Law Tripos programme specification

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					                       University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications

Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this programme
specification. At the time of publication, the programme specification has been approved by the
relevant teaching Faculty or Department. It is, however, natural for courses to develop and change
over time and we reserve the right, without notice, to withdraw, update or amend this programme
specification at any time.


This document contains programme specifications for the Law Tripos and the Double
Maitrise. Admission to the Double Maitrise has been indefinitely suspended such that there
will be no admission to the programme in 2009-10 or thereafter.

                                           LAW TRIPOS

1       Awarding Body                             University of Cambridge
2.      Teaching Institution                      Faculty of Law
3.      Accreditation Details                     Students passing the seven ‘Foundation
                                                  Subjects’ recognised as holding a Qualifying
                                                  Law Degree by the Law Society and General
                                                  Council of the Bar.
4.      Name of Final Award                       Bachelor of Arts
5.      Programme Title                           Law Tripos
6.      UCAS Code                                 M100 BA/Law
7.      Benchmark Statement(s)                    Law
8.      Qualifications Framework Level            H
9a.     Date of Revision                          19 February 2008
9b.     Last Reviewed                             21 May 2009

Aims of the Programme

Knowledge and Understanding

•     To give a thorough grounding in the principles of law viewed from an academic rather
      than vocational perspective, while enabling those wishing to qualify as legal practitioners
      to obtain exemption from the academic stage of professional training in England and
      Wales and in Northern Ireland.
•     To enable students to specialise in fields which are of particular interest to them and to
      provide opportunities to study law from a historical, philosophical or sociological
      viewpoint.
•     To provide opportunities for students to study non-common-law systems and public
      international law.

Skills and other attributes

•     To develop legal skills enabling students to handle legal questions in areas which they
      have not previously studied.
•     To develop general transferable skills enabling students to operate effectively in a range
      of legal and non-legal fields of employment.




                                            Page 1 of 15
Relevant subject benchmark statements

The programme falls within the QAA Benchmark Statement for a Bachelor’s degree with
honours in law. Cross-references to the Benchmark Statement are provided below [BS] and
are to the ‘subject-specific abilities’ section unless otherwise indicated.

The programme is designed to enable compliance with the Joint Statement of the Law
Society and General Council of the Bar on Qualifying Law Degrees. Cross references to the
Joint Statement are provided below [JS].
Programme Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students should be able to demonstrate:

Knowledge and Understanding

[BS 1. Knowledge]
[JS Schedule One (a)(i), (ii), (iii); Schedule Two]

(a) Knowledge and understanding of the sources and institutions of English law and of the
basic structure, principles and concepts of key areas of English law, both public and private,
and of European Union law. They should also demonstrate an elementary knowledge of the
principles and concepts of civil-law systems.

       Development: No prior knowledge of law is expected.

       Opportunities: All three-year students must take papers in Civil Law, Constitutional
       Law, Criminal Law and the Law of Tort. Almost all such students will subsequently
       also take papers in the Law of Contract, Land Law, Equity and European Union Law.
       Further optional subjects also enable the development of knowledge and
       understanding in these fields.

(b) Knowledge and understanding of, and relationships between, other fields of particular
interest to the student, building upon knowledge and understanding of the key areas.

       Opportunities: In addition to papers in Civil Law, Constitutional Law, Criminal Law, the
       Law of Tort, the Law of Contract, Land Law, Equity and European Union Law, all
       three-year students take a further six papers or a further five papers and two half-
       papers, including advanced papers in aspects of topics previously studied at a more
       basic level.

(c) Depending on a student’s choice of options, knowledge and understanding of non-
common-law systems and public international law.

       Opportunities: All three-year students study Civil Law and thus have a basic
       grounding in civil-law systems. Students may choose to study Civil Law II,
       Comparative Law or Public International Law. Students may also participate in an
       Erasmus/Socrates exchange programme with a university in continental Europe.

(d) The ability to understand and make use of a range of perspectives—doctrinal, historical,
philosophical and sociological—on legal issues.


                                           Page 2 of 15
        Opportunities: Apart from a thorough grounding in doctrinal legal approaches, both
        key and optional subjects provide opportunities to examine legal issues from a range
        of other perspectives. In addition, students may choose options which focus on
        historical, philosophical or sociological perspectives (e.g. legal history, jurisprudence,
        criminology, sentencing and the penal system, family in society).

        Teaching Methods: (1) Lectures provide students with an overview of a field and a
        framework around which to focus their individual study (2) Supervisions provide
        opportunities, in discussion with supervisors and other students, to gain further
        insights into subjects, to resolve uncertainties and to participate in problem-solving
        and theoretical discussion. Supervisors provide detailed guidance on reading, provide
        feedback on written work and report termly on students’ progress. (3)Final-year
        students may take half-papers, in which supervisions are not provided. (4) Final-year
        students may also choose to take a seminar paper, enabling them to participate in
        seminar discussion and to submit a research dissertation.

        Means of Assessment: All papers (other than third-year seminar papers) are
        assessed by formal, written, unseen examinations. Final-year seminar papers are
        assessed by way of a dissertation of up to 12,000 words, together with participation in
        seminar discussion.

Skills and other Attributes

Intellectual skills

    [BS 2. Application and Problem Solving; 4. Analysis, synthesis, critical judgement and
    evaluation; 6. Communication and Literacy]
    [JS Schedule One (a) (iv), (b) (i), (ii), (iii), (v)]

•   Ability to understand, analyse and interpret primary and secondary legal materials,
    including case-law, statutory materials and academic writings.
•   Ability to distinguish the relevant from the irrelevant.
•   Ability to apply legal rules to factual situations.
•   Ability to form conclusions supported by rational argument.
•   Ability to think critically about legal rules and institutions.

        Development: These skills are developed throughout the programme, in particular
        through instruction by lecturers and supervisors and through students’ preparation for
        and engagement in supervisions, research for and writing of supervision essays and
        receipt of feedback on them.

        Assessment: These skills are assessed formatively through supervisions and
        supervision essays, together with termly reports on supervisions and written feedback
        on supervision essays. They are assessed summatively by formal written
        examinations, which may include both the application of legal rules to (hypothetical)
        factual situations and critical analysis of the rules.

Research skills

    [BS 3. Sources and research; 4. Analysis, synthesis, critical judgement, and evaluation;
    5. Autonomy and ability to learn; 7. Other key skills: numeracy, information technology
    and teamwork]
    [JS Schedule One (a) (iv), b (iv), (vii)]

                                           Page 3 of 15
•   Ability to identify and locate source material, including reports and statutory material, both
    in paper form and online.
•   Ability to understand and to assess the reliability, currency, relevance and relative
    importance of, and relationships between, source materials.
•   Ability to use indexes and digests, both in paper form and online, for assistance in
    handling large quantities of source material and in approaching areas not previously
    studied.

        Development: These skills are developed throughout the programme through
        preparation for supervisions, through researching supervision essays and Part II
        seminar dissertations, and through participation in moots. In particular, there is
        induction training through introductory tours of the Squire Law Library, through
        participation in the Freshfields Legal IT Course, which includes sessions on research
        using paper resources, and though the use of the university libraries.

        Assessment: These skills are assessed formatively through supervisions and
        supervision essays, together with termly reports on supervisions and written feedback
        on supervision essays. They are assessed summatively by formal assessments
        during the Freshfields Legal IT Course and by the examination of Part II seminar
        dissertations.

Computer literacy skills

    [BS 3. Sources and research; BS 7. Other key skills: numeracy, information technology
    and teamwork]
    [JS Schedule One b (vii), (viii)]

•   Ability to word-process simple documents.
•   Ability to use the internet and e-mail.

        Development: For those students who do not have these basic skills, there is support
        from the University Computing Service and colleges. These basic skills are enhanced
        throughout the programme, by participation in the Freshfields Legal IT Course, by the
        production of word-processed essays for supervisions, by the use of on-line library
        catalogues in the Squire Law Library, University Library, or college libraries, by the
        use of the internet in preparation for supervisions and by communication by e-mail
        with directors of studies, supervisors and others.

        Assessment: These skills are assessed formatively through e-mail communication
        with directors of studies and supervisors and through the production of word-
        processed essays for supervisions. The use of the internet is assessed summatively
        by formal assessments during the Freshfields Legal IT course.

Numeracy skills

    [BS 7. Other key skills: numeracy, information technology and teamwork]

Ability to understand and employ numerical and statistical data.



        Development: Mathematical skills are relevant to those parts of the programme in
        which arguments or principles are based upon numerical or statistical data, such as
        aspects of the law of tort, the law of trusts, company law, and criminology, sentencing
                                           Page 4 of 15
        and the penal system. The University offers further opportunities to enhance such
        skills on an optional and unassessed basis.

        Assessment: These skills are assessed formatively through supervisions and
        supervision essays in the relevant areas. These skills are assessed summatively by
        formal written examinations in a few relevant areas.

Communication and literacy skills

    [BS 6. Communication and literacy]
    [JS Schedule One (a) (v), (b) (vi)]

•   Ability to marshal arguments lucidly, coherently, logically and concisely.
•   Ability to make correct use of written and spoken English.
•   Ability to make correct and effective use of specialist legal terminology.
•   Ability to present material orally in a clear and effective way, with sensitivity to the
    listener’s perspective.
•   Ability to present written material clearly and effectively, with sensitivity to the reader’s
    perspective.

        Development: Written skills are developed formally throughout the course by regular
        writing of supervision essays and receipt of feedback on them, by writing of seminar
        dissertations, and by informal communication with directors of studies, supervisors
        and others. Oral skills are enhanced particularly by participation in supervisions.
        Optional activities available include mooting.

        Assessment: These skills are assessed formatively through supervisions and
        supervision essays, together with termly reports on supervisions and written feedback
        on supervision essays. These skills are assessed summatively in a written context by
        formal written examinations.

Interpersonal skills

    [BS 7. Other key skills: numeracy, information technology and teamwork]

•   Ability to work creatively and flexibly with others.
•   Ability to formulate and meet team objectives.
•   Ability to interact successfully on a one-to-one basis.
•   Capacity to respect different viewpoints.

        Development: These skills are developed through co-operative learning in
        supervisions, by participation in class and seminar discussion, by taking part in the
        wider life of colleges, the Faculty and the University (for example through
        membership and officership of societies, including the Cambridge University Law
        Society), by participation in team-based mooting competitions and through sport,
        music or drama. These skills may also be developed in different cultural contexts by
        students participating in the Erasmus/Socrates exchange scheme with universities in
        continental Europe.

        Assessment: These skills are formatively assessed through supervision and
        supervision reports and through participation in seminar discussion. They also feature
        in the Personal Development File maintained by each student.


                                          Page 5 of 15
Organisational skills

    [BS 5. Autonomy and ability to learn]

•   Capacity for self-direction and self-discipline.

•   Ability to take initiatives.
•   Ability to write and think under pressure and to meet deadlines.
•   Ability to manage time and resources.

       Development: These skills are developed through organisation of work-programmes,
       in particular in preparation for supervision discussion, in writing supervision essays
       and seminar dissertations, in managing extracurricular activities so that they
       complement and do not detract from course-related activities, through membership
       and officership of societies, and through arrangement of work placements, such as
       vacation schemes with solicitors and mini-pupillages.

       Assessment: These skills are formatively assessed through supervisions and
       supervision reports and through participation in seminar courses.

Programme structure

The programme is a full-time course generally taken over three years. An exception is made
for those applicants qualifying for status as affiliated students, who may take the BA degree,
full time, in two years.

Qualification for the BA degree with honours requires passes in two ‘Tripos’ examinations.
Three Tripos examinations in Law are available, namely Law Tripos Parts IA, IB and II. Parts
IA and IB cannot be counted as two separate Tripos examinations to qualify for the BA
degree. Law Tripos Part IA is taken at the end of the first year. Law Tripos Part IB is taken at
the end of the second year by those who have passed Law Tripos Part IA, or by those
changing into law from another Tripos. Law Tripos Part II is taken in the year after taking Law
Tripos Part IB, and is available only to those who have taken Law Tripos Part IB.

There is no final degree classification. Students are classed in all three parts of the Law
Tripos.

Admission to the programme is by application to a college of the University of Cambridge.

The papers for the Law Tripos are as follows:

Group I

Paper 1                 Civil Law I
Paper 2                 Constitutional Law
Paper 3                 Criminal Law
Paper 4                 Law of Tort


Group II

Paper 10                Law of Contract
Paper 11                Land Law
                                             Page 6 of 15
Paper 12              International Law

Group III

Paper 13              Civil Law II
Paper 20              Administrative Law
Paper 21              Family Law
Paper 22              Legal History
Paper 23              Criminology, Sentencing and the Penal System
Paper 24              Equity
Paper 25              Criminal Procedure and Criminal Evidence
Paper 26              European Union Law

Group IV

Paper 40              Commercial Law
Paper 41              Labour Law
Paper 42              Intellectual Property
Paper 43              Company Law
Paper 44              Aspects of Obligations
Paper 45              Conflict of Laws
Paper 46              Comparative Law (not on offer in 2009-10: see University Reporter,
4.2.09)
Paper 47              Jurisprudence
Paper 48              Prescribed subjects (half-papers)

Seminar courses

Up to 12 half-papers are prescribed in each year. Those prescribed may vary from year to
year. About 8 seminar courses are offered each year.

Candidates for Law Tripos Part IA take papers 1-4.

Candidates for Law Tripos Part IB take five papers chosen from among Papers 2 and 4 and
Groups II and III, excluding papers already taken.


Candidates for Law Tripos Part II take five papers chosen from among Paper 3 and Groups
III and IV; or four papers chosen from among Paper 3 and Groups III and IV, plus two half-
papers; or four papers chosen from among Paper 3 and Groups III and IV, plus a seminar
course involving the submission of an essay of not more than 12,000 words, including
footnotes and appendices, but excluding bibliography; or three papers chosen from among
Paper 3 and Groups III and IV, plus two half-papers, plus a seminar course involving the
submission of an essay of not more than 12,000 words, including footnotes and appendices,
but excluding bibliography

Affiliated students do not take Law Tripos Part IA.

Study Abroad

Students may, on application to the Faculty, spend the year following completion of Part IB
studying at one of a number of universities in other countries of the European Union with
which the Faculty has an exchange arrangement. On successful completion of the year
spent abroad, students return to Cambridge to study for Law Tripos Part II.
                                          Page 7 of 15
Further information on the Law Tripos may be found in the Faculty Handbook and in the
Faculty’s Marking Criteria and Classing Conventions, as well as on the Faculty website
http://www.law.cam.ac.uk/.




                                     Page 8 of 15
                       University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications

Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this programme
specification. At the time of publication, the programme specification has been approved by the
relevant teaching Faculty or Department. It is, however, natural for courses to develop and change
over time and we reserve the right, without notice, to withdraw, update or amend this programme
specification at any time.

                                       DOUBLE MAÎTRISE

1      Awarding Body                              University of Cambridge and Université Paris
                                                  II
2.     Teaching Institution                       Faculty of Law
3.     Accreditation Details                      Students passing the seven ‘Foundation
                                                  Subjects’ recognised as holding a Qualifying
                                                  Law Degree by the Law Society and General
                                                  Council of the Bar. Students completing the
                                                  programme will also be able to proceed to the
                                                  French bar examinations
4.     Name of Final Award                        Bachelor of Arts and Maîtrise en droit
5.     Programme Title                            Double Maîtrise
6.     UCAS Code                                  N/a
7.     Benchmark Statement(s)                     Law
8.     Qualifications Framework Level             H
9a.    Date of Revision                           21 May 2009
9b.    Last Reviewed                              21 May 2009

Aims of the Programme

•     To give a thorough grounding in the principles of law viewed from an academic rather
      than vocational perspective, while enabling those wishing to qualify as legal practitioners
      to obtain exemption from the academic stage of professional training in England and
      Wales, Northern Ireland or France.
•     To provide opportunities to study law from a historical, philosophical or sociological
      viewpoint.
•     To develop legal skills enabling students to handle English or French legal questions in
      areas which they have not previously studied.
•     To develop general transferable skills enabling students to operate effectively in a range
      of legal and non-legal fields of employment.

Relevant subject benchmark statements

The programme falls within the QAA Benchmark Statement for a Bachelor’s degree with
honours in law. Cross-references to the Benchmark Statement are provided below [BS] and
are to the ‘subject-specific abilities’ section unless otherwise indicated.

The programme is designed to enable compliance with the Joint Statement of the Law
Society and General Council of the Bar on Qualifying Law Degrees. Cross references to the
Joint Statement are provided below [JS].

The programme complies with requirements for entry to the French bar examinations.

                                            Page 9 of 15
Programme Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students should be able to demonstrate:

Knowledge and Understanding
[BS 1. Knowledge]
[JS Schedule One (a)(i), (ii), (iii); Schedule Two]

(a) Knowledge and understanding of the sources and institutions of English and French law
and of the basic structure, principles and concepts of key areas of each legal system, both in
public law and private law, and of European Union law.

        Development: No prior knowledge of law is expected.

        Opportunities: In Cambridge, students spend their two years principally studying key
        areas of English law, although they also take an introductory paper on French law. In
        Paris, students study key areas of French law.

(b) Knowledge and understanding of some other fields of particular interest to the student,
and their interrelationships, building upon knowledge and understanding of the key areas.

        Opportunities: There is a limited opportunity to take optional subjects in Cambridge.
        There is more scope in the final year in Paris to specialise in branches of law outside
        key areas.

(c) The ability to understand and make use of a range of perspectives—doctrinal, historical,
philosophical and sociological—on legal issues.

        Opportunities: The range of subjects covered concentrates on providing students with
        a thorough grounding in doctrinal legal approaches to English and French law. At the
        same time, both key and optional subjects provide some opportunities to examine
        legal issues from a range of other perspectives.

        Teaching Methods:
        In Cambridge: (1) Lectures provide students with an overview of a field and a
        framework around which to focus their individual study. (2) Supervisions provide
        opportunities, in discussion with supervisors and other students, to gain further
        insights into subjects, to resolve uncertainties and to participate in problem-solving
        and theoretical discussion. Supervisors provide detailed guidance on reading and
        feedback on written work, and report termly on students’ progress. (3) French law is
        taught by way of seminar groups, which are closer to what students experience in
        France.
        In Paris: (1) Lectures provide the systematic presentation of the course. (2) Travaux
        dirigés involve seminar group exercises, which train students in both the content of
        the law and French legal techniques.

        Means of Assessment:
        In Cambridge, all English and EU law papers are assessed by formal, written, unseen
        examinations. French law is assessed by a combination of an oral examination and a
        written, unseen examination, both of which are conducted in French.
        In Paris, subjects are assessed by a combination of oral examinations and written,
        unseen examinations. Marks for participation in the travaux dirigés form part of the
        assessment in some subjects (la note de contrôle continue).

                                               Page 10 of 15
Skills and other Attributes

Intellectual skills

    [BS 2. Application and Problem Solving; 4. Analysis, synthesis, critical judgement and
    evaluation; 6. Communication and Literacy]
    [JS Schedule One (a) (iv), (b) (i), (ii), (iii), (v)]

•   Ability to locate, understand, analyse and interpret primary and secondary legal materials
    on English and French law, including constitutional, legislative and case-law materials
    and academic writings.
•   Ability to distinguish the relevant from the irrelevant.
•   Ability to apply legal rules to factual situations.
•   Ability to form conclusions supported by rational arguments.
•   Ability to think critically about legal rules and institutions.

        Development: These skills are developed throughout the programme, in particular
        through instruction by lecturers, supervisors and those running classes and through
        students’ preparation for and engagement in supervisions, research for and writing of
        supervision essays and receipt of feedback on them. Formal induction is provided
        into both legal systems in Cambridge, but the major development of skills in French
        law occurs through tuition in France.

        Assessment: These skills are assessed formatively through supervisions and
        supervision essays, together with termly reports on supervisions and written feedback
        on supervision essays. They are assessed summatively by formal written
        examinations, which may include both the application of legal rules to (hypothetical)
        factual situations and critical analysis of the rules.

Research skills

    [BS 3. Sources and research; 4. Analysis, synthesis, critical judgement, and evaluation;
    5. Autonomy and ability to learn; 7. Other key skills: numeracy, information technology
    and teamwork]
    [JS Schedule One (a) (iv), b (iv), (vii)]

    •   Ability to identify and locate both English and French source material, including
        legislation and case-reports, both in paper form and online.
    •   Ability to understand and to assess the reliability, currency, relevance and relative
        importance of, and relationships between, source materials.
    •   Ability to use indexes and digests, both in paper form and online, for assistance in
        handling large quantities of source material and in approaching areas not previously
        studied.

        Development: In Cambridge, these skills are developed throughout the programme
        through preparation for supervisions, research for supervision essays and
        participation in moots. In particular, there is induction training through introductory
        tours of the Squire Law Library, through participation in the Freshfields Legal IT
        Course, which includes sessions on research using paper resources, and though the
        use of the university libraries. The French law course provides an introduction to
        French legal sources, skills in the handling of which are enhanced in Paris.

        Assessment: These skills are assessed formatively through supervisions and
        supervision essays, together with termly reports on supervisions and written feedback
                                         Page 11 of 15
        on supervision essays and on work for the French law classes. They are assessed
        summatively by formal assessments during the Freshfields Legal IT Course and by
        the examination in French law. In Paris, the exercises for the travaux dirigés provide
        the principal method of assessing these skills.

Computer literacy skills

    [BS 3. Sources and research; BS 7. Other key skills: numeracy, information technology
    and teamwork]
    [JS Schedule One b (vii), (viii)]

    •   Ability to word-process simple documents.
    •   Ability to use the internet and e-mail.

        Development: For those students who do not have these basic skills, there is support
        from the University Computing Service and colleges. These basic skills are enhanced
        throughout the programme, by participation in the Freshfields Legal IT Course, by the
        production of word-processed essays for supervisions, by the use of on-line library
        catalogues in the Squire Law Library, University Library, or college libraries, by the
        use of the internet in preparation for supervisions and by communication by e-mail
        with directors of studies, supervisors and others.

        Assessment: These skills are assessed formatively through e-mail communication
        with directors of studies and supervisors and through the production of word-
        processed essays for supervisions. The use of the internet is assessed summatively
        by formal assessments during the Freshfields Legal IT course.

Numeracy skills

    [BS 7. Other key skills: numeracy]

Ability to understand and employ numerical and statistical data.

        Development: Mathematical skills are relevant to those parts of the programme in
        which arguments or principles are based upon numerical or statistical data, such as
        aspects of the law of tort, the law of trusts, company law, and criminology, sentencing
        and the penal system. The University offers further opportunities to enhance such
        skills on an optional and unassessed basis.

        Assessment: These skills are assessed formatively through supervisions and
        supervision essays in the relevant areas. These skills are assessed summatively by
        formal written examinations in a few relevant areas.

Communication and literacy skills

    [BS 6. Communication and literacy]
    [JS Schedule One (a) (v), (b) (vi)]

•   Ability to marshal arguments lucidly, coherently, logically and concisely.
•   Ability to make correct use of written and spoken English and French.
•   Ability to make correct and effective use of specialist legal terminology in both English
    and French.
•   Ability to present material orally in a clear and effective way, with sensitivity to the
    listener’s perspective.
                                          Page 12 of 15
•   Ability to present written material clearly and effectively, with sensitivity to the reader’s
    perspective.

        Development: Students are admitted only if they have a high level of attainment in
        French. In Cambridge, written skills are developed formally throughout the course by
        regular writing of supervision essays and receipt of feedback on them, by writing of
        seminar dissertations, and by informal communication with directors of studies,
        supervisors and others. Oral skills are enhanced particularly by participation in
        supervisions. Optional activities available include mooting. For those whose main
        language is English, the French law paper provides opportunities to develop oral,
        aural and written abilities in French prior to going to France. In Paris, practice in oral
        and written communication is provided through participation in travaux dirigés.

        Assessment: In Cambridge, performance in English communication and literacy are
        assessed formatively through supervisions and supervision essays, together with
        termly reports on supervisions and written feedback on supervision essays. These
        skills are assessed summatively in a written context by formal written examinations.
        Performance in French is assessed through the French law paper.
        In Paris, performance is assessed through marks given for work in the travaux dirigés
        and by methods of summative assessment, which combine oral and written
        exercises.

Interpersonal skills

    [BS 7. Other key skills: teamwork]

•   Ability to work creatively and flexibly with others.
•   Ability to formulate and meet team objectives.
•   Ability to interact successfully on a one-to-one basis.
•   Capacity to respect different viewpoints.

        Development: These skills are developed through co-operative learning in
        supervisions, by participation in class and seminar discussion, by taking part in the
        wider life of colleges, the Faculty and the University (for example through
        membership and officership of societies, including the Cambridge University Law
        Society), by participation in team-based mooting competitions and through sport,
        music or drama.

        Assessment: These skills are formatively assessed through supervision and
        supervision reports and through participation in seminar discussion. They also feature
        in the Personal Development File maintained by each student. These skills will be
        measured predominantly by performance in Cambridge.

Organisational skills

    [BS 5. Autonomy and ability to learn]

•   Capacity for self-direction and self-discipline.

•   Ability to take initiative.
•   Ability to write and think under pressure and to meet deadlines.
•   Ability to manage time and resources.


                                           Page 13 of 15
         Development: These skills are developed through organisation of work-programmes,
         in particular in preparation for supervision discussion, in writing supervision essays
         and seminar dissertations, in managing extracurricular activities so that they
         complement and do not detract from course-related activities, through membership
         and officership of societies, and through arrangement of work placements, such as
         vacation schemes with solicitors and mini-pupillages. In Paris, where the ability to
         manage time and to pace learning is an integral part of the programme of study,
         students are required to work more independently, with support only in larger classes.

         Assessment: In Cambridge, these skills are formatively assessed through
         supervisions and supervision reports and through participation in seminar courses. In
         Paris, achievement is monitored by the Director of the Double Maîtrise and by those
         conducting the travaux dirigés.

Programme structure

The programme is a full-time, four-year course. Admission to the programme has been
indefinitely suspended such that there will be no admission to the programme in 2009-10 or
thereafter.

The programme consists of two years of study at the University of Cambridge (Parts IA and
IB of the Law Tripos), followed by two years at the Université de Paris II. Law Tripos Part IA
is taken at the end of the first year. Law Tripos Part IB is taken at the end of the second year
by those who have passed Law Tripos Part IA.

There is no final degree classification. Students are classed in each part of the Law Tripos
and in the examinations at the Université de Paris II.

Year 1 (not on offer in 2009-10 due to indefinite suspension)
Paper 2         Constitutional Law
Paper 3         Criminal Law
Paper 4         Law of Tort
Paper 5         French Law (not on offer in 2009-10: see University Reporter, 4.2.09)

Year 2
Any five subjects from Groups II, III or IV of the Law Tripos, except:
Paper 44       Aspects of Obligations
Paper 46       Comparative Law
Paper 48       Prescribed subjects

Year 3
Droit civil (obligations)
Droit administratif
Procédure civil Droit international public
Droit des affaires I & II
Droit du travail Il
Histoire des obligations or Histoire du droit administrative
Droit des libertés fondamentales

Year 4 (first semester)
Candidates choose option 1 or option 2, plus four ‘complementary’ papers:
Option 1: Droit civil du credit; Droit des contrats spéciaux; Droit international privé I
Option 2: Droit des contrats spéciaux; Droit du credit; Droit fiscal des affaires I
Complementary papers:

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Procédures civiles d’exécution
Droit de la concurrence (interne et communautaire)
Droit international économique
Droit des affaires 1 (instruments de paiement et de crédit)
Grands systèmes de droit contemporains I
Droit international privé I Droit fiscal des affaires I

Year 4 (second semester)
Candidates choose option 1 or option 2, plus four ‘complementary’ papers:
Option 1: Droit des affaires 2 (entreprises en difficulté); Droit international privé 2
Option 2: Droit des affaires 2 (entreprises en difficulté); Droit fiscal des affaires 2
Complementary papers:
Droit de la propriété intellectuelle (brevets, marques, propriété littéraire et artistique)
Droit pénal des affaires
Philosophie du droit
Droit constitutionnel et théorie de l’Etat
Aspects européens des droits fondamentaux
Droit international privé 2
Droit fiscal des affaires 2




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