal state
                              within a distance not exceeding 1000 n.m. of its coast
                              have access to the data.
MAYDAY                        The international radiotelephony distress signal,
                              repeated three times.
Mass Rescue:                  An operation where immediate assistance is required
                              for a large number of persons in distress.
Major Emergency:              Normal resources cannot deal with it. Multi Agency
                              response required, to an event that stretches resources to
                              the limit.
Maritime Domain:              The Maritime Domain encompasses all areas and
                              objects of, on, under, relating to, adjacent to, or
                              bordering a sea, ocean, or other navigable waterway,
                              including all maritime-related activities, infrastructure,
                              people, cargo and vessels and other conveyances.
Maritime Safety               the combination of preventive and responsive measures
                              intended to protect the maritime domain against, and
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                                limit the effect of, accidental or natural danger, harm,
                                environmental damage, risk or loss.
Maritime Situational Awareness (MSA): Maritime Situational Awareness is the effective
                                understanding of any information and data associated
                                with the global maritime domain that could impact the
                                security, safety, environment or economy of the coastal
                                state.
Maritime Safety:                Maritime Safety is the measures taken by the
                                appropriate national and international authorities to
                                ensure the safety of life, safe navigation of ships and
                                transport of goods at sea, prevent accidents, pollution
                                and, in general, all the undesired effects of an incorrect
                                exercise of legal maritime activities.
Maritime Operations Centre       (MOC) The integration of several maritime operational
                                 services which are the responsibility of the Coast
                                 Guard under one Coast Guard national Marine
                                 Operations Centre (MOC). As such, an MOC has
                                 national responsibility for (i) Coastal Vessel Traffic
                                 Management Services (VTM) (ii) Search and Rescue,
                                 (iii) Marine Assistance Service (MAS) as declared by
                                 the IMO, (iv) single point of contact (SPOC) for ISPS
                                 maritime ship security alerts, (v) national maritime
                                 communications centre, (vi) hosts marine emergency
                                 room (vii) SPOC for international Coast Guard to
                                 Coast Guard and (viii) national marine pollution and
                                 ship casualty response coordination centre. It does not
                                 perform functions in respect of criminality at sea,
                                 fisheries control and security of the State or upholding
                                 sovereignty.
Navtex                          Telegraphy system for transmission of maritime safety
                                information, navigation and meteorological warnings
                                and urgent information to ships.
Medevac                          Evacuation of a person for medical reasons.
North Atlantic Coast Guard Forum The North Atlantic Coast Guard Forum (NACGF) is an
                                informal organisation, not bound by treaty, bringing
                                together representatives from North Atlantic/North
                                European countries to facilitate multilateral cooperation
                                on matters related to combined operations including
                                search and rescue. The NACGF may also provide a
                                forum for the exchange of technical experiences.
                                Established in 2007, NACGF includes participation by
                                the United States, Canada, Iceland, Ireland, Spain,
                                Portugal, the United Kingdom, France, Belgium, the
                                Netherlands, Germany, Poland, Denmark, Norway,
                                Sweden, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and the
                                Russian Federation.
On-scene                         The search area or the actual distress site.
On-scene coordinator (OSC)       A person designated to coordinate search and rescue
                                 operations within a specified area
On-scene endurance               The amount of time a facility may spend at the scene
                                 engaged in search and rescue activities.

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PAN-PAN                          The international radiotelephony urgency signal. When
                                 repeated three times, indicates uncertainty or alert,
                                 followed by nature of urgency.
Personal Locator Beacon (PLB)    Personal radio distress beacon for alerting and
                                 transmitting homing signals.
Pilot-in-command                 The pilot responsible for the operation and safety of the
                                 aircraft during flight time.
Planning stage                   A period during a SAR incident when an effective plan
                                 of operations is developed.
Position                         A geographical location normally expressed in degrees
                                 and minutes of latitude and longitude.
Probability of detection (POD). The probability of the search object being detected,
                                 assuming it was in the areas that were searched. POD is
                                 a function of coverage factor, sensor, search conditions
                                 and the accuracy with which the search facility
                                 navigates its assigned search pattern. Measures sensor
                                 effectiveness under the prevailing search conditions.
Rescue                           An operation to retrieve persons in distress, provide for
                                 their initial medical or other needs, and deliver them to
                                 a place of safety.
Rescue coordination centre (RCC) The centre from which a SAR incident is controlled
                                 and coordinated.
Search and rescue mission coordinator (SMC) The suitably trained or qualified official
                                 temporarily assigned to coordinate a response to an
                                 actual or apparent distress situation.
Search and rescue Framework      A general term used to describe documents which exist
                                 at all levels of the national and international search and
                                 rescue structure to describe goals, arrangements, and
                                 procedures which support the provision of search and
                                 rescue services.
Search and rescue point of contact (SPOC) Rescue coordination centres and other
                                 established and recognized national points of contact
                                 that can accept responsibility to receive Cospas-Sarsat
                                 alert data to enable the rescue of persons in distress.
Search and rescue region (SRR) An area of defined dimensions, associated with the
                                 national rescue coordination centre (MRCC Dublin),
                                 within which search and rescue services are provided.
Search and rescue service        The       performance      of     distress    monitoring,
                                 communication, coordination and search and rescue
                                 functions, including provision of medical advice, initial
                                 medical assistance, or medical evacuation, through the
                                 use of public and private resources, including
                                 cooperating aircraft, vessels and other craft and
                                 installations.
Search and rescue stage          Typical steps in the orderly progression of SAR
                                 missions. These are normally Awareness, Initial
                                 Action, Planning, Operations, and Mission Conclusion.
Search and rescue unit (SRU)     A unit composed of trained personnel and provided
                                 with equipment suitable for the expeditious conduct of
                                 search and rescue operations.
Search area.                     The area determined by the search planner to be
                                 searched. This area may be sub-divided into search
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                              sub-areas for the purpose of assigning specific
                              responsibilities to the available search facilities.
Search endurance (T)          The amount of "productive" search time available at
                              the scene Search pattern. A procedure assigned to an
                              SRU for searching a specified area.
Search radius.                The actual search radius used to plan the search and to
                              assign search facilities. It is usually based on
                              adjustments to the optimal search radius that are
                              needed for operational reasons.
Track spacing (S)             The distance between adjacent parallel search tracks.
Triage                        The process of sorting survivors according to medical
                              condition and assigning them priorities for emergency
                              care, treatment, and evacuation.
True air speed (TAS)          The speed an aircraft is travelling through the air mass.
                              TAS corrected for wind equals ground speed.
TSS                           Traffic Separation Scheme, a routing measure aimed at
                              the separation of opposing streams of (Vessel) traffic
                              by appropriate means and by the establishment of
                              traffic lanes.
Uncertainty Phase             A situation wherein doubt exists as to the safety of an
                              aircraft or a marine vessel, and of the persons on board.
VDS                           Vessel Detection System. Council Regulation
                              1966/2006 foresees operational use of satellites in
                              contexts where cost effectiveness can be proven,
                              starting in January 2009. The Vessel Detection System
                              relies on polar orbiting satellites carrying Synthetic
                              Aperture Radar (SAR) instruments, which can detect
                              vessels at sea under most conditions – day and night,
                              and through cloud.
Visual flight rules (VFR)     Rules governing procedures for conducting flight under
                              visual meteorological conditions. In addition, used by
                              pilots and controllers to indicate type of flight plan.
VMS                           Vessel Monitoring System. In connection to the
                              implementation of the Common Fisheries Policy, EC
                              legislation provides for the establishment and operation
                              of a satellite-based VMS by each Member State, in
                              order to monitor the position and movement of fishing
                              vessels.
VTM (IS)                      Vessel Traffic Monitoring (Information System).
                              Established by Directive 2002/59/EC, as amended by
                              Directive 2009/17/EC, on the establishment of a
                              Community vessel traffic monitoring and information
                              system.
VTS                           Vessel Traffic Services. Shore based systems that
                              range from the provision of information messages to
                              the extensive management of maritime traffic.




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                                                                                                                         Appendix 2.1
                 IRCG MARINE VHF COMMUNICATIONS NETWORK

                                                                                Malin Head Coast Guard Radio
                                                                               VHF Channels 16, 67, 23, DSC 70



                                                                                         Malin Head MRSC
                                      Glen Head Coast Guard Radio
                                     VHF Channels 16, 67, 24, DSC 70



                       Donegal Bay Coast Guard Radio
                       VHF Channels 16, 67, 02, DSC
                       70


 Belmullet Coast Guard Radio
VHF Channels 16, 67, 83, DSC 70
                                                                                                                  Carlingford Coast Guard Radio
                                                                       L. Ree CG Radio                           VHF Channels 16, 67, 04, DSC 70
                                                                       VHF Ch 16, 62
  Clifden Coast Guard Radio
                                                                                                                   Dublin Coast Guard Radio
VHF Channels 16, 67, 26, DSC 70
                                                                                                                 VHF Channels 16, 67, 83, DSC 70

                                                                                                                 Dublin MOC
               Galway Coast Guard Radio
             VHF Channels 16, 67, 04, DSC 70                       L. Derg CG Radio                              Wicklow Head Coast Guard Radio
                                                                   VHF Ch 16, 61                                 VHF Channels 16, 67, 02, DSC 70

   Shannon Coast Guard Radio
 VHF Channels 16, 67, 28, DSC 70


                                                                                                                   Rosslare Coast Guard Radio
                                                                                                                 VHF Channels 16, 67, 23, DSC 70
    Valentia MRSC

  Valentia Coast Guard Radio
VHF Channels 16, 67, 24, DSC 70
                                                                                    Mine Head Coast Guard Radio
  Bantry Coast Guard Radio                                                         VHF Channels 16, 67, 83, DSC 70
VHF Channels 16, 67, 23, DSC 70

                                                                   Cork Coast Guard Radio
                                                                VHF Channels 16, 67, 26, DSC 70
                    Mizen Head Coast Guard Radio
                    VHF Channels 16, 67, 04, DSC 70


                                                                             DUBLIN NMOC CONTROLLED RADIO STATIONS

                                                                              MALIN HEAD MRSC CONTROLLED RADIO STATIONS

                                                                             VALENTIA MRSC CONTROLLED RADIO STATIONS

                                                                                AIS STATION




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Irish Coast Guard Volunteer teams                              Appendix 2.2




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  IRCG, Heli, RNLI & CRBI 24/7 Resources                     Appendix 2.3




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Range achieved by current (Sikorsky S61) helicopters within one hour by day from
current SAR bases: Dublin, Waterford, Shannon and Sligo Airports.
(15 minutes readiness, 45 minutes flight = 75 nm = 86 statute miles)




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  On Call and response structure                        Appendix 2.4




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  An Garda Síochána Regions                                          Appendix 2.5




                An Garda Síochána
               Divisional Boundaries                            DONEGAL




                                                         SLIGO/
                                                         LEITRIM
                                                                                CAVAN/
                                                                               MONAGHAN
                                           MAYO
                                                                                              LOUTH

                                                               ROSCOMMON/
                                                                LONGFORD
                                                                                         MEATH

                                                                        WESTMEATH
                                            GALWAY                                               DMR

                                                                                      KILDARE
                                                                          LAOIS/
                                                                          OFFALY
                                                                                              WICKLOW


                                              CLARE

                                                                               KILKENNY/
                                                                   TIPPERARY    CARLOW
                                                  LIMERICK
                                                                                           WEXFORD



                                                         CORK             WATERFORD
                                   KERRY
                                                         NORTH

                                                        CORK
                                                        CITY
                                             CORK
                                             WEST




                                                                                      PREPARED BY PAUL CREANER, MAPPING SECTION
                                                                                                                  14 AUGUST 2009




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  Map of Mountain Rescue Teams                         Appendix 2.6




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                                      Appendix 2.7 DF/IRCG SLA Extract: Schedule of Services

                                             Naval Service

                                      SCHEDULE OF SERVICES
                       Service Description                             Service          Service
                                                                      Provider         Recipient
At request of IRCG, provide assistance as follows,                    Naval      IRCG
    •   Search & Rescue/ Recovery support                             Service
             o   On-scene Co-ordinator
             o    Emergency Medical Technician assistance
             o   Provision of Fire fighting teams
             o   Provision of Engineering assistance
             o   Provision of accommodation for Casualty personnel
             o   Other unforeseen assistance as deemed necessary at
                 the time of the incident
             o   VMS data as appropriate
    •   Pollution Monitoring & Control
             o   Taking of Oil samples
             o   Surveillance
             o   Reporting
    •   Accommodation of IRCG personnel onboard NS as required
    •   Towage in restricted circumstances
    •   Escort
    •   Enforcement
             o   Exclusion Zones
    •   Diving Unit
             o   Body Recovery
             o   Wreck survey as part of body recovery operation,
                 potential salvage or pollution response.
             o   Ordnance disposal of suspect devices at sea
             o   ROV operations
             o   Advice
    •   Technical Assistance and Support
             o   To Marine Pollution Response Team
             o   Salvage/casualty team
             o   IRCG Incident Manager for major SAR incidents


    NS representation on committees                                   N/A        N/A



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                          Service Description                                Service          Service
                                                                            Provider        Recipient
Training                                                                    Naval      IRCG
    •      Offer places on NS On scene Co-ordinator Courses for             Service
           organisations assisting Coast Guard i.e. C.I.L./Marine Inst.
    •      Training exercises with Coast Guard including participation of
           marine assets under contract by the Coast Guard i.e. ILV
           GRAUNAILE, SAR helicopters etc
Training                                                                    IRCG       NS
    •      Provide IRCG support to NS On scene Co-ordinator
    •      Liaison on development of SAR courses
    •      Liaison to provide transport of NS Dive team to incident sites
    •      NS/IRCG staff liaison visits to IRCG Rescue Co-ordination
           Centres/NS facilities
    •      Relevant pollution and salvage courses.
IRCG will supply AIS - WEBGAD. Requires ongoing liaison as AIS              IRCG       NS
project is still under development
IRCG to give to NS contact details of personnel and appointment             IRCG       NS
holders who are authorised to request NS assistance




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                                                 Air Corps

                                       Schedule of Services


                        Service Description                                    Service       Service
                                                                              Provider      Recipient
At request of IRCG, provide assistance as follows,                            Air Corps   IRCG
    •   Search & Rescue, search support
             o   offshore,
             o   coastal
             o   inland waterways
             o   Mountains
             o   On-scene air Co-ordinator


    •   Provision of Top Cover for SAR missions

    •   Island Medevacs when the IRCG are unable to respond

    •   Maritime pollution monitoring
    •   Maritime surveillance
    •   Air Deployed life raft tasks
    •   Environmental escort duties
    •   Representation on Committees,
    •   Partake in joint training exercises as required e.g. annual IRCG
        training exercises with Mountain Rescue Teams4
    •   Emergency temporary accommodation at Baldonnel for IRCG
        helicopters in the event of a civil airport base closure in Dublin.
    •   Technical advice as appropriate.




4
 A protocol in relation to MRT training exercises is to be drawn up between the IRCG, AC and DOD and will
be incorporated under this Annex.
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           Provision of Critical Incident Stress Management Services to the IRCG

  (i)           The Personnel Support Service, (PSS) of the Defence Forces has a number of
                personnel trained in CISM and agrees to provide appropriately trained personnel to
                provide such a service to IRCG staff and volunteers following a request from the
                IRCG. A determination of a Critical Incident and a decision to seek the CISM
                services is a matter for the IRCG.

  (ii)          The Director of the Personnel Support Service, (DPSS) located at DFHQ, Dublin, or a
                staff member appointed by the DPSS will act as the DF’s co-ordinator for providing
                CISM team to the IRCG.

  (iii)         The IRCG should contact the DPSS directly during normal duty hours. The Duty
                Officer, DFHQ should be contacted outside of normal duty hours. These contact
                points are listed below.

  (iv)          The DPSS should be informed by the IRCG of the situation requiring the CISM
                service. The location, the name and phone number of the IRCG Area Officer, the
                number of the IRCG personnel involved should be provided. The IRCG should
                indicate when this service is required.

  (v)           Only the IRCG Search and Rescue Mission Co-ordinator (SMC) or a person
                nominated by him shall request the assistance of the Defence Forces in the provision
                of this service and provide all the necessary detail as outlined in (iv).

  (vi)          The DPSS will select the CISM Team, appoint a Team Leader and advise the IRCG
                who the Team members are. The Team Leader will make initial telephone contact
                with IRCG Area Officer/Manager to discuss details at local level.

  (vii)         On arrival on scene, the CISM Team Leader will report to the IRCG Area Officer,
                who shall have been advised by IRCG HQ and will have organised suitable
                accommodation and facilities for the debriefing and the CISM Team.

  (viii)        In all cases indemnity and liability for DF equipment and personnel rests with the
                Department of Defence. The decision to undertake any task requested by IRCG rests
                with the DF, (initially the DPSS, once on the ground the CISM Team Leader).

  (ix)          Travel, subsistence and miscellaneous expenses will be paid by the IRCG, on the
                production of statements, to the individual members of the DF’s CISM Team.

  (x)           An ongoing review of the procedures shall be conducted at least once annually.

  (xi)          Department of Defence may provide pre-incident CISM training to IRCG subject to
                the exigencies of the service. Travel, subsistence and miscellaneous expenses will be
                paid by the IRCG, on the production of statements, to the individual members of the
                DF’s CISM Team


  (xii)         DF’s CISM Team will be responsible for initial follow – up however, if IRCG staff
                require further counselling it is a matter for IRCG.




National Maritime SAR Framework               Publish date: 2nd March 2010           Pg 61 of 61
version final 2010
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