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									Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
            The Central Land Council
                 Annual Report
                   2007-2008




      The Central Land Council, 33 Stuart Hwy, Alice Springs, NT 0870
                            PO Box 3321, Alice Springs, NT, 0870
                                               tel: 0889516211


Front cover: The last land claim in the CLC region. The Simpson Desert Repeat
Claim was heard by Justice Howard Olney in the field in the Simpson Desert, north-
east of Alice Springs.


An electronic copy of this report can be found at www.clc.org.au



Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
                                            Contents
Chairmans Report                       2     4.3 Cultural and Heritage Support     72
Directors Report                       3     4.4 Community Development
Overview of the CLC                    5
                                                  support                          77
Council Members                        9
Performance Report                 12
                                             Output Group 5                        82
                                             Administration and Support Services

                                             5.1 Distributions                     83
Output Group 1                     15
Land and Natural Resource Management         5.2 Administer land trusts            86

1.1 Permits                        16        5.3 Dispute Resolution                89
1.2 Land and Natural Resource
    Management                     17        Output Group 6                        90
                                             Native Title

                                             Native title determinations           92
Output Group 2                     33        Compensation applications             93
Land Claims and Acquisitions Support         Claimant applications                 94
Services                                     Future acts                           97
2.1 Land Claims                    35        Indigenous land use agreements        98
2.2 Other land acquisition         37
                                             Governance and                        99
Output Group 3                     39        Accountability
Economic Development and Commercial
Services
                                             Financial statements                107
3.1 Land use Agreements            41
3.2 Employment, Education and
   Training                        44

3.3 Mining                         50
3.4 Commercial assistance          58


Output Group 4                     65
Advocacy services

4.1 Public awareness and education 66

4.2 Advocacy and representation        68
Central Land Council Annual Report

  An Overview of the Central Land Council
The Chairman’s Report
                                                          under the Land Rights Act: a repeat land claim in
                                                          the Simpson Desert. If we win this claim, Eastern
                                                          Arrernte people can look after that country and
                                                          protect our sites.

                                                          We’ll get the young fellas out and with some help
                                                          they can develop some business for themselves,
                                                          perhaps in tourism.

                                                          Other Aboriginal people in the CLC region are
                                                          making use of their land. That’s important for
                                                          the future. We need to make use of our land.
                                                          More Aboriginal people in Central Australia are
                                                          thinking like this and the CLC has been working
                                                          really hard with people in the bush for things like
                                                          tourism, cattle, ranger groups and those sorts of
                                                          businesses.
                      CLC Chairman Lindsay Bookie
                                                          The CLC has also helped people to decide to
Our people living in remote Aboriginal                    spend their mining royalties on community things
communities around the CLC region have had to             like art centre buildings and education instead of
cope with massive changes in the last financial           buying things that last a short time. It’s a good
year.                                                     way to go because those mining royalties won’t
                                                          be here forever.
The biggest has been the Federal Government’s
emergency response in our communities.                    There’s been so many changes. Aboriginal
                                                          people and governments need to talk to each
The Government’s emergency response in 2007
                                                          other more. Governments need to listen to us,
was a major change for people in the bush. It
                                                          otherwise our situation won’t get better.
was hard for people because they didn’t under-
stand it and most felt confused. Some felt fright-
ened. Nobody had told us it was happening and
nobody had asked us what we thought about it.

The CLC has helped explain it to our people.
It’s important to explain it to people in the bush,
especially the old people and the young ones.

Some people are happy with changes brought
about by the intervention. Others think every-
thing that’s happening with the intervention is
terrible. We should know about anything that the
Government intends to do in Aboriginal affairs
because we are the ones that are affected.

Last year we began the CLC’s last land claim



Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08          2
The Director’s Report
The last financial year has been dominated by
the Northern Territory Emergency Response
initiated by the Australian Government in July
last year.

In August, more than 500 pages of the legisla-
tion purporting to protect children were rammed
through the Australian Parliament with bipartisan
support. The components of the legislation were
so large and complex that even some of the
Coalition’s own members admitted they hadn’t
read it.

At the time, the Central Land Council voiced
a number of objections to the package includ-
ing the suspension of the Racial Discrimination
Act, the scrapping of permits and the imposition
of five-year leases in particular. In addition it
bore little relationship to the recommendations
                                                                                    CLC Director David Ross
of the Little Children are Sacred Report which
had been used to justify the legislation. Perhaps        made enormous progress in many areas.
most importantly the package was delivered with          Through the CLC, Aboriginal people are increas-
no consultation with Aboriginal people at all and        ingly deciding to spend their own royalty monies
I feel this factor undercuts the effectiveness of        on services and infrastructure that other Austra-
any positive measures brought in to help people.         lians take for granted.
From my discussions with the many Aboriginal             In particular, the Warlpiri people north-west
people in Central Australia I meet in the course         of Alice Springs are investing heavily in their
of our work, there is little doubt that many of          children’s future through self-funded programs
them feel more demoralised and disenfranchised           involving early childhood centres, youth media
than ever. Many people felt the package was po-          and adult learning centres.
litically motivated and aimed at them as a ‘land
grab’. It is unsurprising they felt this way given       Similarly Uluru traditional owners are investing

the constant attacks on land rights since the            their rent monies in infrastructure on their com-

Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act          munities. Our land management and employ-

1976 was brought in. The former Foreign Min-             ment staff continue to work with traditional

ister Alexander Downer has publicly stated that          owners to create sustainable employment op-

the Howard Government believed the Emergen-              portunities on Aboriginal land to care for some of

cy Response would improve the Government’s               the nation’s most environmentally pristine areas.

poll ratings, which also gives some credence to          The Central Land Council has continued its
their misgivings.                                        strong relationship with the mining industry and

Despite the heavy extra workload imposed by              increased mining and exploration activity has led

the Emergency Response, the CLC still man-               to an increase in employment opportunities for

aged to have a very productive year and has              Aboriginal people.


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08         3                Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
The CLC works hard to place Aboriginal people              accountability are still causes for concern. A
on remote communities into pre-vocational                  change of political leadership within the NT Gov-
courses and training programs. Often these                 ernment in November 2007 did little to improve
people have never worked and have only ever                its effectiveness in the bush and I have repeated
experienced welfare.                                       my calls for an inquiry into Australian Govern-

While the numbers appear small, there is no                ment grants to the NT.

doubt Aboriginal people are increasingly keen to           Yet again, I thank the tireless and dedicated CLC
engage and utilise the opportunities presented to          staff who work long hours and drive thousands
them. An extremely welcome new development                 of kilometres to provide a service to our constitu-
is the large number of Aboriginal women taking             ents. Your efforts are sincerely and gratefully
up jobs at the Granites gold mine.                         acknowledged.
For the first time in our mining industry employ-          Lastly, I thank the Australian Government for the
ment strategy, demand for jobs from remote                 funding which will allow the Central Land Council
communities has outstripped the number of jobs             to move into one new purpose-built office in
available at the mine. This can be attributed to           Alice Springs next year.
Aboriginal people feeling increasingly comfort-
able in that environment as more and more                  The building will be a worthy symbol of the
Aboriginal people are employed there.                      resilience and patience of Aboriginal people
                                                           in Central Australia and the 90 members of the
It can be argued that through our employment,
                                                           Central Land Council.
land management and community development
initiatives, a quiet revolution is beginning, where-       Despite the hardships and frustrations they
by Aboriginal people are slowly, but increasingly,         endure as government policy fads come and go,
becoming engaged in the mainstream economy.                our members continue to powerfully articulate
We are justifiably proud of the progress we are            their aspirations for a better future.
making in these areas.
                                                           It is the CLC’s job to ensure that somebody is
Unfortunately the Territory’s governance and               listening.




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08           4
About the CLC

Background                                              July 1973. He recommended that a Central and
                                                        a Northern Land Council be established in order
The Central Land Council is a statutory author-
                                                        to present to him the views of Aboriginal people.
ity operating under the Aboriginal Land Rights
                                                        In 1974 the Central Land Council was formed. At
(Northern Territory) Act 1976 and a Native Title
                                                        that stage the staff consisted of an officer of the
Representative Body under the Native Title
                                                        Department of Aboriginal Affairs, who liaised with
Act 1993.
                                                        lawyers in Melbourne and Adelaide.
The roots of the Central Land Council lie in the
                                                        Following a meeting of representatives of Ab-
history of the Aboriginal struggle for justice in
                                                        original communities, the Council was restruc-
   fig. [ number ] : output famous strike
Central Australia — events like the groups and                 for Kumantjayi Perkins was elected
                                                     outputs1975.2008
                                                      tured in
and walk off by the Gurindji people at Wave Hill
                                                        Chairman and Wenten Rubuntja elected Vice
cattle station in 1966. In response to Aborigi-
                                                        Chairman. A lawyer was assigned by the Central
nal demands, in February 1973 the Common-
                                                        Australian Aboriginal Legal Aid Service to work
wealth Government set up a Royal Commission
                                                        for the Council.
under Mr Justice Woodward to inquire into how
  Enhanced social ,
  political might be achieved in the Northern
land rights and economic                                After considering Mr Justice Woodward’s final
Territory.
  participation and                                     report, the Government drew up an Aboriginal
  equity for Aboriginal                                 Land Rights Bill. However, the Labor Govern-
The Commissioner presented his first report in
  people in the Land
Below: Billy Bunter and Jimmy Wave Hill at Wave Hill station talking about the events of 1966 which helped
  Council’s area as a
                                                                      precipitate the land rights movement
  result of the promo-
  tion, protection and
  advancement of their
  land rights, other
  rights and interests




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08        5                Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
About the CLC


ment was dismissed before the Bill passed               The functions of a Land Council are —
through Parliament.
                                                           to ascertain and express the wishes and the
In June 1976 Wenten Rubuntja was elected                opinion of Aboriginals living in the area of the
Chairman. After vigorous public and parliamen-          Land Council as to the management of Ab-
tary debate the legislation was passed. The             original land in that area and as to appropriate
new Liberal/Country Party Government omitted            legislation concerning that land;
provisions for land claims based on need and
                                                           to protect the interests of traditional Ab-
various other features of the original Bill.
                                                        original owners of, and other Aboriginals inter-
The Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory)         ested in, Aboriginal land in the area of the Land
Act 1976 was assented to on 16 December 1976            Council;
and came into operation on 26 January 1977.
                                                           to assist Aboriginals in the taking of mea-
It gave Aborigines title to most of the Aborigi-        sures likely to assist in the protection of sacred
nal reserve lands in the Northern Territory and         sites on land (whether or not Aboriginal land) in
the opportunity to claim other land not already         the area of the Land Council;
owned, leased or being used by someone else.
                                                           to consult with traditional Aboriginal owners
The Central Land Council is now one of the four         of, and other Aboriginals interested in, Aborigi-
Northern Territory Land Councils operating under        nal land in the area of the Land Council with
the Act.                                                respect to any proposal relating to the use of
                                                        that land;
It’s region includes 780,000 square kilometres
of land, is made up of nine regions and takes in           where the Land Council holds in escrow
more than 20 language groups.                           a deed of grant of land made to a Land Trust
                                                        under Section l2 —
It consists of 90 Aboriginal people elected from
communities around the CLC region who meet in                (i) to negotiate with persons having estates
various bush locations three times a year.              or interests in that land with a view to the
                                                        acquisition of those estates or interests by the
The CLC is also a Native Title Representative
                                                        Land Trust; and
Body under the Native Title Act 1993.
                                                             (ii) until those estates or interests have
As a Commonwealth statutory body, the CLC
                                                        been so acquired, to negotiate with those per-
consults with Aboriginal landowners on mining
                                                        sons with a view to the use by Aboriginals of the
activity, land management, tourism, employment
                                                        land in such manner as may be agreed between
and other development proposals for their land.
                                                        the Land Council and those persons;
Statutory FunctionS
                                                           to negotiate with persons desiring to obtain
The statutory functions of the Central Land
                                                        an estate or interest in land in the area of the
Council are described in Section 23 (1) and are
                                                        Land Council —
laid out below.
                                                             (i) where the land is held by a Land Trust —
Although its functions are determined by the Act,
                                                        on behalf of traditional Aboriginal owners (if any)
the Land Council is first and foremost a repre-
                                                        of that land and of any other Aboriginals inter-
sentative organisation for the Aboriginal people
                                                        ested in the land; and
in its area.



Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08        6
About the CLC


      (ii) where the land is the subject of an ap-         locations within the Central Land Council area.
plication referred to in paragraph 50 (1) (a) - on         Meetings are generally open to all Aboriginal
behalf of the traditional Aboriginal owners of             people in the Central Land Council area, but
that land or on behalf of any other Aboriginals            only Council members may vote or hold office.
interested in the land;
                                                           Communities within the Central Land Council
   to assist Aboriginals claiming to have a tra-          area nominate a member (or members) to the
ditional land claim to an area of land within the          Council.
area of the Land Council in pursuing the claim,
                                                           The list of communities and allocation of rep-
in particular, by arranging for legal assistance for
                                                           resentives are subject to review by the Council
them at the expense of the Land Council;
                                                           and to approval by the Minister. In 2007-2008
   to negotiate and enter into agreements, as             there were 93 members of the Central Land
necessary, for the purposes of subsection 70(4);           Council.
   to compile and keep —                                  the executive
   (i) a register recording the names of the
                                                           The Council members elect and delegate pow-
members of the Land Council; and
                                                           ers to the Executive, which meets between
      (ii) a register recording the names of the           Council meetings.
members of the Land Trusts holding, or estab-
lished to hold, Aboriginal land in its area and            The 11 member Executive is comprised of
descriptions of each area of such Aboriginal               the Chairman, the Deputy Chairman and nine
land; and
                                                           members elected by the delegates from each
 to supervise, and provide administrative or              of the nine regions. The Chairman is a full-time
other assistance for, Land Trusts holding, or
                                                           employee of the Land Council.
established to hold, Aboriginal land in its area.

the council
The Council directs policy within the CLC. It
meets at least three times a year in different

                                               Members of the Central Land Council at Tennant Creek in 2007




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08           7               Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
About the CLC


                                                          executive meetingS




    Dennis Williams and Lindsay Turner painting the
       CLC logo on the Barunga Statement in 1988



the clc logo
The Central Land Council logo was painted by
Wenten Rubuntja, Lindsay Turner Jampijinpa
and Dennis Williams Japanangka from Central
Australia.

It tells part of the Two-Women Dreaming which
links together all the major language groups
of the Centre and calls on Aboriginal people to
come together to celebrate their culture and their
country.

It was incorporated in the Barunga Statement
that was presented to the Prime Minister of
Australia, Bob Hawke, on the 12th of June 1988.

The statement was presented by the chairmen of
the Central and Northern Land Councils, Wenten
Rubuntja and Galarrwuy Yunupingu during the
Barunga Sports and Cultural Festival and takes
the form of a petition set amidst a series of
paintings.

The petition calls for the Australian Government
to recognise the rights of the nation’s indigenous
peoples and the paintings tell stories from the
land.




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08          8
Central Land Council Members




                                                                   Chairman Lindsay Bookie




                                                                Deputy Chairman Maurie Ryan




Region 1 CENTRAL                                       Region 2 SOUTH WEST




Executive member Raelene Smith                         Executive member Harry Wilson
Tangentyere Council: Walter Shaw;                      Docker River Outstations: Jim Nukati; Docker
Hermannsburg Outstations:Alison Hunt, Ralph            River: Yvonne Yipardi; Mutitjulu: Harry Wilson;
Malbunka, Conrad Ratara; Yatesman’s Bore:              Aputula: David Doolan; Tempe Downs: Bruce
Patrick Oliver; Ntaria: Gus Williams                   Breaden; Areyonga: Theresa Nipper; Imanpa (Mt.
Wallace Rockhole: Bernard Abbott                       Ebenezer): Robert Coombes, Philip Coombes;
Iwupataka Council (Jay Creek):Tessa Campbell;          Waltitjata Outstation:vacant; Kings Canyon
Santa Teresa: Paul Williams; Amoonguna:                Outstations:Stephen Clyne
Roseanne Ellis; Uruna: Raelene Silverton
Titijkala: Phillip Wiluyka; Ingkerreke: Veronica
Lynch; Lhere Artepe: Max Stuart


                                                   9                     Central Land Council - Annual Report 2007 - 2008
Region 3 NORTH WEST                                     Region 4 TANAMi




Executive member Gus George                             Executive member William Brown
Mistake Creek: Jack Cooke; Daguragu: Jimmy              Willowra:Teddy Long, William Brown; Yuendumu:
Wavehill; Dagaragu Outstations: Maurie Ryan             Harry Nelson– (ABA member), Francis Kelly; Yuen-
Gus George; Lajamanu: Willie Johnson, Geoffrey          dumu Outstations: Richie Robertson, Jeanie Egan;
Mathews; Lajamanu Outstations: Joe James;               Nyirripi: Chris Michael; Mt. Barkly: Clarke Martin;
Bamboo Springs: Desley Rodgers                          Tanami Downs: Peggy Granites; Mount Denison:
                                                        Roslyn Jones




Region 5 WESTERN                                         Region 6 TENNANT CREEk




Executive member Richard Minor                          Executive member Gina Smith
Kintore: Irene Nungala; Kintore Outstations:            Tennant Creek: Valda Shannon, Ronald Plummer;
Lindsay Corby; Papunya: Dennis Minor; Papunya           Nguyarrmini:Richard James; Epenarra:Philip Beas-
Outstations:Adrian Stockman; Mt Liebig: Bundi           ley; Alekarenge (Warrabri): Joseph Thompson, Ned
Rowe; Mt Liebig Outstations: Richard Minor;             Kelly; Imangara (Murray Downs): Martin Spratt;
Haasts Bluff: Suparkra Jugadai; Haasts Bluff            Kunayungku: Brian Tennyson; Mungalawurru
Outstations: Douglas Multa – (ABA member);              Outstation: Brian Freddie; Canteen Creek: Adrian
Mbunghara: Justin Wako                                  Mick; Wunara: Maisie Ward Karlanjarriyi: Sandra
                                                        Morrison




Central Land Council - Annual Report 2007 - 2008   10
Region 7 EASTERN SANdOvER                                 Region 8 EAST PLENTy




Executive member Maxie Ray                                Executive member Anthony Petrick
Ampilatwatja (Amaroo): Simon Holmes; Alpurru-             Mt. Eaglebeak: Maria Scharber; Irrerlirre (McDon-
rulam (Lake Nash): Maxie Ray; Urapuntja (Utopia):         ald Downs): Toby Petrick; Akarnenhe Well (Atula):
Casey Holmes George Clubb; Atnwengerrpe:                  Michael Williams; Bonya: Lindsay Bookie– (ABA
Gilbert Corbett; Derry Downs: Ron Mills; Irrultja:        member); Atitjere (Harts Range): Anthony Patrick;
Simon Ross; Alparra: Harold Nelson, Lenny Jones           Urlampe Outstation: Allan Rankine; Alcoota:
                                                          Clifford Tilmouth




Region 9 ANMATyERE




Executive member Ron Hagan
Yuelamu (Mt Allen): Ron Hagan, David Stafford
Ti Tree (17 Mile):Comet Fishhook; Ti Tree 6
Mile: Archie Glenn; Adelaide Bore (Woola
Downs): Lawrie Price; Laramba (Napperby):
Steven Briscoe; Wilora (Stirling): Claude Pultara;
Thangkenharange:Tommy Thompson, Tommy
Walkabout




                                                     11            Central Land Council - Annual Report 2007 - 2008
Central Land Council Annual Report


  Financial and Operational Performance

                                   Output GrOupS              OutputS

     OutCOME                Output GrOup 1
                                                               1.1 Permits
   Enhanced                 Land and Natural resource
                            management                         1.2 Land and Natural Resource
   social , political                                          Management
   and economic             total price:        $3,921,878
   participation
   and equity
   for Aboriginal          Output GrOup 2
                           Land Claims and Acquisitions        2.1 Land Claims
   people in the
   Land Council’s          Support Services                    2.2 Other land acquisition
   area as a result        total price:         $908,073
   of the promo-
   tion, protection                                            3.1 Land use Agreements
   and advance-            Output GrOup 3                      3.2 Employment, Education and
   ment of their           Economic Development and                Training
   land rights,            Commercial Services
                                                               3.3 Mining
   other rights and        total price:        $4,477,214
   interests                                                   3.4 Commercial Assistance


                                                               4.1 Public Awareness and Education
   the CLC’s total         Output GrOup 4                      4.2 Advocacy and Representation
   expenditure for         Advocacy Services
                                                               4.3 Cultural and Heritage Support
   the 2007-2008           total price:          $3,769,517
   tOtAL =                                                     4.4 Community Development Support

   $18,349,066


   Other Grants           Output GrOup 5                       5.1 Distributions
   tOtAL =                Administration and Support
                                                               5.2 Administer Land Trusts
   $2,808,191             Services
                          total price:         $2,472,546      5.3 Dispute Resolution
   recoveries

   tOtAL =
                           Output GrOup 6
   $1,960,000
                           Native title
                           total price:          $2,799,839


  Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08     12
Financial and Operational Performance

Performance rePort
                                                           rEvENuE SOurCE                                  %
The Central Land Council has multiple sources
                                                           Aboriginal Benefits Account (ABA)
of revenue which are indicative of the evolving                                                         45%
                                                           funding
nature of operations performed to comply with
statutory functions. The CLC is a Commonwealth             Cost Recoveries                              12%
statutory authority operating under the Aboriginal
Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976 and a            Other Income                                    4%
Native Title Representative Body under the Na-
                                                           Native Title Representative Body
tive Title Act 1993.                                                                                    16%
                                                           funding
Broadly operations support traditional owners in
                                                           Special - Building Project                   11%
achievement and continuing administration of:

l   Land Acquisition                                       Special Purpose Program
                                                           Agreements (primarily related to             12%
l   Native Title
                                                           Land Management)
l   Commercial agreements with parties in-
terested in the use of Aboriginal land and the                                                         100%
management of income arising from land use
                                                          Economic development and commercial services
agreements.
                                                          accounts for the largest expenditure on any out-
l   Working with traditional owners to manage             put group: $4.47M or 24 per cent of the CLC’s
their land and resources, protect sacred sites,           total expenditure. This reflects the increased
progress economic and community development               interest by Aboriginal landowners and govern-
and take up related employment opportunities.             ments in land use agreements; increased de-
                                                          mand for applications for consent to explore and
l   Representing the interests and aspirations of
                                                          mine on Aboriginal land; and costs relating to the
Aboriginal people in Central Australia in regard
                                                          CLC employment unit, tourism development and
to land.
                                                          pastoral development projects.
While the processes associated with acquiring
                                                          As discussed in greater detail in the following re-
Aboriginal freehold title have diminished over the
                                                          ports, outputs classified under Natural Resource
past 30 years, land use agreements and land
                                                          Management ($3,921,878; 21%) and Advocacy
management operations are significantly esca-
                                                          ($3,769,517; 21%) are other growing areas of
lating and economic and employment benefits to
                                                          operations for CLC. In particular, there has been
the traditional owners are increasing.
                                                          growth over past years in the area of community
The Central Land Council is funded on a cash              development (under the output group of Advoca-
basis with annual estimates of revenue, less              cy) and the Community Ranger programs (clas-
expenditure, being break even. CLC operational            sified under Natural Resource Management).
sources of revenue are detailed in the following
                                                          The CLC is aggressive in identifying cost recov-
table:
                                                          ery opportunities in accordance with Common-
                                                          wealth guidelines to mitigate any reduction in
                                                          the level of and/or quality of service delivery in
                                                          performance of its functions. Productivity gains


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08         13
                                                     12
central Land council annual report


and cost recoveries cannot keep pace with in-              CLC jurisdiction. Mining activity has increased
creasing costs, particularly fuel and salary costs.        considerably year-on-year. The CLC had 262
The need to identify special purpose funding               Exploration Licence Applications (ELAs) under
sources to perform CLC functions is becoming               negotiation at 30 June 2008 – an increase of 25
more critical.                                             per cent since 2007. The CLC has a statutory
                                                           function and responsibility to engage in the ELA
The actual net revenue and expenditure result
                                                           process in prescribed time frames.
for the financial year ended 30 June 2008 was
extremely close to break even (effectively $nil –          The Northern Territory Emergency Response by
refer to the Notes in the ABA and the Native Title         the Australian Government imposed serious cost
accounts).                                                 implications for the CLC which has a respon-
                                                           sibility to inform, and express the views, of its
Although a surplus of $4,304,223 is reported
                                                           constituents. There has been no funding for this
in the Central Land Council Income Statement,
                                                           unplanned function. The appointment of one law-
this amount is the result of a significant change
                                                           yer to coordinate leasing negotiations has been
in accounting policy, the details of which are
                                                           funded on a two year basis.
described in the Notes to the accounts.
                                                           Staffing accounts for around 60 per cent of the
The Statutory Financial Statements have been
                                                           CLC’s expenditure. Staff retention is a critical
subjected to the requirements of an Austra-
                                                           issue and “presents a catastrophic level risk” ac-
lian Accounting Standard which insists that all
                                                           cording to a recent OEA report. Professional and
receipts in 2007/8 for special purpose programs
                                                           experienced staff are required to carry out the
must be recognised as current year revenue
                                                           CLC’s statutory functions and recruitment costs
although the matching expenditure will occur in
                                                           range from 15 per cent to 40 per cent of the
future years.
                                                           first year’s salary. The challenge to recruit and
The population of Aboriginal people within the             retain staff will remain and the CLC will continue
CLC region has grown from 18,000 to 25,000                 to seek funding commensurate with maintaining
in the last decade - an increase of 38 per cent.           market level competitiveness.
This population growth increases demand for
                                                           Budgetary pressures continue to mean
CLC resources and services. Most of the CLC’s
                                                           opportunities are missed in the performance of
constituents reside in remote communities and
                                                           CLC’s statutory functions. However, the Central
the “costs of doing business” are increasing
                                                           Land Council is well placed to continue its record
faster than the growth in approved operational
                                                           of enhancing the social, political and economic
funding.
                                                           participation and equity of its constituents.
Fuel costs have risen dramatically in the last two
financial years: an increase of 11% in 2006-2007
and 14% in 2007-2008. Given that CLC staff
travel millions of kilometres a year for work
across the 750,000 square kilometres of our
region, fuel cost increases represent a signifi-
cant cost burden not recognised in approved
estimates of expenditure funding.

The so-called mining boom is evident in the


                                                      14              Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
Central Land Council Annual Report

                        Output Group 1
         Land and Natural Resources Management
 Central Land Council Annual Report



Land and natural resource management

The Land Council aims to provide Aboriginal landowners with information, advice and
support to enable them to manage their land in a sustainable and productive way.




OUTCOME                             OUTPUT GROUP 1

  Enhanced social,
  political and economic
                                       Land and Natural Resource Management
  participation and
  equity for Aboriginal
  people in the Land
                                               OUTPUTS
  Council’s area as a
  result of the promo-                          1.1 Permits
  tion, protection and
  advancement of their
  land rights, other                            1.2 Land and Natural Resource Management

  rights and interests




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08                  16
Output 1.1 Permits

Description of output                                           for certain community access.

The permit system is authorised by section                      At this stage, the changes to the permit system
73 of the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern                      do not appear to have affected permit numbers
Territory) Act 1976 (Cth) and contained within                  overall and in fact there has been an increase in
                                                                permits issued, particularly for entry and media
the Aboriginal Land Act (NT). The system
                                                                permits.
provides all visitors, workers and research-
ers with a system of regulated access to                        This suggests visitors have generally respected
Aboriginal land which is administered by the                    the CLC’s request to continue applying for per-
land councils. The CLC offers entry, transit,                   mits and increased visitation including for NTER
                                                                purposes.
media (news of the day), mining and special
purpose permits.                                                On-line applications

                                                                The CLC has continued to develop its on-line
performance                                                     application system and database with a view
                                                                to increased tracking of applications, improved
The CLC issued a total of 3899 permits as
                                                                database interrogation, and ability to report on
follows:
                                                                the timeliness of permit issues.

                                                                Special purpose permits
                 permits issueD
                                                                Forty seven special purpose permits were issued
 Type                     2006/2007            2007/2008
                                                                for research on anthropology, linguistics or ar-
 Entry                          557                  808
                                                                chaeology, and activities regarding the environ-
 Transit                         2266              2606         ment, tourism and filming.
 Mining                            384               411
 Special Purpose                    NA               47
 Media                             NA                27
 TOTAL                           3500              3899


comment on performance
nt emergency response changes

As noted below, the NTER legislation amended
the system so permits were not required for
public areas in main communities. The new
Australian Government has sought to reintro-
duce permits to communities, with exceptions for
government workers and journalists.

This Bill has not been passed by the Parliament
and the position of the new Senate is unclear.

Despite the changes, which came into effect on
17 February 2008, the CLC has requested that
all visitors to Aboriginal land comply with the
CLC’s permit system and has continued to pro-
cess permits even if they are not legally required


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08               17             Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
Output 1.2 Land and Natural Resource Management

Description of output                                      Aboriginal people have an interest, NRM issues
                                                           (eg. feral animals, weeds and fire issues) and
In the CLC’s region, traditional Aboriginal                identified actions to address those issues.
landowners own 385,392 square kilometres
                                                           These reports are increasingly used as the
of Aboriginal freehold land under the Aborigi-
                                                           foundation for annual work plans of indigenous
nal Land Rights Act. This represents 49 per
                                                           community ranger programs supported under
cent of the 776,549 square kilometres of land
                                                           funding contracts with external agencies.
covered by the CLC’s nine regions.
                                                           environmentaL anD cuLturaL
While the land is of immense traditional impor-
                                                           assessments
tance and spiritual significance to its Aboriginal
owners, much of it is arid or semi arid - there            The CLC provided assessments of potential im-
are few surface waters, it is ecologically fragile,        pacts on identified cultural and natural values to
remote and often inaccessible.                             assist traditional owners to make fully-informed
                                                           decisions in relation to:
Just 14 per cent of the Aboriginal land in the
CLC’s region is suitable for pastoralism.                   exploration licence applications over the
                                                           Haasts Bluff ALT;
However, there is an increasing recognition that
the region contains some of the most pristine               a mining proposal in the Lake Surprise
natural environments in the nation. Not only are           (Yinapaka) area of the Central Desert ALT on the
these areas often dynamic cultural landscapes,             Lander River floodout;
but they support many of Australia’s most
                                                            two NRM Audits to assess land condition
threatened species and have an extremely high
                                                           and natural resource management values of the
conservation value.
                                                           Aboriginal-owned Loves Creek station and the
Aboriginal landowners in Central Australia face a          grazing licence issued over the Mungkarta ALT
diverse and complex range of land management               (formerly McLaren Creek) west of the Stuart
and development issues. These include mineral              Highway;
exploration and mining, tourism, feral animal
                                                            Pmere Nyente ALT (Todd River Downs) -
control, fire mangement, land degradation and
                                                           continue monitoring from 2006-2007 of recovery
land management.
                                                           from land degradation arising from unauthorised
performance                                                overgrazing and feral animal impacts under
                                                           drought conditions after earlier destocking
improveD LanD resource information
                                                           measures and culls were undertaken;
A significant and valuable resource for the CLC
                                                            annual land condition monitoring at seven
is the Sub-Regional Resource Condition Reports
                                                           monitoring sites on the Haasts Bluff ALT under
for each of the nine CLC sub-regions.
                                                           grazing licence;
These reports provide comprehensive informa-
                                                            commercial pastoral activity conducted on
tion to guide the strategic direction of the CLC in
                                                           the Mangkururrpa ALT (formerly Tanami Downs);
building ‘on-ground’ natural resource manage-
ment (NRM) capacity.                                        continued to monitor lessee compliance
                                                           with terms and conditions of 11 grazing licences
Information compiled for each sub-region
                                                           on the Angarapa, Dagaragu, Haasts Bluff,
includes community land use aspirations, local
                                                           Hooker Creek, Mangkururrpa, Malngin, Mung-
resource support, natural and cultural resource
                                                           karta, Warumungu, Wirliyajarrayi, Yalpirakinu
values of Aboriginal land and other land in which
                                                           and Yuendumu ALTs, particularly for environ-


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08          18
central Land council annual report continued...


mental requirements including stocking rates,               level of co-ordination, resource, technical and
overgrazing, erosion etc.; and                              other support undertaking a wide range CNRM
                                                            activities on Aboriginal land and adjoining nation-
 maintained monitoring of another nine
                                                            al parks in the CLC region.
Aboriginal-owned pastoral enterprises
                                                            Efforts continued to shift the resourcing of these
community-baseD LanD
                                                            programs away from a cocktail of administrative-
management programs (ranger
                                                            ly burdensome short term grant funded projects
programs)                                                   to longer term streamlined funding arrangements
Structured community-based cultural and                     with governments and commercial environmental
natural resource management (CNRM) programs                 service contracts to put them on a more sustain-
are increasingly the basis for supporting tradi-            able and secure footing.
tional owners to sustainably manage and protect             There were significant areas of engage-
the cultural and natural values of their country.           ment pursued to this end during this period.
They directly engage senior traditional owners              Increased linkages were established between
in mentoring younger ranger group members                   ranger program development and the Depart-
and build valuable skills to take advantage of              ment of Environment, Water, Heritage and the
opportunities to provide contract environmental             Arts (DEWHA) Indigenous Protected Area (IPA)
management and related services to industry                 Program. Three large areas of Aboriginal land in
and governments.                                            the region have either proceeded to IPA declara-
                                                            tion or are currently the subject of IPA feasibility
These programs are a significant community
                                                            assessment. The Northern Tanami IPA provides
development initiative and enjoy a very high
                                                            a long-term funding framework for the Lajamanu-
level of community support, participation and
                                                            based Wulaign Rangers and it is hoped that IPA
ownership.
                                                            feasibility assessments elsewhere in the region
Ranger groups deliver considerable social,                  (Southern Tanami and Katiti-Petermann regions)
environmental, cultural, employment and other               will deliver similar benefits.
economic benefits to traditional land owners and
                                                            Although increasingly frustrated by difficulties
their communities.                                          with inter-agency co-ordination and collabora-
issues anD chaLLenges to ranger                             tion, the CLC continued to maintain some faith in
groups                                                      the intent of the Healthy Country, Healthy People
                                                            (HCHP) Schedule established under the Over-
CDEP support and collaboration with local com-              arching Agreement on Indigenous Affairs be-
munity councils and resource centres has been               tween the Prime Minister and NT Chief Minister.
critical for maintaining the momentum of the
ranger groups.                                              The schedule is intended to be the basis for a
                                                            “whole-of-government” commitment to establish
The disruptions caused by the Federal Gov-                  a more secure and consistent funding environ-
ernment’s dismantling of CDEP caused con-                   ment to support indigenous engagement in the
siderable setbacks for on-ground projects and
                                                            sustainable management of land and seas in
individual ranger motivation (see Output 3.2) in a
                                                            recognition of the broad range of social, eco-
number of unforeseen ways.
                                                            nomic, cultural and environmental benefits that
As in all areas of the CLC’s operations, recruit-           arise.
ing and retaining staff also proved to be a signifi-
                                                            The CLC continued to engage with the
cant challenge to maintaining group viability.
                                                            processes and perceived opportunities of the
Nevertheless, the CLC maintained a consistent               HCHP Schedule.


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08           19             Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
central Land council annual report continued...


operationaL reports of the                                Community Education Centre and parents to
ranger groups                                             support intergenerational transfer of traditional
                                                          knowledge.
Lajamanu (northern tanami) – WuLaign
ranger group                                              yuenDumu (southern tanami) – WarLpiri
                                                          ranger group
The Northern Tanami Indigenous Protected Area
(IPA) declaration on 30 April 2007 over an area           After significant setbacks to the development
of about 40,000 square kilometres of the Central          of the Yuendumu-based Warlpiri Rangers
Desert and Hooker Creek ALTs provided tradi-              caused by loss of funding and supporting CDEP
tional owners and the Lajamanu-based Wulaign              arrangements, the CLC continued to rebuild
Rangers with longer-term funding arrangements.            momentum in this group through the implemen-
                                                          tation of three NHT projects funded through the
Despite some problems with recruitment and                NT NRM Board’s 2004-2007 Regional Invest-
uncertainty about a funding restructure with              ment Strategy and associated Commonwealth
DEWHA, some achievements were made                        Strategic Reserve.
in the development of the Wulaign Rangers
and the broader management of the Northern                These are:
Tanami IPA.                                                Best Practice Community Fire Management
Implementation of the IPA Plan of Management              on Aboriginal Lands in Arid NT
by the Wulaign Rangers focussed on five key                Implementing recovery actions for the Bilby
management zones comprised of biologically                and other key threatened species,
and culturally significant wetland areas.
                                                           NHT Strategic Reserve Project: Weed Con-
The rangers undertook field-based training in             trol in the Southern Tanami
biological monitoring methods, chemical han-
dling, and weed control.                                  The Yuendumu Rangers carried out strategic
                                                          prescribed burning to reduce wildfire threats to
The CLC consulted traditional owners about                ‘biodiversity hotspots’ along the Lander River
threatened species protection through predator            and the area surrounding Lake Surprise;
control and fire mitigation practices.
                                                          The rangers also carried out threatened species
Fuel reduction burns were conducted to protect            monitoring and fox baiting at Sangsters Bore on
key wetlands within IPA management zones and              the Central Desert ALT, which included training
outstation infrastructure from the threat of wild-        in track, scat, and burrow identification and use
fire as prescribed by the Plan of Management.             of the Cybertracker for data entry.
The Wulaign Rangers continued to work in the              Weed treatment for Parkinsonia and Rubber
Tanami Biodiversity Monitoring Project from               Bush infestations on the Yuendumu ALT and
October to November 2007;                                 adjoining areas was also done.
The CLC supported the CNRM-related aspi-                  The group were contracted to mining company
rations of traditional owners and community               Newmont in the Tanami Biodiversity Monitoring
groups in Lajamanu with 13 cultural mainte-               Project and participated in an 18-month dingo
nance trips to locate and maintain significant            study with the University of Sydney.
sites, collect seed and cultural materials,
                                                          An application submitted to the NT NRM Board
conduct environmental monitoring and traditional
                                                          under the 2007-2010 Regional Investment Strat-
burning activity.
                                                          egy for “Building Capacity to Implement NRM Ini-
It also conducted two trips with the Lajamanu             tiatives in the Southern Tanami” was successful


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08         20
central Land council annual report continued...


but again difficulties in recruitment delayed the          However, the group did have some significant
group’s work on threatened species and weed                achievements:
control projects.                                           completion of a project with Greening Austra-
                                                           lia (NT) constructing camel-proof fencing around
A Working on Country (NT) jobs package submit-
                                                           a culturally significant waterhole on the Peter-
ted to DEWHA in November 2007 and a three-
                                                           mann ALT to maintain its recreational value to
year funding package submitted in December
                                                           the community;
2007 under the Healthy Country ,Healthy People
Schedule seeking DEWHA, ILC and ABA contri-                 numerous country visits on the Petermann
butions has had an initial positive response.              ALT with senior male and female traditional
                                                           owners to protect cultural sites, carry out tra-
The CLC initiated extensive traditional owner
                                                           ditional burning and other land management
consultations, fieldwork and community-based
                                                           practices;
planning over the feasibility of establishing an
Indigenous Protected Area (IPA) in the Southern             the rangers did accredited training with
Tanami.The declaration of an IPA would lead to             Batchelor College toward Certificate II in Con-
five-year funding arrangements.                            servation and Land Management in fire manage-
                                                           ment and flora and fauna identification;
In the last financial year, 27 traditional owner
consultations were undertaken in the affected               fire awareness and safety training in prepa-
communities of Nyirripi, Yuendumu, and Wil-                ration for undertaking prescribed burning to pro-
lowra and other communities in which traditional           tect sacred sites and mosaic burning to protect
owners of the Southern Tanami IPA live.                    threatened species habitat in the Petermann
                                                           Ranges area.
There were a number of highly significant coun-
try visits undertaken with traditional owners for          The CLC started an IPA feasibility assessment
IPA development including Mina Mina and the                in the south-west CLC region over areas of the
ecologically sensitive Lander River and Yina-              Petermann and Katiti ALTs under the terms of a
paka (Lake Surprise) areas in the north of the             funding agreement entered into with DEWHA in
Wirliyajarrayi ALT.                                        December 2007.

An application for continuing Southern Tanami              ntaria (hermannsburg) – tjuWanpa
IPA funding from DEWHA for the 2008/2009 was               ranger group
submitted and is waiting for the final decision of         The Ntaria-based Tjuwanpa Ranger group
the Minister for the Environment.                          expanded their activities on ALTs and jointly-
Docker river – kaLtukatjara ranger                         managed national parks in the Ntaria area (Finke
group                                                      Gorge, Palm Valley and the West MacDonnell
                                                           National Parks).
The CLC continued to support the part-time
employment of eight young men in the Kaltu-                While CDEP issues impacted heavily on this
katjara (Docker River) community in a ranger               group (see Output 3.2), funding became more
program with s.64(4) funding secured from the              secure: the NT Department of Natural Resourc-
ABA in December 2006.                                      es, Environment and the Arts (NRETA) renewed
                                                           its funding of $90,000 to maintain the coordina-
Continuity in the group’s activities was frustrated        tor position and a three-year ILC contract was
in the second half of this period by loss of the           continued.
full-time co-ordinator and subsequent recruit-
ment difficulties which continue.                          An ABA s.64(4) grant for capital equipment
                                                           items, office establishment and operational



Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08          21             Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
central Land council annual report continued...


expenses was also continued.                                creation of a community garden and orchard
                                                           at the 8-Mile community west of Ntaria;
The CLC also successfully secured funds under
the Australian Government’s `Working On Coun-               completion of a Tourism NT contract to im-
try’ program to employ 10 Tjuwanpa Rangers on              prove the Ipolera Campground;
a permanent basis for three years.
                                                            fire-awareness and safety training to under-
A three-year funding package was submitted                 take prescribed burning of strategic fire breaks
in December 2007 under the Healthy Country,                to protect the high biodiversity values of Finke
Healthy People Schedule seeking DEWHA, ILC                 Gorge National Park and infrastructure associ-
and ABA contributions.                                     ated with the Palm Valley Gas Field;

Ranger achievements                                         walking track construction at Tnorala Re-
                                                           serve (Gosses Bluff);
 NHT project “Implementing the recovery
plan for the endangered lizard, Egernia slateri             campground development at Serpentine
(Slater’s Skink)” in collaboration with the NT             Chalet in the West MacDonnell National Park;
Parks and Wildlife Service;
                                                            continued participation in an environmen-
  a distribution survey of the Marsupial Mole             tal survey of Palm Valley Gas Field with Low
(Notoryctes typhlops) in the Ntaria area (Gilbert          Ecological Services.
Springs);
                                                           tennant creek – muru-Warinyi ankkuL
   feral horse and pig surveys;                           (mWa) ranger group
 monitoring and mechanical control of prickly             The employment of the Co-ordinator and opera-
pear infestations around Ntaria;
                                               Below: Muru-warinyi Ankkul (MWA) Rangers take a break from
                                                                    spraying weeds on Rockhampton Downs




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08          22
central Land council annual report continued...


tions of the group were continued under a three-          Alroy Downs and Rockhampton Downs
year funding contract with the ILC to manage
                                                           accredited activities and courses toward Cer-
Warumungu lands in accordance with an agreed
                                                          tificate II and III in Conservation and Land Man-
work plan and inter-agency support.
                                                          agement with Batchelor Institute of Indigenous
Equipment needs and vehicle costs came from               Tertiary Education (BIITE), including related
an ABA s.64(4) grant while the ILC funded an              literacy and numeracy training.
operational base and storage facility.
                                                          aLice springs – amoonguna/ingkerreke
The CLC successfully secured funds under the              rangers
Australian Government’s `Working On Country’
                                                          The demise of the Amoonguna CDEP program
program to employ five rangers on a permanent
                                                          eventually saw this group dissolved. Some par-
basis for three years to carry out Government-
                                                          ticipants were eventually incorporated into a new
endorsed environmental actions.
                                                          ranger program being developed by the Alice
A three-year funding package was submitted                Springs-based Ingkerreke Outstation Resource
in December 2007 under the Healthy Country,               Centre (ORS) under post-CDEP arrangements
Healthy People Schedule seeking DEWHA, ILC                introduced by the Department of Employment
and ABA contributions.                                    and Workplace Relations (DEWR).
Ranger achievements                                       Additional initiatives were taken to consolidate
 fire-proofed four sites of cultural significance        the viability and capacity of emerging ranger
on the Warumungu ALT through slashing and                 groups supported in the previous period and
burning;                                                  develop further community interest in structured
                                                          land management activity elsewhere in the
 protection measures for a significant water-            region.
hole on the Mungkarta ALT;
                                                          neW anD emerging ranger groups
 controlled burns conducted in conjunction
with Bushfires NT to protect areas of cultural            ti-tree - anmatyerr rangers
significance;                                             The CLC was successful in obtaining funding for
 Parkinsonia control on the Partta land-hold-            an Early Investment Proposal under the frame-
ings incorporating the focal Warumungu sites of           work of the Commonwealth-NT Healthy Country,
Jurnkurakurr and Kunjarra (Devils Pebbles);               Healthy People Schedule submitted in the previ-
                                                          ous period to continue to build the capacity of
 regional fire planning with the CLC Fire Man-
                                                          the emerging Anmatyerr Ranger group.
agement Officer and Tennant Creek traditional
owners;                                                   With funding confirmed, CLC Land Management
                                                          staff commenced consultations in November
 140 kilometre walk with 65 traditional own-
                                                          2007 with senior traditional owners regard-
ers and CLC staff from Bonney Well to Barrow
                                                          ing continuing development of the Anmatyerr
Creek;
                                                          community rangers and held planning meetings
 predator baiting, surveys and track-based               to identify possible pilot projects and draft a
monitoring of threatened species occurrence at            workplan.
locations on the Karlantijpa North ALT including
                                                          An Anmatyerr Ranger Co-ordinator was appoint-
training;
                                                          ed in March 2008 under this funding to facilitate
 fulfilled NLP-funded contracts to control               participation and ongoing development.
prickly weeds (mesquite and prickly acacia) on



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central Land council annual report continued...


Ranger achievements                                        capital resources. The outcome for this group
                                                           has not yet been established.
 two NHT-funded water monitoring projects
supported by the NT NRM Board Regional                     atitjere (harts range) – in DeveLopment
Investment Strategy to monitor surface and
                                                           The CLC was successful in this period in secur-
groundwater in the Anmatyerr region;
                                                           ing two sources of funding for new initiatives to
 delivery of a range of accredited courses                extend the established benefits and opportuni-
toward completion of Certificate II and III in Con-        ties of cultural and natural resource manage-
servation Land Management by Charles Darwin                ment participation and related ranger programs
University (CDU) to 15 female members of the               to isolated communities in pastoral districts of
ranger program;                                            the CLC region.
 five male rangers to undertake accredited                ‘Pastoral Partnerships’ Program – This
training toward Certificate II in Rural Opera-             project was submitted as an Early Investment
tions due to linkages with Centrefarm Aboriginal           Proposal for consideration under the Healthy
Horticulture Ltd.’s initiative at the DPIFM Ti-tree        Country, Healthy People Schedule in March
research farm and Adelaide Bore training facility;         2007 and was successful in receiving funding
                                                           in this period from the three key participating
 country trips and intergenerational transfer
                                                           agencies of ABA, ILC and DEWHA.
of cultural knowledge during the course of field
work with female rangers and their children.               Its purpose is to develop an operative model
                                                           between pastoral and indigenous interests (in
The ongoing interests of this group were incor-
                                                           conjunction with other stakeholders) in address-
porated into a Working on Country (NT) jobs
                                                           ing cultural and natural resource management
package submitted to DEWHA in November
                                                           issues in pastoral regions in a multiple land
2007 and a three-year funding package submit-
                                                           use context. Mutually beneficial outcomes are
ted in December 2007 under the Healthy Coun-
                                                           envisaged from the wider application of such a
try, Healthy People Schedule seeking DEWHA,
                                                           model of collaboration if successful
ILC and ABA contributions. Responses from the
ILC and ABA were not known at the close of this            NRM Board (NT) ‘Pilot Project’ Funding - A
period.                                                    successful application submitted in September
                                                           under the 2007-2010 RIS for “NRM Capac-
santa teresa rangers - in DeveLopment
                                                           ity Building with Aboriginal Traditional Owners
 A successful application submitted in September           in Central Australia Program” included pilot
under the NHT’s 2007-2010 Regional Invest-                 projects for both the Sandover and Plenty River
ment Strategy for “NRM Capacity Building with              regions among four ‘pilot projects’ to be imple-
Aboriginal Traditional Owners in Central Aus-              mented under the project. A project co-ordinator
tralia Program” included Santa Teresa among                was appointed in June 2007
four ‘pilot projects’ to be implemented. The CLC
                                                           The future employment interests of the emerg-
employed a project co-ordinator to support 10
                                                           ing program at Atitjere were incorporated into a
participants.
                                                           Working on Country (NT) jobs package submit-
The CLC submitted a Working on Country (NT)                ted to DEWHA in November 2007 and a three-
jobs package to DEWHA in November 2007 and                 year funding package submitted in December
a three-year funding package submitted in De-              2007 under the Healthy Country, Healthy
cember 2007 under the Healthy Country, Healthy             People Schedule seeking DEWHA, ILC and
People Schedule seeking DEWHA, ILC and ABA                 ABA contributions for co-ordination, operational
contributions for co-ordination, operational and           and capital resources. Although receptive to the


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08          24
central Land council annual report continued...


initiative, early responses from DEWHA suggest            completed over 15 days in June involving 65
that their interests will not be considered in the        Kaytetye, Warumungu and Warlpiri participants.
first year of any funding under these packages
                                                          The project was also supported by additional
and will be dependent on the outcomes of the
                                                          funding from the CLC’s IEK intergenerational
development work to be undertaken early in the
                                                          transfer project through the NRM Board
next period.
                                                          (NT) and the NT Department of Education,
Women’s LanD management                                   Employment and Training (DEET).
DeveLopment
                                                          joint management - nt parks
The CLC was successful in securing funding                anD reserves
from the ABA, ILC and DEWHA for an ‘Early
                                                          Despite continuing frustrations and delays
Investment Proposal’ submitted in the previ-
                                                          throughout this period in the granting of titles
ous period under the Healthy Country, Healthy
                                                          underpinning joint management arrangements
People Schedule to implement a series of ‘on
                                                          for 20 national parks and reserves in the CLC
ground’ projects addressing land management
                                                          region, the CLC and traditional owners continued
aspirations of Aboriginal women.
                                                          in good faith to build a strong partnership with
The projects were identified by a group of 50             the NT Parks and Wildlife Service (PWSNT).
women from five communities who attended
                                                          Joint management arrangements came into
the inaugural CLC Womens Land Management
                                                          effect in only the four parks and reserves not
Development forum at the Alice Springs Desert
                                                          subject to title transfer: Rainbow Valley Conser-
Park in March 2007.
                                                          vation Reserve, Alice Springs Telegraph Station
A significant emphasis of the projects is to de-          Historic Reserve, Mac Clark (Acacia Peuce)
velop activities which provide young women with           Conservation Reserve and Ruby Gap Nature
multi-media training to record traditional knowl-         Park.
edge and management practices ‘on-country’ .
                                                          However, work continued toward the preparation
A range of community groups, government                   of new joint management plans and addressing
departments, organisations and programs were              key issues of immediate management concern to
engaged to participate in or help implement four          all parties regardless of title status.
of five projects, as follows:
                                                          In addition to catering for conservation, tourism
 Tennant Creek – Anyinginyi Remote Health,               and cultural interests, traditional owners also
Ali Curung and Tara community clinics, Mung-              have first option over employment and enter-
karta School, Tara School, Muru-warinyi Ankkul            prise opportunities under these arrangements,
Rangers;                                                  providing significant benefit to Aboriginal people
                                                          in remote areas while ‘value-adding’ a cultural
 Mutitjulu – Uluru Kata-Tjuta National Park,
                                                          experience to Northern Territory parks.
Junior Ranger Program;
                                                          The CLC has two dedicated joint management
 Lajamanu – Lajamanu Community Education
                                                          officers to implement joint management arrange-
Centre, Northern Tanami IPA;
                                                          ments.
 Willowra – Willowra School, Willowra Youth
                                                          The productive working relationship established
Program, Charles Darwin University (CDU),
                                                          between the CLC and the PWSNT over the last
Southern Tanami IPA development project;
                                                          three years provided the basis for settling a
The Tennant Creek project “Walking and Sharing            revised MOU.
Stories from Bonney Well to Barrow Creek” was


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central Land council annual report continued...


West macDonneLL nationaL park                            PWSNT and CLC throughout 2008 on a draft
                                                         joint management plan for these parks.
The CLC conducted country visits and planning
workshops for traditional owners’ input into the         Watarrka nationaL park
joint management plan.
                                                         Joint management planning and field trips were
These involved representatives of PWSNT and              held with traditional owners of Watarrka National
members of three separate planning groups                Park to facilitate traditional owner’s input into a
established on cultural affiliations to represent        joint management plan.
traditional owner interests across the whole park
                                                         rainboW vaLLey conservation reserve
and improve the effectiveness of the joint man-
agement planning process.                                A Rainbow Valley Conservation Reserve Cultural
                                                         Heritage Action Plan workshop was held with tra-
The CLC continued to keep traditional owners
                                                         ditional owners. A field trip with a working group
up-to-date with the progress in joint manage-
                                                         assessed potential risks from visitation to areas
ment planning and the activities of the PWSNT
                                                         of significance.
in the region.
                                                         There were a number of meetings of the Rain-
Traditional owners were consulted over a
                                                         bow Valley Joint Management Committee to
PWSNT proposal to include the eastern Alice
                                                         address operational planning matters, consider
Valley area on Owen Springs Pastoral Lease
                                                         a traditional owner tourism concession proposal
into the West MacDonnell National Park under
                                                         and be updated on developments within the
the same joint management arrangements as
                                                         Reserve.
the rest of the park.
                                                         Traditional owners also worked to redevelop
Traditional owners of Iwupataka ALT were also
                                                         interpretive signage.
consulted over a proposal to upgrade a road on
the ALT for use by the PWSNT to access eastern           DeviLs marbLes conservation reserve –
areas of the West MacDonnell National Park and           joint management pLanning
for ranger training purposes.
                                                         The CLC held Devils Marbles Conservation Re-
Further discussions were held with PWSNT over            serve Joint Management Committee meetings to
the proposed West MacDonnell National Park               address operational planning for the reserve and
World Heritage nomination.                               reviewed public comments on the Devils Marbles
                                                         Conservation Reserve Joint Management Plan.
east macDonneLL ranges group of
parks anD reserves                                       Davenport-murchison nationaL park
Joint management for this group of parks and re-         Senior traditional owners were involved in an
serves includes Trephina Gorge, N’dhala Gorge,           aerial control burning program undertaken by
Corroborree Rock, Arltunga Historical Reserve            PWSNT in the proposed Davenport Ranges
and Ruby Gap National park.                              National Park and were consulted on other burn-
                                                         ing work regarding implications for significant
Traditional owners of the Arltunga Historical
                                                         cultural sites within the park.
Reserve and Trephina Gorge National Park were
involved in an introductory joint management             gregory nationaL park
planning meeting for these parks.
                                                         The CLC and the NLC developed a strategy to
The CLC also consulted traditional owners about          progress the joint management planning process
membership of a representative planning group            and associated issues for this large national park
for N’Dhala and Trephina Gorge to work with              straddling the CLC-NLC jurisdictional boundary


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08        26
central Land council annual report continued...


in the Victoria River District.                          Does monitoring and evaluation improve joint
                                                         management? The case study of national parks
chambers piLLar historicaL reserve
                                                         in the Northern Territory, which is a joint project
The CLC has begun a cultural values report to            established by Charles Darwin University (CDU)
inform a new joint management plan and held              with the CLC, NLC and the NT Department of
joint management planning workshops.                     Natural Resources, Environment and the Arts.

The draft joint management plan was reviewed-            The CLC was heavily involved in planning for
by traditional owners and the CLC presented              governance processes for jointly-managed parks
their suggested changes to PWSNT.                        in the NT and hosted forums to bring traditional
                                                         owners, joint management staff and the NT Min-
DuLcie ranges nationaL park
                                                         ister for Parks and Wildlife together.
The CLC consulted Eastern Arrernte traditional
owners over access and boundary issues for
                                                         joint management - uLuru – kata
an agreed living area in the park, a program of          tjuta nationaL park (uktnp)
park country visits, a joint management planning         An MOU between the CLC and the Common-
schedule, progress with title handover arrange-          wealth Director of National Parks was renewed
ments and general progress in joint manage-              in late 2005 to maintain the CLC’s Joint Manage-
ment.                                                    ment Officer (JMO) position at Uluru – Kata Tjuta
                                                         National Park for a further three years.
aLice springs parks anD reserves
                                                         The continuous employment of the JMO from re-
The CLC briefed the Lhere Artepe Aboriginal
                                                         cruitment in October 2005 through to April 2008
Corporation, the prescribed body corporate
                                                         consolidated and enhanced the effectiveness of
representing Alice Springs native title holders,
                                                         CLC’s park-based capacity to consult traditional
on the NT joint management arrangements
                                                         owners and support their involvement in the joint
with specific reference to parks within the Alice
                                                         management of UKTNP.
Springs town boundary, inclusive of the Alice
Springs Telegraph Station Historical Reserve             The JMO also provides broad support to the UK-
and Kuyunba, Emily Gap and Jessie Gap Nature             TNP Board of Management (BoM) to carry out
Reserves.                                                its functions and wider representation of the CLC
                                                         and UKTNP traditional owners as a member of
anna’s reservoir conservation reserve
                                                         the Joint Management Partnership (JMP) team.
The CLC consulted Anmatyerr traditional owners
                                                         On the basis of a review conducted in 2005 JMP
in relation to Anna’s Reservoir Conservation
                                                         composition was extended to also include the
Reserve in May 2008 and efforts were made to
                                                         Board Secretary, Mutitjulu Community Liaison
communicate the management aspirations of the
                                                         Officer and Park Manager.
traditional owners with PWSNT.
                                                         The CLC has been unable to fill the JMO posi-
The CLC also participated in numerous planning
                                                         tion since becoming vacant in April 2008 with a
meetings, inter-agency workshops, forums and
                                                         significant barrier being the availability of suit-
direct negotiations with PWSNT.
                                                         able housing.
It also participated in inter-agency meetings to
                                                         A range of specific park management support
formulate an Indigenous Cultural and Intellectual
                                                         was provided to UKTNP traditional owners,
and Property (ICIP) protocol in the context of
                                                         Board members and other members of the JMP
joint management of NT national parks.
                                                         for the period by the CLC.
It also particpated in an ARC Linkage Project –


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08        27             Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
central Land council annual report continued...


The JMO represents the interests of the CLC              on Aboriginal land in Central Australia;
and UKTNP traditional owners in meetings with
                                                         The CLC also employed a Pastoral Land Man-
UKTNP Senior Management Team and Parks
                                                         agement Officer to promote greater awareness
Australia staff to improve day-to-day operational
                                                         of natural resource management (NRM) issues
co-ordination on joint management matters.
                                                         in pastoral planning and decision-making on
It also provides advisory, logistical, legal and         Aboriginal land through such measures as NRM
other support for the Board of Management and            audits and land condition monitoring for areas
ongoing liaison with the Ayers Rock Resort.              under grazing licences.

The CLC continued to work with Parks Australia           Funding applications were submitted to the
to finalise the new draft UKTNP Plan of Man-             National Landcare Program’s Sustainable Prac-
agement which is expected to be presented to             tices Grants: “Improving land condition and prof-
traditional owners before the end of 2008.               itability through sustainable grazing strategies in
                                                         the Indigenous Pastoral Program” to undertake
The CLC also provided support for meetings
                                                         audits on six IPP properties, develop and deliver
between the Mutitjulu Council Aboriginal Corpo-
                                                         a grazing land management course and develop
ration and the UKTNP Board of Management to
                                                         infrastructure on the Mungkarta ALT to support
consider continuing unresolved servicing issues
                                                         sustainable grazing strategies.
in the community.
                                                         Importantly, the CLC maintained linkages with
The CLC facilitated traditional owner participa-
                                                         agencies such as DPIFM, NRETA and training
tion in a number of workshops and projects
                                                         providers to provide technical advice and train-
focussed on natural resource management
                                                         ing to Aboriginal landowners.
issues affecting UKTNP and surrounds (Katiti &
Petermann ALTs) this year.                               The CLC conducted a review of all existing
                                                         grazing licences and agistment agreements on
There was an increased demand for traditional
                                                         Aboriginal land to identify areas of improvement
owner consultations and interest from the media
                                                         for compliance and administration and undertook
in Mutitjulu and the Park.
                                                         initiatives to address specific issues and improve
partnerships – pastoraL                                  sustainability on a number of IPP properties.

The CLC maintained support for traditional own-          For instance, the CLC assisted the Mungkarta
ers to undertake sustainable pastoral activities         licensee to update the property management
on their land in 2007/2008 through continued             plan and discuss with traditional owners how
participation in the Indigenous Pastoral Program         they will implement more sustainable grazing
(IPP), a co-operative partnership operating              strategies.
under a five-year MOU between the CLC, NLC,
                                                         On other properties, it assisted in herd restruc-
the Indigenous Land Corporation (ILC), the NT
                                                         tures and infrastructure to increase their long-
Department of Primary Industry, Fisheries and
                                                         term capacity.
Mines (DPIFM), DEWR and the NT Cattleman’s
Association.                                             It has developed drought management strategies
                                                         for other properties by reducing grazing pressure
Under these arrangements the CLC maintained
                                                         through agistment, sale of stock and property
the employment of an Indigenous Pastoral De-
                                                         management planning.
velopment Officer and participated in meetings
of the IPP Steering Committee and a Southern             It prepared a number of funding submissions
Operational Working Group to address on-                 and completed audits of Aboriginal pastoral
ground matters relating to pastoral development          properties.


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08        28
central Land council annual report continued...


coLLaboration – mining                                     Productive links were also established with the
                                                           Alice Springs Bureau of Meteorology to access
The CLC continued to work closely with the
                                                           relevant weather information to support CLC
Newmont mining company and associated
                                                           prescribed burning activities.
consultants to co-ordinate implementation of the
third consecutive year of surveys for the Tanami           improved resourcing
Biodiversity Monitoring Program.
                                                           It was the second operational year of a two-year
The program was established to obtain base-line            Natural Heritage Trust (NHT) project funded by
data to assess the cumulative environmental im-            the NRM Board (NT) for Best Practice Com-
pacts of mining operations on Aboriginal lands in          munity Fire Management on Aboriginal Lands in
the Tanami region and has served as a valuable             Arid NT.
annual opportunity to further develop the skills of
                                                           It continued to provide resources, in conjunc-
indigenous ranger groups in the Tanami region.
                                                           tion with Natural Disaster Mitigation Program
coLLaboration – fire                                       (NDMP) funds, to raise fire awareness and
management                                                 increase on-ground capacity and participation
                                                           of traditional owners and Aboriginal rangers in
The CLC made significant gains in this period in           strategic fire management activities.
consolidating and demonstrating its capacity to
effectively address strategic fire management              Key elements of the project are building strategic
issues on Aboriginal land across the region.               firebreaks and the ignition of protective burns
                                                           aimed at reducing wildfire threats to areas of
There was better collaborative fire mitigation             high biodiversity value, sites of cultural signifi-
planning by the CLC’s Fire Management Of-                  cance, and public and private infrastructure on
ficer, Bushfires NT, and other stakeholders and            or adjoining Aboriginal land, including pastoral
improved resourcing to develop and implement               infrastructure.
strategic fire management programs.
                                                           Further resources were secured to continue
There was a resultant increase in planning and             established momentum in regional fire planning
implementation of strategic fire management                and management through lodgement in Septem-
actions with traditional owners and indigenous             ber 2007 of two successful applications for NHT
ranger programs.                                           funding under the Regional Investment Strategy
The CLC achieved a range of outcomes of                    of the NRM Board (NT).
benefit to multiple stakeholders through collabo-
                                                           improved representation
ration with Bushfires NT staff in both Tennant
Creek and Alice Springs on a number of issues              There was a significant new initiative to establish
of mutual interest and concern including fire              greater formal recognition and representation of
access tracks, strategic burning and developing            Aboriginal interests in regional fire planning and
an overarching wildfire mitigation strategy for            decision-making.
Aboriginal land in the Tanami and south-west                The CLC successfully applied to the NRM Board
desert regions.                                            (NT) in September 2007 for resources to under-
There were also good working arrangements                  take a project entitled ‘Developing a Consulta-
with Parks Australia (North) to address cross-             tive Structure for Representation of Aboriginal
boundary fire management issues between                    Land Interests in Regional Fire Planning’.
Uluru–Kata Tjuta National Park (UKTNP) and the             The project is focussed on CLC sub-regions
adjoining Katiti and Petermann ALTs.                       dominated by broad-scale Aboriginal land-



Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08          29             Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
central Land council annual report continued...


holdings including the Tanami, Tennant Creek,              Grazing Licence in conjunction with the Depart-
Western Desert and Petermann region in the                 ment of Primary Industry, Fisheries and Mining
south-west.                                                (DPIFM) and the ILC, including provision of an
                                                           aerial marksman and contribution to costs.
It will address issues of cultural affiliation and
appropriate representation, key fire planning and          awareness raising
management issues of concern to remote com-
                                                           The CLC has held many community consulta-
munities and traditional owners, future resourc-
                                                           tions about feral animal and weed impacts.
ing requirements and integration into the existing
Bushfires NT regional structure.                           Parkinsonia infestations are an emerging threat
                                                           to healthy country in the southern Tanami region
It is envisaged that at least two regional Aborigi-
                                                           and the CLC developed capacity in ranger
nal Fire Management Committees will arise from
                                                           groups to identify and control it.
this work representing the wider Tanami and
south-west regions.                                        While resources were available from the ILC to
                                                           employ a dedicated feral animal officer, initial
strategic actions                                          recruitment efforts were unsuccessful.
During this period the CLC Fire Management                 Nonetheless, considerable work has been put in
Officer worked effectively with the CLC’s network          to raising feral animal awareness with the follow-
of regionally-focussed Land Management staff,              ing groups:
traditional owners and indigenous community
ranger groups in instigating a significant increase         Haasts Bluff ALT, Mungkarta ALT and Loves
in the level of planning and implementation of             Creek PL.- options for feral horse control were
prescribed burning activity and related strategic          discussed with traditional owners at Haasts Bluff.
fire management infrastructure developments.                collaboration between the Kaltukatjara Rang-
Details of this work is contained in the previous          ers, a Juvenile Diversionary Unit (JDU) Youth
section on ranger groups.                                  Officer, Mission Australia and the Kaltukatjara
                                                           School on issues arising from large feral camel
coLLaboration - invasive species                           numbers in the Docker River region.
management
                                                            the Ntaria-based Tjuwanpa Rangers re-
inter-agency co-operation                                  garding feral horse impacts and related animal
Central Australia is host to around one million            welfare issues
feral camels. There has been some collabora-                raised awareness among traditional owners
tive camel management with the Centralian Land             of the impact of feral horses and uncontrolled
Management Association (CLMA) representing                 stock on the viability of pastoral operations on
pastoral interests but a related funding applica-          the area of the West Mungarta ALT Grazing
tion for feral camel control submitted to the NRM          Licence and the Angarapa Grazing Licence.
Board (NT) for NHT funds was unsuccessful.
                                                            liaised with a youth worker at Kintore about
The CLC developed some strategies to protect               opportunities for promoting community-based
key ecological communities and water sites                 small-scale camel harvesting operations for
within UKTNP and the adjoining Katiti ALT from             camel meat supply to the community;
feral camels and invasive weeds in conjunction
                                                                advised the Apiwentye manager (Atula) to
with Greening Australia (NT) and UKTNP staff.
                                                           seek traditional owner consent to cull camels.
There was support for feral animal culling
on Loves Creek Station and Haast Bluff ALT


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08          30
central Land council annual report continued...


on-ground action - weeds                                   carried out consultations with traditional
                                                          owners at Loves Creek Station and the Haasts
The CLC co-ordinated the following on-ground
                                                          Bluff ALT Grazing Licence on the need for feral
weed control actions undertaken by indigenous
                                                          horse and camel control.
ranger groups across the CLC region:
                                                          An aerial feral cull on Loves Creek was under-
 removal of Parkinsonia and Rubber bush on
                                                          taken in June 2008 and removed approximately
the Yuendumu ALT by the Warlpiri Rangers
                                                          700 horses, 300 camels and 50 donkeys. The
 removal of Parkinsonia from the Hooker                  Haasts Bluff cull will occur in July 2008.
Creek catchment by Wulaign Rangers;
                                                           supported Tjuwanpa Rangers in feral pig
 control of Parkinsonia on the Partta lands to           survey along 50 kilometres of Ellery Creek in
the north of Tennant Creek by the Muru-warinyi            June 2008, which indicated very low numbers of
Ankkul (MWA) Rangers                                      pigs remaining after action taken in the previous
 control of prickly weeds (mesquite and                  period.
prickly acacia) on Alroy Downs and Rockhamp-              representation
ton Downs by the MWA Rangers
                                                          The CLC is a key member of the Steering Com-
 mechanical control and monitoring of prickly            mittee of the Desert Knowledge CRC (DK-CRC)
pear infestations around the Ntaria area by the           feral camel research project tasked with devel-
Tjuwanpa Rangers.                                         oping a feral camel management plan for the
Ranger groups are ideally placed to fight against         cross-jurisdictional region of NT, SA and WA.
weeds and the CLC has worked hard to ensure               It is also represented in government weed strat-
they get commercial weed management con-                  egy meetings.
tracts.
                                                          coLLaboration - threateneD
on-ground action - feral animals                          species protection
 a renewal of the CLC corporate firearm                  Consistent with s.23(2) of the Aboriginal Land
licence through the NT Police for joint feral ani-        Rights (NT) Act 1976, the CLC supported a
mal and stock control programs with traditional           number of collaborative efforts and indepen-
owners;                                                   dent initiatives for the protection of wildlife on
 addressed the issue of bore water access                Aboriginal land in relation to species considered
for potential pet-meat operators on ALTs with big         vulnerable or endangered under NT and/or
camel numbers;                                            Commonwealth legislation.

 identification of appropriate aerial culling            All activities contributed significantly to the
services.                                                 knowledge of threatened species distribution
                                                          in Central Australia, derived largely through
 assisted Angarapa ALT traditional owners in
                                                          traditional owners ecological knowledge and the
a joint muster with the lessee of neighbouring
                                                          participation of Aboriginal ranger groups.
MacDonald Downs station to remove 100 feral
horses from an area held under grazing licence.           The Greater Bilby (Macrotis lagotis)

 assisted the Mutalki community to relocate              The CLC continued to co-ordinate a two-year
70 feral horses to Tennant Creek Station and the          NHT-funded project on Aboriginal land across
Kurnturlpara ALT to be broken in as stock horses          the CLC region: Implementing recovery actions
using the ABA-funded stock truck.                         for the bilby and other key threatened species.



Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08         31             Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
central Land council annual report continued...


In this period, significant work undertaken toward        Greater Desert Skink (Egernia kintorei)
achieving the objectives of this project at key
                                                           Petermann ALT - located a previously un-
locations included:
                                                          known population of the threatened great desert
 Karlantijpa North ALT (eastern Tanami) field            skink (Egernia kintorei) during IPA feasibility
surveys with the Tennant Creek-based Muru-                fieldwork undertaken with the Docker River
warinyi Ankkul (MWA) Rangers, consultants,                based Kaltukatjara Rangers and senior women
Warlmanpa traditional owners from Mangala-                traditional owners. Mosaic burning was done
wurru and Karlumpurpla to locate active greater           with the Rangers to protect identified great des-
bilby populations and conduct feral predator              ert skink habitat in the Docker River region.
monitoring and baiting;
                                                          Black-footed Rock Wallaby (Petrogale
 Nyirripi (south-west Tanami locality) -                 lateralis)
targeted bilby surveys with consultants and tradi-
                                                           Warumungu and adjoining Mungkarta ALT
tional owners on the distribution and abundance
                                                          - completed a black-footed rock wallaby sur-
of bilbies in the region;
                                                          vey with 10 senior traditional owners and their
 Sangsters Bore (Central Desert ALT) preda-              children under an NT Government EnvironmeNT
tor (fox) baiting and track-based threatened spe-         grant.
cies monitoring for the presence of bilbies and
                                                           Pmere Nyente ALT - traditional owners, Tju-
other threatened species including Mulgara and
                                                          wanpa and Santa Teresa Rangers monitored the
the great desert skink undertaken with Warlpiri
                                                          black-footed rock wallaby.
rangers, traditional owners, and consultants in
late 2007 and March 2008                                   Senior Alyawarra men were consulted about
                                                          programs for protection of threatened species in
Field surveys were also undertaken with tradi-
                                                          the Davenport bioregion including the culturally-
tional owners to look for signs and habitat of the
                                                          significant black-footed rock wallaby, the bilby
greater bilby on the Alyawarra ALT.
                                                          and the spectacle hare wallaby.
Slater’s Skink (Egernia slateri)
                                                          Marsupial Mole (Notoryctes typhlops)
 Loves Creek -The CLC confirmed a previ-
                                                          In the Ntaria area (Gilbert Springs), traditional
ously unknown population of the slater’s skink at
                                                          owners were consulted and Tjuwanpa Rang-
Loves Creek during an NRM audit of the station
                                                          ers participated in a marsupial mole distribution
with traditional owners. A funding application
                                                          survey as part of a collaborative NHT-funded
was subsequently submitted to the “Threatened
                                                          project with NT Parks and Wildlife.
Species Network Community Grants Program”
to meet costs of follow-up surveys and provide            At Lander River / Lake Surprise the occurrence
training and employment for the emerging Santa            of Marsupial Mole was recorded for the first
Teresa Ranger program;                                    time in the dune fields on the Central Desert and
                                                          Wirliyajarrayi ALT during Southern Tanami IPA
 Rodna ALT - continued involvement of the
                                                          feasibility fieldwork.
Ntaria-based Tjuwanpa Rangers in an NHT-
funded project as a collaborative partner with            The CLC also represented constituent interests
PWSNT including DNA sampling;                             and perspectives at relevant threatened species
                                                          and biodiversity forums occurring throughout the
 Urrampinyi Iltjiltjarri ALT - recorded a previ-
                                                          year.
ously unknown population and hosted a TSN
field trip to a site of known occurrence north-
west of Ntaria.


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08         32                Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
Central Land Council Report

             Output Group 2
       Land Claims and Acquisitions
                   Support Services
 Central Land Council Annual Report


Output Group 2

Land Claims and Acquisitions Support Services

The CLC has a responsibility to assist Aboriginal people in its region to secure land
for traditional Aboriginal owners.




OUTCOmE                             OUTPUT GROUP 2

   Enhanced social,
                                        Land Claims and Acquisition Support services
   political and economic
   participation and
   equity for Aboriginal
   people in the Land
                                               OUTPUTS
   Council’s area as a
   result of the promo-                         2.1 Land Claims
   tion, protection and
                                                2.2 Other Land Acquisition
   advancement of their
   land rights, other
   rights and interests




                                                 Below: Claimants give evidence at the Simpson Desert Repeat Claim




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08               34
Output 2.1 Land Claims

DescriptiOn Of Output                                        people so that they may return and live on their
                                                             own country.
Securing and maximising the land base for
traditional Aboriginal landowners has been
one of the most important statutory func-                    perfOrmance
tions for the Central Land Council. There
have been four hearings into aspects of land                      OutstanDinG LanD cLaims
claims in the CLC region this year.                           Wakay Alyawerr Repeat Land          Negotia-
                                                              Claim                               tions with NT
Section 23 of the Aboriginal Land Rights (North-
                                                                                                  Government
ern Territory) Act 1976 requires land councils to
                                                                                                  to be settled
assist Aboriginal people to pursue land claims,
                                                              Crown Hill Land Claim               Recommend-
in particular, by arranging legal assistance at
                                                                                                  ed for grant
no cost to the claimants. Section 50 of the Act
                                                              Frances Well Land Claim             Under nego-
provides a process by which Aboriginal people
                                                                                                  tiation
in the Northern Territory may claim unalienated
                                                              Simpson Desert Land Claim           Hearing
Crown land, or ‘land in which all estates and
                                                              incorporating the Simpson           commenced
interests are held for and on behalf of Aboriginal
                                                              Desert Repeat Land Claim
people’.

The Act allows for the return of successfully
claimed land to the traditional Aboriginal owners            Wakay aLyaWerr repeat LanD
as inalienable Aboriginal freehold title. It also al-        cLaim
lowed claims on pastoral land when the pastoral
                                                             This land claim is for an area that was not
lease was owned by Aboriginal interests.
                                                             recommended for grant in a previous land claim.
However, the ‘sunset clause’, Section 50(2a)
                                                             Therefore a further hearing was conducted on 5
of the Land Rights Act, prevents the hearing of
                                                             November 2007, for the purposes of sub-section
any land claims lodged after June 1997. Twelve
                                                             50(2B) of the Land Rights Act, to enable the
claims lodged before that date will be resolved
                                                             Aboriginal Land Commissioner to determine
when they are gazetted by the Australian gov-
                                                             whether the requirements of that subsection had
ernment in accordance with the NT Parks and
                                                             been met and that it was likely that he would find
Reserves (Framework for the Future) Act 2004.
                                                             that the claimants were the traditional owners of
Some are still to be heard by the Aboriginal Land            the area claimed.
Commissioner and others have been discontin-
                                                             On 21 December 2007, the Commissioner
ued.
                                                             published his findings in favour of the land claim
Part 8 of the Northern Territory’s Pastoral Land             proceeding.
Act 1992 sets out procedures whereby Aborigi-
                                                             Subsequently, the Northern Territory Govern-
nal people can apply for a community living area
                                                             ment made an offer of settlement of the land
on pastoral lease land. These community living
                                                             claim under which most of the land claimed, with
areas, or ‘excisions’, are generally small areas of
                                                             the exception of an area around the Aboriginal
one or two square kilometres and are sought by
                                                             community of Canteen Creek, would become
                                                             Aboriginal land under the Land Rights Act, and



Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08            35             Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
central Land council annual report continued...


Northern Territory freehold title would be granted        Following the hearing the Commissioner ruled
to the balance of the land around Canteen                 that most of the land comprised in the original
Creek, excluding the area over which the Com-             land claim was available for claim. No date has
monwealth holds a ‘lease’.                                yet been fixed for the substantive hearing of the
                                                          land claim.
Negotiations concerning the area offered under
Northern Territory freehold title are ongoing.            simpsOn Desert LanD cLaim
                                                          incOrpOratinG tHe simpsOn
crOWn HiLL LanD cLaim
                                                          Desert repeat LanD cLaim
This is a land claim to a very small parcel of
                                                          The hearing of the land claim to an area of
land which covers approximately half of the site
                                                          approximately 18,000 square kilometres
Irrinjirrinjirri, also known as Crown Hill.
                                                          commenced on 30 June 2008, at a remote site
This site straddles the boundary with Mt Denison          south of Atula Station, which is part of the Ane-
Pastoral Lease. The area was originally part of           tye Aboriginal Land Trust.
Mt Allan Station, but for cultural reasons was
                                                          At the commencement of the proceedings, and
excluded from the land claim over Mt Allan.
                                                          in response to brief submissions from the par-
On the basis that the groups claiming Crown Hill          ties, the Aboriginal Land Commissioner ruled
were the same as those who had been found to              that the required grounds existed to hear the
be traditional owners in the Brookes Soak Land            repeat land claim.
Claim, the Aboriginal Land Commissioner was
                                                          In view of the remoteness of the sites in the
able to rely on evidence provided in the latter
                                                          Simpson Desert, the balance of the land claim
land claim, and on the basis of written submis-
                                                          was conducted through the use of helicopters to
sions, followed by a visit to the site accompanied
                                                          transport the Commissioner, legal representa-
by senior claimants, recommended the area for
                                                          tives and claimants to various locations.
grant.
                                                          The land claim hearing is to be completed in
frances WeLL LanD cLaim
                                                          September 2008. It is understood that this will be
Frances Well is located adjacent to Titjikala             the last land claim to be heard under the Land
Community.                                                Rights Act in Central Australia.
The land claim is to a modest area of land which          cOmment On perfOrmance
had, amongst various uses, previously been a
                                                          Pursuant to the 2006 amendments to section
reserve for the benefit of Aboriginals.
                                                          67A of the Land Rights Act, all other unheard
Land tenure issues in the area of the land claim          land claims in the CLC area have been brought
revolve around whether the area was part of the           to conclusion.
North-South Stock Route and therefore unavail-
able for claim. For such a small area of land the
land tenure history was complex.

A hearing was convened by the Aboriginal Land
Commissioner at Alice Springs on 20 May 2008,
to consider submissions that addressed the
status of the land.



Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08         36
Output 2.2 Other Land Acquisition

DescriptiOn Of Output                                     leases occupying their traditional country.
                                                                     executive meetinGs
                                                          pastOraL Leases - cOmmunity LivinG areas
Aboriginal people have only been able to
claim vacant Crown land and land owned by                 The CLC conducted two consultations and site
Aboriginal people under the Aboriginal Land               visits with traditional owners to renegotiate the
Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976. This left           location of a community living area on Dneiper
the thousands of Aboriginal people who lived              Pastoral Lease in the Plenty River region. The
on pastoral leases landless.                              CLA has a poor water supply. Preparation of a
                                                          new CLA application under the Part 8 provisions
There are two other, albeit difficult, paths Ab-
                                                          of NT Pastoral Land Act and negotiations with
original people may pursue to own their tradi-
                                                          the Dneiper lessee are ongoing.
tional land. They can apply for a Community
Living Area under Part 8 of the Pastoral Land Act         The CLC resumed land-swap negotiations with
1992 which may give them a small parcel of land           the Hamilton Downs lessee in July 2007 to
- perhaps a couple of square kilometres - on a            resolve issues associated with cattle grazing
pastoral lease.                                           on the western ‘Kunoth paddock’ portion of the
                                                          Thakaperte ALT.
Alternatively, they may apply to the Indigenous
Land Corporation (ILC) to buy land on their               A proposed alternative area put forward by tra-
behalf.                                                   ditional owners on the northern boundary of the
                                                          West MacDonnell National Park was rejected by
                                                          the lessee. The CLC and traditional owners are
perfOrmance                                               now reconsidering the original proposal in the

          OtHer LanD acquisitiOn                          vicinity of the Hamilton Downs Youth Camp.

 Purchases of land in Central Australia nil               LanD acquisitiOn – natiOnaL parks
 by the ILC
                                                          Delays continued in formalising joint manage-
 Granting of CLAs under Part 8 of the          nil
                                                          ment arrangements over 20 national parks and
 Pastoral Land Act
                                                          reserves in the CLC region.

                                                          Administrative and political delays frustrated
cOmment On perfOrmance                                    efforts to facilitate title-handovers by both the
pastOraL Leases - iLc                                     Australian and Northern Territory Governments
                                                          for 16 national parks and reserves subject to
The CLC made unsuccessful representations to
                                                          tenure change and joint management in accor-
the ILC for assistance to take up a ‘first option’
                                                          dance with the NT Parks and Reserves (Frame-
offered on the purchase of a pastoral lease in
                                                          work for the Future) Act 2004.
the Sandover River region with a strong history
of positive relations between the lessee family           The registration of applicable Indigenous Land
and traditional owners. The property has signifi-         Use Agreements with the National Native Title
cant pastoral and other established commercial            Tribunal in 2006/2007 for four parks and re-
opportunities.                                            serves subject to joint management arrange-
                                                          ments without title transfer did result in joint
The CLC continued to provide advice on ILC
                                                          management at the Rainbow Valley Conserva-
land acquisition processes for other traditional
                                                          tion Reserve, Alice Springs Telegraph Station
owners seeking assistance to purchase pastoral


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08         37              Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
central Land council annual report continued...


Historic Reserve, Mac Clark (Acacia Peuce)
Conservation Reserve and Ruby Gap Nature
Park.

The CLC met with various NT Government
representatives in early 2008 to identify and
address all outstanding matters to allow title
transfer for Schedule 1 and 2 parks to proceed.

The passage of the Indigenous Affairs Legisla-
tion Amendment Bill 2008 through the Federal
Parliament on 26 June 2008 scheduling Sched-
ule 1 parks under the Land Rights Act has
given significant hope to traditional owners that
the granting of titles underpinning joint manage-
ment will occur before the end of 2008.

The CLC continued to represent the interests of
Eastern Arrernte traditional owners in various
meetings and negotiations with the NT Govern-
ment to specifically resolve the process of title
transfer for the Dulcie Ranges National Park
Community Living Area.

The CLC also consulted traditional owners at
Ellery Creek to discuss a land-swap proposal put
forward by the NT Parks and Wildlife Service.

The proposal would rationalise the southern
boundary of the West MacDonnell National Park
with adjoining Aboriginal land along Namatjira
Drive. The inclusion of the eastern Alice Valley
portion of Owen Springs station was agreed to
but negotiations are continuing on other areas.




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08        38
Central Land Council Annual Report

                    Output Group 3
                 Economic Development and
                       Commercial Services
  Central Land Council Annual Report


 Output Group 3

 Economic Development and Commercial Services

The CLC has a statutory responsibility to assist Aboriginal people in its region
to carry out commercial activities on their land and to consult with Aboriginal
landowners about any proposal relating to the use of that land.


OUTCOmE                              OUTPUT GROUP 3


   Enhanced social, polit-              Economic Development and
   ical and economic par-               Commercial Services
   ticipation and equity
   for Aboriginal people
   in the Land Council’s                       OUTPUTS
   area as a result of the                      3.1 Land Use Agreements
   promotion, protection
   and advancement of                           3.2 Employment, Education and Training

   their land rights, other
                                                3.3 Mining
   rights and interests
                                                3.4 Commercial Assistance



             Below: Traditional owners visit the Ranger Mine in Kakadu national park as part of a uranium
                                                                      education strategy run by the CLC




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08                 40
Output 3.1 Land Use Agreements

DescriptiOn Of Output                                     The CLC also deals with any issues arising from
                                                          grazing licenses that are already in place.
A statutory responsibility of the Land Council
is to help Aboriginal people use their land                               perfOrmance
for commercial purposes and to negotiate on                                 Grazing licenses
their behalf with entrepreneurs and compa-                Current                                             12
nies wanting to use that land.                                                                                 9
                                                          Proposed
Through its professional staff with expertise             Rejected                                             1
in land management, including mining, pas-                Granted                                              1
toral development, environmental protection,              Abandoned                                            1
parks and tourism, as well as economic and                 Under negotiation                                   6
commercial analysts, the Land Council is a                Agistment agreements                                 3
valuable resource to land owners.                         Compliance inspections, consultations or             4
                                                          other action
Commercial proposals to use Aboriginal land
come from both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal in-
dividuals, companies and government agencies.                             perfOrmance
The CLC processes applications and helps make                    Proposals to take feral animals for
                                                                      commercial purposes
land use agreements on Aboriginal land. Under
such an agreement, the Aboriginal landown-                Under negotiation                                         2
ers get sacred site protection, environmental             Rejected                                                  1
protection, some compensation and sometimes
                                                          The CLC provides support to traditional owners
employment and training.
                                                          in licence negotiations and plays an ongoing
In return, the lessee gets clear, reliable and en-        role under the collaborative Indigenous Pastoral
during agreements without confusion or uncer-             Program (IPP) in the implementation and ongo-
tainty. These agreements can be made for many             ing monitoring of licence conditions. Key issues
purposes, but are most common with pastoral-              in negotiations include training and employment
ists or mining companies.                                 opportunities for traditional owners and remote
It’s important to note that land use agreements           communities, sustainable grazing levels compat-
under the Aboriginal Land Rights Act are differ-          ible with cultural and natural resource values
ent to Indigenous Land Use Agreements which               and the redevelopment of pastoral infrastructure
are dealt with under the Native Title Act and             for the future benefit of traditional owners.
discussed in Output 6.                                    Most licences are issued for five years, but
                                                          range from one to eight years with right-of-re-
perfOrmance summary
                                                          newal conditions in most cases.
Many years of drought in Central Australia have
                                                          The CLC also monitors grazing agreements
led local pastoralists to show increasing interest
                                                          through compliance inspections. Four of these
in obtaining grazing licences over ungrazed ar-
                                                          were conducted during the past financial year.
eas of Aboriginal land during the past 12 months.
                                                          The compliance inspection allows the CLC to
The CLC assists with negotiations to bring social
and commercial benefits to the land owners and            check that parties to the agreement are meeting
to protect the country’s sacred site and environ-         their obligations under the contract.
mental values.                                            The inspection can take many forms, but usually
                                                          involves driving around the Land Trust. It can

Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08         41              Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
central Land council annual report continued...


also include helicopter flights to assess the num-        on the 17th of June 2008. The meeting of 44
ber of cattle grazing on the property, the condi-         traditional owners instructed the CLC to enter
tion of the pasture and infrastructure, animal            into negotiations with the proponent.
welfare, feral animal control, weeds, fire breaks
                                                          Haasts BLuff aLt (unDerana LOcaLity)
and if infrastructure requirements are being met.
                                                          In the absence of a current camel export mar-
GrazinG Licence prOpOsaLs
                                                          ket, the CLC assisted traditional owners of the
In 2007/2008, grazing licence proposals pro-              Underana Camel Farm, west of Gosses Bluff, to
gressed through assessment, traditional owner             pursue other options by holding discussions in
consultations and proponent negotiations for the          March with a party seeking to graze cattle over
following areas:                                          the area. However, an independent assessment
                                                          of the property’s carrying capacity found the
atnetye aLt
                                                          proposal was unrealistic.
Initial discussions, a property inspection and
                                                          Haasts BLuff aLt (papunya LOcaLity)
evaluation have been done for a long-term graz-
ing licence over the former Atula Station portion         The CLC commenced evaluation of a preliminary
of the Atnetye ALT in the North Simpson Desert            proposal received in May 2008 from Australian
area. The proposal includes an infrastructure             Livestock Services Pty. Ltd. for a one-year ‘pilot’
redevelopment and land rehabilitation program.            grazing project. If approved, a longer-term pro-
                                                          posal to graze up to 3000 head in the Papunya
anatye aLt (fOrmerLy tarLtOn DOwns
                                                          area will be assessed.
stOck reserve)
                                                          aHakeye aLt (fOrmerLy ti-tree pL)
The CLC consulted traditional owners and mem-
bers of the Warlpeyangkere Cattle Aboriginal              The CLC held further consultations with tra-
Corporation about a seven-plus-three-year graz-           ditional owners on a grazing licence proposal
ing licence proposal over the whole of the ALT.           over the whole of the land trust in the context
Negotiations were concluded and the grazing               of a history of informal and unregulated grazing
licence formally issued in 2008.                          arrangements. The proposal from the former
                                                          manager of the Aboriginal-owned Puraiya Cattle
nGaLurrtju aLt (fOrmerLy centraL
                                                          Company was rejected. Caretaker arrangements
mOunt weDGe pL)                                           have been put in place while a further proposal
One grazing licence proposal from the Napperby            is under negotiation.
lessee was assessed and preliminary discus-
                                                          DaGuraGu aLt
sions held with key traditional owners ahead of
presentation to a wider traditional owner group.          The CLC consulted members of the Yuritj (Berta
                                                          Werta) Aboriginal Corporation in March and April
yaLpirakinu aLt (fOrmerLy mt aLLan pL)                    2008 regarding an external proposal to agist
One grazing licence proposal was assessed and             cattle in an area subject to an infrastructure de-
preliminary discussions held with key traditional         velopment program under an ABA grant. Despite
owners ahead of presentation to a wider tradi-            approval from corporation members, the propos-
tional owner group.                                       al has since been put on hold by the proponent.

pawu aLt (fOrmerLy mOunt BarkLy pL)                       existinG GrazinG Licences
An external grazing licence proposal from mem-            Compliance inspections, traditional owner con-
bers of the former lessee’s family was assessed           sultations and other actions were undertaken
and traditional owner consultations undertaken            in relation to the following grazing licences on


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08         42
central Land council annual report continued...


Aboriginal land:                                          l Continued consultations with traditional
                                                                     executive meetinGs
                                                          owners from Mutitjulu, Haasts Bluff, Papunya,
munGkarta aLt (fOrmerLy mcLaren
                                                          Mt. Liebig, Kintore and Yuendumu on a proposal
creek)
                                                          received in April 2007 from Arnhem Meats for
The CLC reported on the progress of the five-             agreement to take up to 8,000 camels for pet-
year grazing licence issued to Orange Creek               meat purposes across a wide area in the CLC’s
Station over the portion of the land trust west of        western and south-western regions. Traditional
the Stuart Highway at an annual review meeting            owners of some areas were receptive to the
in March 2008 at Mungkarta.                               proposal but agreement is yet to be reached on
                                                          a range of implementation issues and the level
Haast BLuff aLt
                                                          of economic return to traditional owners;
The CLC consulted traditional owners to obtain
                                                          l A commercial safari-hunting proposal from
approval to transfer a five-year grazing licence
                                                          Hunt Australia seeking access to unspecified
over a portion of the ALT to another party due to
                                                          Aboriginal Land Trusts for paying clients seeking
financial hardship being suffered by the current
                                                          feral animal culling and/or trophy hunting adven-
licensee, the Hayes family of Deep Well station.
                                                          tures. The proposal was rejected;
HOOker creek aLt
                                                          l A proposal from Kings Creek station to
The CLC responded to a serious breach of graz-            muster and remove all feral animals from the Ur-
ing licence conditions by the adjoining Riveren           rampinyi-Iltjiltjarri ALT (formerly Tempe Downs).
station lessee in relation to unauthorised clear-         Negotiations and consultations are ongoing.
ing of 12 kilometres of fenceline without consul-
tations with traditional owners and prior sacred
site clearance.

yaLpirakinu aLt (fOrmerLy mt aLLan)

A one-year grazing licence issued to Ringwood
station over a northern portion of the ALT was
not renewed after its expiry in December 2007
due to outstanding rental arrears and unresolved
matters in relation to the muster and sale of
cattle belonging to the Land Trust.

A report commissioned from Edwards Manage-
ment Consultants was received in October 2007.
The report assesses existing infrastructure and
land condition and will be used as the basis for
advice to traditional owners on carrying capaci-
ties and rental values when considering any
further grazing licence proposals.

OtHer prOpOsaLs

 A number of proposals for access to Aboriginal
land to take feral animals for a range of commer-
cial purposes were also processed during this
period including:



                                                     43             Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
Output 3.2 Employment, Education and Training

DescriptiOn Of Output                                                  mininG EmpLOymEnT
Aboriginal people in Central Australia                                                      No of
                                                         Employment/training
have suffered chronic unemployment for                                                      participants
decades. Through land use agreements un-                 machinery operation course
                                                                                                        7
der both the Aboriginal Land Rights Act and              Tanami mine

the Native Title Act, the CLC has been able to           mining and related machinery
                                                         operation employment with
negotiate employment opportunities for Ab-                                                             42
                                                         HWE, and ESS at Newmont’s
original people in remote communities.
                                                         The Granites gold mine
perfOrmance                                                                                    14 Warlpiri
                                                         pre-vocational training program
The CLC pursued employment, education and                                                     participants
                                                         at The Granites Gold Mine
training opportunities for Aboriginal people in                                              (Yuendumu)
eight areas of activity throughout the year:             exploration at Jarra Jarra            4 (Wilora)

l   mining,                                              environmental work crew at
                                                                                                        4
l   national park joint management,                      The Granites Gold Mine
l   construction and transport,                          uranium exploration activity -
                                                                                                      4
l   community ranger programs,                           Toro Exploration and Nupower
                                                                                              (Laramba)
l   pastoral,                                            Resources in Napperby area
l   tourism,
l   horticultural,
                                                             COnSTRUCTiOn AnD EmpLOymEnT
l   Indigenous ecolological knowledge(IEK)
                                                         training courses in construction              45
The CLC is pleased to report that after more             and transport
than 10 years of positive results, three previ-
                                                         apprentices                                    3
ously externally-funded positions have been
incorporated into the more secure funding ar-              nATiOnAL pARkS jOinT mAnAGEmEnT
rangements of the CLC’s 2007-2008 operational            employment (FEP)                              47
ABA budget.
                                                         park traineeships                              3
The valuable relationships and reputation
established over the last decade continue to be               COmmUniTy RAnGER pROGRAmS
the basis for continuing demand for the CLC’s            number of established groups                   5
services from potential employers able to offer          emerging groups                                4
training and employment opportunities to tradi-          number of people employed                    100
tional owners and remote communities across
the region.                                                                  pASTORAL
Collaborative land management arrange-                   6-week training Rural College                  3
ments and a range of enterprise development              mustering            contracts                 5
partnerships supported by the CLC are also               governance meetings for Aborigi-               5
increasingly providing sustainable employment            nal cattle companies
opportunities.
                                                                                 iEk
                    hORTiCULTURE
                                                         training: multi-media                         40
 training: rural operations                    21




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08        44
central Land council annual report continued...


mininG                                                   Bore project near Aileron.

Until now, most employment and training place-           The CLC also participated in inter-agency
ments into the mining industry have been with            forums and other initiatives aimed at increasing
Newmont Asia Pacific Ltd (Newmont) in the                Aboriginal employment and training opportuni-
Tanami region. However the increasing profile of         ties in the region icluding the Tanami Regional
the CLC’s Employment Unit and new opportuni-             Partnership Agreement, job expos and career
ties arising with exploration and mining activity        information days on remote communities.
elsewhere in the region saw the CLC expand its
                                                         cOnstructiOn anD transpOrt
level of engagement in supporting indigenous-
uptake of mining-based employment.                       Under an agreement with Industry Service
                                                         Training (IST) the CLC recruited 45 indigenous
While table 2 shows the number of people
                                                         people for three training programs in general and
placed into employment in the mining industry,
                                                         civil construction, transport and warehousing.
the CLC has also supported people it placed
in employment in 2006-2007. This support is              The CLC also supported three trainees from the
essential to improving employees long term               Mt Theo Youth Diversionary Program near Yuen-
employment prospects.                                    dumu to take up mechanical apprenticeships.

The CLC also met with private enterprise to ex-          natiOnaL park jOint
ploit employment opportunities in future opera-          manaGement
tions.
                                                         The CLC continued to perform representative
Olympia Resources - Harts Range                          and practical functions to secure employment
                                                         and training opportunities for indigenous people
The Olympia Resources proposed sand and gar-
                                                         under two joint management regimes for national
net mine in the Harts Range area may provide
                                                         parks in the region.
significant new opportunities and the CLC has
been in extensive discussions with the company.          In the case of the Commonwealth-managed
                                                         Uluru – Kata Tjuta National Park (UKTNP) the
The CLC has also facilitated related opportuni-
                                                         CLC actively participated in board meetings and
ties including a joint venture between Tangen-
                                                         training committees.
tyere Council and the Arltarlpilta CGC at the
Atitjere (Harts Range) community for labour hire         It also met a number of times with Parks Austra-
and training activities.                                 lia (North) to address issues directly impacting
                                                         on Anangu employment within the Park includ-
The Land Council met with traditional owners at
                                                         ing the application of APS standards to Anangu
Atitjere in February this year to talk about em-
                                                         employees and the proposed devolving of
ployment and business opportunities at the new
                                                         park-based Anangu employment to the Mutitjulu
mine and related servicing and environmental
                                                         community.
management requirements.
                                                         A further three meetings were held in February
At that meeting the Arrkarnke Awapete Aborigi-
                                                         2008 to develop Aboriginal employment opportu-
nal Corporation was established to advance the
                                                         nities within the Park.
eastern Arrernte people’s employment and busi-
ness interests in the region.                            For national parks managed by the NT Parks
                                                         and Wildlife Service (PWSNT) the CLC collabo-
Arafura Resources
                                                         rated with outstation resource centres, commu-
The CLC met with the company regarding em-               nity councils and the Parks and Wildlife Service
ployment & training opportunities at its Nolans          in the implementation of Flexible Employment


                                                    45             Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
central Land council annual report continued...


Programs (FEP) across many of the 20 national            mote areas where few, if any, other employment
parks subject to joint management arrangements           opportunities exist or are able to build the same
in the southern NT.                                      degree of confidence and self-esteem, as well as
                                                         valuable life skills, qualifications and experience
These programs encourage involvement in joint
                                                         for future employment.
management activities and in developing capac-
ity to take up contract-based park-management            For most activities undertaken since these
work.                                                    programs were developed rangers received a
                                                         ‘top-up’ to their CDEP payment under grants ap-
In the last financial year 47 people were placed
                                                         proved by a number of sources, including NHT-
into 57 on-ground projects. Participants came
                                                         funded Australian Government programs.
from Alice Springs, Amoonguna, Tennant Creek
and remote communities in the region including           ‘Top-up’ contributed toward an income for the
Ntaria, Titjikala, Mpwelarre, Santa Teresa and           rangers akin to a full-time wage for real work in
Ulpanyali.                                               managing threats to nationally significant values
                                                         of the unique environment of Central Australia.
Working in teams alongside Parks and Wildlife
staff on a wide-range of park related projects,          The dismantling of CDEP initiated by the Federal
participants received a training wage and in most        Government in August 2007 caused significant
cases accredited training toward Certificates in         and widespread uncertainty to existing funding
Conservation and Land Management.                        arrangements for many ranger groups.

Many discussions were held with PWSNT staff              It was also a blow to their motivation and
on a range of FEP issues and opportunities.              capacity, most groups being temporarily ‘moth-
                                                         balled’ as a result while the implications were
Three ranger trainees were placed with PWSNT
                                                         reassessed.
this year, including a second member of the
Muru-warinyi Ankkul Rangers.                             As CDEP programs were progressively wound
                                                         up across the region CLC-employed Ranger
cOmmunity ranGer prOGrams
                                                         Co-ordinators helped rangers in the more
In collaboration with local resource centres             established programs to move off CDEP onto
and community councils, the CLC continued to             Centrelink where required while funding arrange-
co-ordinate education, training and employment           ments were renegotiated or, in a few cases,
opportunities in cultural and natural resource           substituted under emerging Commonwealth
management (CNRM) to support the employ-                 programs such as Working on Country later in
ment of indigenous community rangers under               the period.
CDEP and other arrangements.
                                                         At the beginning of the year approximately 100
These programs develop the skills of rang-               people were employed in a full-time, regular
ers in areas such as feral animal and inva-              part-time or periodic capacity in five established
sive weed survey and control, flora and fauna            and four emerging ranger programs.
surveys, including actions related to nationally-
                                                         All of the groups suffered prolonged interruption
listed threatened species and biodiversity
                                                         to their activity and loss of rangers into unem-
hotspots, fire management and wildfire control,
                                                         ployment.
monitoring and protecting valuable inland wet-
lands, protecting cultural sites and recording           The CLC became the employer for the ABA-
indigenous ecological knowledge.                         funded Docker River program due to cancella-
                                                         tion of intended CDEP arrangements for that
Ranger programs occur largely in the most re-
                                                         community.


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08        46
central Land council annual report continued...


By the end of the year, the efforts of CLC Ranger        Australia Program” Regional Investment Strat-
Co-ordinators and supporting staff had main-             egy application approved in late 2007. Funding
tained some cohesion throughout this period of           arrangements were also resolved with DEWHA,
uncertainty for the six more established groups          ABA and ILC sufficiently to initiate the Pastoral
in the region. All had been assisted to regain           Partnerships Project in the Atitjere-Mount Rid-
momentum partially or fully under new funding            dock area early in the next period.
arrangements or to continue limited activity un-
                                                         central australian indigenous community
der existing funding while more secure arrange-
                                                         ranger camp
ments were negotiated.
                                                         The 2nd Central Australian Indigenous Commu-
The Tennant Creek and Ntaria-based Tjuwanpa
                                                         nity Ranger camp was held at Hamilton Downs
ranger programs had largely recovered from the
                                                         Youth Camp in August 2007 and was attended
CDEP disruptions, employing 15 rangers under
                                                         by 50 rangers from six community-based Ab-
Working on Country arrangements starting in
                                                         original ranger groups across the CLC region.
May 2008.
                                                         The ranger camp provided the opportunity
Ranger programs at Docker River, Yuendumu,
                                                         to consolidate a shared identity and purpose
Lajamanu and Ti-Tree continued to operate on
                                                         through presentations on work experiences and
existing or reconfigured funding arrangements
                                                         future directions. It also enabled government
from a range of sources while negotiations were
                                                         agencies to address all ranger groups on new
finalised on a jobs package under DEWHA’s
                                                         initiatives and opportunities and for rangers to
Working on Country (NT) program to provide
                                                         be informed about the dismantling of the CDEP
3-year funding support for a Co-ordinator, Senior
                                                         scheme.
Ranger and 5 Rangers for each group.

Each of these groups retained a core of 8 to 10          second national indigenous Land and sea
interested rangers over the year depending on            management conference (niLsmc)
activity levels although more than 30 people,            With additional funding from DEWHA and the
predominantly women, had participated in the             ABA, the CLC supported a representative
development activities of the Anmatyerr Rangers          group of 12 Aboriginal rangers from five Central
in the Ti-Tree area by the end of the year;              Australian Aboriginal community ranger groups
The Amoonguna Ranger group withered with the             to present at the 2nd National Indigenous Land
loss of the Amoonguna CDEP program. Partici-             and Sea Management Conference (NILSMC) in
pants were helped by the CLC to move to a new            Cardwell, Queensland in October 2007.
ranger program being developed by the Alice              funding
Springs-based Ingkerreke Outstation Resource
Centre with CLC assistance under an approved             The CLC received funding to provide permanent
Working on Country (1) program.                          employment for 10 full-time equivalent (FTE)
                                                         positions from the Department of Environment,
Two emerging ranger groups at Santa Teresa               Water, Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA) over
and Atitjere (Harts Range), excluded from the            three years. These positions supported a mix
initial response of DEWHA to the WoC(NT) pack-           of 15 full-time and part-time positions, 10 in the
age put forward, continued to conduct or prepare         Ntaria-based Tjuwanpa Rangers and five in the
for CNRM activities with development funding             Muru-warinyi Ankkul Rangers of Tennant Creek.
secured from the NRM Board (NT) for ‘pilot
projects’ under the CLC’s “NRM Capacity Build-           The CLC also submitted a three-year funding
ing with Aboriginal Traditional Owners in Central        application in November 2007 to support an ad-



                                                    47             Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
central Land council annual report continued...


ditional 64 full-time Working on Country(NT) and         Indigenous Pastoral Program (IPP) Steering
Real Job opportunities for indigenous commu-             Committee with other stakeholders to maximise
nity rangers and pastoral workers following the          indigenous employment and training opportu-
scrapping of CDEP by the Federal Government.             nities in the NT pastoral industry and ensure
                                                         respective efforts are co-ordinated.
The ranger groups supported by the CLC con-
tinued to increase their skills, experience and          During the year it met with the ILC and the
capacity through a range of grant-funded natural         NT Cattlemen’s Association to facilitate place-
resource management activities on Aboriginal             ments into non-Aboriginal pastoral operations
land and contracts to provide environmental and          in Central Australia under the future ‘Real Jobs’
other services to other land-holders, industry,          program’.
and land management agencies (see output 1
                                                         In December 2007 a combined funding package
for more details).
                                                         was submitted to ILC and DEWHA for consider-
All activities undertaken built ranger confidence        ation under the funding framework of the Healthy
and competence in the workplace through a                Country, Healthy People Schedule to support 32
level of training and mentoring by Ranger co-            full-time equivalent positions across eight ranger
ordinators and in many cases a transfer of skills        groups under the WoC (NT) program and 32
from collaborating agency staff and specialists.         full-time equivalent positions under the ILC ‘Real
                                                         Jobs’ program.

pastOraL                                                 Of the ILC-sponsored positions, 20 are to
                                                         undertake NRM-based activity in a pastoral
The CLC supports a number of Aboriginal cattle
                                                         enterprise context and 12 positions assigned
companies. Often the directors of these compa-
                                                         to commercially-based indigenous pastoral
nies need assistance with the complex gover-
                                                         operations on Loves Creek, Tanami Downs and
nance and management issues associated with
                                                         Atula.
running a large cattle company.
                                                         Contributions were sought from both agencies
Assistance was provided in particular to these
                                                         toward additional resources required by the CLC
companies:
                                                         to host these positions, particularly in the area
l Jayrook P/l to address governance and                  of job mentoring, human resources and training
management issues affecting the viability of the         support.
company’s activities on the Aboriginal-owned
                                                         While subsequent negotiations have been fruitful
Loves Creek Station;
                                                         in relation to the DEWHA-administered positions
l support to Aboriginal directors of former              there has since been little direct engagement by
Tanami Downs Station (Mangkururrpa ALT);                 the ILC with the CLC on the ‘Real Jobs’ ele-
                                                         ments of the package and a successful outcome
l Wirliyajarrayi Cattle Aboriginal Corporation
                                                         on these positions appears less likely.
with governance issues on the former Willowra
station.                                                 OtHer pastOraL empLOyment
The CLC supported the employment of five                 The CLC monitored indigenous employment on
men from Willowra in May 2008 for a muster at            Aboriginal-owned cattle stations and grazing
Tanami Downs Station, providing valuable work            licences negotiated on Aboriginal land. Critical
experience and achieving successful outcomes             focus was given to indigenous employment ben-
for all parties.                                         efits in evaluating all grazing licence proposals
The CLC continued to work as a member of the             received during the year.



Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08        48
central Land council annual report continued...


tOurism                                                    participants in a 140 km walk from Bonney Well
                                                           to Barrow Creek with senior traditional owners in
The CLC successfully submitted an application
                                                           June 2008.
to the NT Department of Employment, Educa-
tion and Training (DEET) for $25,000 to develop
a Tourism Training Package for the Thakeperte
community. See Output 3.4 for more reporting on
tourism activities.

HOrticuLturaL
The CLC continued to work with Centrefarm
Horticultural Limited, Tangentyere Job Shop and
Central Desert Training to establish a training
program to prepare Aboriginal people for place-
ment into emerging commercial horticultural
employment opportunities on the Ahakeye ALT in
the Ti-Tree region.

As a result 21 Anmatyerre people commenced
a Rural Operations training course at Ti-Tree
research farm in February 2008 and there will be
a second intake of 19 people before the end of
the year.

The CLC is on a steering committee for the pro-
posed Adelaide Bore horticultural training facility
on the Ahakeye ALT.

It is also helping the Ali Curung community to
set up a horticultural training program to enable
the community to meet the labour requirements
of Centrefarm and a southern partner for their
joint venture horticultural development on the
Warrabri ALT.

The CLC liaised with trainers on behalf of the
West Waterhouse outstation group who wish to
to establish a commercial date plantation.

inDiGenOus ecOLOGicaL knOwL-
eDGe (iek) – meDia traininG
The CLC organised multi-media training by NT
Libraries training for five young Alyawarra men
from Ampilatawatja to enable them to record
the IEK of senior men in the Davenport Range
region.

Pintupi Anmatjere Warlpiri (PAW) Media was
engaged to provide three weeks of training to 35


                                                      49             Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
Output 3.3 mining


DescriptiOn Of Output                                     The CLC’s obligations include ensuring that the
                                                          right of traditional owners to control access to
mining on Aboriginal land contributes more                Aboriginal land is maintained and that native title
than a billion dollars a year to the Northern             rights and interests are enhanced and protected.
Territory economy and accounts for 80 per
                                                          It must also ensure that Aboriginal people are
cent of the Territory’s income derived from
                                                          fully informed and empowered to take control of
mining. The majority of the mining activity in
                                                          decisions regarding exploration and mining on
the CLC region occurs west of Alice Springs
                                                          their land or where they hold native title.
in the Tanami region where thousands of
square kilometres of land are under explora-              The overriding statutory obligation on the land
                                                          councils is to consult traditional owners and act
tion.
                                                          on instructions on the basis of group consent en-
The CLC has made agreements on behalf of                  sures absolute validity of traditional landowners’
traditional Aboriginal landowners with mining             consent. Adherence to the processes under the
companies for more than 20 years.                         Act delivers certainty to both traditional owners
Under both the Land Rights Act and the Native             and miners.
Title Act, the CLC has forged agreements which            Thanks to the Aboriginal Land Rights Act, the
offer security to mining companies and ben-               CLC has been able to work collaboratively with
efits to Aboriginal people through jobs, training,        mining companies mining on Aboriginal land to
sacred site protection, environmental protection          maximise the employment of Aboriginal people.
and compensation payments.




perfOrmance
     Efficient and effective processing of applications for consent to the grant of exploration
                                    licences on Aboriginal land
 performance measures                                          2008        2007        2006        2005
 Number of exploration licence applications effectively              48          50          39          67
 progressed to an initial traditional owner meeting


 Number of exploration licence applications processed                42          39          68         110
 to a final decision


 Number of exploration licence applications under                  262         209         146          149
 negotiation as at 30 June


 Average time taken (in years) from date application is             3.5         1.8         2.3         1.5
 received to either consent or refuse




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08         50
central Land council annual report continued...


ExpLORATiOn AnD mininG                                    sequent mining. An agreement for mining must
                                                          be made to allow mining to proceed.
expLOratiOn Licence appLica-                              Mining generally involves substantial impacts
tiOns (eLas anD epas)                                     to the environment and can affect neighbouring
                                                          communities. The decision, therefore, that tra-
Exploration for minerals and petroleum is regu-
                                                          ditional Aboriginal owners are required to make
lated under Northern Territory legislation admin-
                                                          at the exploration licence application is quite
istered by the Minister for Mines and Energy.
                                                          onerous.
Exploration licences (ELs) are required for min-
                                                          This is at the earliest point in the development
eral exploration and a separate title, an explo-
                                                          process when the least information is available
ration permit (EPs), is required for oil and gas
                                                          on the nature of any possible development.
exploration.
                                                          In this context the CLC is required under the
With respect to exploration licence applications
                                                          Land Rights Act to ensure traditional Aboriginal
on Aboriginal land, the Northern Territory min-
                                                          landowners are informed as far as practicable
ister for Mines and Energy initiates the process
                                                          when making decisions.
contained in the mining provisions (Part IV) of
the Land Rights Act by consenting to exploration          Where an agreement is made for exploration,
applicants to enter into negotiation with the CLC.        the Land Council must be satisfied that tradition-
                                                          al Aboriginal landowners understand the nature
Applicants then have three months to lodge an
                                                          and purpose of the agreement and, as a group,
application for the consent to the grant of the
                                                          consent to them.
CLC
                                                          Considerable effort and resources are directed
In response to applications for consent, the Cen-
                                                          at ensuring the relevant traditional Aboriginal
tral Land Council organises meetings to consult
                                                          owners of land affected by exploration licences
the relevant traditional Aboriginal landowners
                                                          are identified and that they participate in the
and ascertain their views.
                                                          relevant meetings.
The applicant is entitled to present the explora-
                                                          The table on the next page summarises the
tion proposals to traditional Aboriginal owners
                                                          numbers of ELAs and EPAs dealt with by the
at the first meeting and a representative of the
                                                          CLC during the year.
minister can also attend this part of the meeting.
                                                          Consent to negotiate was given to 100 ELAs and
Where instructed, the CLC negotiates an agree-            the CLC received applications for the consent
ment over the terms and conditions of the grant.          to the grant of 96 ELAs during the year. This
Through this process the rights and interests of          represents a continuation of a very high level of
traditional Aboriginal landowners are protected           interest in exploration on Aboriginal land.
and once a decision is made, the applicants ob-
                                                          During the year, 17 large-scale meetings were
tain the certainty they need to make the substan-
                                                          conducted to consult traditional Aboriginal
tial investment exploration requires.
                                                          landowners.
Under the mining provisions (Part IV) of the Land
                                                          A large number of applications (65) for
Rights Act, the traditional Aboriginal landowners’
                                                          separate exploration licences and exploration
consent is required to the grant of exploration
                                                          permits on Aboriginal land were discussed,
titles on Aboriginal land.
                                                          including a significant number (48) of new
Once consent is given to exploration, the tradi-          applications taken to their first consultation
tional Aboriginal owners cannot refuse any sub-           meeting.


                                                     51             Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
central Land council annual report continued....


                   cOunt Of expLOratiOn appLicatiOns (eLa & epas)
                                                                2008              2007                2006

 Consent to negotiate from NT Government                         100               123                   95
 Application for consent to the grant*                             96              101                   65
 Withdrawn during negotiating period                               10                24                  18
 Refused                                                           24                 6                  15
 Consent to the grant                                               8                 9                  35
 Granted by NT Government                                          11                33                  47
 Under negotiation as at 30 June                                 262               209                 146

Note: *Count of ‘Applications for consent’ includes applications following expiry of
moratorium period.

Meetings were held across the CLC region in-               the average processing rate as compared to last
cluding Tennant Creek, Yuendumu, Willowra, Ar-             year’s average (2.3 years) and previous years.
eyonga, Nyrripi, Alice Springs, Alekarenge, and            Of note is a particular group of five ELAs and
Lajamanu. Achieving this number of meetings in             one EPA, which have had very long consultation
a remote situation requires significant organisa-          histories. This group of applications is located
tional effort and substantial resources.                   in an extremely remote region, not previously
As a result of consultations with traditional              explored which holds high biodiversity and
Aboriginal owners the CLC consented to eight               conservation value. In addition, consultations
exploration licence applications covering some             proved complex because of the large size of the
5,800 square kilometres of Aboriginal land.                exploration permit, covering some 16,000 square
Twenty three exploration licence applications              kilometres of Aboriginal land, affecting several
and one exploration permit was refused. Ten                communities and different language groups.
exploration licence applications were withdrawn            In terms of CLC inputs, exploration permits for
while within the negotiating period. The graph on          oil and gas require greater resources and time
the next page compares this years’ number of               because they cover much larger areas than
exploration licence applications, both consented           mineral exploration licences - as they are gener-
to and refused in previous years.                          ally aimed at covering significant portions of
During the year, the Northern Territory Govern-            geological basins. Exploration permits can be up
ment granted a total of 11 exploration licences            to 10 times the area of the maximum exploration
and permits on Aboriginal land and as of 30 June           licence application area.
2008 there are a total of 148 granted exploration          Overall for the year, the number of applications
licences on Aboriginal land.                               concluded remained less than the number of ad-
The average time for processing applications,              ditional applications for consent.
which were either consented or refused during              This has led to a further increase in the number
this financial year, was three-and-a-half years            of applications under negotiation at the end of
- from the date the applications were received             the financial year. At June 30, 2008 there were
by the CLC. A major influence on this result has           262 exploration licences under negotiation
been the strategy this year to finalise long stand-        compared to 209 at the end of the last financial
ing applications which has caused an increase in           year.


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08          52
central Land council annual report continued...


                                                                            expLOratiOn Licence
             100                                                            appLicatiOns


              80
                                                                                Received
              60
                                                                                Refused

              40                                                                Consented

              20


                   1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008


OtHer cOnsuLtatiOns                                         exploration on Aboriginal land. In addition, some
                                                            holders of granted licences on Aboriginal land
Strong interest in uranium exploration was
                                                            have farmed out or sought to switch to uranium
maintained as the uranium price eased from
                                                            exploration on granted tenements.
record highs but maintained historically high
levels. Of the exploration applications received            The Tanami region has become a focus of much
by the CLC, 75 percent (72) were solely or                  of the renewed interest in uranium. Traditional
primarily aimed at discovering uranium. These,              Aboriginal owners have not been exposed to
combined with previous applications for uranium             uranium applications in this region since 1986,
represent a vast area sought for uranium                    when applications at that time were refused.

                          Below: CLC staff and traditional owners at Karlanjarri talk about exploration applications




                                                       53              Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
central Land council annual report continued....


Since then extensive exploration has occurred              These include the physical properties of uranium
which has been almost exclusively for gold.                and radiation, the nuclear fuel cycle, uranium
Several mining operations have been developed              mining in Australia, potential radiation exposure
from subsequent discoveries.                               pathways, techniques for uranium exploration,
                                                           radiation safety and management, arguments
Traditional Aboriginal owners’ experience in
                                                           for and against using uranium. The banners
the Tanami over the last 20 years has led to a
                                                           were designed to focus discussions held in
relatively good understanding of the impacts
                                                           communities. Two large-scale community
associated with gold mining and familiarity with
                                                           meetings were organised, one at Lajamanu and
the consultation process and agreement making.
                                                           the other at Kalkaringi in September 2007.
Proposals for uranium exploration, however,
                                                           In addition to the CLC presenting factual
raise specific issues unique to uranium mining
                                                           information on uranium, representatives from
and the supply chain. Traditional Aboriginal
                                                           the uranium representative body, the Australian
owners need to be aware of these in order to
                                                           Uranium Association, and the peak Australian
make fully informed decisions.
                                                           conservation body, the Australian Conservation
For instance, at the political level, understanding        Foundation were invited to address the meeting
that uranium mining in Australia remains a                 and present their views and positions to the
contentious and contested issue is important, as           meeting.
is knowledge of the unique properties of uranium
                                                           The Radiation Officer from the Northern Territory
and the implications radiation poses at the mine
site.
                                                             Below: A traditional owner uses a Geiger Counter to
Consultation meetings over specific exploration                                          learn about radioactivity
licence applications do not allow the breadth and
complexity of issues to be sufficiently canvassed
so the CLC developed a two-tiered approach to
uranium consultations.

The strategy aims, in the first instance, to
give affected Aboriginal communities facts on
uranium and information on the supply chain, to
be followed-up with consultations with traditional
Aboriginal owners over specific exploration
licence applications.

In developing the first tier community information
sessions, the CLC worked in conjunction with
the Uranium Industry Framework Subgroup
on Indigenous Engagement and the Northern
Territory Mines and Energy Division to develop
an information package suitable for presentation
in remote Aboriginal communities in the Tanami.

A series of seven two-metre high posters were
produced covering several themes related
specifically to the environmental and social
issues associated with uranium mining.



Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08          54
central Land council annual report continued....


Government’s Minerals and Energy Division                 tour and produced high quality DVDs of the
also presented at the meetings and discussed              community meeting and also of the Ranger trip.
the regulatory regime and safety. The sessions
                                                          As part of the on-going uranium information
were intended to be purely educational with no
                                                          strategy, the poster exhibition and the DVDs
decisions being asked of traditional Aboriginal
                                                          have been shown at other communities in the
owners on the day.
                                                          CLC region affected by uranium exploration.
There was no discussion over specific                     This year sessions were held in Tennant Creek,
exploration licences and no representatives from          Alekarenge, and Ti Tree in April 2008, Alice
the particular companies were present.                    Springs in May 2008 and Areyonga in June
                                                          2008.
Initial feedback from Aboriginal communities
indicates an increased awareness of issues
surrounding uranium mining.                               AGREEmEnT mAkinG
There was considerable interest in seeing first           A total of three new exploration agreements
hand an operating uranium mine and having an              were finalised during the year, relating to a total
opportunity to relate the information provided            of five exploration licences. The details are as
at the community uranium information sessions             follows.
with the reality of the mine.
                                                          An agreement was signed in November 2007 for
In October 2007 the CLC organised a visit to the          the grant of three exploration licences (24541,
Ranger Uranium Mine. A bus, supported by CLC              25511, 25427) to Westgold Resources Ltd,
field officers and vehicles, took 22 Aboriginal           south-west of Tennant Creek on the Karlantijpa
people from Lajamanu and Kalkaringi to Jabiru             South Aboriginal Land Trust. The licences cover
in the Top End of the Northern Territory.                 the Rover 1 copper- gold- cobalt prospect which
Two companies that have applications in the               contains known mineralisation discovered in the
region, Northern Uranium Ltd and Thundelarra              1970s by drilling geophysical targets. The Rover
Exploration Ltd, contributed to the cost of hiring        field is one of the least-explored regions of Aus-
the bus. Energy Resources of Australia Ltd,               tralia and is thought to be either an extension or
which operates Ranger, hosted the group and               mirror of the nearby Tennant Creek gold field.
facilitated an inspection of the Ranger mine and          Protecting sacred sites has been a significant
processing facilities.                                    matter and clearances undertaken by the CLC
Meetings were held with workers from the mine             have made available areas of prospective
and officers from the Office of the Supervising           ground. The agreement builds on good relations
Scientist, which has a statutory monitoring role.         established between Westgold and the CLC over
The visiting traditional owners also met with the         existing agreements, which are for licences con-
senior Mirrar traditional owners of the Ranger            tiguous to the areas agreed to this year.
mine to hear their concerns relating to the mine.         The other agreement signed is with Kajeena
The tour was exposed to a divergent range of              and joint venture partners, Tech Cominco
views and opinions on uranium mining and saw              Ltd and BHP Billiton Ltd for four exploration
first hand how uranium is recovered and radia-            licences over the Haasts Bluff Aboriginal Land
tion is managed on an operating minesite.                 Trust. The area is a very remote region west
A film crew from PAW Media and                            of Alice Springs and not previously explored.
Communications attended the community                     Negotiations over the agreement have been very
information sessions and accompanied the                  protracted as Kajeena has sought joint venture
                                                          parties to manage the exploration.


                                                     55             Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
central Land council annual report continued....


   summary Of expLOratiOn anD                                   curred during the year. A major meeting of the
                                                                Granites Liaison Committee was scheduled for
       mininG aGreements
                                                                June 16, 2008 to consider significant changes
                                          Current - 30
                              2007                              being planned at the mine site. The meeting,
                                           June 2008
                                                                however, was postponed due to the death of
 Exploration
                                                                senior traditional Aboriginal owners prior to the
 Agreements (no. of         7 (32)             54 (148)         meeting.
 ELs & EPs)
Area of Aboriginal                                              At Newmont’s Tanami Mine, 100 kilometres north
                            5,800 sq           52,000 sq        of the Granites, rehabilitation and closure work
land in exploration
                               km                 km            continued. A Tanami Liaison meeting was held in
agreements
                                                                September 2007. At this meeting traditional Ab-
Mining Agreements                                               original owners were shown rehabilitation work
                                nil             10 (12)
(no. of MLs & PLs)**                                            that had occurred on the mineral leases. Instruc-
                                                                tions were obtained on various closure matters,
                                                                such as retaining the airstrip, some of the haul
AGREEmEnT impLEmEnTATiOn                                        roads, and bore field and where possible filling in
Where agreements are entered into with mining                   pits. A site of historical heritage containing an old
companies the CLC assumes a range of obliga-                    windmill is to be kept undisturbed.
tions and responsibilities, which are required to               Also discussed was a revised agreement
be undertaken diligently.                                       negotiated by the CLC with Newmont, which
As at June 30, 2008 the CLC has 54 current                      consolidates various agreements for the Tanami
exploration agreements in respect of 148 ex-                    mining lease and neighbouring leases, on all of
ploration tenements and 10 mining agreements                    which production has ceased. The original deeds
relating to a total of 12 mineral leases or produc-             provide for ongoing payments in circumstances
tion licences.                                                  where production was not occurring. Traditional
                                                                Aboriginal owners agreed to vary the payments
These include agreements for the Production
                                                                to better reflect the fact that mining has ceased
Licences (PLs) for both the Mereenie Oil and
                                                                and that the term of the mining leases is continu-
Gas Field and the Palm Valley Gas Field, as well
                                                                ing because Newmont is spending considerable
as mineral lease (ML) agreements for operating
                                                                resources on properly rehabilitating the site.
gold mining at The Granites – see table above.
                                                                During the year, the CLC has been working to fi-
The agreements generally provide for sacred
                                                                nalise a Regional Partnership Agreement, which
site protection; entry permits and access condi-
                                                                was envisaged under the memorandum of un-
tions; work program approval; environmental
                                                                derstanding between the Australian Government
protection and rehabilitation; Aboriginal employ-
                                                                and the Minerals Council of Australia. The Re-
ment, training and contracting; liaison, reporting
                                                                gional Partnership Agreement (RPA) is between
and inspection.
                                                                the CLC, Newmont, and both the Australian and
tanami mininG aGreements – newmOnt                              Northern Territory Governments.
asia pacific                                                    Among other things, the agreement estab-
Newmont’s Tanami Operations mine, the world                     lishes a steering committee to guide work being
class Callie deposit at its Granites operation, is              undertaken by the RPA Project Officer who has
Australia’s fifth largest gold producer. Ongoing                been employed by the CLC employment unit.
monitoring of the agreements and, in particular,                The focus of the role of the position is to foster
environmental and rehabilitation aspects oc-                    the development of Aboriginal businesses and


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08               56
central Land council annual report continued....


enterprises.                                             leum that the proposed alteration is not accept-
                                                         able.
The first contract issued by Newmont under the
RPA occurred in April 2008. The business arm             In September 2007, Central Petroleum finally
of Dagaragu Community Council was contracted             accepted the CLC advice and requested sacred
by Newmont to build a five kilometre fence either        site clearance of the access route as defined in
side of the Tanami Highway as it passes through          the agreement. Clearance of the access route
the Tanami mining leases.                                was given by the CLC in November 2007.

A lot of effort went into setting up the work but        Road construction and associated water boring
once the contract was issued, it proved very suc-        commenced in April 2008. As of the end of June
cessful with completion of a high quality fence          2008 most of the stores and equipment for the
ahead of time.                                           drilling rig have been transported to the first drill-
                                                         ing site at Blamore and drilling is anticipated to
paLm vaLLey Gas fieLD – maGeLLan
                                                         commence early in July 2008.
petrOLeum

A Liaison Committee meeting was held at Palm
                                                         GOvERnmEnT LiAiSOn
Valley on May 2008. Magellan provided tradi-
tional Aboriginal landowners with updates on the         The CLC worked collaboratively with the North-
field’s operation.                                       ern Territory Mines and Energy Division during
                                                         the year to maintain productive relationships and
The rehabilitation and stability of the completed
                                                         ensure an effective meshing of the Department’s
drill site at PV11 (a dry well) and access road
                                                         and CLC’s processes with respect to granting
was inspected. This site at the headwaters of a
                                                         exploration and mining titles.
tributary to the waterway contains ancient spe-
cies of palm found in the Finke Gorge National           The changes to Part IV of the mining provisions
Park. Closure options for the site are under con-        contained in the Aboriginal Land Rights (NT)
sideration by traditional Aboriginal owners.             Amendment Act 2006 commenced on 1 July
                                                         2007. Transition to the new provisions has been
                                                         smooth.
ep 93 centraL petrOLeum
                                                         One of the significant changes is the capacity for
Last year it was reported that there is disagree-
                                                         the minister to delegate his role with respect to
ment between the CLC and Central Petroleum
                                                         attending traditional Aboriginal owner consulta-
over the access route to its proposed well sites
                                                         tions over exploration licences.
located in remote areas of the Simpson Desert
east of Alice Springs on granted Exploration             Such a delegation has been made to the North-
Permit 93.                                               ern Territory Mining Minister and as such of-
                                                         ficers from the Mines and Energy Division have
In the previous financial year, the CLC had
                                                         attended some of the first meetings of traditional
conducted sacred site clearances of the well
                                                         Aboriginal owners.
sites and approved drilling at the locations. The
access route to the drill sites was agreed to in
the exploration agreement.

However, Central Petroleum sought to alter the
access route and proposed a route that is not
acceptable to traditional Aboriginal owners.

The CLC has consistently advised Central Petro-


                                                    57              Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
OUTpUT 3.4 Commercial Assistance

DescriptiOn Of Output
                                                                         pastOraL perfOrmance
Working with individual landowners, com-                                                        Larger
munities and across the region, the CLC                                                          cattle
supports landowners to take advantage of                             Number of    Number       stations
commercial opportunities on Aboriginal land                          Aboriginal   of other        that
                                                                    Land Trusts   pastoral     received
and to develop long-term sustainable Ab-
                                                                     that were   enterprises  assistance
original enterprises. The CLC works directly                          assisted  that received     and
with Aboriginal landowners in commercial                            through IPP   support      support
activities of tourism, pastoral development,
and bush foods.

The CLC has sought to support Aboriginal
                                                                         14                6                 4
people to develop their infrastructure, busi-
ness development training, business plans
                                                                  tOurism – reGiOnaL
and capacities in these commercial activities.
                                                                  pLanninG, enterprise DeveLOp-
                                                                  ment anD capacity

perfOrmance                                                       The CLC has worked across a range of areas in
                                                                  tourism enterprise development for Aboriginal
The CLC supports Aboriginal people to develop                     landowners. In regards, to regional development
tourism enterprises in their communities.                         we undertook regional planning activities and
                                                                  work with communities across our region (see
          tOurism perfOrmance                                     Table 1). The research and consultation within
                                                                  this work is essential to increasing sustainability
                                               Number
                                                                  of project ideas.
 Number             Number of tour-            of tourism
 of tourism         ism joint ven-             work-              The CLC has also supported individual enter-
 enterprises        tures partner-             shops and          prise development across a number of commu-
 supported          ships created              trial tours        nities in our region. This included support for a
                                               undertaken         range of tours, securing funding for enterprise
                                                                  developments and progression of tourism pro-
        13                    4                    10             posals. Table 2 presents those communities that
                                                                  the CLC worked with.

                                                                  The CLC also continues to support enterprise
                                                                  development in communities through building
The CLC responds to Aboriginal landowner
                                                                  capacity of community residents.This is essential
requests for practical ‘on-ground’ assistance and
                                                                  to ensure skills, capabilities and capacities of
project management expertise for their pastoral
                                                                  residents are developed and maintained. This
stations.
                                                                  year we have helped build capacity in tourism
Staff that work on commercial activities through                  enterprise through supporting:
tourism and pastoral programs are funded under
                                                                  l traditional owner participation in the WAITOC
a number of programs: ILC, NHT, Tourism NT,
                                                                  Indigenous Tourism Conference.
and the another four positions are ABA funded.
                                                                  l Lilla traditional owners to attend the Austra-
                                                                  lian Tourism Exchange in Perth (June).


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08                 58
central Land council annual report continued....



 taBLe 1: reGiOnaL tOurism pLanninG researcH anD cOnsuLtatiOn
                              This study evaluated strategic indigenous tourism opportunities in the
                             Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park area. DJ Consultants submitted a report
 Uluru Region Strate-        outlining a number of potential enterprises for future development. Con-
 gic Tourism Study         tinuing discussions on project support are occurring with UKTNP tradition-
                            al owners and Tourism NT. Specific requests have been made to fund the
                                    Southwest Regional Indigenous Tourism Development Plan.
 Western Aranda
                           The plan was launched in July 2007. The CLC provided significant support
 Tourism Develop-
                             for the improvements to tourism infrastructure on the Red Centre Way.
 ment Plan
                            CLC identified traditional owner tourism aspirations in the context of joint
 Chambers Pillar His-        management consultations for Chambers Pillar. There are potential link-
 torical Reserve            ages to this and the joint management work at Rainbow Valley Conserva-
                                               tion Reserve and Titjikala community.


                             CLC undertook an investigative tour with traditional owners in Northern
 Northern Simpson
                              Simpson Desert. The tour identified existing tourism operations in the
 Desert
                                              region and potential developments.



l a 12 week DEET- funded training program                  Meetings were held with the following organisa-
for Thakeperte traditional owners which delivered:         tions and groups:
Senior First Aid, media training and site visits to        •  Operational Working Group of CLC and Tour-
other Aboriginal tourism operations;                       ism NT;
l representation of traditional owner and indig-           • Central Australian Tourism Industry Associa-
enous tourism enterprise interests in a number of          tion (CATIA);
interagency meetings, development forums and               • Destination Development;
working groups.                                            • Desert Knowledge CRC;
                                                           • Red Centre – First National Landscape.




                                                      59            Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
central Land council annual report continued....


                  taBLe 2: tOurism enterprise DeveLOpment witH cLc
                                     cOmmunities
 Lajamanu         Support for cultural tourism

                  Development of campground and cultural tour proposal with ABA funds
 Town Bore
                  Developed a three day trial tour with joint venture partner, Trek Larapinta

                  Funding applications to restore and develop basic tourism infrastructure at these out-
                  stations which are along the Red Centre Way
 Paddock          Ipolera campground improvements completed in May 08 included: improved water
 Palm, Ip-        supply, ablution facilities, solar power reconnection, installation of BBQs, landscaping
 olera and        and bough shelter construction
 Rodna            Trial tour at Ipolera with joint venture partner, Spirit of the Desert
                  Trial tour at Palm Paddock with joint venture partners, Alice Springs Sightseeing
                  Centre

                  Support with registering Rainbow Valley Cultural Tours as a business

                  Successful grant application for Rainbow Valley Cultural Tours set up costs funded by
 Rainbow          Indigenous Development Fund
 Valley           Accessed funding for development of Rainbow Valley Cultural Tours business plan
 Conser-          through Indigenous Business Australia (IBA)
 vation
                  Negotiations between Rainbow Valley Cultural Tours and Alice Springs Sight-Seeing
 Reserve
                  Centre including one trial tour conducted with Tourism NT. Since commencing op-
                  erations, six commercial tours and one free family tour for traditional owners from
                  Thakeperte ALT have been conducted.

 Iwupataka        Submitted a funding application to IBA for business planning of Iwupataka Ecotourism
 ALT              Caravan Park and Cultural Tours

 Harry
                  Facilitated discussions for a tourism enterprise with Harry Creek community members,
 Creek
                  TNT and DBERD
 (South)
                  Support for a proposal from the Ulpanyali community
 Commu-           Development of proposal for a guided Kings Canyon rim walk with TNT for Wartarrka
 nities in        traditional owners
 Watarrka
 National         Establishment of a joint venture between Lilla Tours and Hinterland Tours for guided
 Park             tour of Lilla rockhole

                  Securing NT Tourism funding for signage at Akanta campground

 Thakperte        Engaged a consultant to prepare a DEET funding submission for tourism training
 (Hamilton        Upgraded existing community infrastructure with Ingkerreke Outstation Resource
 Downs)           Centre assistance




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08          60
central Land council annual report continued....




                                                            Above: Planning for tourism on the Thakeperte ALT

The CLC provided presentations at workshops,             support for pastoral development on Aboriginal
including tourism workshops for traditional own-         land.
ers at Santa Teresa and Tempe Downs station,
                                                         In conjunction with IPP staff and pastoral con-
and an economic development in parks session
                                                         sultants, the CLC provided advice to Aboriginal
with NT Parks & Wildlife and Tourism NT.
                                                         landowners on pastoral production including
pastOraL DeveLOpment                                     stocking rates, business and property planning
                                                         and sustainability issues. To improve planning
The CLC provided for pastoral development sup-
                                                         confidence and certainty of support over the
port to Aboriginal land owners involved in larger
                                                         longterm work has commenced on a three year
commercially-based projects and smaller groups
                                                         funding application to the ILC.
starting up enterprises. The CLC participates in
the Indigenous Pastoral Program (IPP), a collab-         Aboriginal Land Trusts which received sup-
oration between: CLC, NLC, NT Department of              port under the IPP included: Undarana Camel
Primary Industry, Fisheries and Mines (DPIFM),           Farm (Haast Bluff ALT), Atnetye ALT, Daguragu
Department of Employment and Workplace Rela-             ALT, Loves Creek Station, Haast Bluff ALT,
tions and NT Cattleman’s Association.                    Pawu ALT, Wirliyajarrayi ALT, Mangkururrpa ALT,
                                                         Mangalawurru (Karlantijpa North ALT), Kurn-
The CLC works with 16 pastoral stations through
                                                         turlpara (Kunturlpara and Warumunga ALTs),
the IPP.
                                                         Mungkarta ALT, Ahakeye ALT, Yalpirakinu ALT,
The IPP’s focus is to reinvigorate and increase          Yuendumu ALT, and Ngalurrtju ALT. Additional
Aboriginal participation in the pastoral industry        assistance was provided to other traditional
through improved co-ordination and resource              owners of community-based pastoral enterprises


                                                    61             Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
central Land council annual report continued....



 Table 3: Community Pastoral Enterprise and Commercial Stations that received CLC support

 Wirliyajarrayi         Meeting with Wirliyajarrayi Cattle Aboriginal Corporation regarding purchase and
 ALT (formerly          repair of a second hand grader
 Willowra):

                        Consultations with Angarapa ALT to plan infrastructure requirements
 Angarapa
 ALT (formerly          Discussions with licensee of the Angarapa Grazing Licence and the owners of
 Utopia):               the Eastern Desert Art company regarding their offer of technical, management
                        and financial support for the project

                        Aerial survey of stock numbers on the Anurrete ALT in preparation for traditional
 Anurrete ALT
                        owners mustering

                        Provided assistance to Walpeyangkere Cattle Aboriginal Corporation to muster
 Anatye ALT
                        over the former Tarlton Downs Stock Reserve, resulting in the sale of 37 head.

 Karlantijpa ALT        Obtained ILC funding for development of the Mangalawurru pastoral project

                        Assessed watering points on the Underana Camel Farm

                        Assisted traditional owners in bore repairs
 Haasts Bluff ALT
                        Practical on-ground support for mustering 40 camels for sale and organised
                        repairs and maintenance of drafting yards

                        Provided representation of traditional owners on the restructured Board of
 Tanami Downs           Directors of Peake Pty. Ltd.

                        Initiated a fire management plan

                        Initiated business and succession planning on behalf of Apiwentye Pastoral Co.,
 Atula
                        funded by IBA

                        Assisted the Directors of Jayrook to manage transitional ‘caretaker’ arrange-
 Loves Creek
                        ments
                        Assisted the Aboriginal-owned Puraiya Cattle Company with a hand-over of com-
                        pany affairs

 Titree                 Supported transition to ‘caretaker’ arrangements for stock and infrastructure by
                        an external party




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08         62
central Land council annual report continued....


across the CLC region and to larger Aboriginal-
owned commercial pastoral stations (see Table 3
for details).

Further, the CLC provided project management
and development support for three community-
based cattle enterprises in receipt of s.64(4)
grants from the ABA:

Urrampinyi Iltjiltjarri ALT: $290,000 for herd
and infrastructure improvements;

Alatyeye block (Alcoota locality): $300,000 for
herd and infrastructure improvements;

Daguragu ALT: $225,000 for herd development,
infrastructure improvements and ongoing project
management.

BUSH FOODS
The CLC was involved in bush foods through
networks and working groups. Staff are a part of
the Indigenous Reference Group of the Desert
Knowledge CRC Merne Altyerre-ipenhe Project
and have had meetings with CSIRO and Charles
Darwin University regarding traditional owner
participation in the bush foods industry. Staff
have also been documenting traditional owner
enterprise aspirations in the Southern Tanami for
inclusion in the Southern Tanami IPA, including
bush food harvest and related tourism opportuni-
ties.




                                                    63   Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
Central Land Council Annual Report

                   Output Group 4
                      Advocacy Services
 Central Land Council Report


Output Group 4

Advocacy services

The CLC has a statutory responsibility to ascertain and express the wishes and
opinions of Aboriginal people in its region, to protect the interests of Aboriginal
people and help to protect sacred sites.


OUTCOmE                    OUTPUT GROUP 4

  Enhanced social ,
  political and economic
                            Advocacy Services
  participation and
  equity for Aboriginal
  people in the Land
                                OUTPUTS
  Council’s area as a
  result of the promo-            4.1 Public Awareness and Education
  tion, protection and
                                  4.2 Advocacy and Representation
  advancement of their
  land rights, other
                                  4.3 Cultural and Heritage Support
  rights and interests
                                  4.4 Community Development Support




                                             65              Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
Output 4.1 Public Awareness and Education

DescriptiOn Of Output                                             the media and answered inquiries from staff, the
                                                                  media and Aboriginal traditional owners on the
The CLC plays an important role in informing                      changes.
its constituents and the wider public about
                                                                  The CLC produced other publications during the
Aboriginal issues in Central Australia. Every
                                                                  year, including booklets explaining the Native
year the CLC produces a wide range of infor-
                                                                  Title Act and the Aboriginal Land Rights Act and
mative and educational materials on issues
                                                                  three editions of Land Rights News.
of importance to Aboriginal people. It is also
often the first point of contact for journalists                  The CLC also published a 16-page magazine
                                                                  included in the local newspaper which outlined
and the general public wishing to know more
                                                                  positive developments in remote communities
about Aboriginal people in Central Australia.



perfOrmance


            mEdIA                 2006-07          2007-08
 Land Right News                               3         3
 Press releases                            14           18
 Information booklets                          1         6
 Promotional Magazine                          1         1
 Newsletters, articles and
                                               8        11
 posters
 Website visits                       69034         81856
 DVD                                           4         6
 Presentations to                              9        15
 stakeholders
 Land Management                               4         5
 publications


In this financial year, there has been a very high
demand for information from people living in
remote areas wanting to know about how the
Federal Government’s intervention into Northern                   as a result of the CLC’s work and served to
Territory Aboriginal communities would affect                     raise awareness of the organisation by the wider
them.                                                             public. It was well received by both Aboriginal
                                                                  people and non-Aboriginal people.
In response to the high level of uncertainty, the
CLC produced a series of newsletters detailing                    The CLC also contributed to a range of main-
facts and policy under the intervention.                          stream natural resource management publica-
                                                                  tions providing examples of the successes of
It also prepared articles and features for Land
                                                                  central Australian Aboriginal ranger programs.
Rights News, a newspaper co-produced by the
CLC and Northern Land Council that has a print                    In response to the high level of exploration
run of 13,000 copies, press releases to inform                    applications to look for uranium, the organisa-
                                                                  tion is undertaking a major educational initiative


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08                 66
central Land council annual report continued...


to inform key communities about the issues             National Park.
surrounding potential uranium exploration and
                                                       A DVD produced from the roadshow forms part
mining. This strategy was supported by nine
                                                       of the information package being delivered to all
government, industry and NGO agencies in the
                                                       communities under phase 2 of the strategy. The
interests of presenting a balanced perspective
                                                       strategy separates information provision from
on a controversial issue.
                                                       decision making meetings. To date the CLC has
Phase 1 of the strategy involved community             conducted seven information meetings and 10
meetings in the northern Tanami with speakers          decision making meetings.
from all sides of the uranium debate as well as
                                                       The requirement for educational material and
a visit by a group of traditional owners to the
                                                       general media also increased with the growth of
Ranger uranium mine near Jabiru in Kakadu
                                                       the CLC’s community development initiatives.

                                                       The CLC was proud to open its digital photo
                                                       archive in the Alice Springs Town Library and
                                                       provide an archive kiosk in its reception area this
                                                       year. This facility is used constantly by Aboriginal
                                                       visitors and will be expanded regionally.

                                                              Left: the Uranium information session held at
                                                                                         Lajamanu in 2007.

                                                              Below: the banners produced for the uranium
                                                                                      information roadshow




                                                  67               Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
Output 4.2 Advocacy and Representation

DescriptiOn Of Output                                                    executive meetinGs
                                                                         executive meetinGs
The CLC has a statutory responsibility to                                 date             No of Resolutions
ascertain, express and represent the wishes
                                                                      18 July 2007                           24
and the opinions of Aboriginal people living
in the CLC area, and to protect the interests                   20 September 2007                            18
of Aboriginal people living in the area.
                                                                30 October 2007                              20
To fulfil this responsibility the CLC identifies                5 December 2007                              20
significant legislative and policy matters,
                                                                28 February 2008                             25
consults with traditional owners and Aborigi-
                                                                29 May 2008                                  40
nal people to ascertain their views, brings
                                                                Total Executive
significant policy matters to the attention of                                                              147
                                                                Resolutions
the Council and Executive, and engages with
all levels of government and other stakehold-
ers to ensure Aboriginal views and aspira-                     In the last financial year, a round of governance
tions are taken into account.                                  training involving a one day workshop in each of
                                                               the CLC’s nine regions was completed.
perfOrmance
                                                               The governance manual resulting from that train-
              cOunciL meetinGs                                 ing was finalised and printed (to be provided to
      date                Place         No of                  all 90 members of Council at their next meeting).
                                        resolutions
                                                               The CLC made seven submissions to the Austra-
 31 July & 1                                                   lian Government on general policy:
                    Werre Therre                      8
 August 2007
                                                                submission to the Senate Inquiry into the
 13-14                                                         NT Emergency Response Bill 2007 and related
 November           Urlampe                           8        legislation;
 2007
                                                                new government policy briefing on NT Emer-
 29-30
                    Kintore                        17          gency Response and ‘From the Grassroots’
 April 2008
                                                               briefing report on community views;

                                                                submission to FaHCSIA regarding changes
   Below: CLC Field staff serve meals to members at a
                                                               to the permit system relating to access for
                         CLC meeting at Kintore in 2008
                                                               journalists;

                                                                submission to the Senate Community Af-
                                                               fairs Committee Inquiry into the Emergency
                                                               Response Consolidation Bill 2008;

                                                                submission to the Department of Communica-
                                                               tions, Information Technology and the Arts on the
                                                               Telecommunications Universal Services Obliga-
                                                               tion review;

                                                                submission to Australian Government discus-
                                                               sion paper on the Community Development
                                                               Employment Program;


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08              68
central Land council annual report continued...


 proposal paper to FaHCSIA on remote                       a detailed policy document forwarded to the new
housing.                                                    Government in December 2007.

The CLC also made three submissions to the NT               nt emerGency respOnse
Government regarding the new Local Govern-                  Announced on 21 June 2007, the NTER, with its
ment Act.                                                   suite of measures, has been the most significant
cOmment On perfOrmance                                      indigenous policy issue this financial year. The
                                                            CLC has worked hard to help our constituents
feDeraL eLectiOn                                            understand the issues, to influence government
The federal election was held in November 2007              policy and implementation, and to prepare for
resulting in a change of government.                        the expected 12 month review.

The CLC has worked to establish relationships               The CLC provided a written submission to the
with the new government and senior departmen-               Senate Inquiry into the NT Emergency Response
tal officials, and identify opportunities for policy        Bill 2007 and related Bills, and appeared before
and advocacy input.                                         the Committee in August 2007. The CLC took a
                                                            delegation of traditional owners to Canberra to
In particular, the CLC has sought to influence the
                                                            coincide with the introduction of the legislation.
future direction of the NT Emergency Response
(NTER), detailed further below, through meet-               To assist our constituents and others to under-
ings with both the Prime Minister and Minister for          stand the implications of the NTER the CLC
Indigenous Affairs, and through the production of           produced a community newsletter outlining the


       Below: The Minister for Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, Jenny Macklin talks
        with CLC Chair Lindsay Bookie and NLC Chair Wali Wunungmurra in Darwin soon after the Government’s
                                                                                                    election in 2007




                                                       69             Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
central Land council annual report continued...


measures, and also a series of fact sheets.               communities. The CLC also made submissions
These were circulated widely and are available            to both FaHCSIA, regarding access for journal-
on the CLC website.                                       ists and to the Senate Community Affairs Com-
                                                          mittee Inquiry into the FaHCSIA (Emergency
Community meetings were held in Lajamanu,
                                                          Response Consolidation) Bill more generally.
Ampilatwatja, Titjikala, Laramba, Tangentyere
and several meetings at Yuendumu. Members                 The CLC will continue to monitor the progress of
of the taskforce, including General Chalmers and          the Bill and any subsequent changes.
Sue Gordon, attended the CLC Council meeting
                                                          LeasinG arranGements
held 1 August 2007.
                                                          During this reporting period the CLC continued
The CLC developed a proposal for a research
                                                          to negotiate with both the NT Government and
project designed to obtain detailed community
                                                          the Australian Government in order to reach
views about the impact of the NTER. Expert ad-
                                                          agreement on standard form leases for govern-
vice was sought through a series of workshops
                                                          ment infrastructure and a housing head lease
to determine how best to obtain these views and
                                                          template for community residential housing.
structure the project. Research was undertaken
in Hermannsburg, Yuendumu, Titjikala, Papu-               The parties are close to reaching agreement on
nya, Kintore and Ali Curung, with researchers             both forms of s.19 leases and there have been
conducting individual and small group interviews          regular meetings throughout the year.
with Aboriginal men and women.
                                                          Anticipating a vastly increased workload associ-
In addition, the CLC spoke to the Government              ated with the Australian Government policy that
Business Managers of those communities, inter-            all new infrastructure on Aboriginal land must
viewed staff working in other agencies on those           have a lease, the CLC successfully sought addi-
communities, and interviewed other agencies               tional resources from the Minister to allow for the
based in Alice Springs.                                   employment of a senior lawyer to coordinate this
                                                          work. A new senior lawyer will start shortly.
Detailed data has been requested of both Cen-
trelink and the Operations centre. The report             As part of considering the risks and advantages
will be finalised by the end of July 2008 and will        for traditional owners in issuing housing head-
be provided to the Australian Government’s 12             leases to Territory Housing, the CLC has done
month review of the NTER.                                 a substantial amount of work regarding the NT
                                                          Government’s proposed changes to remote
permits                                                   housing management arrangements.
The NTER legislation amended the system so                The CLC has consulted with external housing
permits were not required for public areas in             experts, undertaken research and produced a
main communities. These changes came into                 proposal paper outlining our preferred option for
effect on 17 February 2008. The new Australian            the housing leaseholding entity. Officials from
Government has, in the FaHCSIA (Emergency                 the NT Government attended the April 2008
Response Consolidation) Bill 2008, sought to              CLC Council meeting, giving Council members
reintroduce permits to communities, with excep-           an opportunity to explore these issues in detail.
tions for government workers and journalists.             The CLC proposal paper was forwarded to both
This Bill has not been passed by the Parliament           governments in June 2008.
and the position of the new Senate is unclear.
                                                          As at the end of the financial year, discussions
The CLC advised communities of the changes in             with both levels of government were continuing.
a community newsletter and correspondence to


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08         70
central Land council annual report continued...


aBa issues                                                The CLC attended Local Government Advisory
                                                          Board meetings on 17-18 July 2007, 30-31 Octo-
The CLC continues to seek to influence the fund-
                                                          ber 2007 and 4-5 December 2007.
ing guidelines and processes for assessing and
approving community grants, including by draft-           A total of three separate submissions were pro-
ing suggested guidelines for adoption by OIPC.            vided to the NT Government on various aspects
The CLC Director and policy staff attended the            of the proposed new legislation, and important
ABA Advisory Committee meetings to provide                changes were achieved due to the CLC’s work.
advice as needed. During this financial year, the         The CLC also progressed the development of a
ABA Advisory Committee met on 4-6 September               memorandum of understanding between shires
2007 and 9-10 April 2008.                                 and land councils, and expect these will be
teLecOmmunicatiOns                                        drafted and signed in the next financial year. The
                                                          newly appointed Shire CEOs attended the April
The CLC continues to sit on the Telstra Con-              2008 CLC Council meeting, providing an exten-
sumer Consultative Committee (TCCC) as the                sive briefing on the new arrangements.
Indigenous organisation representative.

The TCCC meets three times a year. Through
these forums, and other avenues, the CLC
continues to be actively engaged with key
regulatory, industry, government and consumer
organisations.

In addition to the continued promotion of the
CLC report into mobile phone usage (completed
in the previous reporting period), the CLC also
produced a submission on the Telecommunica-
tions Universal Services Obligation review to
the Department of Communications, Information
Technology and the Arts.

LOcaL GOvernment refOrm

The NT Government’s reform of local govern-
ment arrangements continues to be implement-
ed, with full implementation scheduled for 1 July
2008.

During this financial year the NT Government
tabled legislation providing for the new scheme,
created the legal entities for the shires and com-
menced recruitment and administrative opera-
tions, resolved boundary issues and produced
business plans for each shire.

The CLC continued to work hard to protect the
rights and interests of traditional owners in the
process and ensure that the Land Rights Act and
the new Local Government Act are compatible.


                                                     71             Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
OUTPUT 4.3 Cultural and Heritage support
                                                           perfOrmance
DescriptiOn Of Output
Aboriginal people in Central Australia consis-              cuLturaL anD HeritaGe activity
tently proclaim their desire to keep Aborigi-                      Activity                 Quantity
nal law and culture strong.                                 Traditional ownership
Today, for most Aboriginal people in the                    Identifications (TOID)             37
                                                            ALRA
CLC’s region, land and culture remain inex-
                                                           Traditional ownership
tricably bound and the protection of sacred
                                                           Identifications (TOID)              25
sites and objects is still a critical issue.
                                                           NTA
A significant role of the CLC is to assist and
                                                           Cultural values
support Aboriginal people to do this.                                                           2
                                                           reports
Every year the CLC recieves numerous requests              Country visit for IPAs              30
by government agencies, mining and other com-              Other land man-
mercial interests seeking to carry out activities                                              22
                                                           agemnt country visits
on Aboriginal land.
                                                           Other IEK projects
                                                                                               17
The CLC carries out Work Area Clearances to                supported
ensure that sacred sites are not damaged during            Work Area
                                                                                               49
this work.                                                 Clearances
The correct identification of traditional owners is        Sacred site clearance
                                                                                               38
fundamental to ensuring the smooth operation               certificates
of the Land Rights Act and the CLC frequently              Responses to gene-
does anthropological research to determine                 alogy requests from                 12
traditional ownership of land. While it can be a           Aboriginal people
major exercise, this procedure enables develop-
ment to proceed with certainty.
                                                           cOmment On perfOrmance
The combination of poverty and the high mortal-
ity rate of Central Australian Aboriginal people
                                                           sacreD site prOtectiOn anD WOrk area
means that assistance often has to be given for
funerals to enable people to be buried on their            cLearances
country with the appropriate ceremonies. The               Sacred sites are places of deep spiritual sig-
CLC is responsible for administering funds to              nificance and are an integral part of Aboriginal
assist its constituents to do this.                        culture.
In addition there is also funding available to             Their protection is vital for the continuation of
assist Aboriginal people in its region to maintain         religious and cultural traditions and as a source
their cultural affiliations by carrying out ceremo-        of identity for Aboriginal people.
nial activities.
                                                           The CLC assists Aboriginal people to protect
                                                           their sacred sites by ensuring that every devel-
                                                           opment proposal (including exploration and min-
                                                           ing activity, the Alice Springs to Darwin Railway
                                                           and road works) goes through a site clearance
                                                           (work area clearance process).



Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08          72
central Land council annual report continued...


Where sites are damaged, either because site
clearances were not obtained, or because condi-                   tHe cLc sacreD site
tions imposed by traditional owners were not                     cLearance certificate
adhered to, the CLC assists traditional owners
                                                            A CLC Sacred Site Clearance
either to negotiate compensation or prosecute
                                                            Certificate serves a two-fold purpose.
the offender.
                                                            Firstly, it serves to prevent damage to and
Each year the CLC receives numerous                         interference with, Aboriginal sacred sites.
requests from government agencies, public sec-              The certificate achieves this by setting
tor corporations and mining and other commer-               out conditions in relation to entering and
cial interests seeking permission from Aboriginal           working on the subject land. An applicant,
landowners to undertake a diverse range of                  when applying for a certificate, agrees
activities on their lands.                                  to be bound by the conditions of the
A work area clearance is completed prior to the             certificate.
commencement date of the proposed work.
                                                            Secondly, the certificate serves to pro-
Through the clearance process, traditional own-             tect the Applicant against prosecution for
ers gain a sound understanding of the request,              entering, damaging or interfering with
and hence the ability to make informed decisions            sacred sites under the Northern Terri-
about it.                                                   tory Aboriginal Sacred Sites Act and the
They may advise the CLC that some areas are                 Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory)
not available for the proposed work because                 Act 1976 . It achieves this by providing the
of sacred sites in the area or instruct the CLC             applicant with documentary evidence that
on protection measures and conditions to be                 the custodians and traditional Aboriginal
imposed on the proponent so that work can pro-              owners of the subject land have been
ceed in a way that does not damage the sites or             consulted and consent to the Applicant’s
in any way affect their integrity.                          proposed works.



cOmment On perfOrmance
                                                         ingi, Willowra, Papunya, Kintore, Harts Bluff,
aBOriGinaL ceremOniaL activities anD                     Mt Liebig, Epenara, Tennant Creek, Ali-Curing,
funeraLs                                                 Mungkarta, Soapy Bore, Anterrengye, Alparra,
                                                         Amplatwatja, Irreilee (# 5), Mulga Bore, Mt Allen,
The CLC was successful in obtaining a grant of
                                                         Laramba, Twerrep and Willowra.
$500,000 from the ABA to continue the ceremo-
ny and funeral support program which has been            This year the CLC also processed 171 funeral
operating for many years.                                assistance applications.

The CLC has a clear process for the allocation           inDiGenOus ecOLOGicaL
of ceremony funds to each of the CLC’s nine re-          knOWLeDGe (iek)
gions. The following regions were assisted with
                                                         The CLC was appointed by the NRM Board (NT)
ceremony support, largely for men’s business
                                                         in November 2007 to host a $1 million program
which takes place annually over the summer
                                                         to support intergenerational transfer of Indig-
months:
                                                         enous Ecological Knowledge (IEK) across the
 Ntaria, Santa Teresa, Amoonguna, Williams              CLC region.
Well, Imanpa, Lajamanu, Dagaragu, Kalkar-
                                                         With an equivalent program hosted by NAILSMA


                                                    73             Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
central Land council annual report continued...


in the north, the program forms a significant             ing program for IEK project participants to record
component of $2.7 million of Natural Heritage             material for ongoing community access, C&NRM
Trust (NHT) funding under the NT Regional                 activities and curriculum development;
Investment Strategy to support the recording,
                                                          Significant in-kind support was also provided to
recovery, maintenance and application of IEK.
                                                          a number of other projects focussed on intergen-
After years of delay in gaining approval of               erational IEK transfer and incorporation of IEK
Commonwealth Ministers, the program faced a               into ‘mainstream’ natural resource management.
further hurdle in early 2008 when the original two
                                                          For example, four senior Alyawarre men in the
-year funding period was reduced to one year to
                                                          Davenport Ranges region were recorded talking
meet departmental deadlines for completion of
                                                          about their country and practices by young Alya-
all NHT (II) projects ahead of the incoming Car-
                                                          warre men. A large number of people attended
ing for Our Country arrangements.                         a showing of the footage from the project at
Successful representations made by CLC in                 Ampilatawatja.
March 2008, including a direct appeal to the
                                                          BOnney WeLL tO BarrOW creek WaLk
Minister for the Environment, Water, Heritage
and the Arts, contributed to an extension until           The 140 kilometre walk from Bonney Creek to
December 2009 .                                           Barrow Creek by traditional owners focussed
                                                          on traditional knowledge and management of a
The CLC appointed an IEK Support Officer in               series of soakages along a traditional walking
February 2008 to co-ordinate the program and a            route.
seven-member IEK Technical Assessment Panel
(TAP) with the expertise and representation               The project was funded by DEWHA, ILC and
required to guide the roll-out of the program.            ABA through the Healthy Country, Healthy
                                                          People Schedule as a component of the CLC’s
 By the end of the year the program had re-               Womens Land Management Development proj-
solved decision-making protocols and assess-              ect. Significant additional funding was provided
ment criteria and established administrative and          by the NT Department of Education and the
financial procedures.                                     CLC’s IEK project,
The CLC widely communicated the opportunity               Preparation for the walk was considerable and
of IEK project funding, especially for country            required country visits to establish the route,
visits, to individuals and groups in the region.          planning meetings with traditional owners of five
Three IEK projects in the Wauchope, Lander                traditional ‘estates’ traversed by the walk and a
River and Lake MacKay areas were approved in              multi-media training workshop with 35 partici-
                                                          pants.
this period and two of those are completed.
                                                          Sixty five people from Tennant Creek, Mung-
The CLC prepared another nine applications
                                                          karta, Ali Curung, Tara and Stirling completed
for consideration by the IEK TAP in July 2008
                                                          the 15 day walk.
including school-based and CLC-supported proj-
ects in the Alice Springs, Ti-Tree, Nyirripi, Wil-        sOutHern tanami ipa feasiBiLity stuDy
lowra, Sandover and Eastern Arrernte regions.
                                                          There was an emphasis on incorporating IEK
A number of dedicated IEK recording kits with             into all aspects of the Southern Tanami Indig-
video, sound, camera and GPS equipment have               enous Protected Area (IPA) Feasibility project.
been assembled for IEK activities.
                                                          There were two trips to to document traditional
CLC staff worked on developing a media train-             land management practices and IEK relating to


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08         74
central Land council annual report continued...


fire, protection of soakages and other surface               Anmatyerr traditional owners of the Ahakeye
waters in areas being considered for inclusion in           ALT;
the proposed Southern Tanami IPA.
                                                             traditional owners of the Northern Tanami
This IEK material will inform the delineation of            IPA to locate, maintain and monitor signifi-
the proposed IPA area and the future Plan of                cant sites, collect seed and cultural materials,
Management.                                                 conduct environmental monitoring and related
                                                            traditional burning activity;
IEK funding applications were prepared in
consultation with key traditional owners to re-              two trips in association with the Lajamanu
cord, implement and transfer IEK for proposed               Community Education Centre and parents to
management zones, including the Lake Surpise/               support intergenerational transfer of traditional
Lander River area andthe Nyirripi rockholes.                knowledge;

The CLC engaged with a number of potential                   Eastern Arrernte traditional owners to sig-
IEK project collaborators including the Yuendu-             nificant sites in the Entire Creek area of Mount
mu-based Warlpiri Rangers, PAW Media, and                   Riddock PL;
the Jarra-Pijirrdi (Mt Theo) Youth Program as
                                                             a country visit with traditional owners of the
well as supporting the country visit programs of
                                                            the Alyawarr ALT;
the Yuendumu Community Education Centre and
Willowra school.                                             a women’s trip to Sangsters bore on the
                                                            Central Desert ALT to support intergenerational
Three IEK projects initiated by the Threatened              transfer of tracking knowledge and country
Species Unit of the NT Department of Natural                stories;
Resources, Environment and the Arts (NRETA)
to gather indigenous ecological and cultural                 the Hermannsburg-based Tjuwanpa Ranger
knowledge were supported. These involved                    group field trips with senior traditional owners
two rare wattles in Central Australia and                   to record their third film in an ongoing series
a two-way approach to the management of Cen-                on hunting and preparing bush meat foods in
tral Australian waterbodies focussing on rock-              relation to native fish species found in water-
holes and springs on the Santa Teresa ALT.                  holes and gorges in the region;

                                                             the Tennant Creek-based Muru-waranyi Ank-
traDitiOnaL LanD manaGement suppOrt
                                                            kul Rangers to protect imporatant sites on the
Through co-ordination, planning, research and               Warumungu ALT from fire.
logistical support, the CLC facilitated ‘on-country’
trips for a range of other traditional land man-            uLuru - kata tjuta natiOnaL park (uktnp)
agement purposes, maintenance of sacred sites               cuLturaL HeritaGe suppOrt
and related cultural obligations.                           In the context of protecting the cultural interests
A number of trips were held with traditional own-           of traditional owners in joint management of
ers including assistance for:                               Uluru - Kata Tjuta National Park (UKTNP), the
                                                            CLC undertook 58 work area clearances and/
 Mutitjulu and Docker River communi-
                                                            or consultations in relation to 26 park manage-
ties to visit areas of the Katiti and Petermann
                                                            ment requirements, park infrastructure, research
ALTs to establish their cultural interests in
                                                            applications, interpretive signage and related
the proposed IPA and to undertake tradi-
                                                            cultural heritage matters.
tional burning practices and gather bushfoods.
Protection of a waterhole from feral camels was             These included the Uluru weather station, a
also undertaken by the Kaltukatjara Rangers;                climb closure on 22 July 2007, a fox baiting proj-


                                                       75             Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
central Land council annual report continued...


ect, installation of new park bores, infrastructure        Alice Springs and Central Remote Indigenous
repairs and improvements to the Uluru basewalk             Coordination Centres (ICC) and the Central
and Valley of the Winds walk, UKTNP Cultural               Land Council again assisted with the 2008
Centre redevelopment, a number of tree remov-              Women’s Law and Culture Meeting.
als, stage three of the new Uluru sunrise viewing
                                                           This year the meeting was hosted by the women
area, gravel pit rehabilitation, the ‘Sorry Rock’
                                                           from Willowra north-west of Alice Springs.
repatriation project and sacred site desecration
of the Kata Tjuta (The Olgas) dome.                        Around 200 women from across Central Austra-
                                                           lia participated in this successful event which ran
The CLC’s park-based Joint Management
                                                           for five days and was attended and supported by
Officer also continued to provide support for
                                                           13 of the CLC’s female staff members.
traditional owner interests as a member of the
UKTNP Cultural Heritage & Science Consultative             A staff position was assigned to women’s issues
Committee.                                                 to coordinate all aspects of the event, includ-
                                                           ing funding submissions and acquittals, liaising
WOmen’s LaW anD cuLture
                                                           with host women, publicising the event, site
meetinG                                                    preparation, organising food, water and other
This annual event was funded by grants from the            essential items and, where possible, transport.




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08          76
OUTPUT 4.4 Community Development

DescriptiOn Of Output                                     cOmment On perfOrmance
Aboriginal people continue to be an ex-                   The CLC has a strong background in community
tremely disadvantaged group in terms of key               consultation and working with landowners to
social, economic and health indicators.                   achieve sustainable changes in their communi-
                                                          ties. Specifically, the CLC is addressing the use
Redressing the extreme disadvantage of                    of rent and royalties money for long-term com-
many Central Australian Aboriginal communi-               munity benefits with Uluru traditional landowners
ties has proven to be very challenging.                   and Warlpiri communities.

Many programs and projects to help improve                Working with communities on community-driven
the well being of Aboriginal people in Central            priorities has contributed to achieving more
Australia are failing and gaps in socio-eco-              meaningful outcomes from their own sources of
nomic indicators compared with mainstream                 funding.
Australia are increasing.                                 The WETT project supplements and extends, but
The CLC community development approach                    does not replace, education and training ser-
provides opportunities for Aboriginal people              vices that are the responsibility of governments.
in Central Australia to be meaningfully in-               Over time, Warlpiri community members expect
volved in determining their lives and futures.            that using their own money will encourage gov-
                                                          ernments to match funding.
Sound decision-making and governance pro-
cesses are critical in achieving meaningful com-
munity development outcomes.
                                                          cOmmunity DeveLOpment usinG
In order to take advantage of opportunities,              rent anD rOyaLties mOney
Aboriginal people need to be involved in making
                                                          The CLC progressed two large community devel-
decisions. The CLC seeks to inform and promote
                                                          opment programs, the Uluru Rent Money Project
understanding in communities to turn aspirations
                                                          and the Warlpiri Education and Training Trust
into meaningful long-term benefits for traditional
                                                          (WETT) as well as developing two other proj-
landowners, their families and communities.
                                                          ects, the Moly Hill Mine Project and the Tanami
                                                          Dialysis Support Service Feasibility Study.
perfOrmance
                                                          The CLC also initiated the Granites Mine
       cOmmunity DeveLOpment                              Affected Area Aboriginal Corporation (GMAAAC)
            prOjects                                      community development project which supports
                                                          community committees using affected areas
 Number of communities working on                         monies from mining for community benefit proj-
                                               28
 community development with CLC                           ects.

                                                          Other community development projects and ac-
 Number of Uluru Rent money projects                      tivities included ongoing support for the Yuendu-
                                               4
 completed                                                mu pool, now under construction, development
                                                          of a proposal for a NT Parks Joint Management
 Number of Warlpiri students who                          CD Project; working towards a community de-
 received assistance from WETT for             64         velopment framework for the CLC; and ongoing
 their secondary studies
                                                          meetings with CLC’s external reference group.
                                                          The Community Development Unit employed



Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08         77             Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
central Land council annual report continued...


three staff: two project officers and one co-coor-         laundry at Ukaka;
dinator. On 29 May, the CLC and Kurra Aborigi-
                                                            equipment purchases, renovations and mar-
nal Corporation signed an agreement for Kurra
                                                           keting support activities at the Ernabella Aborigi-
to fund 1.5 project officer positions specifically
                                                           nal Art Centre;
to undertake WETT project work. An overview of
major projects is provided below.                           Mutitjulu grader project.

uLuru rent mOney                                           Several projects are also close to completion,
                                                           including a multi-purpose shed housing an arts
Traditional landowners of Uluru Kata Tjuta Na-
                                                           workshop, church, band room and mechanical
tional Park contribute half of their portion of the
                                                           workshop at Kwale Kwale and a generator, arts
rent money received from park visitors to com-
                                                           workshop renovations and fencing at Youngs
munity development projects. The CLC works
                                                           Well.
to support traditional Uluru landowners to make
decisions on the community projects.                       The CLC provided planning for a healthy food
                                                           cooperative at Yunyarinyi (Kenmore Park) com-
CLC supported the completion of the follow-
                                                           munity, including a business plan. In Imanpa, the
ing initiatives using traditional owners’ rent
                                                           CLC negotiated the transfer of store ownership
receipts from Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park
                                                           to a new community-based store association and
under the CLC’s Uluru Rent Money Community
                                                           negotiated a store management agreement with
Development Project:
                                                           Outback Stores. A new store is intended to be
 sports hall at Areyonga;                                 built utilising rent money, Commonwealth and NT
                                                           Government funds.
   power supply upgrades and new community

                                                           Below: The renovated art and craft centre at Areyonga




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08          78
central Land council annual report continued...


The CLC also supported the start of a regional              tHe Wett prOject
initiative with rent money in the roll-out of Ara
                                                            WETT uses royalties from Newmont’s min-
Irititja, an Anangu social history data base to four
                                                            ing operations in the Tanami region to improve
NT communities.
                                                            education and training outcomes for Warlpiri
The project money was spent on software, hard-              people. This fund is administered by the CLC.
ware, technical support, for training and local             The project implements programs in communi-
employment for the communities.                             ties that enable them to achieve better education
The CLC and a working group of committed                    and training opportunities for their people.
members of Mutitjulu progressed three priority              This financial year the main activities and
initiatives identified by the community from its            outcomes in this Project, using negotiated mine
annual receipt of Uluru rent money, including:              royalties quarantined in the Trust for education
rubbish collection, grader repairs and emer-                and training, included:
gency water points. The CLC also supported the
                                                             implementation of four long-term education
Mutitjulu community with two larger projects:
                                                            and training programs prioritised by Warlpiri
Swimming pool - A CLC consultant’s report                   communities;
completed planning advice on a swimming pool
                                                             a three-year partnership agreement be-
initiative and the Mutitjulu working group has
                                                            tween the CLC and World Vision Australia (WVA)
agreed on a preferred pool location and design.
                                                            to jointly design and implement a Warlpiri Early
Recreation hall - Discussion held with the                  Childhood Program with WETT monies. Two
Mutitjulu Foundation charity about project man-             program staff have been recruited by WVA, one
aging a concept plan of the recreation hall and             of them funded by FaHCSIA for two years;
undertaking the work.
                                                             a Warlpiri Youth and Media Program with
The CLC was involved in a high level stake-                 four Warlpiri communities developed by Mt Theo
holder meetings on the planning, governance                 Yuendumu Substance Misuse Aboriginal Cor-
and other issues impeding the development of a              poration (MYSMAC) in partnership with Warlpiri
swimming pool and an improved recreation hall.              Media. It undertook diversionary activities such
The CLC agreed to participate in a reference                as literacy/computer literacy and pre-vocational
group to progress and monitor the implementa-               media training with youth at risk. Youth media
tion of agreements reached at the meeting.                  workers have been employed, equipment pur-
                                                            chased and program activities have begun;
Traditional owner group meetings were held to
provide feedback on the progress of initiatives              The Warlpiri Learning Community Program is
funded in the project’s first two rounds, explore           designed to provide communities with Learning
traditional owner views on the effectiveness of             Centres that will provide people with access to
the project, further develop the project’s guiding          the internet, library services, a Warlpiri cultural
principles, identify regional issues that could be          history database and opportunities for training
addressed and review key project governance                 and post-compulsory education.
arrangements such as the process of traditional             A Learning Community Centre staffed by local
owner selection of communities.                             people has been fitted out in Lajamanu.
These are essential to planning and ongoing                 In Willowra, a concept plan for a dedicated build-
implementation of the Uluru Rent money project.             ing has been completed with the community.

                                                            The CLC is working with a community-based



                                                       79             Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
central Land council annual report continued...


working group and other stakeholders on a CLC-            Moly Hill
funded business plan for the Willowra Learning
                                                          In response to the determination of the native
Centre.
                                                          title holders of the Moly Hill mine site to spend
 64 Warlpiri secondary students were as-                 their royalties from a proposed mine on projects
sisted to study in their communities or to attend         that develop and maintain their outstations, the
boarding schools under the Warlpiri Secondary             CLC negotiated with the Centre for Appropriate
Student Support Program. The program funded               Technology (CAT) to design a sustainable out-
achievement vouchers, school excursions, fam-             station development and support project. Com-
ily visits to boarding schools or home visits for         munity consultations and site visits have begun
boarders.                                                 as part of the project planning.

The CLC continud to support Warlpiri-patu-                LanD manaGement anD
kurlangu Jaru. The members are central in the             cOmmunity DeveLOpment
WETT community consultations, WETT Advisory               Much of the CLC’s land management work
Committee meetings and in presentations for               involves working with Aboriginal people on the
funding to Kurra.                                         ground to improve their daily lives. Issues as
Tanami Dialysis Support Service Feasibility               diverse as water supplies for communities, em-
Study                                                     ployment as rangers, siting of bores and outsta-
                                                          tions, governance issues for Aboriginal pasto-
Kurra Aboriginal Corporation allocated a quarter
                                                          ral properties, IPAs and joint management of
of a million dollars to set up a dialysis unit for
                                                          national parks are all carried out as functions of
renal patients in Yuendumu, following a report
                                                          land management in the CLC. Details of much of
about the feasibility of this service for remote
                                                          this work can be found in the preceding outputs.
Tanami communities commissioned by the
CLC. The allocation provides for the part-time            The CLC continued to provide assistance to resi-
manager and patient support worker, and initial           dents of affected communities and outstations to
infrastructure and operational budget.                    plan and negotiate capital infrastructure works
                                                          projects eligible for funding from the Railway
The unit will have two treatment chairs and allow
                                                          Community Development Fund. The Fund was
renal patients from Yuendumu, Willowra, Yue-
                                                          established to ameliorate impacts of the Alice
lamu and Nyirrpi living in Alice Springs to visit
                                                          Springs to Darwin Railway development on ap-
home more often and stay longer.
                                                          proximately 30 existing and developing commu-
Gmaaac, yuenDumu pOOL anD                                 nities in the rail corridor vicinity.
OtHer prOjects                                            wATER

The construction of the Yuendumu pool is well             Potable water is a major issue for many com-
underway with the help of the CLC’s participa-            munities in Central Australia and the CLC has
tion on the Yuendumu Pool Steering Committee              represented traditional owners in meetings
and funds from the Granites Mine Affected Area            with the NT Government regarding legislative
Aboriginal Corporation (GMAAAC).                          changes and proposals for the issuing of water
                                                          licences to Aboriginal communities within Water
The CLC carried out a round of community
                                                          Control Districts.
consultations in or near the eight GMAAAC
communities as the start of a new CLC                     The CLC also liaised with government, resource
community development project to realize more             centres, community councils, the Centre for
sustainable community benefit from GMAAAC                 Appropriate Technology and other organisations
monies.                                                   in an attempt to resolve a number of community


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08         80
central Land council annual report continued...


water supply and related bore maintenance is-            At Canteen Creek, 30 donkeys posing an envi-
sues including:                                          ronmental health and safety risk were culled.

 Waju community living area on Mount Cave-              Residents of Mulga Bore and Laramba also re-
nagh station for improvements to their water             quested help to exclude stock from a neighbour-
supply;                                                  ing pastoral lease.

 Mulga Bore community in the Sandover re-               At Willowra the CLC supported the Wirliyajarrayi
gion to resolve the water supply issue impacting         Cattle Corporation to construct a donkey exclu-
on community health;                                     sion fence around the Willowra community.

 research and advice on bore quality and
quantity data for traditional owners of the
Thakaperte ALT;

 Foxall’s Well outstation (Mt. Riddock
locality) regarding unresolved water and power
infrastructure needs.


OUTSTATIONS

Negotiating Community Living Areas and out-
stations for people is another function of land
mangement. More details can be found in Output
1.2. on Community Living Areas.

This year the CLC consulted Lake Nash-based
traditional owners of the Irrmarne ALT about
housing requirements for a proposed outstation
development on the adjoining Aboriginal-owned
Ooratippra station.

It also continued to liaise with the Anmatjere
Community Government Council and station
manager regarding support for housing and wa-
ter supply works required for a new outstation on
the western side of the Aboriginal-owned Alcoota
station in the Plenty River region.

Consultations and site visits were conducted
with traditional owners of the Mpweringe-Ar-
napipe ALT (Blacktank and Sandy Bore portion)
to assess suitable locations for a new outstation
development on the Land Trust.
FERAL ANImALS

The CLC responded to several requests for
assistance to exclude or remove stock and feral
animals impacting on the community environ-
ment and community health.



                                                    81             Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
Central Land Council Annual Report

                       Output Group 5
          Administration and support services
 Central Land Council Annual Report


Output Group 5

Administration and support services

The CLC has a statutory responsibility to ascertain and express the wishes and opin-
ions of Aboriginal people its region, to protect the interests of Aboriginal people and
help to protect sacred sites.




OUTCOmE                      OUTPUT GROUP 5

  Enhanced social, polit-
                               Administration and Support Services
  ical and economic par-
  ticipation and equity
  for Aboriginal people
  in the Land Council’s
                                   OUTPUTS
  area as a result of the
  promotion, protection              5.1 Distributions
  and advancement of
                                     5.2 Administer Land Trusts
  their land rights, other
  rights and interests
                                      5.3 Dispute Resolution




Below: the CLC region covers 750,000 square kilometres of remote and often inaccessible country




                                                 83               Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
Output 5.1 Distributions

DescriptiOn Of Output                                     Strait Islander) Act 2006 rules.
The CLC maintains a Land Use Trust Account                Drafts of the new rules will be presented at
to receive monies on behalf of associations               the next Annual General Meetings of the
of Aboriginal people and individuals in accor-            associations.
dance with section 35 of the Aboriginal Land
Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976.                     Associations are required to conduct meet-

These associations are all incorporated under             ings and make resolutions for their Aboriginal

the Corporations (Aboriginal and Torres Strait            traditional owner membership list to be created

Islander) Act 2006 (CATSI Act)                            or varied.

The associations provide the CLC with meet-
ing resolutions which nominate the recipients of                   perfOrmance 2007-2008
royalty income distribution.                                  Corporations (Aboriginal and Torres Strait
The CLC has a statutory obligation to provide                       Islander) Act 2006 (CATSI Act)
administration and monitor compliance with                                       compliance
statutory regulatory requirements and the rules
                                                           Annual General Meetings and committee                78
of the corporation.
                                                           meetings held and income distribution
It also provides governance services, traditional          instructions taken
ownership identification as required and admin-            Associations independently audited prior             63
istration of meetings as required by the rules of          to Annual General Meetings
the corporations established under the CATSI               All Chairperson and Committee reports
Act.                                                       forwarded to the Registrar
The CLC has a staff of seven people to provide             Association Annual General Meet-                     63
these functions.                                           ings held between 1st July and 31st
                                                           December
It also administers the Ceremonial Purposes
                                                           Associations closed                                  8
Fund on behalf of the Aboriginal Benefits Ac-
                                                           Membership lists of all associations
count. The grant assists Aboriginal people with
                                                           updated and forwarded to the Registrar
conducting ceremonies and funerals.

perfOrmance                                               Tax and BAS returns for 63 Associations,
Association membership can range from family-             two companies and a Trust were completed
based groups to large associations within the             and lodged within Australian Taxation Office
CLC area and the CLC again undertook ex-                  requirements.
tensive research as to traditional ownership
                                                          The CLC also processed 171 funeral applica-
identification relative to distribution of monies.
                                                          tions.
It is a core requirement that monies are distrib-
                                                          cOmment On perfOrmance
uted in an accurate and equitable way.
                                                          The CLC’s work in maintaining and
This year the CLC arranged ASIC compliance for            distributing statutory and negotiated payments
three incorporated companies and progressed               has increased as more mining and land use
the process of bringing all associations into line        agreemnets are forged under both the Aboriginal
with new Corporations (Aboriginal and Torres              Land Rights Act and the Native Title Act.


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08         84                Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
central Land council report continued...


The CLC Executive decides on the distribution                bers maximise the economic benefit from royalty
of ceremonial and funeral funds. There is a ceil-            payments.
ing of $1200 to assist with the cost of funerals.
                                                             The CLC operates a separate trust account for
Ceremonial funds are distributed on a regional
                                                             the receipt and distribution of section 35(2) pay-
basis.
                                                             ments. At no point are those funds receipted
abOriGinaL assOciatiOn                                       into the operational accounts of the CLC.
manaGement centre (aamc)
                                                             The use of the AAMC to disburse funds to
The CLC established the Aboriginal Association
                                                             Aboriginal people on behalf of Incorporated
Management Centre (AAMC) to provide adminis-
                                                             Aboriginal Associations provides a high level of
tration, accounting, consultation and secretarial
                                                             governance in accordance with the directions of
services to incorporated Aboriginal Associations
                                                             each Aboriginal Association.
who receive income from the CLC under sec-
tion 35 of the ALRA (i.e. royalty payments from              The AAMC has well-established processes for
mining leases and other land use agreements).                disbursing funds to Aboriginal people and has a
Each of these Aboriginal Associations is incorpo-            number of controls in place to mitigate risks as-
rated under the CATSI Act.                                   sociated with the process.

Support is provided to Aboriginal Associations               The Office of Evaluation and Audit EA perfor-
on a negotiated percentage (usually 5%) of                   mance audit nominated “The creation of the
receipts. The key activities undertaken by the               Aboriginal Associations Management Centre
AAMC include assisting Aboriginal Associations               (AAMC) and its role in supporting Aboriginal As-
to achieve legislative compliance; managing                  sociations on a fee for service basis” as a better
core administrative activities (e.g. completion              practice.
of ATO and BAS returns); facilitating meetings
to determine distribution payments; managing
the income distribution process; facilitating the
external audit of Aboriginal Associations; and
identifying traditional owners eligible for distribu-
tion payments (using the services of the Anthro-
pology section).

The AAMC structure and processes provides a
model of better practice for the CLC to assist
Aboriginal Associations with the administration
of royalty payments. The AAMC is administra-
tively and physically separated from other CLC
activities (the offices are separately located from
the CLC).

At the same time the structure provides a level
of assurance that the Aboriginal Associations
are operated in accordance with legislative
requirements, control processes are applied to
distributions, and Aboriginal Association mem-


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08            85                Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
Output 5.2 Administer Land Trusts


DescriptiOn Of Output                                      in trust and common seals;
                                                                       executive meetinGs
Aboriginal land is formally held by Land                   l   maintains a register of common seals and
Trusts - Aboriginal people who hold the title              trustees;
for the benefit of all the traditional owners
and people with traditional interests in the               l   ensures membership is up to date and

land.                                                      complies with the Aboriginal Land Rights Act;

These are statutory corporations and usually               l   registers agreements; and

consist of a chairperson and not less than three           l   conducts consultations.
members who hold office for periods not exceed-
                                                           perfOrmance
ing three years. Land Trust members are usually
                                                           There are more than 70 Land Trusts in the CLC’s
traditional Aboriginal landowners of the land held
                                                           region.
in trust.
                                                           Thirteen new Aboriginal Land Trusts were cre-
The functions of a Land Trust are to hold title to
                                                           ated in 2005 to hold title for land to be handed
land, exercise powers to acquire, hold and dis-
                                                           back under an agreement with the Northern
pose of real and personal property for the benefit
                                                           Territory Government, which will return some
of the traditional landowners and where land is
                                                           land that has been under claim since 1997 to the
granted in a deed of grant held in escrow, to ac-
                                                           traditional owners in return for 99 year leases for
quire the estates and interests of other persons
                                                           national parks.
with a view of gaining the delivery of the title to
the Land Trust.                                            Unfortunately, due to a large number of the
                                                           members of these land trusts passing away this
A Land Trust can only deal with the land in
                                                           financial year, consultations had to be under-
ways that the Land Council directs it to but Land
                                                           taken to reconstitute the memberships.
Councils can only direct Land Trusts to deal in
land in ways that the traditional owners have              Otherwise, the administrative load of maintaining
determined.                                                an up-to-date register of trustees has been sig-
                                                           nificantly reduced by amendments to the Aborigi-
To assist the Land Trusts the CLC :
                                                           nal Land Rights Act last year which extends the
l    provides secure storage for Deeds of Grant            term of trustees from three years to five years.
                                                                Below: Traditional owners in the Northern Tanami




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08          86
central Land council report continued...



                                               cattLe DuffinG
   A growing concern to the Central Land Council in the past 12 months has been the increasing
   level of unauthorised grazing, illegal mustering or cattle duffing and other unauthorised activity
   on Aboriginal land.

   The CLC took action on seven major incidents involving Aboriginal land during the financial
   year.

   They included cases of unauthorised grazing, unauthorised road construction, illegal trapping of
   cattle and the illegal muster and sale of cattle.

   CLC staff conducted traditional owner consultations and negotiations after reports of unauthor-
   ised grazing on the Ahakeye Aboriginal Land Trust, which was formerly Ti Tree Station.

   Similar action was taken on the Anatye Aboriginal land trust (formerly Tarlton Downs Stock
   Reserve).

   An assessment of cattle numbers, land condition and environmental health had to be undertak-
   en on the Angarapa Land Trust (formerly Utopia Pastoral Lease) to gauge the impact of unau-
   thorised grazing on its southern portion.

   Illegal trap gates were removed from an area off the Aboriginal-owned Loves Creek Pastoral
   Lease and an investigation was launched into the alleged unauthorised removal of cattle from
   the Pawu Land Trust (formerly Mount Barkley pastoral lease).

   A formal complaint was lodged with the Australian Crime Commission and Northern Territory
   Police in February this year after a case of suspected illegal mustering and sale of cattle from
   the Yalpirakinu land trust (formerly Mount Allen pastoral lease).

   Assistance is being provided to an ongoing police investigation into the case and the CLC has
   obtained the cancellation of several obsolete brands registered on the Yalpirakinu Land Trust.

   In another case, the CLC has investigated a complaint involving the unauthorised construction
   of 14 kilometres of road across the Central Desert Aboriginal Land Trust. The work has dis-
   turbed sacred sites and caused environmental damage.

   The illegal activity has the affect of diverting CLC resources away from proactive functions but
   more importantly upsets traditional owners when sacred sites are damaged or their earning
   potential is reduced.

   It also highlights the need for vigilance by residents and police in isolated regions and the need
   for the NT Government to re-instate a ‘stock squad’ within the ranks of the NT Police.




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08           87         Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
central Land council report continued...


                      AbORiGinAL LAnD TRusTs in The CLC ReGiOn
Ahakeye ALT                     Ltalaltuma ALT
Aherrenge ALT                   Mala ALT
Akanta ALT                      Malngin 2 ALT
Akekarrwenteme Urey-            Malngin ALT
enge ALT
                                Mangkururrpa ALT
Alatjuta ALT
                                Melknge ALT
Alyawarra ALT
                                Mount Frederick ALT
Amoonguna ALT
                                Mpwelarre ALT
Anatye ALT
                                Mpweringe-Arnapipe (2)
Angarapa ALT                    ALT
Ankweleyelengkwe ALT            Mpweringe-Arnapipe
Anurrete ALT                    ALT

Apatula ALT                     Mt Frederick (No.2) ALT

Arnapipe ALT                    Mungkarta 2 ALT

Athenge Lhere ALT               Mungkarta ALT

Atnetye ALT                     Ngalurrtju ALT

Central Desert ALT              Ntaria ALT

Daguragu ALT                    Pantyinteme ALT

Haasts Bluff ALT                Pawu ALT

Hooker Creek ALT                Petermann ALT              Thakeperte ALT            Warumungu ALT

Iliyarne ALT                    Pmer Ulperre In-           Thangkenharenge ALT       Watarrka ALT
                                gwemirne Arletherre
Ilparle ALT                                                Uluru-Katatjuta ALT       Wirliyajarrayi ALT
                                ALT
Inarnme ALT                                                Uretyingke ALT            Yalpirakinu ALT
                                Pmere Nyente ALT
Iwupataka ALT                                              Urrampinyi Iltjiltjarri   Yewerre ALT
                                Purta ALT
                                                           ALT
Kanttaji ALT                                                                         Yingualyalya ALT
                                Pwanye ALT
                                                           Uruna ALT
Karlantijpa North ALT                                                                Yiningarra ALT
                                Rodna ALT
                                                           Wakaya ALT
Karlantijpa South ALT                                                                Yuendumu ALT
                                Roulpmaulpma ALT
                                                           Wampana - Karlantijpa
Katiti ALT                                                                           Yunkanjini ALT
                                Rrurtenge ALT              ALT
Lake Mackay ALT
                                Santa Teresa ALT           Warrabri ALT



Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08          88
Output 5.3 Dispute Resolution in relation to land

DescriptiOn Of Output
Each Land Council has a statutory duty to
conciliate disputes. Fortunately, in the CLC
area the number of disputes is modest. In
some cases it is recognised that conciliation
is, or will ultimately be, ineffective to resolve
a dispute.

In such a situation the CLC adopts strategies
to manage the dispute over time, and minimise
disturbance among groups associated with the
area in dispute


perfOrmance
Efforts to address the dispute in a Tennant Creek
area in the current year included commissioning
an expert independent report as to competing
claims.

The CLC will be guided by the recommendations
of that report.

As in some other disputes of this nature, dis-
agreement is exacerbated if a particular indi-
vidual remains intransigent in the face of a group
consensus.

Another more public dispute between Aboriginal
families is not fundamentally about land owner-
ship and other agencies are mediating in the
media




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08         89   Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
Central Land Council Annual Report
                       Native Title

                   Output Group 6
Native Title Report continued...
 Central Land Council Annual Report


Output Group 6

Native title

The Central Land Council is a Native Title Representative Body for Central Australia
under the Native Title Act 1993



OUTCOmE                             OUTPUT GROUP 6

  Enhanced social, polit-
  ical and economic par-                Native Title
  ticipation and equity
  for Aboriginal people
  in the Land Council’s
  area as a result of the
  promotion, protection
  and advancement of
  their land rights, other
  rights and interests




  Below: Former Northern territory MLA elliot McAdam, fiormer Chief Minister Clare Martin, CLC Chairman Lindsay
                                       Bookie and CLC Executive member Maxie Ray sign an ILUA at Tennant Creek




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08            91              Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
Output 6.1 Native Title

DESCRIPTION OF OUTPUT                                               NATIvE TITlE 2007-2008
Native title is the name used by the Austra-               new Native Title Application (Aileron)      1
lian High Court to describe the rights and                 objection (withdrawn following agree-       1
interests Aboriginal people have over their                ment)
lands dating from long before European                     Future Act Non-Mining Agreements            3
settlement of Australia.                                   (ILUAs)

These rights and interests are called ‘com-                Future Act Mining Agreements                4
mon law’ Indigenous property rights and                    Native title settlement ILUA                1
were recognised by the High Court in the
                                                           Mining and exploration Agreements           9
mabo judgment (3 June 1992) and made into
                                                           Active native title applications            22
legislation in 1993.

Until then, the legal system in Australia had
                                                               FUTURE ACT MINING/ExPlORA-
wrongly assumed that the land of Australia had
                                                                TION RElATED MEETINGS AND
belonged to no one, or was terra nullius, when
the British arrived in 1788.
                                                                  CONSUlTATIONS 2007-2008
                                                           Site surveys, work area clearances and     29
The Mabo judgment found that native title to land          consultations
existed in 1788 and may continue to exist. The
                                                           Instructions meetings                      24
High Court’s Wik judgment (December 1996) de-
                                                           ILUA negotiation related                   23
termined that native title could coexist with other
                                                           s29 consultations                          13
rights on land held under a pastoral lease.
                                                           Native title holder identification field   4
Native title recognises that Indigenous people             trips
have traditional rights to speak for country, but
                                                           Miscellaneous field trips                  4
native title does not give Indigenous people own-
ership of the land like the Land Rights Act does.
                                                             NATIvE TITlE RESOlUTIONS PASSED
The Central Land Council is the recognised                   by ThE ClC ExECUTIvE 2007-2008
Native Title Representative Body (NTRB) for                Mining agreements                          1
Central Australia under the auspices of the Na-
                                                           Exploration agreements                     9
tive Title Act .
                                                           Deeds of Assumption                        9
In that capacity the CLC helps native title hold-          Distribution of compensation monies        6
ers make applications, negotiate agreements
about future developments and resolve disputes             AGREEMENT MAkING
between groups.                                            The CLC has adopted a clear strategy to secure
                                                           beneficial outcomes for native title holders
PERFORMANCE
                                                           through negotiated agreements, including ILUAs
 NATIvE TITlE ClAIM MEETINGS AND                           and other agreements.
          CONSUlTATIONS                                    NATIvE TITlE DETERMINATIONS
 National parks                                28
                                                           Tennant Creek
 Claim research/affadavit                      13
                                                           In November 2006 the CLC completed negotia-
                                                           tions with the Northern Territory Government
                                                           regarding native title applications over Tennant


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08          92
Central land Council Annual Report continued...


Creek (previously four applications, three con-                  COMPENSATION APPlICATIONS
solidated into one application).
                                                                 When deemed appropriate and instructed by
The terms of an ILUA were agreed to and the                      native title holders, the CLC seeks to secure
orders required for a consent determination                      compensation for acts that have resulted in the
of native title over areas within Tennant Creek                  extinguishment or impairment of their native title
settled by the parties.                                          rights and interests.

On September 3, 2007, Tennant Creek became                       No new native title compensation applications
the first town in Australia to have a native title               were lodged with the National Native Title Tribu-
determination by consent. Justice Mansfield of                   nal (NNTT) for determination during the report-
the Federal Court handed down his determina-                     ing period.
tion at a special sitting of the court in Tennant
                                                                 yUlARA
Creek and an Indigenous Land Use Agreement
(ILUA) was signed immediately afterward.                         Judgement in the Yulara Compensation Applica-
                                                                 tion (Johnny Jango v. Northern Territory (2006)
The ILUA, which will benefit about 200 Waru-
                                                                 FCA 318) was delivered on 31 March 2006. In
mungu native title holders, acknowledges
                                                                 his reasons for judgement, the trial judge found
extinguishment over some areas and provides
                                                                 against the claimants.
compensation for that extinguishment includ-
ing seed funding for the establishment of an                     The judgement was appealed to the full Federal
educational trust.                                               Court and heard on November 6, 2006. On July
                                                                 6, 2007 the Federal Court dismissed the applica-
Native title issues have now been comprehen-
                                                                 tion to appeal.
sively settled for the entire town.

           Below: Justice Mansfield congratulates native title holder Mrs Fitz on the consent determination in Tennant Creek




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08                93                Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
Central land Council Annual Report continued...


ClAIMANT APPlICATIONS                                     tion of native title over these areas desirable to
                                                          ensure their protection.
The CLC pursues native title determinations that
will achieve recognition and protection of native         The CLC has good anthropological and linguistic
title rights and deliver outcomes that are impor-         material to support native title applications over
tant to native title holders.                             these areas and anticipates determinations by
                                                          consent.
The CLC has a total of 22 active native title
claimant applications registered with the NNTT.           AIlERON
In the reporting period, CLC staff undertook a
                                                          A new application was filed and registered in the
total of 41 meetings and consultations relat-
                                                          reporting period relating to a portion of Aileron
ing to NTAs and has made significant progress
                                                          PPL and to deal with future mining acts. The
in anthropological research and preparation of
                                                          area in the vicinity of Nolan’s Bore, has been
consent determination reports.
                                                          subject to intensive exploration and mining
The CLC is continuing discussions with the NT             interest.
Government with respect to land within the town
                                                          A mineral lease has been applied for and mining
boundaries of Ti Tree and the CLC and NT Gov-
                                                          operations are expected to commence within the
ernment are pursuing the process of determina-
                                                          next 18 months.
tions by consent in the following applications and
hopes to have these settled in 2008-2009.                 Seven meetings were held with native title hold-
                                                          ers during the reporting period to take instruc-
OORATIPPRA PPl, NEwhAvEN, kAlkARINGI,                     tions and affidavits for the native title application.
SINGlETON, PINE hIll
                                                          Another two consultation meetings were held in
This process has been assisted by the determi-            relation to mining proposals.
nation of the Newcastle Waters test case [King
v Northern Territory of Australia (2006) FCA944]          PATTA, kARlU kARlU, DUlCIE RANGES, wEST
where final orders were handed down on Sep-               MACDONNEll RANGES NATIONAl PARk
tember 26, 2007.                                          These four applications will be withdrawn as part
This case settled many of the outstanding issues          of a negotiated settlement with the NT Govern-
regarding native title claims over pastoral leases        ment, which includes the granting of freehold
in the Northern Territory.                                title under the Aboriginal Land Rights (NT) Act,
                                                          and leasing of the area to the NT Government
One new native title application was filed with
                                                          for park joint management once provisions have
the NNTT in the reporting period. The new ap-
                                                          been agreed to.
plication covers an area of land on Aileron PPL
and is in response to a mineral lease application         Extensive consultations in relation to joint
and mining operations are expected to com-                management of the parks continued during the
mence within the next 18 months.                          reporting period.

In the reporting period, a decision was also              The CLC is still waiting for the Australian and NT
made to file whole-of-lease claims over Mt Do-            Governments to finalise the granting of title aris-
reen and Napperby PPLs respectively, as both              ing from the parks settlement.
PPLs have increasingly become subject to inten-           PINE hIll PPl
sive exploration and mining interest, with every
likelihood that mining will proceed. The PPLs             Consent determination
are known to have many sacred sites and areas             Minor re-drafting of the consent determination
of great cultural significance, making recogni-           report was undertaken in the reporting period


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08         94
Central land Council Annual Report continued...


and submitted to the NT Government along with                 tion to this area and compensation for the use of
statements from claimants. Negotiations are                   the land by owners of mineral claims.
ongoing and a consent determination by the
                                                              Extensive anthropological field research has
Federal Court is anticipated in the latter part of
                                                              been undertaken for a determination and the
2008.
                                                              consultant’s report is being finalised.
Compensation
                                                              lAkE NASh
A Community Living Area application was
prepared and provided to the Department of In-                The application was lodged in response to
frastructure, Planning and Environment and the                mining future acts. A report from a consultant
Northern Territory Land Corporation in April 2007             historian has been peer reviewed and finalised.
and a response is yet to be received, as is the
                                                              The second round of anthropological research
grant of a Crown Lease over NTP 6109 (horticul-
                                                              was undertaken in August 2007 and further
tural development).
                                                              research is scheduled for September 2008 after
AlyAwARR (SANDOvER ) INCORPORATING                            which the consultant’s report will be finalised.
DERRy DOwNS, MURRAy DOwNS, ElkEDRA                            OORATIPPRA PPl
AND AMMAROO PPlS
                                                              The application was lodged in response to
A native title application was lodged in response             mining future acts, but the CLC has now been
to mining and horticultural future acts. Three                instructed to pursue a determination of native
claim research field trips were undertaken in                 title.
the reporting period. Further field research will
continue in 2008-09.                                          The anthropology report is being reviewed and
                                                              statements from members of the claimant group
kAlkARINGI                                                    were taken during the reporting period.
It’s anticipated that this application will be settled        Legal research was also undertaken regarding
through negotiation with the NT Government.                   s. 47A (exclusive possession). The application
A revised consent determination report is being               is to be amended on the instructions of native
internally reviewed and affidavits will be forward-           title holders.
ed to the NT Government in 2008.                              SINGlETON PPl
Three meetings were held in Kalkaringi dur-                   This application was lodged in response to
ing the reporting period to take instructions on              future acts both in respect of the future use of
an ILUA concerning the grant of three freehold                the pastoral property and the acquisition of land
blocks as compensation for the loss of native                 from the pastoral property to expand a tourist
title and the agreement is currently waiting for              venture.
registration by the NNTT
                                                              The application has been substantially amended
kURUNDI PPl                                                   and served upon the NT Government in the
The application was lodged in response to                     reporting period.
mining future acts. Negotiations were held in                 The CLC is waiting for a response.
2003-04 with the ILC to acquire the property on
behalf of native title holders.                               NEwhAvEN PPl

An ILUA was registered in 2005-06 with respect                A consent determination was revised by a
to an area of land known as the Kurinelli Mineral             consultant in the reporting period and is being
Field and deals with the issues of cultural protec-           reviewed internally. Amendments to the native


                                                         95             Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
Central land Council Annual Report continued...


title application will be required and instructions        This is a Right To Negotiate application arising
sought in 2008-09.                                         from Future Act (non-mining).

Once the report is reviewed and finalised, it will         An application was filed with the NNTT on No-
be submitted to the NT Government for assess-              vember 8, 2005 and registered on April 13, 2006.
ment.                                                      Further action on this application is dependent
                                                           on site selection by the Commonwealth for the
A determination of native title rights will require
                                                           proposed nuclear waste dump under the Com-
the current lessee, Australian Wildlife Conser-
                                                           monwealth Radioactive Waste Management
vancy, a party to the native title application, to
                                                           Act 2005. No advice had been received in the
formalise the land management arrangements.
                                                           reporting period.
The trigger for this work will be the acceptance
                                                           MT EvERARD
by the NT Government of the consent determina-
tion report.                                               This is a Right To Negotiate application arising
                                                           from Future Act (non-mining).
GlEN hElEN
                                                           An application was filed with the NNTT on No-
Two applications were filed and registered to
                                                           vember 8, 2005 and registered with the Tribunal
administer future act rights regarding exploration
                                                           on April 20, 2006.
licence applications.
                                                           Further action on this application is dependent
Objections to the use of the expedited proce-
                                                           on site selection by the Commonwealth for the
dures’ have been filed with the National Native
                                                           proposed nuclear waste dump under the Com-
Title Tribunal.
                                                           monwealth Radioactive Waste Management Act
Both future acts were settled and both applica-            2005. No advice had been received in the report-
tions are to be withdrawn and one application              ing period.
over the whole of the property is to be consid-
                                                           bOND SPRINGS
ered. Anthropological field research has been
completed and a report by a consultant was                 This application arising from Future Act (mining)
peer reviewed and finalised in the reporting               was filed with the NNTT 28 April 2006. An objec-
period. Work on the drafting of the application is         tion was filed with the NNTT and meetings held
continuing.                                                with claimants and the proponent in 2007-08.

AlCOOTA (1)                                                An agreement was made in October 2007.

Further anthropological research is required. A            Consultations with native title holders are
land claim hearing under the provisions of the             ongoing and it’s anticipated instructions will be
Aboriginal Land Rights Act was completed in                obtained to withdraw the native title application.
2004.
                                                           MOly hIll (JINkA )
The Aboriginal Land Commissioner’s Report
                                                           An application was registered with the NNTT in
was delivered in May 2007 and recommended
                                                           August 2004 for the specific purpose of dealing
the entire Alcoota PL be granted to an Aboriginal
                                                           with a number of future acts.
Land Trust.
                                                           A site survey was undertaken, three meetings
The CLC is still awaiting the Minister’s decision
                                                           were held with native title holders during the
to grant land under the Land Rights Act before
                                                           reporting period and a mining agreement was
withdrawing the native title application.
                                                           made in October 2007.
AlCOOTA (2)


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08          96
Central land Council Annual Report continued...


Instructions will be sought to withdraw the NTA            the reporting period.
after construction and commencement of the
                                                           NORThERN TERRITORy NATIONAl
project in accordance with the Mining Agree-
ment.
                                                           PARkS AND RESERvES
                                                           The CLC is still waiting for grants of land by
MOUNT DOREEN
                                                           the Commonwealth for Dulcie Ranges, West
A native title application was filed and registered        MacDonnell Ranges and Karlu Karlu (Devil’s
for a portion of Mount Doreen PPL to deal with             Marbles).
mining Future Acts – three exploration licence
                                                           Application of the terms and conditions regard-
applications where the target mineral is uranium.
                                                           ing the development of plans of management
On registration, an objection was filed in the             have continued in the reporting period.
NNTT. In 2005-06 an application was made to
                                                           In particular, the CLC and the NT Government,
the NT Minister for mines to declare reservations
                                                           through the Territory Parks and Wildlife Service,
from occupancy under s178 of the Mining Act to
                                                           have commenced negotiations with native title
protect certain parts of the Mount Doreen area
                                                           holders over the plans of management for Rain-
from further mining/exploration activity.
                                                           bow Valley, the Western MacDonnell Ranges,
A total of seven meetings were held with na-               Karlu Karlu (Devil’s Marbles), the Dulcie Ranges
tive title holders during the reporting period. In         and the Alice Springs Telegraph Station.
response to concerns from native title holders, a
                                                           CLC Land Management staff undertook 28 con-
native title application over the whole of Mount
                                                           sultation meetings and site visits with native title
Doreen PPL will be pursued. Anthropological
                                                           holders on matters relating to joint management,
research on this commenced in the reporting
                                                           operational planning and tourism development.
period.
                                                           FUTURE ACTS
NAPPERby
                                                           MINING/ExPlORATION FUTURE ACTS
An application was filed in response to a future
act. On registration, an objection was filed with          The CLC seeks to notify and provide informa-
the NNTT.                                                  tion to native title claimants and holders of future
                                                           acts that may impact on their native title rights
The parties conferred via a number of phone
                                                           and interests.
conferences and an agreement was reached on
November 24, 2005, whereby the NT Govern-                  Administration of “future acts” as defined by the
ment could grant the exploration licences. How-            Native Title Act is ongoing and a high priority for
ever, the native title holders instructed the CLC          the CLC.
that as they were not able to prevent the grant,
                                                           The CLC regional office network is an important
they did not want to participate in any further
                                                           conduit through which native title claimants and
activities regarding the exploration.
                                                           holders are informed of future acts that may
Ten meetings were held with native title holders           impact on their native title rights and interests.
during the reporting period, most of which were
                                                           The Northern Territory media is monitored on
to deal with future acts.
                                                           a daily basis and the CLC maintains a records
Following concerns from native title holders, a            database of all applications, relevant timelines
decision has been taken to proceed with a native           and associated tasks.
title application over the whole of Napperby PPL.
                                                           The CLC responds to all applicants outlining the
Anthropological research on this commenced in
                                                           native title process and recommending agree-


                                                      97              Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
Central land Council Annual Report continued...


ments as a preferred option.                                executed by the CLC in the reporting period.
                                                            One objection was lodged which has since been
In some instances, meetings of the affected na-
                                                            resolved by agreement and withdrawn.
tive title holders were organised, while in others,
existing instructions adequately dealt with the             MINING AGREEMENT - MOlyhIll
application.
                                                            The Molyhill Mining Agreement was signed un-
In all instances, contact with the applicant was            der the provisions of the Native Title Act 1993 by
required at some stage of the process.                      the CLC in October 2007.
One difficulty in the process is determining                The company is proposing to operate an open
whether the application is a genuine explora-               cut mine and processing facility on Jinka Station
tion proposal or the development of saleable                at the site of the old Molyhill Mine approximately
property.                                                   250kms north-west of Alice Springs.
The CLC responded to 150 notifications under                The mine is to produce tungsten ore and molyb-
s.29 of the Native Title Act in the reporting period        denite concentrate for sale.
2007-08.
                                                            The mining agreement flows from the ILUA en-
A total of 97 major future act – mining meetings            tered into in June 2001 following an s.29 “future
requiring the combined resources of the native              act” notice for Exploration Licence 22349 on
title unit and other operational units within the           Jinka Station covering the old Molyhill Mine and
CLC - were held during 2007-08.                             surrounding areas.
Many other meetings were held by individual                 The CLC entered into an ILUA with the licence
officers for notification or research purposes and          holder and the agreement was registered with
are too numerous to list.                                   the NNTT on 11 November 2002.
The CLC’s region covers 775,963 square kilome-              A native title claim was lodged in October 2003
tres, most of it remote. It is a resource intensive         covering the mineral lease applications and
process and the rapidly escalating cost of fuel to          approximately nine square kilometres of Jinka
nearly $3.00 a litre in some remote locations is            pastoral lease in order to secure the right to
an increasing concern for the CLC.                          negotiate.
Despite this, the CLC’s procedures for consulta-            The named applicant on behalf of the native title
tion and agreement making are continuing and                holders is Lindsay Bookie and he appears as a
working well in protecting native title interests.          signatory to the mining agreement on behalf of
To date there have been very few objections to              the native title holders.
expedited procedures under the Native Title Act             The provisions are comparable to similar condi-
and a significant number of agreements fina-                tions in mining agreements that the CLC has
lised.                                                      negotiated on Aboriginal land.

MINING AND ExPlORATION                                      The financial compensation terms were based
AGREEMENTS                                                  upon independent advice from an experienced
                                                            mineral economist and the CLC staff lawyer
The CLC has made 19 agreements with respect
                                                            confirms that the terms are reasonable and ben-
to exploration and mining, including four Indig-
                                                            eficial for native title holders (Note that no native
enous land use agreements that have been
                                                            title determination has been made, nor will be
registered with the National Native Title Tribunal.
                                                            sought).
The following future act agreements were


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08           98
Central land Council Annual Report continued...


The native title holders have also been discuss-
ing with the CLC community development staff a
process of utilising the benefits from the agree-
ment focusing on their living needs for outsta-
tions as well as health and education benefits.

They have instructed the CLC to discuss with
the Centre for Appropriate Technology a project
management agreement to facilitate their outsta-
tion development using the royalty income from
the agreement and this will be developed over
the next 12 months.



      ExPlORATION AGREEMENTS
PJ Forner & K Gray
Crossland Nickel Pty Ltd
Central Petroleum (ILUA)
Mincor Resources                                          Above: Oil and petroleum applications in the Central Land
WDR Base Metals Pty Ltd                                                                              Council region
Finching Pty Ltd & Mundena Holdings NL
                                                         RECENT TRENDS IN ExPlORATION
Deep Yellow Ltd                                          AND MINING
Spinifex Uranium Pty Ltd
                                                         FUTURE ACTS
Uranium Exploration Australia Pty Ltd
                                                         Mining is the single largest driver of the CLC’s
        DEEDS OF ASSIGNMENT/                             native title work program and the activity that
            ASSUMPTION                                   draws most heavily on staff time and resources.
Toro Resources                                           The number of exploration tenements notified
Rawson Resources                                         under s.29 of the Native Title Act has increased
Frontier Oil & Gas Pty Ltd                               greatly over recent years and the CLC makes
Central Petroleum                                        every effort to obtain instructions from native title
Merlin Energy (EP 97)                                    holders and respond to these notifications in a
Merlin Energy (EP 93)                                    timely manner.

Uranium Oil & Gas Pty Ltd (25382, 25329)                 Despite this, it has not been possible to respond
Uranium Oil & Gas Pty Ltd (ELs 25346, 25368,             to all notifications received in 2007-2008.
25504)                                                   The increasing workload for the CLC reflects the
Broken Range NL                                          increase in global commodity prices which are
                                                         stimulating exploration.

                                                         Gold, iron ore, nickel, oil and a range of other
                                                         commodities have increased significantly in price
                                                         (uranium prices have increased seven-fold since
                                                         2004).




                                                    99               Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
Central land Council Annual Report continued...


A high proportion of exploration applications              are from the Antulye estate group of the Alice
are from uranium explorers as several uranium              Springs native title claim whose country extends
deposits are known to exist in Central Australia.          beyond the area of the Alice Springs native title
                                                           determination. Many native title holders live in
Record oil prices have similarly renewed interest
                                                           Santa Teresa and communities around Alice
in the potential of Central Australia.
                                                           Springs.
The whole of the Amadeus and Georgina Basins
                                                           Company representatives briefed CLC staff on
are subject to exploration permits with the num-
                                                           their initial proposal and a meeting with the na-
ber of permits granted having risen from two in
                                                           tive title holders and the applicant companies
2003-2004 to 15 in 2007-2008.
                                                           was held on site in April 2008.
Seismic programs for oil and gas cover far great-
                                                           The application of the Native Title Act provisions
er tracts of land than a mineral drilling program.
                                                           to negotiations (as the NTA does not provide for
This makes the clearance process a far more                ‘veto’ of exploration applications, a native title
resource-intensive and time consuming exercise             claim would engage the right to negotiate provi-
for the CLC and increasingly, is placing consid-           sions) was discussed, however, no instructions
erable pressure on the available resources of              were provided to lodge a claim.
the organisation.
                                                           When the companies attended the meeting, they
ANGElA AND PAMElA URANIUM DEPOSIT                          provided an introduction to their operations in
                                                           Australia and worldwide and presented specific
In December 2006, the Northern Territory Gov-
                                                           material regarding the deposits and the explora-
ernment revoked a reservation from occupation
                                                           tion work they intended to undertake.
over the Angela and Pamela uranium deposit
located 25 kilometres south of Alice Springs.              A further meeting with senior traditional owners
                                                           was held on site in May to confirm instructions
Tenders were called to explore this deposit,
                                                           and to meet again with company representatives
which had been extensively drilled three de-
                                                           to provide further information, particularly with
cades ago, but reserved due to the Labor Party’s
                                                           regard to safety issues and employment and
three mines policy.
                                                           training matters.
More than 35 applicants applied and in March
                                                           Further information has been sought from
2008 the NT Government announced that EL
                                                           Cameco-Paladin on provisions for exploration
25758 over the Angela Pamela uranium deposit
                                                           work, which would inform any agreed outcomes
would be issued to the joint venture of Cameco
                                                           considered necessary by native title holders to
Australia Pty Ltd (50%) & Paladin Energy Miner-
                                                           manage the process.
als NL (50%).
                                                           The CLC has a duty to provide balanced infor-
The ELA is situated on Owen Springs PPL and
                                                           mation about exploration and the issues associ-
is being dealt with through the normal future act
                                                           ated with uranium mining.
process.
                                                           The CLC held a uranium information session for
The CLC engaged an anthropological consultant
                                                           native title holders in May 2008, during which
to prepare a ‘Native Title Holder Identification
                                                           views of the applicant companies, environmen-
Report’ on the Angela-Pamela area with suf-
                                                           tal groups, government and the uranium mining
ficient information to enable the CLC to support
                                                           industry were presented.
a Native Title Determination Application should it
be required.                                               The CLC is aware that the prospect of a uranium
                                                           mine is a controversial issue and that there are
Some of the native title holders for the area


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08         100
Central land Council Annual Report continued...


strong views held on all sides of the uranium              with agreement negotiations.
debate.
                                                           This involves working closely with native title
The CLC is, however, tasked with providing                 holders to identify individual and community
information to native title holders and represent-         priorities, exploring the range of options and
ing their views and interests when a decision is           potential opportunities that the agreement might
reached and the CLC has informed native title              present - i.e. potential for employment, educa-
holders it will support them whatever their deci-          tion, economic development, partnership ar-
sion is.                                                   rangements, community projects and developing
                                                           a realistic plan based on needs, opportunities,
Consultations are continuing and the CLC will
                                                           available capacity and resources.
act on instructions from those meetings as nec-
essary.                                                    It is a comprehensive process that requires time,
                                                           effort and specialist expertise and draws heavily
NON-MINING FUTURE ACTS
                                                           on the human and operational resources of the
The CLC executed three future act non-mining               CLC.
Indigenous Land Use Agreements in the report-
                                                           The federal minister’s speech of May 21, 2008
ing period:
                                                           and statements regarding sustainable use and
•   Kalkaringi Township ILUA                               application of native title benefits have been
                                                           encouraging. The CLC is optimistic that the
•   Power and Water Corporation (Brewer Es-
                                                           pro-active role it is taking in this regard will be
    tate) ILUAs (2)
                                                           recognised and resourced accordingly.
A total of four future act – non-mining meetings
were held during the reporting period, two were            INDIGENOUS lAND USE AGREEMENTS
to negotiate and receive instructions in order to          The CLC has implemented a clear strategy to
finalise the compensation ILUA for the extin-              secure beneficial outcomes for native title hold-
guishment of native title in Kalkaringi township           ers through negotiated ILUAs and other agree-
and two were in relation to the Power and Water            ments, including “good faith” agreement under
Authority Brewer Estate ILUAs.                             s31 of the Native Title Act.
FUTURE ACTS AND ThE EvOlvING ROlE OF                       The CLC has five ILUAs registered with the
ThE ClC                                                    NNTT.

The CLC is committed to promoting the use and              POST DETERMINATION ASSISTANCE
application of benefits arising from native title
                                                           Lhere Artepe Aboriginal Corporation (Alice
agreements in ways that maximise sustainable,
                                                           Springs PBC)
socio-economic outcomes for native title holders
and their communities.                                     The Prescribed Body Corporate (Lhere Artepe
                                                           Aboriginal Corporation) of the Native Title own-
An evolving role of the CLC therefore, is to as-
                                                           ers in the Alice Springs determination (Hayes
sist native title holders in making informed deci-
                                                           v Northern Territory) reached agreement with
sions about sustainable use and application of
                                                           the CLC in 2004-05 giving effect to its indepen-
compensation monies and benefits arising from
                                                           dence.
native title agreements.
                                                           Lhere Artepe Aboriginal Corporation now has its
To the extent that it is possible, the CLC fa-
                                                           own coordinator and financial resources to ob-
cilitates a process of community development
                                                           tain legal advice on matters relating to its com-
consultations with native title holders concurrent
                                                           mercial activities. However, in matters relating to


                                                     101               Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
Central land Council Annual Report continued...


native title it may continue to request advice and             the constitution to comply with the Corporations
assistance from the CLC.                                       (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander) Act 2006
                                                               (CATSI Act) tenure issues, town camp matters
At the request of Lhere Artepe Aboriginal
                                                               and a possible compensation application.
Corporation (LAAC), the CLC senior lawyer at-
tended the LAAC Working Executive meeting in                   It is anticipated that a number of these activities
September 2007 and the AGM in October 2007                     will require ongoing legal and logistical assis-
for which the CLC also provided some logistical                tance, particularly in relation to ILUA negotia-
assistance.                                                    tions for the Mt John Valley development, con-
                                                               sideration and negotiation of other development
Throughout the reporting period, senior native
                                                               proposals on native title land and revision to the
title unit staff have participated in 20 consulta-
                                                               LAAC constitution.
tion meetings with or on behalf of the LAAC,
provided advice and assistance to LAAC and                     Ilkewartn Ywel Aboriginal Corporation (Pine Hill
the Northern Territory Government on matters                   PBC)
relating to various future developments, ILUA ne-
                                                               The CLC assisted with the corporation’s first
gotiations, internal governance and changes to
                                                               AGM held in November 2007. Assistance with



                                 INDIGENOUS lAND USE AGREEMENTS



 Patta Aboriginal Corporation,                 ILUA regarding township of Tennant Creek. ILUA allows for
 Northern Territory Government                 recognition of native title as well as extinguishment and com-
 and CLC                                       pensation over some areas and enables native title issues to
                                               be dealt with over the entire town. ILUA registered with NNTT
                                               February 22, 2008.

                                               ILUA in respect of Petroleum Exploration Permits No.s 82, 112,
 Central Petroleum and its subsid-
                                               118 & 125 across the southern portion of the CLC’s region.
 iaries and CLC
                                               ILUA registered with NNTT 13 June 2008.



 Daguragu Community Govern-                    ILUA dealing with compensation for extinguishment of three
 ment Council, NT Government,                  blocks in Kalkaringi township. Awaiting registration by the
 CLC and the native title party                NNTT.


                                               Indigenous Land Use Agreement dealing with transmission
                                               lines and gas pipeline for the relocation of gas turbine power
 Power & Water Authority and CLC
                                               generation plant for Alice Springs. The plant is being relocated
                                               to the Brewer Estate. Awaiting registration with the NNTT.

                                               Indigenous Land Use Agreement dealing with transmission
 Power and Water Authority and                 lines and gas pipeline for the relocation of gas turbine power
 Envestra and CLC                              generation plant for Alice Springs. The plant is being relocated
                                               to the Brewer Estate. Awaiting registration with the NNTT.



Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08             102
Central land Council Annual Report continued...


implementation of the ILUA continued during                   mation package, which is now in the process of
the reporting period, although no business is                 being finalised.
likely until the horticulture block lease is granted.
                                                              In 2007-08, the focus was very much on devel-
Once the business starts, some capacity building
                                                              oping a uranium education strategy in response
support from the CLC is anticipated as matters
                                                              to the huge interest in uranium in CLC’s region.
arise.
                                                              The strategy identified the northern Tanami as a
Patta Aboriginal Corp (Tennant Creek PBC)                     priority region and the Tanami uranium road-
                                                              show was held in September and October 2007.
Assistance with implementation of the ILUA has
                                                              The roadshow involved community meetings at
continued during the reporting period following
                                                              Lajamanu and Kalkaringi communities with guest
determination of native title in September 2007.
                                                              presenters from the Australian Uranium Associa-
An AGM is scheduled for August 2008 and the                   tion, the Australian Conservation Foundation and
CLC has been asked to attend to provide advice                Northern Territory Government. The meetings
with the setting up of the education trust struc-             were followed by a trip to Jabiru by 22 traditional
ture and revision of the constitution. It is likely           owners to visit the Ranger Uranium Mine, meet
further assistance will be requested as matters               with the Office of the Supervising Scientist and
arise.                                                        the traditional owners of the Ranger Mine.

DISPUTE RESOlUTION                                            The events were filmed and uranium informa-
                                                              tion days have been scheduled for communities
The CLC’s routine processes attempt to iden-
                                                              across the CLC region in the coming months.
tify and minimise disputes over land from initial
contact with native title holders.                            GOVERNANCE AND ADMINISTRATION

There have been no major disputes relating to                 The CLC operates under the direction of the 90
overlapping native title claims in the CLC region             member council with delegated responsibilities
during this reporting period. In anticipation                 being held by the 11 member executive.
that disputes may arise in the future, the CLC
                                                              The CLC aims to certify applications for native
provides relevant staff with the opportunity to
                                                              title determination and applications for registra-
develop negotiation/mediation skills.
                                                              tion of ILUAs in a timely manner. Native title
AlTERNATIvE PROCEDURE AGREEMENTS                              determinations and ILUA applications are pre-
                                                              sented to the Council or Executive before going
The CLC did not enter into alternative procedure
                                                              to the National Native Title Tribunal.
agreements during the reporting period
                                                              The CLC was recognised as a Native Title Rep-
bODy CORPORATE AGREEMENTS
                                                              resentative Body (NTRB) in January 1994 and
No body corporate agreements were entered                     established a dedicated Native Title Unit (NTU)
into during the reporting period.                             to undertake NTRB functions as prescribed
                                                              under the Native Title Act and to advance the
EDUCATION
                                                              rights and interests of native title holders within
The CLC distributed and explained information                 its service region.
contained within the CLC Native Title booklet at
                                                              The NTU works to an operational plan which is
native title meetings and to individuals where
                                                              the foundation of the CLC’s annual native title
practicable and on request throughout the re-
                                                              work program and is reviewed biannually.
porting period.
                                                              The 2007-08 operational plan was revised
The CLC has also revised its native title infor-
                                                              primarily to reflect the emerging need to pursue


                                                        103              Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
Central land Council Annual Report continued...


whole-of-lease native title applications over
                                                         COURSE                  DAYS   ATTENDEES
Napperby and Mt Doreen PPLs in response
to intensive mining exploration interest across          Native Title Legal
those areas.                                                                        2           3
                                                         Issues Forum
The CLC’s Native Title operations are supported          Foundations of
                                                                                    3           1
by the CLC’s corporate and regional services             Native Title
which provide logistical and on the ground sup-          Greenhouse Emis-
port for field work. The native title work program       sion regulations &
                                                                                    1           1
relies heavily on these resources and has ben-           Carbon Trading in
efited from being able to leverage off the broader       the NT
operational infrastructure of the CLC in carrying        NT Emergency
out its work.                                            Response Task              1           1
hUMAN RESOURCES                                          Force
                                                         Fist Aid                   3          12
The CLC has 20 native title funded positions,
                                                         Anthropology
which include a manager, principal legal officer,                                   4           4
                                                         Conference
legal officers, research officer, anthropologists,
mining, administrative, land management and              Supervisor Training        3           1
project officers. Some positions sit within the
                                                         Corporate                         All CLC
Native Title Unit and others are located within
                                                         Governance                        council
various other departments of the CLC and repre-                                     1
                                                         Training                         members
sent key linkages these departments have with
the native title work program.                           HR Workshop                2           2

PROFESSIONAl DEvElOPMENT                                 Indigenous Com-
                                                         munities Economic
A key event in the reporting period was a                                           2           1
                                                         Development & Tax
research workshop organised by the CLC in con-           Policy
junction with the University of Queensland. The
                                                         4WD Awareness              2           3
workshop, “Practice Issues in Applied Anthro-
pological Research in Central Australia and the          Improving Capac-
Northern Territory”, was initiated primarily for the     ity in Native Title
benefit of CLC staff, although select organisa-          Research: Anthro-          3           1
tions and research consultants were also invited.        pological Issues &
The workshop was a great success and attended            Concepts
by 35 people, including 18 CLC staff.
                                                         Mediation Workshop         5           2
A summary of staff professional development              Practice Issues in
and training exercises undertaken in the report-         Applied Anthropologi-
ing period is detailed in the table opposite.            cal Research in Cen-       3          18
CONSUlTANTS                                              tral Australia & The
                                                         Northern Territory
The CLC engaged 19 consultants to work direct-
                                                         National Native Title
ly on native title activity during the 2007-2008                                    3          12
                                                         Conference
reporting period. The consultants had the
required specialist expertise required by the CLC        Cross Cultural
                                                                                    1           3
to achieve native title outcomes                         Awareness


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08           104
Central Land Council Annual Report

   Accountability and Governance
 Central Land Council Annual Report


Accountability and Governance

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE                                     SUN enterprise-wide integrated business ap-
                                                         plication and associated products.
The CLC is committed to:
                                                         Managers and other staff access operational
l maintaining and developing appropriate ac-
                                                         management financial reporting, including
counting and financial management systems;
                                                         budget funding versus actual expenditure vari-
l providing relevant, accurate and timely per-           ance analysis, in an on-line real-time password
formance based management reporting;                     secured and controlled environment.

l managing procurement of funds to sustain               In collaboration with the Office of Indigenous
and advance the CLC operational plan and per-            Policy Coordination, the outcomes and out-
formance of statutory functions;                         puts framework was approved by The Hon Mal
                                                         Brough MP Minister for Families, Community
l administering and monitoring compliance
                                                         Services and Indigenous Affairs Minister Assist-
with statutory regulatory requirements;
                                                         ing the Prime Minister for Indigenous Affairs.
l recruitment, training and development op-
                                                         The framework is intended to provide the basis
portunities for CLC personnel;
                                                         for preparing budget estimates and reporting on
l preparing, implementing and managing                   performance and utilisation of resources.
appropriate governance and risk management
                                                         Management is continuing to address the
framework;
                                                         challenge of applying the framework to routine
l accounting, financial management and per-              reporting of operational performance.
formance reporting.
                                                         In addition to the usual ANAO statutory audit
The Central Land Council is a Commonwealth               process the CLC has experienced audits by the
Statutory Authority within the terms of the Com-         Australian Taxation Office (GST),the Office of
monwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997             Evaluation and Audit (Performance Audit).
and the Minister has determined the form of
                                                         Significantly the Aboriginal Land Rights (North-
financial statements to be as prescribed under
                                                         ern Territory) Act 1976 was extensively amended
Schedule 2 of the Commonwealth Authorities
                                                         in October 2006 and considerable resources
and Companies Act 1997.
                                                         continue to be engaged in implementing the
The Council is also a Native Title Registered            consequent changes to governance and admin-
Body within the terms of the Native Title Amend-         istration.
ment Act 1998 and various sections of that Act
                                                         An extensive revision of Commonwealth legisla-
proscribe financial reporting requirements.
                                                         tion pertaining to Aboriginal Corporations has
Elsewhere in this report the Council’s statutory         been concluded.
annual financial reports are published together
                                                         The new Corporations (Aboriginal and Tor-
with the unqualified audit opinion issued by the
                                                         res Strait Islander) Act requires considerably
Australian National Audit Office.
                                                         expanded compliance and governance activity.
The Council maintains and develops financial             Implementation continues to be a challenge.
accounting and reporting systems utilising the


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08       100
Central Land Council Organisational Structure



                                                               CENTRAL LAND COUNCIL

                                           94 MEMBERS FROM 75 COMMUNITIES AND OUTSTATIONS




                                                                       EXECUTIVE
                                                        Chair, Deputy Chair and nine regional members


                                                  Chairman                                Deputy Chairman



                                                                       Director



                 Regional Services                      Directorate           Native Title                  Legal

                 Community liaison & de-       Policy                         Native Title applications     Land claims
                 velopment                     Media                          Land use agreements           Agreements
                 Regional office support       Council and Executive
                                                                                                            Legal advice
                                               liaison
                                               Women’s issues


                   Regional Offices
                   Regional offices             Mining                       Anthropology                   Corporate Services
                       Lajamanu                                              Traditional Ownership          Financial management
                                                Exploration
                       Alparra                                                                              Human Resources
                                                                             Identification (TOID)
                       Papunya                  Applications
                                                                             Land claims                    Records & Library
                       Yuendumu
                                                Mining Agreements            Work area clearances
                       Kalkaringi                                                                           Information Technology
                       Tennant Creek            & Employment                 Community                      AAMC - Royalty
                       Anmatyere
                                                                             development                    Associations
                       Mutitjulu
                       Atitjere                                                                             Property
                                                                  Land Management
                       Alice Springs
                                                          Regional land management
                                                          Community ranger programs
                                                          Joint management
                                                          Enterprise development
                                                          Employment




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08                     101                  Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
Central land Council Annual Report continued...


ExTERNAl REViEw Of CENTRAl lANd                            l the strategic planning process and resultant
COuNCil                                                    CLC Strategic Plan 2002 – 2007;

PERfORmANCE AudiT                                          l induction process that requires new employ-
                                                           ees to read and sign all CLC policies and the
The Office of Evaluation and Audit (Indigenous             promotion of CLC policies on their intranet.
Programs), Department of Finance and Deregu-
lation was requested (November 2006) by the                The CLC welcomes the frequent comments in
Parliamentary Secretary to audit the four North-           the Discussion Paper that confirm that the CLC
ern Territory Land Councils.                               has a clear and well-established process for
                                                           consulting with Aboriginal people and is “…com-
The objective of the audit was to “…assess the             mitted to obtaining informed consent on the use
efficiency, effectiveness and economy of the               of Aboriginal land” (pg 6).
management and administration of the Land
Councils, including mechanisms for measuring               After examination of the full range of activities
the achievement of outcomes and benchmarking               undertaken by the CLC, the Discussion Paper
performance”.                                              concludes that ‘the activities of the CLC are con-
                                                           sistent with the objectives of the ALRA and the
On the 17th March 2008 the CLC received the fi-            function prescribed to the Land Councils (pg 32).
nalised copy of the Central Land Council Discus-
sion Paper which formed part of the performance            These positive findings confirm that the CLC
audit of the Northern Territory Land Councils              strives to achieve the best possible outcomes
report recently completed by the Office of Evalu-          across a broad range of functions for traditional
ation and Audit (Indigenous Programs) [OEA].               owners and other Aboriginal people in this
                                                           region.
The OEA provided CLC with the opportunity to
comment on various aspects of the Discussion               The Central Land Council through it’s Council,
Paper and subsequently included those com-                 Executive and administrative arm endorses and
ments in the final document.                               actively works toward positive and continuous
                                                           improvement processes and programs.
The audit determined 11 recommendations for
consideration and identified six better practices.          A series of independent performance audits
                                                           has demonstrated a commitment to excellence
Better Practices identified within the CLC                 in administration and governance and the CLC
include:                                                   continues to achieve that outcome in an evolving
l use of the Australian Electoral Commission               and dynamic legislative, political and community
to oversee the election of Full Council members,           environment.
Chairman and Deputy Chairman positions.                    The Central Land Council looks forward to the
l development of the governance induction                  opportunity to engage in discussion to identify
and training programme.                                    funding and resources appropriate to the timely
                                                           implementation of the recommendations in this
l the CLC Regional Office structure, with re-
                                                           report.
porting and accountability lines to Alice-Springs
based staff.                                               Implementation of the recommendations is a
                                                           continuing process.
l the creation of the Aboriginal Associations
Management Centre (AAMC) and its role in                   EsTimATEs REViEw
supporting Aboriginal Associations on a fee for
                                                           The CLC is required to submit Estimates of
service basis.
                                                           Administrative Expenditure to the Minister on an


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08         102
Central land Council Annual Report continued...


annual basis. The Minister engages KPMG Dar-              The office accommodation will be constructed
win to conduct an independent forensic review             on Lot 7409 (27) Stuart Highway, Alice Springs,
and assessment of the Estimates to facilitate the         Northern Territory.
approval process.
                                                          The gross project estimate is $10,980,000,
Once approved the Estimates provide the CLC               including land acquisition, building design and
funding for operational expenses, salaries and            construction and furniture, fittings and equipment
wages and capital expenditure for the financial           fit-out.
year.
                                                          The funding sources are the Aboriginal Benefits
During the financial year, at four monthly inter-         Account, litigation cost recoveries, incorrectly
vals, the CLC is required to submit a report to           levied payroll tax recovery from the Northern
the Minister in the Outcome/Outputs framework.            Territory Government and disposal of currently
                                                          owned property which will be surplus to opera-
sTATuTORy REPORTiNG
                                                          tional requirements when the new premises are
The CLC is a Commonwealth Statutory Authority             occupied.
in accordance with the Commonwealth Authori-
                                                          At this time it is anticipated that the move to the
ties and Companies Act 1997 (CAC Act) and
                                                          new premises will occur in April/May 2009.
responds to the Financial Management and
Financial Accountability Act 1997 (FMA Act).              Risk mANAGEmENT ANd fRAud
The Australian National Audit Office is requested
                                                          CONTROl
by the Minister to perform the annual audit of            The Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines
CLC financial statements. The purpose of the              apply to all agencies covered by the Financial
audit is for the ANAO to express an opinion as to         Management and Financial Accountability Act
whether the financial statements give a true and          1997 (FMA Act) ; and bodies covered by the
fair view in accordance with the Commonwealth             Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act
Authorities and Companies Orders (Financial               1997 (CAC Act) that receive at least 50 per cent
Statements for reporting periods ending on or             of funding for their operating costs from the
after 1 July 2006) made by the Finance Minister           Commonwealth or a Commonwealth agency.
(FMOs) and Australian Accounting Standards
                                                          The Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines do
(including the Australian Accounting Interpreta-
                                                          not apply to a CAC Act agency that does not re-
tions).
                                                          ceive the above level of funding. Such agencies
The financial statements for the year ended 30th          are, however, strongly encouraged to comply
June 2008 have been audited and an unqualified            with the best practice standards set out in these
audit opinion has been issued by the ANAO.                guidelines.

NEw OffiCE COmPlEx                                        As a CAC statutory authority that is not 50 per
                                                          cent budget funded the CLC is not required to
The CLC currently operates from six locations
                                                          implement these guidelines.
in Alice Springs as staff numbers and activities
have expanded beyond the capacity of its main             However, the CLC acknowledges that the guide-
premises.                                                 lines do provide better practice approaches for
                                                          fraud control in the public sector.
The CLC and the Department of Families, Com-
munity Services and Indigenous Affairs agreed             The CLC has developed various internal prac-
on program funding for a new building on 24 July          tices and procedures to ensure appropriate
2007.                                                     authorisations and financial delegations are in



                                                    103              Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
Central land Council Annual Report continued...


place and for rigorous monitoring and detection             Finance Circular 2008/3 provides operational
of any anomalies in the following areas:                    detail. The CLC will be attending to a revision of
                                                            the audit committee charter and recruiting appro-
l   use of purchase orders;
                                                            priately skilled individuals for appointment to the
l use of, and access to, CLC vehicles, assets               new committee to facilitate compliance before
and property;                                               2008 year end.
l   use of computers, email and internet;                   sTAff
l   petty cash and handling of cash;                        Central Land Council staff work under the CLC
l   signing of cheques;                                     Enterprise Bargaining Agreement (EBA) and the
                                                            CLC/NLC Award.
l   approving payments;
                                                            The current EBA expired on February 2007 but
l   approving travel movement & bookings;                   remains active until replaced. Negotiations of
l   disposal of assets.                                     a new certified agreement have commenced.
                                                            Compliance with legislative changes are recogn-
Staff and management of CLC operate under
                                                            ised as prerequisites.
an Instrument of Authorisations which docu-
ments the appropriate financial delegations and             EmPlOyEE RElATiONs
authorities framework.
                                                            The development, implementation, administra-
Presently there is one matter before the Court              tion and evaluation of human resources/indus-
which is set for trial on 13 October 2008, relative         trial relations strategies and policies enables
to an alleged fraud involving a relatively small            the CLC to enhance organisational flexibility,
amount.                                                     improve workplace productivity, and facilitate
                                                            workplace reform to support its general objec-
Overlaying this framework of Policy and Pro-
                                                            tives.
cedure is a Code of Conduct which proscribes
personal and professional behavior and ethics in            Achievements in 2007/08 included:
the workplace.
                                                            l ensuring that CLC was compliant with
We are proud of the absence of substantive                  changes to the Workplace Relations Act (1996)
negatives in our track record and some of our               and all ensuing changes;
procedures have been referred to as best prac-
                                                            l ensuring that the provisions in the Enterprise
tice in peer organizations and the wider commu-
                                                            Agreement were utilised to enhance organisa-
nity. While the existing CLC practices have the
                                                            tional flexibility and to facilitate organisational
elements of a fraud strategy, a risk management
                                                            change and workplace reform.
framework and plan was established during
2006/7 which is subject to continuing develop-              l provision of advice and counsel to line man-
ment and improvement.                                       agers, on a case management basis, to assist
                                                            with the management of employees under the
AudiT COmmiTTEE                                             Unsatisfactory Performance Procedures; and
New Regulations 6A & 6B of the Commonwealth                 l provision of strategic and operational IR
Authorities and Companies Regulations pre-                  advice
scribe base requirements for the composition of
audit committees of Commonwealth authorities
effective 1 January 2009.

Department of Finance and Deregulation


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08          104
Central land Council Annual Report continued...
sTAff dEVElOPmENT ANd TRAiNiNG.

The CLC is committed to ongoing professional                 career with the AAMC section;.
Development of its workforce and supports ac-                l two Indigenous female employees attended
cess to appropriate training.                                the Indigenous Women’s Leadership Program;
The CLC is especially committed to developing                l four indigenous students from Centralian
strategies that facilitate employment and career             College will be doing work experience with the
development for Aboriginal staff who make up                 CLC.
52 per cent of the 159 staff employed, and have
formally stated this commitment in Part 3 of the             sTATisTiCAl iNfORmATiON
CLC EBA.

Staff are able to access training and further                  Trends in the Representation of EEO Groups
education as part of the CLC Career Develop-                                  30 June 2008
ment program and also receive Cross Cultural                 female                                               67
Training, First Aid, OH&S related topics and                 male                                                 93
4WD Skills.                                                  Aboriginal                                           84
The CLC Career development program enables                   non Aboriginal                                       76
staff to receive support and assistance with a
range of study and learning options.
                                                             Table B: A comparison of staff numbers in
All new staff are required to complete a two day
                                                             2006/07 and 2007-08 financial years
induction program which provides them with a
                                                                                          30th June      30th June
comprehensive insight into the CLC and all that
                                                                                               2007           2008
it offers, as well as its policies and expectations.
                                                             Chairman                               1              1
There were a 358 attendees at 72 needs based
                                                             Director                               1              1
short courses.
                                                             Senior Executive
                                                                                                    2              2
EquAl OPPORTuNiTy                                            Service 1
The Central Land Council (CLC) is committed to               NTU PLO                                1              1
providing a working environment in which staff               Senior Officer A                       4              5
feel they are a valued member of the organisa-                Senior Officer B                      6              9
tion, that they are treated fairly and are given             Senior Officer C                      15             14
recognition in the organisation’s success.                   AO6                                   29             38
Equal Opportunity (EO) supports the develop-                 AO 5                                  29             26
ment and implementation of strategically-based               AO 4                                  22             24
anti-discrimination, equal employment opportu-               AO 3                                   7              9
nity (EEO) and affirmative action policies and               AO 2                                   4             17
programs as well as Aboriginal Employment
                                                              AO 1                                  2            13
and Career Development. Additionally, the CLC
                                                              Total                              123            160
respects and values diversity in the workplace.

Achievements in 2007-08 under the Indigenous
Employment Strategy:

l creation of a new trainee position in the                  Table C: Designation of Aboriginal staff in
Land Management department,                                  2006/07 and 2007-08 financial years

l   an Aboriginal staff member took up a new

                                                       105              Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
Central land Council Annual Report continued...


                            30th June          30th June         iNfORmATiON sysTEms
                              2007               2008            Enhanced productivity is a permanent goal of the
 Chairman                        1                1              CLC management and staff.
 Director                        1                1
                                                                 Several opportunities have been identified to use
 Senior Executive                0                0              off-the-shelf software designed to enhance col-
 Service 1                                                       laborative work practice and workflow especially
 Senior Officer A                0                0              through the expanded use of electronic forms
                                                                 and workflow.
 Senior Officer B                0                0
                                                                 A significant upgrade to the software utilised to
 Senior Officer C                4                5
                                                                 manage royalty distributions and the registers of
 NTU PLO                         0                0              traditional owners was completed.
 AO 6                            6                5              This has improved functionality and maintenance
 AO 5                           11                11             of traditional owner databases in the field which
 AO 4                           21                23             helps to process disbursements in a timely way.

                                                                 The initial steps in the implementation of a em-
 AO 3                            6                8
                                                                 ployee self service interface to our payroll and
 AO 2                            4                17             personnel databases were completed.
 AO 1                            2                13
                                                                 The object of the project is to provide on-line
 Total                          56                84
                                                                 access via a web interface and to empower
OCCuPATiONAl HEAlTH ANd sAfETy                                   personnel to manage their personal informa-
                                                                 tion records, manage leave applications and
The following statements are provided in ac-                     recording, training requirements, skills recording.
cordance with section 74 of the Occupational                     Implementation will proceed in 2008/2009.
Health and safety (Commonwealth Employment)
Act 1991.                                                        The CLC operates a Library and Records facility
                                                                 with appropriately qualified and accredited staff.
l section 68 Occurrences (Notification and
Reporting of Accidents and Dangerous Occur-                      Library services include current affairs
rences): Three incidents under section 68 were                   information, scientific and historical reference
reported to Comcare;                                             enquiries, on-line searches and inter-library
                                                                 loans
l there were no notices issued under sec-
tions 29 (Provisional Improvement Notices), 46
(Power to Issue Prohibition Notices), and 47
(Power to Issue Improvement Notices) of the
OH&S Act, and no directions were given to the
Department under section 45 (Power to Direct
that Workplace Not Be Disturbed);

l no investigations were conducted in 2007–08
and the CLC remains committed to adhering to
Comcare guidelines.




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08               106
Central Land Council
       financial statements
              30 June 2008
    fig. [ number ] : output groups and outputs for 2008




  Enhanced social ,
  political and economic
  participation and
  equity for Aboriginal
  people in the Land
  Council’s area as a
  result of the promo-
  tion, protection and
  advancement of their
  land rights, other
  rights and interests




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08   108
Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08   109   Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
Central Land Council --Annual Report 07 --08
Central Land Council Annual Report 07 08       110
Central land CounCil
inCome statement
for the year ended 30 June 2008




                                                                                 2008                      2007
 INCOME                                                 NOTES
                                                                                    $                         $
 Revenue
 Revenue                                                   3(a)           19,583,591                14,224,250
 Sale of goods and rendering of services                   3(b)            2,008,884                 1,883,702
 Interest                                                  3(c)              318,536                   181,636
 Total Revenue                                                            21,911,011                16,289,588

 Gains
 Gains from sale of assets                                 3(d)               252,207                   266,063
 Total Gains                                                                  252,207                   266,063

 TOTAL INCOME                                                             22,163,218                16,555,651

 EXPENSES
 Employees and council members benefits                    4(a)             9,886,706                9,278,675
 Suppliers                                                 4(b)             6,763,892                6,008,764
 Depreciation and amortisation                             4(c)             1,208,397                1,277,345

 TOTAL EXPENSES                                                           17,858,995                16,564,784




 Surplus / (deficit) before income tax                                      4,304,223                    (9,132)

 Surplus / (deficit)                                                        4,304,223                    (9,132)




                The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes



                                                    111              Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
Central land CounCil
balanCe sheet
for the year ended 30 June 2008

                                                                                  2008                 2007
 ASSETS                                          NOTES
                                                                                     $                    $
 Financial assets
 Cash and cash equivalents                        10(b)                      8,967,420             3,855,168
 Trade and other receivables                       6(a)                        840,535             2,456,018
 Investments                                       6(b)                               4                   4
 Total financial assets                                                      9,807,959             6,311,190
 Non-financial Assets
 Land and buildings                                7(a)                      8,346,075             6,257,906
 Infrastructure, plant and equipment               7(b)                      2,104,728             2,199,141
 Intangibles                                       7(d)                                -               4,842
 Inventories                                       7(e)                          11,110              12,576
 Total non-financial assets                                                 10,461,913             8,474,465
 Total assets                                                               20,269,872            14,785,655


 LIABILITIES
 Payables
 Suppliers                                         8(a)                      1,800,434             1,310,418
 Special Purpose Grants                            8(b)                      1,401,947              848,837
 Total payables                                                              3,202,381             2,159,255
 Provisions
 Employee provisions                               9(a)                      1,994,945             1,858,077
 Total provisions                                                            1,994,945             1,858,077
 Total liabilities                                                           5,197,326             4,017,332


 NET ASSETS                                                                 15,072,546            10,768,323

 EQUITY
 Asset revaluation reserve                                                     538,323               538,323
 Retained surplus                                                           14,534,223            10,230,000

 Total equity                                                               15,072,546            10,768,323

 Current assets                                                              9,819,069             6,323,766
 Non-current assets                                                         10,450,803             8,461,889
 Current liabilities                                                         4,662,624             4,266,753
 Non-current liabilities                                                       534,702               524,163



                  The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes



Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08          112
Central land CounCil
Cash flow staement
for the year ended 30 June 2008

                                                                             2008                         2007
 Operating activities                        NOTES
                                                                                $                            $
 Cash received
 Revenue                                                              20,136,701                   15,073,087
 Goods and services                                                    2,008,884                    1,883,702
 Net GST received/(paid) to ATO                                            73,397                    (204,006)
 Interest                                                                318,536                       181,636


 Total cash received                                                  22,537,518                   16,934,419


 Cash used
 Employees                                                             9,749,838                   10,005,145
 Suppliers                                                             4,730,324                    4,154,633


 Total cash used                                                      14,480,162                   14,159,778
 Net cash from operating activities           10(a)                    8,057,356                    2,774,641


 Investing activities


 Cash received
 Proceeds from sales of property, plant
                                                                          268,794                      276,895
 and equipment
 Total cash received                                                     268,794                       276,895
 Cash used
 Purchase of property, plant &
                                                                       3,213,898                    1,275,270
 equipment
 Total cash used                                                       3,213,898                    1,275,270


 Net cash from investing activities                                  (2,945,104)                     (998,375)


 Net increase/(decrease) in cash held                                  5,112,252                    1,776,268
 Cash and cash equivalents at the
                                                                       3,855,168                     2,078,900
 beginning of the reporting period

 Cash and cash equivalents at the
                                              10(b)                    8,967,420                     3,855,168
 end of the reporting period.

               The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes


                                                   113             Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
Central land CounCil
statement of ChanGes in eQuitY
as at 30 June 2008


                                 Accumulated               Asset revaluation
                                                                                      TOTAL EQUITY
                                    results                    reserve

                                  2008            2007       2008        2007           2008          2007
                                     $               $          $           $              $             $

 Opening balance             9,456,416         9,248,262   538,323     55,073       9,994,739      9,303,335

 Net effect of
 changes in
 accounting policy
                               773,584          990,870          -             -     773,584        990,870
 relating to revenue
 recognition of
 grant received
 Opening balance
                           10,230,000                                  55,073      10,768,323     10,294,205
 as restated                                10,239,132     538,323

 Net surplus                                                     -                  4,304,222       208,154
                             4,304,222          208,154                        -
 Effect of changes
 in accounting policy
 relating to revenue                           (217,286)                                     -     (217,286)
                                        -
 recognition of grant
 received
 Net surplus as
 restated
                             4,304,223           (9,132)         -             -    4,304,223        (9,132)

 Income and
 expenses
 recognised directly
                                        -              -         -    483,250                -      483,250
 in equity:
 - Revaluation of
 Land & Buildings
 Closing balance
                           14,534,223 10,230,000           538,323    538,323      15,072,546     10,768,323
 as at 30 June

Prior period balances have been adjusted for a change in accounting policy - refer Note 1, section 1.4.




                  The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes



Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08               114
Central land CounCil
sChedule of Commitments and
ContinGenCies
as at 30 June 2008
                                                                2008                                  2007
                                                                   $                                     $
 BY TYPE
 Capital commitments
   Land & Buildings                                        7,367,537                                       -
 Total capital commitments                                 7,367,537                                       -

 Other Commitments
   Operating leases                                         222,463                               157,910
 Total other commitments                                    222,463                               157,910

 Commitments receivable                                             -                                      -
 Net Commitments by Type                                   7,590,000                              157,910

 BY MATURITY
 Capital commitments
   One year or less                                        7,367,537                                       -
 Total capital commitments                                 7,367,537                                       -

 Operating lease commitments
   One year or less                                         222,463                               157,910
 Total operating lease
                                                            222,463                               157,910
 commitments

 Commitments receivable                                             -                                      -

 Net Commitments by Maturity                               7,590,000                              157,910
 NB: Commitments are GST inclusive where relevant.


 Name of lease                               General description of arrangements

                                             The capital committment reported arises from expected
                                             payments associated with the construction of a 2300 sq
 Land & Buildings                            m purpose built office complex at 27 Stuart Highway,
                                             Alice Springs. Total contract value is $10,980,000.
                                             Expected completion date is March 2009.

                                             Lease payments are subject to annual increase in
                                             accordance with upwards movements in the Consumer
 Leases for office accommodation
                                             Price Index. Current lease agreements are not greater
                                             than one year in duration.
Contingent Assets and Liabilities

There were no contingent assets or liabilities as at 30 June 2008

                The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes



                                                   115              Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
ClC notes to and forminG Part of finanCial
statements
note 1:              summarY of siGnifiCant aCCountinG PoliCies
1.1 OvERvIEw

The Central Land Council (CLC or the Council) is a statutory authority formed within the provision of Section 21 of the
ALR (NT) Act. The Land Council receives appropriations from the ABA pursuant to ministerially approved estimates
prepared in accordance with Section 34 of the Act and made available under Section 64 of the Act. The Land Council
in its present form with its present programs is dependent on Government policy and on continuing appropriations
by Parliament.

The funding conditions of the Land Council are laid down by the ALR (NT) Act, and any special purpose agreement
guidelines. Accounting for monies received from the ABA is subject to conditions approved by the Minister for Fami-
lies, Communities and Multicultural and Indigenous Affairs.

1.2 BASIS OF PREPARATION OF ThE FINANCIAL REPORT

The financial statements are required by clause 1(b) of Schedule 1 to the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies
Act 1997 and are a general purpose financial report.
The statements have been prepared in accordance with:
Finance Minister’s Orders (FMO’s) being the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Orders (Financial
Statements for reporting periods ending on or after 1 July 2007);
Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB)
that apply for the reporting period.
The financial report has been prepared on an accrual basis and is in accordance with historical cost convention,
except for certain assets at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices
on the results or the financial position.
The financial report is prepared in Australian dollars.
Unless specifically required by an Accounting Standard or directed by an FMO, assets and liabilities are recognised in
the CLC’s Balance Sheet when and only when it is probable that future economic benefits will flow and the amounts
of the assets or liabilities can be reliably measured. Assets and liabilities arising under agreements equally propor-
tionately unperformed are however not recognised unless required by an accounting standard. Liabilities and assets
that are unrealised are reported in the schedule of commitments and the schedule of contingencies.
Unless alternative treatment is specifically required by an accounting standard, revenues and expenses are rec-
ognised in the Land Council’s Income Statement when and only when the flow or consumption or loss of economic
benefits has occurred and can be reliably measured.
1.3 SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING JUdGEMENTS ANd ESTIMATES

In the process of applying the accounting policies listed in this note, the CLC has made the following judgements that
have the most significant impact on the amounts recorded in the financial statements:
The fair value of land and buildings has been taken to be the market value of similar properties as determined by an
independent valuer.
No accounting assumptions or estimates have been identified that have a significant risk of causing a material adjust-
ment to carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next accounting period.

1.4 ChANGE IN ACCOUNTING POLICY

The CLC changed its accounting policy for the financial year ended 30 June 2008 relating to its revenue recognition
of monies received from various funding bodies. Revenue was previously recognised only to the extent that the
services required have been performed or the eligibility criteria had been satisfied for the grantee. When monies
received have been paid in advance of performance or eligibility, a liability is recognised. As required, the contribu-
tion definition interpretation under AASB1004, Contribution, in conjunction with the Framework for the Preparation
and Presentation of Financial Statements (cited as Framework) (July 2004), the CLC has now analysed the Grants
received. Under the interpretation of this standard, restrictions over how the moneys should be spent do not result in
obligations (and therefore no liability is able to be recognised), while a stand-ready obligation to return unspent funds
results in an obligation (and therefore a liability is recognised). This change has been implemented in the financial




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08              116
ClC notes to and forminG Part of finanCial
statements
year ended 30 June 2008 and prior year balances have been restated.
The aggregate effect of the change in accounting policy on the CLC’s financial report for the year ended 30 June
2008 is as follows (no taxation effect results from these changes)

                                               2008                                           2007
                         Previously                                        Previously
                           stated        Adjustments       Restated          stated       Adjustments        Restated
                              $                 $                $             $                $                 $
    Income
    Statement

    Adjustment to
    opening
    retained surplus      9,456,416             773,584    10,230,000       9,248,262           990,870      10,239,132


    Revenue              21,911,010                    -   21,911,010       6,506,874         (217,286)       6,289,588

    Surplus (deficit)
    before
      income tax          4,304,222                    -       4,304,222                      (217,286)          (9,133)
                                                                              208,153

    Balance Sheet
    Special Purpose
    Grant
       Liability          1,401,948                            1,401,948    1,622,421         (773,584)         848,837



1.5 STATEMENT OF COMPLIANCE
Australian Accounting Standards require a statement of compliance with International Financial Reporting Standards
(IFRSs) to be made where the financial report complies with these standards. Some Australian equivalents to IFRSs
and other Australian Accounting Standards contain requirements specific to not-for-profit entities that are inconsis-
tent with IFRS requirements. CLC is a not for profit entity and has applied these requirements, so while this financial
report complies with Australian Accounting Standards including Australian Equivalents to International Financial Re-
porting Standards (AEIFRSs) it cannot make this statement.
AdOpTION OF NEW AUSTRALIAN ACCOUNTINg STANdARdS
No accounting standard has been adopted earlier than the application date as stated in the standard.
The following new standards are applicable to the current reporting period.
Financial instrument disclosure

AASB 7 Financial Instruments: Disclosures is effective for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2007
(the 2007-08 financial year) and amends the disclosure requirements for financial instruments. In general AASB 7
requires greater disclosure than that previously required. Associated with the introduction of AASB 7 a number of
accounting standards were amended to reference the new standard or remove the present disclosure requirements
through 2005-10 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards [AASB 132, AASB 101, AASB 114, AASB 117,
AASB 133, AASB 139, AASB 1, AASB 4, AASB 1023 & AASB 1038]. These changes have no financial impact but will
effect the disclosure presented in future financial reports.
The following new standards, amendments or interpretations have become effective for the Central Land Council in
the period. There is no material impact on the financial report of adoption of these standards based on Central Land
Council’s assessment.
Amendments:

•      2007-4 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from ED 151 and Other Amendments and
       Erratum: Proportionate Consolidation
•      2007-7 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08               117              Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
ClC notes to and forminG Part of finanCial
statements
•    UIG Interpretation 11: AASB 2 – Group and Treasury Share Transactions and 2007-1 Amendments to Austra-
     lian Accounting Standards arising from AASB Interpretation 11
Future Australian Accounting Standard Requirements:

The following new standards, amendments to standards or interpretations have been issued by the Australian
Accounting Standards Board effective for future reporting periods. It is estimated that the impact of adopting these
pronouncements when effective will have no material financial impact on future reporting periods.
AASB Interpretation 12 Service Concession Arrangements and 2007-2 Amendments to Australian Accounting
Standards arising from AASB Interpretation 12
AASB 8 Operating Segments and 2007-3 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from AASB 8
2007-6 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from AASB 123
AASB Interpretation 13 Customer Loyalty Programmes
AASB Interpretation 14 AASB 119 – The Limit on a Defined Benefit Asset, Minimum Funding Requirements and their
Interaction
Other:

The issued standard AASB 1049 Financial Reporting of general government Sectors specifies the reporting
requirements of the Australian Government for the General Government Sector, and is not applicable to the operations
of CLC.

1.6 REvENUE
Types of revenue
The revenues described in this Note are revenues relating to the core operating activities of the Central Land Council:
Revenues from Government are recognised at the time the Land Council becomes entitled to the funding, or as con-
tributions on receipt as per AASB 1004
Interest revenue is recognised using the effective interest rate method as set out in AASB 139 – Financial Instru-
ments, Recognition and Measurement.
Revenue from disposal of non-current assets is recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer.
Revenue from the rendering of a service is recognised by reference to the stage of completion of the contract to pro-
vide the service. The stage of completion is determined according to the proportion that costs incurred to date bear
to the estimated total costs of the transaction.
Resources received free of charge

Services received free of charge are recognised as revenue when and only when a fair value can be reliably de-
termined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is
recognised as an expense.
Contributions of assets at no cost of acquisition or for nominal consideration are recognised at their fair value when
the asset qualifies for recognition. Resources received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or gains de-
pending on their nature.
Program Funding Agreements

Most agreements require the grantee to perform services or provide facilities, or to meet eligibility criteria. Receipts
from agreements are recognised as income when received. Where agreement funds have been paid in advance had
a stand-ready obligation to return unspent funds, a liability is recognised.
Revenues from Government
Amounts appropriated for Departmental outputs appropriations for the year (adjusted for any formal additions and re-
ductions) are recognised as revenue, except for certain amounts that relate to activities that are reciprocal in nature,
in which case revenue is recognised only when it has been earned.
1.7 GAINS
Other Resources Received Free of Charge
Resources received free of charge are recognised as gains when and only when a fair value can be reliably de-



Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08             118
ClC notes to and forminG Part of finanCial
statements
termined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is
recognised as an expense.
Contributions of assets at no cost of acquisition or for nominal consideration are recognised as gains at their fair
value when the asset qualifies for recognition, unless received from another government Agency or Authority as a
consequence of a restructuring of administrative arrangements.
Resources received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or gains depending on their nature.
Sale of Assets
Gains from disposal of non-current assets is recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer.

1.8 EMPLOYEE BENEFITS
Employee Benefits
Liabilities for services rendered by employees are recognised at the reporting date to the extent that have not been
settled.
Liabilities for ‘short-term employee benefits’ (as defined in AASB 119) and termination benefits due within twelve
months are measured at their nominal amounts
The nominal amount is calculated with regard to the rates expected to be paid on settlement of the liability.
All other employee benefit liabilities are measured as the present value of the estimated future cash outflows to be
made in respect of services provided by employees up to the reporting date.
Leave
The liability for employee benefits includes provisions for annual leave and long service leave. No provision has
been made for sick leave as all sick leave is non-vesting and the average sick leave taken in future years by em-
ployees of the Land Council is estimated to be less then the annual entitlement for sick leave.
The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration, including the Central Land Council’s
employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather
than paid out on termination.
The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases through promo-
tion and inflation.
Separation and Redundancy
provision is made for separation and redundancy benefit payments. CLC recognises a provision for termination
when it has developed a detailed formal plan for the terminations and has informed those employees affected that it
will carry out the terminations.
Superannuation
The majority of employees of Central Land Council are members of Acumen Superannuation Fund. Central Land
Council makes employer contributions to the Acumen at the rate of 9% paid on monthly basis. The Central Land
Council complies with the requirements of the superannuation choice legislation.
The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June represents outstanding contributions for the final fortnight
of the year.
1.9 LEASES
A distinction is made between finance leases and operating leases. Finance leases effectively transfer from the
lessor to the lessee substantially all the risks and benefits incidental to ownership of leased non-current assets. In
operating leases, the lessor effectively retains substantially all such risks and benefits.
Where a non-current assets is acquired by means of a finance lease, the asset is capitalised at either the fair value
of the lease property or, if lower, the present value of minimum lease payments at the inception of the contract and
a liability is recognised at the same time and for the same amount.
The discount rate used is the interest rate implicit in the lease. Leased asset are amortised over the period of the
lease. Lease payments are allocated between the principal component and the interest expense.
Operating lease payments are expensed on a basis which is representative of the pattern of benefits derived from
the leased assets.
The net present value of future net outlays in respect of surplus space under non-cancellable lease agreements is
expensed in the period in which the space becomes surplus.
1.10 BORROwING COSTS
All borrowing costs are expensed as incurred.


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08             119               Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
ClC notes to and forminG Part of finanCial
statements
1.11 CASh ANd CASh EQUIvALENTS
Cash and cash equivalents includes notes and coins held and any deposits in bank accounts with an original ma-
turity of 3 months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and subject to insignificant risk of
changes in value. Cash is recognised at its nominal amount.
1.12 FINANCIAL ASSETS
CLC classifies its financial assets in the following categories:
•    financial assets as ‘at fair value through profit or loss’
•    ‘held-to-maturity investments’,
•    ‘available-for-sale’ financial assets, and
•    ‘loans and receivables’.
The classification depends on the nature and purpose of the financial assets and is determined at the time of initial
recognition. Financial assets are recognised and derecognised upon ‘trade date’.
Effective interest method
The effective interest method is a method of calculating the amortised cost of a financial asset and of allocating in-
terest income over the relevant period. The effective interest rate is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future
cash receipts through the expected life of the financial asset, or, where appropriate, a shorter period.
Income is recognised on an effective interest rate basis except for financial assets ‘at fair value through profit or
loss’.
Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss
Financial assets are classified as financial assets at fair value through profit or loss where the financial assets:
• has been acquired principally for the purpose of selling in the near future;
• is a part of an identified portfolio of financial instruments that the Authority manages together and has a recent
actual pattern of short-term profit-taking; or
• is a derivative that is not designated and effective as a hedging instrument.
Assets in this category are classified as current assets.
Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss are stated at fair value, with any resultant gain or loss recog-
nised in profit or loss. The net gain or loss recognised in profit or loss incorporates any interest earned on the
financial asset.
Available-for-sale financial assets
Available-for-sale financial assets are non-derivatives that are either designated in this category or not classified in
any of the other categories. They are included in non-current assets unless management intends to dispose of the
asset within 12 months of the balance sheet date.
Available-for-sale financial assets are recorded at fair value. gains and losses arising from changes in fair value
are recognised directly in the reserves (equity) with the exception of impairment losses. Interest is calculated using
the effective interest method and foreign exchange gains and losses on monetary assets are recognised directly in
profit or loss. Where the asset is disposed of or is determined to be impaired, part or all of the cumulative gain or
loss previously recognised in the reserve is included in profit for the period.
Where a reliable fair value can not be established for unlisted investments in equity instruments cost is used. The
CLC has no such instruments as at balance date.

Held-to-maturity investments
Non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments and fixed maturity dates that the group has the
positive intent and ability to hold to maturity are classified as held-to-maturity investments. Held-to-maturity invest-
ments are recorded at amortised cost using the effective interest method less impairment, with revenue recognised
on an effective yield basis.

Loans and receivables
Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that have fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an
active market are classified as ‘loans and receivables’. They are included in current assets, except for maturities


Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08                120
ClC notes to and forminG Part of finanCial
statements
greater than 12 months after the balance sheet date. These are classified as non current assets. Loans and re-
ceivables are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method less impairment. Interest is recogn-
ised by applying the effective interest rate.

Impairment of financial assets
Financial assets are assessed for impairment at each balance date.
• Financial assets held at amortised cost - If there is objective evidence that an impairment loss has been incurred
for loans and receivables or held to maturity investments held at amortised cost, the amount of the loss is measured
as the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of estimated future cash flows discount-
ed at the asset’s original effective interest rate. The carrying amount is reduced by way of an allowance account.
The loss is recognised in the Income Statement.
• Available for sale financial assets - If there is objective evidence that an impairment loss on an available for sale
financial asset has been incurred, the amount of the difference between its cost, less principal repayments and am-
ortisation, and its current fair value, less any impairment loss previously recognised in expenses, is transferred from
equity to the Income Statement.
• Available for sale financial assets (held at cost) - If there is objective evidence that an impairment loss has been
incurred the amount of the impairment loss is the difference between the carrying amount of the asset and the present
value of the estimated future cash flows discounted at the current market rate for similar assets.

1.13 FINANCIAL LIABILITIES

Financial liabilities are classified as either financial liabilities ‘at fair value through profit or loss’ or other financial
liabilities. Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon ‘trade date’.
Financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss
Financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss are initially measured at fair value. Subsequent fair value ad-
justments are recognised in profit or loss. The net gain or loss recognised in profit or loss incorporates any interest
paid on the financial liability.
Other financial liabilities

Other financial liabilities, including borrowings, are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs.
Other financial liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with
interest expense recognised on an effective yield basis.
The effective interest method is a method of calculating the amortised cost of a financial liability and of allocating
interest expense over the relevant period. The effective interest rate is the rate that exactly discounts estimated
future cash payments through the expected life of the financial liability, or, where appropriate, a shorter period.
Supplier and other payables
Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the
goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).
1.14 APPROPRIATIONS RECEIvABLE
These receivables are recognised at the nominal amounts due.
1.15 CONTINGENT LIABILITIES ANd CONTINGENT ASSETS

Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets are not recognised in the Balance Sheet but are reported in the relevant
schedules and notes. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of a liability or asset or represent an as-
set or liability in respect of which the amount cannot be reliably measured. Contingent assets are disclosed when
settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent liabilities are disclosed when settlement is greater than
remote.
1.16 FINANCIAL GUARANTEE CONTRACTS
Financial guarantee contracts are accounted for in accordance with AASB139. They are not treated as a contingent
liability, as they are regarded as financial instruments outside the scope of AASB137.

1.17 ACQUISITION OF ASSETS
Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of
assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value



                                                              121                Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
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statements
plus transaction costs where appropriate.
Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and revenues
at their fair value at the date of acquisition, unless acquired as a consequence of restructuring of administra-
tive arrangements. In the latter case, assets are initially recognised as contributions by owners at the
amounts at which they were recognised in the transferor’s accounts immediately prior to the restructuring.

1.18 ProPerTy (LANd, BuiLdiNgS ANd iNfrASTrucTure), PLANT ANd equiPmeNT
Asset Recognition Threshold
Purchases of property, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the Balance Sheet, except for pur-
chases costing less than $2,000, which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of
a group of similar items which are significant in total).
The initial cost of an asset includes an estimate of the cost of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the
site on which it is located.
Revaluations Basis
Fair values for each class of asset are determined as shown below:

 Asset Class                               Fair value Measured at:

 Land                                      Market selling price
 Building                                  Market selling price
 Leasehold Improvements                    Depreciated replacement cost
 Plant & Equipment                         Market selling price
 Heritage and cultural assets              Market selling price

Assets that are surplus to requirement are measured at their net realisable value. At 30 June 2008 Central Land
Council Authority held no surplus assets (30 June 2007: $0).
Following initial recognition at cost, Land, buildings, infrastructure, plant and equipment are carried at fair value
less accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. Formal revaluations undertaken up to 30 June
2002 were done on a deprival basis; revaluations since that date are at fair value, being re-valued with sufficient
frequency such that the carrying amount of each asset class is not materially different, as at reporting date, from its
fair value. Valuations undertaken in any year are as at 30 June.
Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment is credited to equity under the
heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reverses a previous revaluation decrement of the
same asset class that was previously recognised through operating results. Revaluation decrements for a class of
assets are recognised directly through operating results except to the extent that they reverse a previous revaluation
increment for that class.
Any accumulated depreciation as at the revaluation date is eliminated against the gross carrying amounts of the
assets restated to the revalued amount.
Frequency
Freehold land, buildings and plant and equipments are subject to a formal valuation every five years. Central Land
Council policy is for formal valuations to be carried out by an independent qualified valuer. Between formal valua-
tions assets are assessed for movements in fair value.
Depreciation
Depreciable property, plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their esti-
mated useful lives to the Land Council using, in all cases, the straight-line method of depreciation. Leasehold im-
provements are depreciated on a straight-line basis over the lesser of the estimated useful life of the improvements
or the unexpired period of the lease.
Depreciation rates (useful lives) and methods are reviewed at each balance date and necessary adjustments are
recognised in the current, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate. Residual values are re-estimated
for a change in prices only when assets are revalued.
Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:



Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08             122
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statements
                                                                2008                       2007
             Buildings on freehold land                         40 years                   40 years
             Leasehold improvements                             Lease term                 Lease term
             Motor vehicles and IT equipment                   3 to 4 years                3 to 4 years
             Office equipment and furniture                    7 to 10 years               7 to 10 years

The aggregate amount of depreciation allocated for each class of asset during the reporting period is disclosed in
Note 7c.
1.19 INTANGIBLES
CLC intangibles comprise internally developed software for internal use. These assets are carried at cost less ac-
cumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses.
Software is amortised on a straight-line basis over its anticipated useful life. The useful lives of CLC software are 7
to 10 years (2006-07: 7 to 10 years).
All software assets were assessed for indications of impairment as at 30 June 2008.
1.20 IMPAIRMENT OF ASSETS
Assets carried at up-to-date fair value at the reporting date are not subject to impairment testing. Assets carried at
cost, which are not held to generate net cash inflows, have been assessed for indications of impairment. Where
indications of impairment exist the asset is written down to the higher of its net selling price and if the entity would
replace the asset’s service potential, its depreciated replacement cost.
All assets were assessed for impairment at 30 June 2008. Where indications of impairment exist, the asset’s recov-
erable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its
carrying amount.
1.21 INvENTORIES

Inventories not held for resale are valued at cost, unless they are no longer required, in which case they are valued
at net realisable value.
1.22 TAXATION / COMPETITIvE NEUTRALITY

The Central Land Council is exempt from all forms of taxation except fringe benefits tax and the goods and services
tax (GST).
Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of GST:
except where the amount of gST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office; and
except for receivables and payables.
Competitive Neutrality
The Central Land Council does not provide any services on a for-profit basis. Under Competitive Neutrality ar-
rangements, CLC is not required to pay Australian Income Tax Equivalent payments to the Government.
1.23 INSURANCE

The Central Land Council has insured for risks through the Government’s insurable risk managed fund ‘Comcover’.
Workers compensation is insured through Comcare Australia.
1.24 COMPARATIvES

Where necessary, comparatives have been reclassified and repositioned for consistencies with current year disclo-
sures.


note 2:              events after the balanCe sheet date
There were no significant events after balance date.




                                                          123               Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
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statements
 Note 3: REvENUE                                                          2008                    2007
                                                                             $                       $
 Note 3(a) - revenue
 From Government - ABA Appropriations for outputs                     7,782,813              9,227,017
 From Government - ABA S64(1) rollover                                         -                         -
 From Government - Special Purpose Contracts                          6,302,755              4,114,009
 From Government - Unearned revenue                                   5,199,995                773,584
 Non-Government - Special Purpose Contracts                            298,028                 109,639
 Total Revenues - Grants & Contracts                                19,583,591              14,224,250

 during the 2007/2008 financial year the Minister for Families, Housing, Community Services and
 Indigenous Affairs wrote to the Central Land Council varying the budget estimates, applying funds
 against an outstanding sec64(1) recievable of $2,130,187. This has the effect of reducing reported
 revenue for 2007/2008. Refer note 5 for further details.
 Unearned Revenue
 AASB 1004 requires recognition of revenue once control of assets is with the CLC. Prior year fund-
 ing under agreements has been recognised on a percentage of completion (entitlement) basis, with
 a corresponding liability at year end. This has the effect of additional revenue being recognised for
 the CLC in the 2007/2008 financial year. For the 2007/2008 financial year, $5,199,995 was recieved
 and recognised as revenue, with corresponding outflows of resources expected in the 2008/2009
 financial year. Further details can be found in Note 1 - Change of Accounting policy.



 Note 3(b) - Sale of goods and rendering of services
 Provision of goods - Related entities                                      523                  1,071
 Provision of goods - External entities                                   3,459                  3,658
 Rendering of services - Related entities                                92,550                 30,020
 Rendering of services - External entities                            1,912,352              1,848,953
 Total sales of goods and rendering of services                       2,008,884              1,883,702

 Note 3(c) - interest revenue
                                                                                              181,636
 Interest from deposits                                                318,536                181,636
 Total interest revenue                                                318,536                181,636

 Note 3(d) - Net gains from Sale of Assets
 Motor Vehicles, Plant & Equipment
     Proceeds from sale                                                268,794                276,895
     Net book value of assets sold                                     (16,587)               (10,832)

 Net gain from disposal                                                252,207                 266,063




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08     124
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statements
                                                                       2008                             2007
NOTE 4: EXPENSES
                                                                          $                                $


Note 4(a) - employee benefits
Wages & salaries                                                  8,097,568                       6,986,840
Superannuation                                                      746,728                       1,173,457
Leave                                                               891,945                         676,128
Other employee benefits                                             150,465                         442,250
Total employee benefits expenses                                  9,886,706                       9,278,675

Total employee expenses                                           9,886,706                       9,278,675

There were no expenses incurred for separation or redundancy of employees.
The Land Council undertakes to make regular monthly contributions in accordance with the
Superannuation Guarantee legislation at the prescribed rate of 9%. All payments are within the terms of
the CLC EBA and Awards.
The Land Council pays Compulsory Professional Indemnity Insurance to Law Society NT for all its
practicing Lawyers.

Note 4(b) - Supplier expenses
Goods from related entities                                         164,626                         169,036
Goods from external entities                                      3,282,761                       3,034,091
Services from related entities                                    1,101,013                         897,388
Services from external entities                                   1,963,586                       1,593,026
Operating lease rentals                                             194,956                         169,984
Workers Compensation & professional Indemnity
                                                                     56,950                         145,239
Insurance premium
Total suppliers expenses                                          6,763,892                       6,008,764

Note 4(c) - depreciation & Amortisation
Depreciation:
  Buildings                                                          74,486                          84,235
  Motor vehicles                                                    907,275                         839,608
  Plant and equipment                                                29,046                          23,823
  Library                                                            23,118                          23,118
  Computers                                                         169,630                         300,633
Total depreciation                                                1,203,555                       1,271,417

Amortisation of intangibles (software)                                 4,842                           5,928
Total depreciation and amortisation                               1,208,397                       1,277,345



The aggregate amounts of depreciation expensed during the reporting period for each class of
depreciable asset are detailed in Note 7(c) - Analysis of Property, Plant and Equipment.




                                                  125             Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
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statements

 Note 5: STATEMENT OF BUdGET vs ACTUAL ABORIGINAL BENEFIT ACCOUNT
 APPROPRIATIONS

                                               ABA Approved
                                                                     ABA Actual             variance
                                                   Estimates
                                                           $                   $                  $
                                                   2007/2008           2007/2008          2007/2008
 expenditure
    Salaries and related expenses                  7,257,000           7,436,905           (179,905)
      Operational expenses                         4,084,000           4,355,716           (271,716)

 Total recurrent expenditure                      11,341,000          11,792,621           (451,621)


      Capital                                        967,000             807,021             159,979


 Total expenditure                                12,308,000          12,599,642           (291,642)


 Income
      ABA sec. 64(1)                               7,782,813           7,782,813                    -
      Sec. 64(1) Liability                         2,130,187           2,130,187                    -
     Administration fees                           1,819,000           1,969,848             150,848
     Interest                                        100,000             189,130               89,130
     Sale of assets                                  195,000             180,794             (14,206)
     Recoveries                                      223,000             441,739             218,739
     Other                                            58,000             158,982             100,982

 Total income                                     12,308,000          12,853,493             545,493

 ABA surplus / (deficit) at 30 June                        -             253,851             253,851
 2008

 Salaries and operating expenditures shown above are included in the Income Statement as Em-
 ployee and Council Members expense and Suppliers expense, respectively.

 On the 28th April 2008 the ABA estimates were varied to include $292,000 for expenses to develop
 housing and infrastructure leases pursuant to s.19 of the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territo-
 ry) Act 1976. As at 30th June 2008, $31,514 had been spent against this project, with the balance
 of $260,486 to be spent in 2008/2009 financial year. There is a net deficit within the ABA of $6,635
 for the financial year ended June 2008, funded from a surplus brought forward after writeback of
 this balance of $260,486 estimate variation.

 Audit fees due and payable for audit of the 2007/2008 accounts have been accrued into the current
 financial year ($40,800) . This represents a change in accounting policy as per FMO Section 23.1.
 Refer also Note 14.




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08       126
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statements
Note 5(a): reconciliation - ABA cash receipts to
Income Statement

Cash release received during the
                                                                            2008                    2007
reporting period:
                                                                              $                       $
ABA Section 64(1)                                                     7,782,813               9,227,017
Section 64(1) Receivable                                              2,130,187                       -
                                                                      9,913,000               9,227,017

Funds receivable at 30 June:
ABA - Section 64(1)                                                              -            2,130,187
Consistent with Note 1.1, the Land Council maintains accounts on an accrual basis, however, this
budget comparison is prepared on a cash basis, consistent with the cash estimates approved by
the Minister.
Amendments to the ALRA during the 2006/2007 period removed the Section 64(1) minimum alloca-
tion of 40% for Council administration. In June 2007, the Aboriginals Benefit Account advised there
continued to be a statuatory amount payable of $2,130,187. The outstanding Section 64 receivable
amount was collected in 2007/2008 through variation to ABA estimates, reducing the recievable to
$Nil as at 30 June 2008.


Note 5(b): reconciliation - ABA Special Purpose grant: community outstations road and
Erosion Project - 2052

                                                                      2007/2008                2006/2007
Income
ABA grant income                                                          98,000                   76,000
Total income                                                              98,000                   76,000
expenditure
Operational expenditure                                                     (188)                 105,398
Total expenditure                                                           (188)                 105,398
Annual movement in grant funds                                            98,188                  (29,398)
Multi-year grant balance of funds: $98,415


Note 5(c): reconciliation - ABA Special Purpose grant: funeral &
Ceremonial Activities - 2091
ABA grant income                                                         100,000                  300,000
Total income                                                             100,000                  300,000
expenditure
Funeral expenses                                                         205,756                  147,839
Ceremonial expense                                                        40,641                   91,056
Total expenditure                                                        246,397                  238,895
Annual movement in grant funds                                         (146,397)                   61,105
Multi-year grant balance of funds: ($91,072)




                                               127            Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
 ClC notes to and forminG Part of finanCial
 statements
  Note 5(d): reconciliation - ABA Special Purpose grant: yuendumu community ranger
  Programme - 2062
                                                                  2007/2008        2006/2007
  Income
  ABA grant income                                                        -                -
  Total income                                                            -                -

  expenditure
  Operational expenditure                                              8,128            230
  Total expenditure                                                    8,128            230

  Annual movement in grant funds                                      (8,128)          (230)


  Multi-year grant balance of funds: $1,469

  Note 5(e): reconciliation - ABA Special Purpose grant: Arkarnta Tourist
  Campground - 2068
                                                                    2007/2008     2006/2007
  Income
  ABA grant income                                                          -              -
  Total income                                                              -              -

  expenditure
  Operational expenditure                                            (20,788)         39,197
  Total expenditure                                                  (20,788)         39,197

  Annual movement in grant funds                                      20,788        (39,197)

  Multi-year grant balance of funds: $24,091

  Note 5(f): reconciliation - ABA Special Purpose grant: indigenous Land
  Management Project - 2081
                                                                    2007/2008     2006/2007
  Income
  ABA grant income                                                      5,418         22,500
  Total income                                                          5,418         22,500

  expenditure
  Operational expenditure                                             21,035          30,998
  Total expenditure                                                   21,035          30,998

  Annual movement in grant funds                                     (15,617)        (8,498)

  Multi-year grant balance of funds: ($1,615)




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08    128
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statements

Note 5(g): reconciliation - ABA Special Purpose grant: Small community
Cattle Enterprises - 2078
                                                                2007/2008                  2006/2007
Income
ABA grant income                                                        -                                 -
Total income                                                            -                                 -

expenditure
Operational expenditure                                                 8,273                  (2,340)
Total expenditure                                                       8,273                  (2,340)

Annual movement in grant funds                                        (8,273)                    2,340

Multi-year grant balance of funds: $922

Note 5(h): reconciliation - ABA Special Purpose grant: Tennant creek ranger
Support Project - 2080
                                                                  2007/2008                2006/2007
Income
ABA grant income                                                      28,900                    36,000
Total income                                                          28,900                    36,000

expenditure
Operational expenditure                                               12,603                    34,974
Total expenditure                                                     12,603                    34,974

Annual movement in grant funds                                        16,297                     1,026


Multi-year grant balance of funds: $26,994

Note 5(i): reconciliation - ABA Special Purpose grant: Burta Wurta community
Cattle Enterprise - 2079
                                                                  2007/2008                2006/2007
Income
ABA grant income                                                     50,000                     73,600
Total income                                                         50,000                     73,600

expenditure
Operational expenditure                                              122,282                    31,504
Total expenditure                                                    122,282                    31,504

Annual movement in grant funds                                       (72,282)                   42,096

Multi-year grant balance of funds: $3,614




                                             129           Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
ClC notes to and forminG Part of finanCial
statements
 Note 5(j): reconciliation - ABA Special Purpose grant: Targetting youth in
 crisis to Petrol Sniffing - 2089
                                                                    2007/2008        2006/2007
 Income
 ABA grant income                                                             -               -
 Total income                                                                 -               -

 expenditure
 Operational expenditure                                                      -         24,234
 Total expenditure                                                            -         24,234

 Annual movement in grant funds                                               -        (24,234)

 Multi-year grant balance of funds: $31,615

 Note 5(k): reconciliation - ABA Special Purpose grant: docker river Land care
 Programme - 2097
                                                                    2007/2008        2006/2007
 Income
 ABA grant income                                                     116,405          120,342
 Total income                                                         116,405          120,342

 expenditure
 Operational expenditure                                              128,727           85,082
 Total expenditure                                                    128,727           85,082

 Annual movement in grant funds                                       (12,322)          35,260

 Multi-year grant balance of funds: $22,939

 Note 5(l): reconciliation - ABA Special Purpose grant: Ntaria ranger Support Programme - 2098
                                                                    2007/2008        2006/2007
 Income
 ABA grant income                                                      70,400          101,600
 Total income                                                          70,400          101,600

 expenditure
 Operational expenditure                                               22,557           77,288
 Total expenditure                                                     22,557           77,288

 Annual movement in grant funds                                        47,843           24,312

 Multi-year grant balance of funds: $72,155




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08   130
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statements

Note 5(m): reconciliation - ABA Special Purpose grant: Alatyeye cattle enterprise - 2099
                                                                       2007/2008                2006/2007
Income
ABA grant income                                                          112,940                    12,840
Total income                                                              112,940                    12,840

expenditure
Operational expenditure                                                   150,822                              -
Total expenditure                                                         150,822                              -

Annual movement in grant funds                                            (37,882)                   12,840

Multi-year grant balance of funds: ($25,042)


Note 5(n): reconciliation - ABA Special Purpose grant: Akanta cattle enterprise - 2100

                                                                       2007/2008                2006/2007
Income
ABA grant income                                                                   -                 18,102
Total income                                                                       -                 18,102

expenditure
Operational expenditure                                                     14,245                             -
Total expenditure                                                           14,245                             -

Annual movement in grant funds                                            (14,245)                   18,102
prior year balance of grant 2100 has been amended to $18,102 due to a mis-classification at June 2007.
Multi-year grant balance of funds: $3,856

Note 5(o): reconciliation - icc Women’s Law & culture - 54838
                                                                       2007/2008                2006/2007
Income
ICC grant income                                                            60,000                   56,000
Sundry Other Income                                                              -                    2,000
Total income                                                                60,000                   58,000

expenditure
Operational expenditure                                                     59,644                   58,356
Total expenditure                                                           59,644                   58,356

Annual movement in grant funds                                                 356                     (356)

Multi-year grant balance of funds: Nil




                                                131             Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
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statements
  Note 5(p): reconciliation - ABA Special Purpose grant: Travel Assistance indigenous
  Rangers - 2804
                                                                    2007/2008           2006/2007
  Income
  ABA grant income                                                      10,000                  -
  Total income                                                          10,000                  -

  expenditure
  Operational expenditure                                              10,000                   -
  Total expenditure                                                    10,000                   -
  Grant funds                                                               -                   -

  Note 5(q): reconciliation - ABA Special Purpose grant: urana Potara -
  Ceramics Business - 2804
                                                                    2007/2008           2006/2007
  Income
  ABA grant income                                                      39,775                  -
  Total income                                                          39,775                  -

  expenditure
  Operational expenditure                                                    -                  -
  Total expenditure                                                          -                  -

  Grant funds                                                          39,775                   -

  Note 5(r): reconciliation - ABA Special Purpose grant: urana Potara - date Palm - 2804
                                                                    2007/2008           2006/2007
  Income
  ABA grant income                                                      21,500                  -
  Total income                                                          21,500                  -

  expenditure
  Operational expenditure                                                    -                  -
  Total expenditure                                                          -                  -

  Grant funds                                                          21,500                   -




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08   132
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statements

Note 6: FINANCIAL ASSETS
                                                                                          2008            2007
 Note 6(a): TrAde ANd oTHer receiVABLeS                                                       $               $
 Trade debtors                                                                          764,869         299,410
 Less: provision for doubtful debts                                                              -
                                                                                                              -
                                                                                        764,869         299,410


 Sundry debtors                                                                            2,269        13,199
 ABA - S64(1) rollover (see Note 5(a))                                                         -     2,130,187
 GST receivable                                                                           73,397        13,222
 Total trade and other receivables                                                      840,535      2,456,018

 All receivables are current assets. Debtors are recognised at their nominal amounts due less provisions
 for impairment, if any. Provisions are made when collection of the debt is judged to be less rather than
 more likely. All debtors are unsecured and as such, the carrying value of the net receivables represents
 the amount exposed to credit risk.

 Trade and other receivables (gross) are aged as follows:
 Not overdue                                                                            729,624         130,005
 Overdue by:
 - less than 30 days                                                                      35,157       102,085
 - 30 to 60 days                                                                          35,319        10,312
 - 60 to 90 days                                                                          27,550        49,688
 - more than 90 days                                                                      12,885     2,163,928
                                                                                         110,911     2,326,013

 Total receivables (gross)                                                              840,535      2,456,018
 Provision for doubtful debts is aged as follows:
 - more than 90 days
                                                                                                 -              -

 Note 6(b): iNVeSTmeNTS
 Investment in Centrecorp Aboriginal Investment Corporation Pty Ltd (“Centrecorp”).
 Considered to be a non-current asset. This investment represents the Land Council’s            3               3
 shareholding of three fully paid ordinary shares of $1.00 each at cost.
 The investment was acquired for the purposes of participating in Central Australian
 ventures on behalf of Aboriginal people. The investment is pursuant to Section
 22(1)(c) and 23(1)(b) of ALR (NT) Act. The profits of Centrecorp will be distributed
 according to its charitable trust deed for the benefit of Aboriginal people in the
 Central Australian region and as such the Land Council has no economic interest in
 Centrecorp and does not account for Centrecorp as a controlled entity.
 Investment in Imparja Television Pty Ltd.                                                      1               1
 This investment represents the Land Council’s shareholding of one fully paid ordinary
 share at cost. The investment was acquired for the purpose of participating in this
 important Aboriginal development by way of representation on the Board of Directors
 of Imparja Television Pty Ltd.
 As this investment does not allow the Central Land Council control of Imparja
 Television Pty Ltd this interest is not accounted for as a controlled entity. Considered
 to be a non-current assets
 Total Investments                                                                              4               4




                                                    133              Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
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statements
  Note 7: NON FINANCIAL ASSETS

                                                                     2008                             2007
 Note 7(a) – Land and Buildings
 Freehold land at gross carrying value (at fair value)          3,247,000                        3,247,000
 Buildings on freehold land:
      - fair value                                              3,073,505                        3,073,505
      - work in progress                                        2,232,463                           69,808
      - accumulated depreciation                                 (206,893)                       (132,407)
 Total Land and Buildings                                       8,346,075                        6,257,906


 Prior year balance of “Buildings on freehold land - at fair value” has been reduced by $69,808 due to a
 mis-classification
 as at 30 June 2007 (reported as $3,143,313 in 2006/2007). For comparative purposes above this is
 reported correctly
 as work in progress. All work in progress relates to a purpose built office complex at 27 Stuart Highway,
 Alice Springs.

 Note 7(b) - infrastructure, Plant and equipment
 Motor vehicles - at cost                                       3,693,106                        3,465,564
 Accumulated depreciation                                      (2,211,246)                     (1,965,480)
                                                                1,481,860                        1,500,084

 Plant, furniture and equipment - at cost                         208,140                          125,803
 Plant, furniture and equipment - at fair
                                                                  125,450                          125,450
 value
 Accumulated depreciation                                         (88,405)                        (59,359)
                                                                  245,185                         191,894

 Library at fair value                                            231,178                          231,178
 Accumulated depreciation                                         (46,236)                         (23,118)
                                                                  184,942                          208,060

 Computer equipment at cost                                     1,076,987                        1,013,719
 Accumulated depreciation                                       (884,246)                        (714,616)
                                                                  192,741                          299,103

 Total Infrastructure, plant and
                                                                2,104,728                        2,199,141
 equipment

 All revaluations are independent and are conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated at
 note 1. Recent independent valuations undertaken on these assets have been completed by Michael
 pankhurst, Senior Valuer, Rodney Hyman Asset Services (2005), and the Australian Valuation Office
 (selected Land & Building assets - 2007) . At 30 June 2008, the directors believe that assets are carried
 at the present fair market value and no indicators of impairment were found for land and buildings.




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08        134
ClC notes to and forminG Part of finanCial
statements


Note 7(c) – Analysis of
Property, Plant and Equipment

                        Land &          Motor         Plant &
                                                                   Library     Computers               TOTAL
Table (A):            Buildings       vehicles     Equipment
                                                                         $             $                   $
Reconciliation of             $              $              $
the opening and
closing balances
of property, plant
and equipment
2007/2008

As at 1 July 2007

 Gross book value     6,390,313      3,465,564          251,253    231,178        1,013,719        11,352,027

Accumulated
depreciation/         (132,407)     (1,965,480)         (59,359)   (23,118)       (714,616)       (2,894,980)
amortisation
 Opening net book
                      6,257,906      1,500,084          191,894    208,060          299,103         8,457,047
value

 Additions
   By purchase        2,162,655        905,638           82,337            -         63,268         3,213,898


Depreciation
                       (74,486)      (907,275)          (29,046)   (23,118)       (169,630)       (1,203,555)
expense

Revaluations during
                                              -                -                            -                     -
the period                      -                                          -



Disposal
                                -    (678,096)                 -           -                -       (678,096)
     Gross Value
Disposals
-     Accumulated               -      661,509                 -           -                -         661,509
      Depreciation


As at 30 June 2008

 Gross book value     8,552,968      3,693,106          333,590    231,178        1,076,987        13,887,829


Accumulated
                      (206,893)     (2,211,246)         (88,405)   (46,236)       (884,246)       (3,437,026)
depreciation




                                                  135              Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
ClC notes to and forminG Part of finanCial
statements

 closing net book
                             8,346,075          1,481,860          245,185    184,942      192,741    10,450,803
 value

 Note 7(c) – Analysis of Property, Plant and equipment continued
 Table (B):                    Land &              Motor         Plant &
                                                                              Library    Computers        TOTAL
 Reconciliation of           Buildings           vehicles     Equipment
                                                                                    $            $            $
 the opening and                     $                  $              $
 closing balances
 of property, plant
 and equipment
 2006/2007



 As at 1 July 2006


  Gross book value           6,016,413          3,068,211          230,472    231,178      843,071    10,389,345


  Accumulated
 depreciation/               (157,522)         (1,769,546)         (35,535)               (445,965)   (2,408,568)
                                                                                     -
 amortisation

  Opening net book
                             5,858,891          1,298,665          194,937    231,178      397,106     7,980,777
 value

 Additions

      By purchase                               1,041,027           20,781                 213,462     1,275,270
                                        -                                            -


 Depreciation
                               (84,235)         (839,608)          (23,823)   (23,118)    (300,633)   (1,271,417)
 expense
 Revaluations during
                               483,250                   -                -                       -      483,250
 the period                                                                          -



 Disposals - Gross
                             (109,350)          (643,674)                 -                (42,814)    (795,838)
 Value                                                                               -

 Disposals -
 Accumulated                   109,350            643,674                 -                 31,982       785,006
                                                                                     -
 Depreciation


 As at 30 June 2007
  Gross book value           6,390,313          3,465,564          251,253    231,178     1,013,719   11,352,026

 Accumulated
 depreciation/               (132,407)         (1,965,480)         (59,358)   (23,118)    (714,616)   (2,894,979)
 amortisation




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08                 136
ClC notes to and forminG Part of finanCial
statements

closing net book
                         6,257,906      1,500,084         191,895    208,060           299,103        8,457,047
value


                                                                                       2008               2007
Note 7(d) - intangibles                                                                $                     $
Computer software - at cost                                                       17,965                17,965
Accumulated depreciation                                                        (17,965)              (13,123)

Total Intangibles                                                                  -                      4,842
No indicators of impairment were found for intangible assets.

Note 7(e): inventory
inventories not held for sale(cost):
Fuel                                                                               3,585                 3,585
Tyres                                                                              7,525                 8,991
Total Inventories                                                                 11,110                12,576

All inventories are current assets.

Note 8: PAYABLES
Note 8(a): SuPPLier PAyABLeS
Trade creditors                                                                1,008,277               540,443
Sundry creditors and accruals                                                    792,157               769,975

Total supplier payables                                                        1,800,434            1,310,418
All suppliers payable are current
TRAdE CREdITORS
Settlement is usually made net 30 days

Note 8(b): Special Purpose contracts
Liability for special purpose contracts                                        1,401,947               848,837
Total Special Purpose Contracts                                                1,401,947               848,837
Prior year balances have been restated in line with a change in accounting policy (AASB 1004). Refer
Note 1 for further details. These restated liabilities are able to be carried where there is a stand ready
obligation to return unspent funds. See also Note 3 and Note 16.


Note 9: PROvISIONS
Note 9(a): emPLoyee ProViSioNS

Salaries and wages                                                               297,233              234,872
Leave                                                                          1,697,712            1,623,205

Aggregate employee entitlement liability                                       1,994,945            1,858,077

   Current                                                                     1,460,243            1,333,914
   Non-current                                                                   534,702              524,163



                                                    137             Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
ClC notes to and forminG Part of finanCial
statements
Note 10 - CASh FLOw RECONCILIATION

                                                                      2008                           2007
                                                                          $                             $
Note 10(a): reconciliation of operating surplus to net cash from operating
activities:
Operating surplus / (deficit)                                     4,304,223                        (9,132)
Non-Cash Items
Depreciation and amortisation                                     1,208,397                     1,277,345
Gain on disposal of assets                                              (252,207)                (266,063)
Changes in Assets and Liabilities
  Decrease /(Increase) in receivables                                   1,615,483                  49,199

  Decrease /(Increase) in inventory                                         1,466                  (2,733)

  Increase /(Decrease) in employee provisions                             136,868                  50,320

  Increase /(Decrease) in payables                                      1,043,126               1,675,705
Net cash from operating activities                                      8,057,356               2,774,641

Note 10(b): reconciliation of cash
Cash balance comprises:
Cash on hand
- Petty cash                                                                1,900                    1,900
Cash at bank
- Operations                                                            4,798,590               3,769,898
- Building Account                                                      4,142,087                       -
- OIPC Account                                                             24,843                  83,370

Balance of cash as at 30 June shown in the Statement of
                                                                        8,967,420               3,855,168
Cash Flows

All accounts are recognised at their nominal values. Interest, which is earned at the daily prevailing
rate, is credited to revenue as it accrues and is paid semi-annually. Refer Note 17 - Financial
Instruments for further details.


Note 11 - EXECUTIvE REMUNERATION
Total remuneration received or due and receivable by the
Executive:
Salaries and benefits                                                     123,827                 149,601
Superannuation contributions                                               11,144                  11,807
                                                                          134,971                 161,408
The number of Executives of the Land Council included
in these figures are shown below in the relevant
remuneration bands:
$Nil - $14,999                                                          10                      15
$120,000-$134,999                                                        1                        1
Total number of executives of the Land council                          11                      16
Executive members met 10 times this year. The Superannuation Guarantee Contribution is paid where
appropriate.




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08       138
ClC notes to and forminG Part of finanCial
statements
Note 12 - RELATEd PARTY dISCLOSURE

The names of the Land Council Executive who have held office at some time during the year ended 30
June 2008 are shown below.

L Bookie - Chairman                                        G George
M Ryan - Deputy Chairman                                   W Brown
A Petrick                                                  R Minor
M Ray                                                      H Wilson
R Smith                                                    G Smith
R Hagan
The aggregate remuneration of Executives is disclosed in
Note 11.



Note 13: REMUNERATION OF OFFICERS
                                                                            2008                       2007
                                                                                $                           $
The number of officers who received or were due to
receive total remuneration of $130,000 or more:
$160,000-$174,999                                                               2                           1
$175,000-$189,999                                                               -                           1
$220,000-$234,999                                                               1                           1
Total                                                                           3                           3

The aggregate amount of total remuneration paid to
officers shown above:
Salaries and Benefits                                                   546,807                     550,804
Superannuation contributions                                             49,213                      35,770
                                                                        596,020                     586,574

Note 14 - AUdITORS REMUNERATION
Remuneration to the Auditor-General for auditing the
financial statements for the reporting period.

The fair value of services provided was:                                  50,700                     56,600
Other services - grant acquittals                                         35,276                     14,000
Amounts paid to priceWaterhouseCoopers for auditing
the accounts of Associations administered by the Land                     40,690                     68,000
Council
                                                                        126,666                     138,600
The Audit Fees above report the costs associated with auditing each financial year. Consistent with
FMO interpretation advice in June 2007, fees for 2006/2007 were expensed in the period in which the
audit services were rendered (2007/2008). This FMO interpretation has been reversed in June 2008
(FMO 23.1), hence the total Audit expense recorded against 2007/2008 CLC accounts is $263,101.

The Land Council incurs the cost of an audit on each of the Associations, subsequently these costs are
covered by fees charged to the Associations. priceWaterhouseCoopers continues to perform the audits
of the Associations.
No other services were provided by the Auditor General during the reporting period.




                                                 139             Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
ClC notes to and forminG Part of finanCial
statements
 Note 15: LANd USE TRUST ACCOUNT

 The Land Council maintains a Land Use Trust Account. Monies received on behalf of the Associations
 of Aboriginal people and individuals in accordance with Section 35 of the ALR (NT) Act, are held in the
 Land Use Trust Account and are disbursed in accordance with the terms of the trust. These monies are
 not available for other purposes of the Land Council, and are not recognised in the financial statements.

                                                                            2008                    2007
                                                                                $                       $
 Opening Balance                                                        4,108,115               2,531,503
 Add receipts
 Subsection 64(3) statutory royalty equivalents                         7,116,795               9,218,944
 Section 42,43,44,46,48a & 48d negotiated monies                       12,741,577              11,561,338
 Section 15,16,19 & 20 rental and lease monies                          2,915,601               3,887,220
 Other monies                                                             747,895                 615,655
 Total Receipts                                                        23,521,868              25,283,156

 Deduct payments
 Section 35(2) statutory royalty equivalents                            7,116,795               9,218,944
 Section 35(3) negotiated payments                                     14,033,706              11,186,845
 Section 35(4) rental and lease monies                                  2,364,411               2,942,977
 Other payments                                                           421,176                 357,778
 Total Payments                                                        23,936,088              23,706,544

 Cash at bank and term deposits                                         3,693,895               4,108,115

 Closing Balance                                                        3,693,895               4,108,115

 Note 15(a) - details of amounts paid - S35(2)
                                                                       2007/2008               2006/2007
 Details of amounts paid as required by Section 37(4) ALR
                                                                                 $                       $
 (NT) Act:
 Granites Mines Affected Areas Aboriginal Corporation                   5,320,043               7,404,195
 Ngurratjuta Pmara Ntjarra Aboriginal Corporation                       1,707,222               1,814,749
 Tanami Mines Affected Areas Aboriginal Corporation                        89,530
                                                                        7,116,795               9,218,944

 Note 15(b) - details of amounts paid - S35(4a)
                                                                       2007/2008
 Details of amounts paid as required by Section 35(4A)
                                                                                 $
 ‘Accountable Amounts’ ALR (NT) Act.
 Voyages Hotels & Resorts                                                   5,386
 Centre for Appropriate Technology Inc.                                   134,708
 Areyonga Community Council                                                50,000
 Anangu Pitjantjatjara Services                                            56,846
 Community Enterprises Australia Ltd                                       30,621
 Uluru Auto’s                                                               3,591
 Motor Vehicle Registry                                                       751
 Bungala Aboriginal Corporation                                            59,659
                                                                          341,563



Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08       140
ClC notes to and forminG Part of finanCial
statements

                                                                                 2008                   2007
                                                                                     $                      $
Note 16 – SPeciAL PurPoSe coNTrAcTS

Statement of completion for Special Purpose Contracts
Unearned Revenue

Contract contributions recognised as revenue                               2,099,186                 773,584

Building contract contrib. recognised as revenue                           3,100,810                            -
Subtotal - unearned revenue                                                5,199,996                 773,584


Liability for special purpose contracts
                                                                           1,401,947                 848,837
(refer Note 8 (b))
Closing balance unearned revenue and liability                             6,601,943              1,622,421

Revenue was previously recognised only to the extent that the services required had been performed.
Refer Note 1 for further details. The subtotal unearned revenue represents recognised revenue for
which there will be outflows in the following year (services not yet performed). The closing balance
unearned revenue and liability represents the net expected cash outflow in relation to these agreements
in the following financial year.

This is represented by
Amount owing from/(to) the CLC operations account                          3,501,133              1,622,421
Amount owing from/(to) the Building Account                                3,100,810                      -
                                                                           6,601,944              1,622,421

Note 17: FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS
Note 17(a) – categories of financial instruments
Financial Assets
Held to maturity financial assets
  Investments                                                                         4                         4
Loans and receivables
  Cash at bank                                                             8,967,420              3,855,168
  Recievables for goods and services                                         840,535              2,456,018
carrying amount of financial assets                                        9,807,959              6,311,190

Financial Liabilities
Other Financial Liabilities
  Trade Creditors                                                          1,008,277                 540,443
  Sundry creditors and accruals                                              792,157                 769,975

carrying amount of financial liabilities                                   1,800,434              1,310,418

The carrying amounts are a reasonable approximation of fair value. The majority of the financial assets/
liabilites above are short term payables and recievables. The Central Land Council has not transferred
financial assets whilst maintaining an involvement.




                                                   141           Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
 ClC notes to and forminG Part of finanCial
 statements
    Note 17(b) – Net income and expenses from financial
    assets and liabilities
                                                                                      2008            2007
                                                                                          $                  $
  Loans and receivables
    Interest revenue (see note 3(c))                                               318,536         181,636
  Net gain/(loss) loans and
                                                                                   318,536         181,636
  receivables
  Net gain/(loss) from financial assets                                            318,536         181,636

  There was no income or expense to be recognised from financial liabilities of the Central Land Council.




  Note 17(c) – credit risk

  Recievables for goods and services ($840,535) represent the total exposure of the Central Land Council
  to credit risk (2007: $2,456,018). The Central Land Council is exposed to minimal credit risk as the
  majority of recievables are short term; are due under legislation or contract; or are recievable from the
  Australian Taxation Office in the form of a gST refund. An ageing analysis can be found at Note 6(a).

  All debtors are unsecured and as such, the carrying value of the net receivables represents the amount
  exposed to credit risk. The Central Land Council holds no collateral to mitigate against credit risk.

  Note 17(d) – Liquidity risk and market risk

  The Central Land Council’s financial liabilities are suppliers payables and employee liabilities. The
  Central Land Council in its present form with its present programs is dependent on Government policy
  and on continuing appropriations by Parliament. The Central Land Council manages its budget to
  ensure it has adequate funds to meet payments as they fall due. Financial liabilities at 30 June 2008 of
  $1,800,434 (2007: $1,310,418) are all current liabilities (due within 1 year).



  There is no market risk relating to the Central Land Councils financial assets or liabilities.




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08          142
ClC notes to and forminG Part of finanCial
statements



Note 17(e) – interest
rate risk

Financial                 Floating Interest       Non-Interest                                    weighted
Instrument      Notes           Rate              Bearing                        Total              Avg.
                                                                                                  Interest
                                                                                                    Rate
                             2008        2007        2008        2007         2008          2007 2008 2007
                                $             $         $           $            $             $     %          %
Financial As-
sets
Cash at bank
                10(b)   8,965,520   3,853,268                             8,965,520 3,853,268 5.975 4.850
                                                            -
Cash on
hand
                10(b)           -             -     1,900        1,900        1,900        1,900         -          -
Receivables
goods &         6(a)            -             -
                                                  840,535
                                                            2,456,018
                                                                           840,535 2,456,018
                                                                                                         -          -
services
Total
                        8,965,520   3,853,268     842,435 2,457,918                                      -      -
                                                                          9,807,955 6,311,186

Total Assets                                                             20,269,872 14,785,655




                                                  143            Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
ClC notes to and forminG Part of finanCial
statements

 Note 18: CONSULTING PAYMENTS

 Consistent with s.37(8) of the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territoy) Act 1976 (ALRA) “Additional
 Reporting Requirements” the following listing specifies each consultant engaged by the council during
 the reporting period to do work in relation to the Council’s performance of functions or exercise of powers
 under ALRA.


 Consultant                                                                                      2007/2008

 A J Dever Pty Ltd Trust A/c (Legal)                                                            $     9,807

 AKA Consulting (Anthropology - Land Claims)                                                     $   56,304

 Anthony Gatti (Anthropology)                                                                   $     6,000

 Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (Policy)                                         $   15,000

 Australian National University (Community Development)                                         $     7,214

 Centre for Approp. Tech (Community Development)                                                 $   15,918

 Christine Godden (Community Development)                                                        $   20,125

 desert Wildlife Services (Land Management)                                                     $     8,000

 Dianne Bell (Anthropology)                                                                      $   12,000

 Lemessurier Harrington Consulting (Legal)                                                      $     1,500

 Miles Holmes (Anthropology)                                                                    $     2,800

 patrick Hookey (Community development / Interpretation)                                        $     2,147

 Patterson’s List (Legal - Land Claims)                                                          $   41,345

 Peter Allsop (Tourism)                                                                         $     3,840

 Petronella Vaarzon-Morel (Policy)                                                               $   29,400

 pintubi Anmatjere Walpari Media (Education - Mining)                                            $   36,903

 Qld Comm Housing Coalition (policy)                                                            $     7,351

 R J Howells pty Ltd (Legal - Land Claims)                                                       $   16,875

 Rural Solutions (Community Development)                                                        $     6,836

 SGS Economics and Planning (Policy)                                                             $   21,489

 Siohan McDonnell (Policy)                                                                       $   15,500

 Tangentyere Design (Community Development)                                                     $     2,625

 Western desert Nganampa Walytj (Community development)                                          $   15,000

 World Vision Australia (Community development partner)                                         $     7,720

                                                                                                 $ 361,698




Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08       144
Central Land Council
          Native Title
        Financial Statements
Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08   146
147   Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08   148
CENTRAL LANd COUNCIL - Native Title Representative Body
INCOME STATEMENT
for the year ended 30 June 2008

                                                        NOTES                    2008                   2007
INCOME
Revenue                                                                            $                      $
Revenue from government                                  3(a)              2,650,350              3,050,797
Interest                                                 3(b)                 43,762                 54,888
Sale of goods and rendering of services                  3(c)                  3,200                      -

Total Revenue                                                              2,697,312              3,105,685

Gains
Gains from disposal of assets                            3(d)                  44,000                        -
Total Gains                                                                    44,000                        -

TOTAL INCOME                                                               2,741,312              3,105,685

EXPENSE
Employees and council members                            4(a)              1,470,956              1,427,335
Suppliers                                                4(b)              1,235,438              1,483,905
Depreciation                                             4(c)                175,587                169,096

TOTAL EXPENSES                                                             2,881,980              3,080,336



operating surplus/(deficit) before income tax                               (140,668)                 25,349

Operating result                                                            (140,668)                 25,349




              The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes


                                                  149              Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
 CENTRAL LANd COUNCIL - Native Title Representative Body
 BALANCE ShEET
 as at 30 June 2008
                                                            NOTES                   2008            2007
                                                                                       $               $
 ASSETS
 Financial assets
 Cash and cash equivalents                                   10                   24,843           83,370
 Total financial assets                                                           24,843           83,370
 Non-financial Assets
 Infrastructure, plant and equipment                         6(a)                322,826          376,269
 Total non-financial assets                                                      322,826          376,269
 Total assets                                                                    347,669          459,639

 LIABILITIES
 Provisions
 Employee provisions                                         7(a)                227,921          199,223

 Total provisions                                                                227,921          199,223

 Total liabilities                                                               227,921          199,223

 NET ASSETS                                                                      119,748          260,416

 EQUITY

 Asset revaluation reserve                                                        14,288           14,288
 Retained surplus                                                                105,460          246,128

 Total equity                                                                    119,748          260,416


 Current assets                                                                   24,843           83,370
 Non-current assets                                                              322,826          376,269
 Current liabilities                                                             145,116          113,223
 Non-current liabilities                                                          82,805           86,000




                  The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes



Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08          150
CENTRAL LANd COUNCIL - Native Title Representative Body
CASh FLOw STATEMENT
for the year ended 30 June 2008
                                                            Notes                     2008                   2007
                                                                                         $                      $
Operating activities
Cash received
Revenue from government                                     3(a)                2,650,350                3,050,797
Interest                                                    3(b)                   43,762                   54,888
Goods and services                                          3(c)                    3,200                        -

Total cash received                                                             2,697,312                3,105,685

Cash used
Employees                                                                       1,442,258                1,367,096
Suppliers                                                                       1,235,438                1,468,905

Total cash used                                                                 2,677,696                2,836,001

Net cash from/(used by) operating activities                  8                     19,616                269,684
Investing activities
Cash received
Proceeds from sales of property, plant & equipment                                  44,000                        -
Total cash received                                                                 44,000                        -

Cash used
Purchase of property, plant & equipment                                           122,145                 245,707

Total cash used                                                                   122,145                 245,707

Net cash used by investing activities                                             (78,145)               (245,707)

Net increase/(decrease) in cash held                                              (58,527)                 23,977
Cash at the beginning of the reporting period                                       83,370                 59,393
Cash at the end of the reporting period                      10                     24,843                 83,370

STATEMENT of ChANGES in EQUITY
as at 30 June 2008
                                                                           Asset
                                            Accumulated                 revaluation
                                               results                    reserve             TOTAL EQUITY
                                            2008       2007            2008      2007           2008    2007
                                                $          $                $       $              $       $
Opening balance as at 1 July              246,128    220,779          14,288 14,288          260,416 235,067
Net surplus / (deficit)                 (140,668)       25,349             -          -    (140,668)        25,349
Net revaluation increment                         -               -        -          -              -            -
Closing balance as at 30 June             105,460      246,128        14,288   14,288        119,748       260,416


                   The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes



                                                      151               Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
 Central land CounCil - native title rePresentative bodY
 notes to and forminG Part of finanCial statements
 note 1: summarY of siGnifiCant aCCountinG PoliCies
 1.1       overview
 The Central Land Council (CLC) is a Native Title Representative Body (NTRB) as prescribed in the Native Title
 Amendment Act 1998 and a Land Council under the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976. Since
 being recognised as an NTRB, the CLC has performed the functions of the NTRB in association with other CLC
 functions. The CLC has reporting requirements specified in the Native Title Amendment Act 1998, Commonwealth
 Authorities and Companies Act 1997 (schedule 1) and Finance Minister’s Orders.
 The NTRB is dependent on the continued release of these funds for its continued existence and ability to carry out its
 normal activities. The funding conditions of the NTRB are laid down by the Native Title Act, and any special purpose grant
 guidelines. Accounting for monies received from FaCSIA is subject to conditions approved by the Land Rights Branch.


 1.2      Basis of Preparation of the Financial Report
 These financial statements of the Central Land Council as a NTRB are required by Section 203dC (4) of the Native
 Title Amendment Act 1998 and are a general purpose financial statements.
 The statements have been prepared in accordance with:
 •    Finance Minister’s Orders (FMO’s) being the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Orders (Financial
      Statements for reporting periods ending on or after 1 July 2007);
 •    Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board
      (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.
 The CLC has prepared the Income Statement, Balance Sheet and Cash flow statement applicable to the NTRB
 operation and function. All NTRB account balances have been identified from within the CLC financial information
 and accurately extracted from the CLC accounts, representing the completeness and existence of all assets and
 liabilities of the NTRB. The CLC maintains an NTRB revenue and expenditure cost centre and the Statement of
 Financial Performance is a complete and accurate record of NTRB revenue and expenditure.
 The NTRB Income Statement, Balance Sheet have been prepared on an accrual basis and are in accordance with
 historical cost convention. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the
 results or the financial position. The financial report is prepared in Australian dollars.
 Unless specifically required by an Accounting Standard or directed by an FMO, assets and liabilities are recog-
 nised in the NTRB Balance Sheet when and only when it is probable that future economic benefits will flow and
 the amounts of the assets or liabilities can be reliably measured. Assets and liabilities arising under agreements
 equally proportionately unperformed are however not recognised unless required by an accounting standard. No
 capital liabilities and assets that are unrecognised are reported in the Schedule of Commitments and the Schedule
 of Contingencies.
 Unless alternative treatment is specifically required by an accounting standard, revenues and expenses are recogn-
 ised in the NTRB Income Statement when and only when the flow or consumption or loss of economic benefits has
 occurred and can be reliably measured.
 1.3       Significant Accounting Judgements and estimates
 In the process of applying the accounting policies listed in this note, NTRB has made the following judgements that
 have the most significant impact on the amounts recorded in the financial statements;
 •    The value of vested employee benefits has been calculated in accordance with recognition and measurement
      principles in line with AASB 119.
 No accounting assumptions or estimates have been identified that have a significant risk of causing a material
 adjustment to carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next accounting period.
 1.4       Statement of Compliance
 Australian Accounting Standards require a statement of compliance with International Financial Reporting Stan-
 dards (IFRSs) to be made where the financial report complies with these standards. Some Australian equivalents
 to IFRSs and other Australian Accounting Standards contain requirements specific to not-for-profit entities that are
 inconsistent with IFRS requirements. The NTRB is deemed a not for profit entity and has applied these require-
 ments, so while this financial report complies with Australian Accounting Standards including Australian Equivalents
 to International Financial Reporting Standards (AEIFRSs) it cannot make this statement.



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notes to and forminG Part of finanCial statements
Adoption of new Australian Accounting Standards
No accounting standard has been adopted earlier than the application date as stated in the standard.
The following new standards are applicable to the current reporting period.

Financial instrument disclosure
AASB 7 Financial Instruments: Disclosures is effective for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2007
(the 2007-08 financial year) and amends the disclosure requirements for financial instruments. In general AASB 7
requires greater disclosure than that previously required. Associated with the introduction of AASB 7 a number of
accounting standards were amended to reference the new standard or remove the present disclosure requirements
through 2005-10 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards [AASB 132, AASB 101, AASB 114, AASB 117,
AASB 133, AASB 139, AASB 1, AASB 4, AASB 1023 & AASB 1038]. These changes have no financial impact but
will effect the disclosure presented in future financial reports.

The following new standards, amendments or interpretations have become effective for the NTRB in the period.
There is no material impact on the financial report of adoption of these standards based on NTRB’s initial assess-
ment.

Amendments:
•  2007-4 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from ED 151 and Other Amendments and
    Erratum: Proportionate Consolidation
•    2007-7 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards
•    UIg Interpretation 11: AASB 2 – group and Treasury Share Transactions and 2007-1 Amendments to
     Australian Accounting Standards arising from AASB Interpretation 11

Future Australian Accounting Standard Requirements:
The following new standards, amendments to standards or interpretations have been issued by the Australian
Accounting Standards Board effective for future reporting periods. It is estimated that the impact of adopting these
pronouncements when effective will have no material financial impact on future reporting periods.

•    AASB Interpretation 12 Service Concession Arrangements and 2007-2 Amendments to Australian Accounting
     Standards arising from AASB Interpretation 12
•    AASB 8 Operating Segments and 2007-3 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from
     AASB 8
•    2007-6 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from AASB 123
•    AASB Interpretation 13 Customer Loyalty Programmes
•    AASB Interpretation 14 AASB 119 – The Limit on a Defined Benefit Asset, Minimum Funding Requirements
     and their Interaction

Other:
The issued standard AASB 1049 Financial Reporting of general government Sectors specifies the reporting
requirements of the Australian Government for the General Government Sector, and is not applicable to the opera-
tions of the NTRB.


1.5      Revenue
Types of revenue
The revenues described in this Note are revenues relating to the core operating activities of the NTRB:
•    Revenues from government are recognised at the time the NTRB becomes entitled to the funding.
•    Interest revenue is recognised using the effective interest rate method as set out in AASB 139.
•    Revenue from disposal of non-current assets is recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer.
•    Revenue from the rendering of a service is recognised by reference to the stage of completion of the contract
     to provide the service. The stage of completion is determined according to the proportion that costs incurred
     to date bear to the estimated total costs of the transaction.



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Resources received free of charge
Services received free of charge are recognised as revenue when and only when a fair value can be reliably
determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is
recognised as an expense.
Contributions of assets at no cost of acquisition or for nominal consideration are recognised at their fair value
when the asset qualifies for recognition, unless received from another government authority as a consequence of a
restructuring of administrative arrangements. Resources received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or
gains depending on their nature.


Program Funding Agreements
Most agreements require the grantee to perform services or provide facilities, or to meet eligibility criteria. Receipts
from agreements are recognised as income when received. Where agreement funds have been paid in advance
had a stand-ready obligation to return unspent funds, a liability is recognised.

Revenues from Government
Amounts appropriated for Departmental outputs appropriations for the year (adjusted for any formal additions and
reductions) are recognised as revenue, except for certain amounts that relate to activities that are reciprocal in
nature, in which case revenue is recognised only when it has been earned.

Interest
Interest is credited as revenue as it accrues.

1.6    Gains
Other Resources Received Free of Charge
Resources received free of charge are recognised as gains when and only when a fair value can be reliably
determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is
recognised as an expense.
Contributions of assets at no cost of acquisition or for nominal consideration are recognised as gains at their fair
value when the asset qualifies for recognition, unless received from another government Agency or Authority as a
consequence of a restructuring of administrative arrangements.
Resources received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or gains depending on their nature.

Sale of Assets
Gains from disposal of non-current assets is recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer.


1.7     employee Benefits
Employee Benefits
Liabilities for services rendered by employees are recognised at the reporting date to the extent that have not been
settled.
Liabilities for ‘short-term employee benefits’ (as defined in AASB 119) and termination benefits due within twelve
months are measured at their nominal amounts
The nominal amount is calculated with regard to the rates expected to be paid on settlement of the liability.
All other employee benefit liabilities are measured as the present value of the estimated future cash outflows to be
made in respect of services provided by employees up to the reporting date.
Leave
The liability for employee benefits includes provisions for annual leave and long service leave. No provision has
been made for sick leave as all sick leave is non-vesting and the average sick leave taken in future years by em-
ployees of the NTRB is estimated to be less then the annual entitlement for sick leave.
The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration, including the NTRB employer super-
annuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on
termination.
The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases through promo-




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tion and inflation.
Separation and Redundancy
provision is made for separation and redundancy benefit payments. The NTRB recognises a provision for termina-
tion when it has developed a detailed formal plan for the terminations and has informed those employees affected
that it will carry out the terminations.


Superannuation
The majority of employees of the NTRB are members of Acumen Superannuation Fund which is defined contri-
bution fund for NTRB employees. NTRB makes employer contributions to the Acumen at the rate of 9% paid on
monthly basis. The NTRB complies with the requirements of the superannuation choice legislation.
The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June represents outstanding contributions for the final fortnight
of the year.


1.8       Leases
A distinction is made between finance leases and operating leases. Finance leases effectively transfer from the
lessor to the lessee substantially all the risks and benefits incidental to ownership of leased non-current assets. In
operating leases, the lessor effectively retains substantially all such risks and benefits.
Where a non-current assets is acquired by means of a finance lease, the asset is capitalised at either the fair value
of the lease property or, if lower, the present value of minimum lease payments at the inception of the contract and
a liability is recognised at the same time and for the same amount.
The discount rate used is the interest rate implicit in the lease. Leased asset are amortised over the period of the
lease. Lease payments are allocated between the principal component and the interest expense.
Operating lease payments are expensed on a basis which is representative of the pattern of benefits derived from
the leased assets.
The net present value of future net outlays in respect of surplus space under non-cancellable lease agreements is
expensed in the period in which the space becomes surplus.
1.9        Borrowing costs
All borrowing costs are expensed as incurred.


1.10       Cash and cash equivalents
Cash means notes and coins held and any deposits held at call with a bank or financial institution. Cash is recogn-
ised at its nominal amount.
NTRB cash is received into the OIPC bank account. All payments are made from the CLC operating account. On
a regular basis the funds are transferred from the OIPC bank account to the CLC operating account for the value of
payments on behalf of the NTRB.

1.11       Financial Assets
The NTRB classifies its financial assets in the following categories:
•      financial assets as ‘at fair value through profit or loss’
•      ‘held-to-maturity investments’,
•      ‘available-for-sale’ financial assets, and
•      ‘loans and receivables’.
The classification depends on the nature and purpose of the financial assets and is determined at the time of initial
recognition. Financial assets are recognised and derecognised upon ‘trade date’.
The NTRB’s only financial asset as at balance date is cash at bank. There are no financial assets which have been
acquired for sale, are part of a portfolio or market, are investments, or are receivable as at balance date. There is
no impairment to the financial assets of the NTRB.

Effective interest method
The effective interest method is a method of calculating the amortised cost of a financial asset and of allocating



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interest income over the relevant period. The effective interest rate is the rate that exactly discounts estimated
future cash receipts through the expected life of the financial asset, or, where appropriate, a shorter period.
Income is recognised on an effective interest rate basis except for financial assets ‘at fair value through profit or
loss’.
Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss
Financial assets are classified as financial assets at fair value through profit or loss where the financial assets:
•      has been acquired principally for the purpose of selling in the near future;
•      is a part of an identified portfolio of financial instruments that the Authority manages together and has a recent
       actual pattern of short-term profit-taking; or
•      is a derivative that is not designated and effective as a hedging instrument.
Assets in this category are classified as current assets.
Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss are stated at fair value, with any resultant gain or loss recog-
nised in profit or loss. The net gain or loss recognised in profit or loss incorporates any interest earned on the
financial asset.
1.12       Financial Liabilities
Financial liabilities are classified as either financial liabilities ‘at fair value through profit or loss’ or other financial
liabilities. Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon ‘trade date’.


1.13       Appropriations Receivable
Where applicable, these receivables are recognised at the nominal amounts due.


1.14       Other Liabilities
Trade creditors and accruals are recognised at their nominal amounts, to the extent at which the liabilities will be
settled. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of
having been invoiced).
Trade creditors are settled on the transfer of funds from the OIPC bank account to the CLC operating account.


1.15       Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets
Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets are not recognised in the Balance Sheet but are reported in the rel-
evant schedules and notes. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of a liability or asset or represent
an asset or liability in respect of which the amount cannot be reliably measured. Contingent assets are disclosed
when settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent liabilities are disclosed when settlement is
greater than remote.


1.16       Financial Guarantee Contracts
Financial guarantee contracts are accounted for in accordance with AASB139. They are not treated as a contingent
liability, as they are regarded as financial instruments outside the scope of AASB137.


1.17       Acquisition of Assets
Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of
assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value
plus transaction costs where appropriate.
Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and revenues at their fair
value at the date of acquisition, unless acquired as a consequence of restructuring of administrative arrangements.
In the latter case, assets are initially recognised as contributions by owners at the amounts at which they were
recognised in the transferor’s accounts immediately prior to the restructuring.


1.18     Property (Land, Buildings and infrastructure), Plant and equipment
Asset Recognition Threshold
Purchases of property, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the Statement of Financial Position,



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except for purchases costing less than $2,000, which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where
they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total). This threshold was increased to $2,000
(2007: $1,000) effective from 1st July 2007.
The initial cost of an asset includes an estimate of the cost of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the
site on which it is located.

Depreciation
Depreciable property, plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their
estimated useful lives to the NTRB using, in all cases, the straight-line method of depreciation. Depreciation rates
(useful lives) and methods are reviewed at each balance date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the
current, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate. Residual values are re-estimated for a change in
prices only when assets are revalued.
Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:
                                           2007              2006
Motor vehicles and IT equipment           3 to 4 years         3 to 4 years
Office equipment and furniture            7 to 10 years        7 to 10 years
The aggregate amount of depreciation allocated for each class of asset during the reporting period is disclosed in
Note 4(c).

1.19     Impairment of Assets
Assets carried at cost, which are not held to generate net cash inflows, have been assessed for indications of impairment.
Where indications of impairment exist the asset is written down to the higher of its net selling price and if the entity would
replace the asset’s service potential, its depreciated replacement cost.
All assets were assessed for impairment at 30 June 2008. Where indications of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable
amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying
amount.

1.20     Taxation / competitive Neutrality

The NTRB is exempt from all forms of taxation except fringe benefits tax and the goods and services tax (gST).
Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of GST:
•	  except where the amount of gST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office; and
•	  except for receivables and payables.

Competitive Neutrality
The NTRB does not provide any services on a for-profit basis. Under Competitive Neutrality arrangements, the NTRB
is not required to pay Australian Income Tax Equivalent payments to the Government.


1.21     Insurance

The NTRB has insured for risks through the government’s insurable risk managed fund, called ‘Comcover’. Work-
ers compensation is insured through Comcare Australia.


1.22      Comparatives
Where necessary, comparatives have been reclassified and repositioned for consistencies with current year disclo-
sures.

note 2:              events after the balanCe sheet date
There were no material events after balance day to be reported.




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                                                                            2008              2007
                                                                               $                 $
 Note 3: REvENUE

 Note 3(a) - revenues from government
 FaCSIA Grant - Operational                                            2,650,350          3,050,797
 Total revenues from government                                        2,650,350          3,050,797

 Note 3(b) - interest revenue
 Interest from deposits                                                   43,762             54,888
 Total interest revenue                                                   43,762             54,888

 Note 3(c) - Sale of goods and rendering of services
 Rendering of services - External entities                                  3,200                  -
 Total sales of goods and rendering of services                             3,200                  -

 Note 3(d) - Net gains from Sale of Assets
 Motor Vehicles, Plant & Equipment
     Proceeds from disposal                                               44,000                   -
     Net book value of assets disposed                                         -                   -

 Net gain from disposal                                                   44,000                   -

 Note 4: EXPENSES

 Note 4(a) - employee expenses
 Wages & salaries                                                      1,273,879          1,172,346
 Superannuation                                                          110,433             97,465
 Leave                                                                    60,748             75,239
 Other employee benefits                                                  25,896             82,285
 Total employee benefits expenses                                      1,470,956          1,427,335

 Total employee expenses                                               1,470,956          1,427,335
 There were no expenses incurred for separation or redundancy of
 employees.

 The NTRB undertakes to make regular monthly contributions in accordance with the Superannuation
 Guarantee legislation at the prescribed rate of 9%.

 Note 4(b) - Supplier expenses
 Goods from related entities                                              46,309                 -
 Goods from external entities                                            254,446           302,528
 Services from related entities                                          449,000           522,275
 Services from external entities                                         470,682           644,102
 Workers Compensation premium                                             15,000            15,000

 Total Suppliers expenses                                              1,235,438          1,483,905




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Note 4(c) - depreciation and Amortisation
Depreciation of property, plant and equipment                               175,587               169,096

Total depreciation and amortisation                                         175,587               169,096


The aggregate amount of depreciation or amortisation expensed during the reporting
period for each class of depreciable assets are as follows:
Motor vehicles                                                              141,647               117,811
Plant and Equipment                                                          33,940                51,285
Total depreciation and amortisation                                         175,587               169,096

Note 5 - FaCSIA GRANT:        Native Title - Operational
                                                                2007/2008                  2007/2008
                                                             Approved Budget                Actual
                                                                    $                          $
INCOME
   Other Project Income
   Bank Interest                                                           32,000                   43,762
   Other Income                                                                 -                    3,200
   FaCSIA Funding
   06/07 Unexpended Funds C/Fwd for expend in 07/08                       83,370                    83,370
   Vehicle Disposal                                                       46,000                    44,000
   Operational                                                         2,650,350                 2,650,350
   TOTAL INCOME                                                        2,811,720                 2,824,682

EXPENdITURE
  Capital
  Vehicles                                                                136,000                  122,144
  Total Capital                                                           136,000                  122,144
  Operational
  Salaries
  CEO/GM or equivalents                                                  140,000                   137,500
  Corporate staff (eg Accounting admin.)                                 300,000                   292,000
  project staff(legal, anthro, field) Attributable                     1,101,000                 1,093,578
  Services
  Accommodation                                                           150,500                  153,323
  Motor Vehicles Corporate                                                 25,000                   28,000
  Motor Vehicles Attritbutable                                             40,500                   46,745
  Repair and Maintenance Equipment                                         13,000                   32,024
  Repair and Maintenance Buildings                                          3,000                   11,960
  Bank Charges                                                              1,000                      909
  Audit Fees                                                               12,000                   20,900
  Consultants Corporate                                                     6,000                    3,671
  Consultants Attributable                                                190,000                  208,631
  Communications Telephones, Fax and IT                                    87,700                   90,081
  Insurance - Other                                                        15,000                   15,000
  Insurance - Assets                                                       17,000                   20,205
   Insurance Professional Indemnity                                        23,000                   16,621
   Corporate HR / Finance / propertyServ / Library                        140,650                  128,676



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notes to and forminG Part of finanCial statements
   Note 5 - FaCSIA GRANT:            Native Title - Operational continued


                                                                            2007/2008                 2007/2008
      EXPENdITURE cont
                                                                      Approved Budget                    Actual
                                                                                    $
      Training & development
      Governing Committee                                                              3,500                 5,104
      Staff                                                                           50,000                47,232
      Meetings
      Governing Committee                                                             12,000                 9,915
      Members (Meetings)                                                              18,000                 9,500
      Claimants (Meetings)                                                            35,000                32,582
      Attributable Other meetings expenses                                            12,000                17,650
      Travel & Allowances
      Chairperson                                                                      9,000                 4,264
      Other Governing Committee members                                               20,000                 9,475
      Members (Travel)                                                                20,000                20,795
      Claimants (Travel)                                                              50,000                43,090
      Staff (Travel) Corporate                                                        28,000                20,463
      Staff (Travel) Attributable                                                     50,500                45,088
      Supplies & Consumables
      Corporate Ext.Copying / Office Sup                                              15,000                27,571
      Attributable Other Expenses                                                      4,000                 1,773
      Other
      06/07 C/Fwd Office Fit-Out - Corporate Corporate                              83,370                  83,370
                                                                                 2,675,720               2,677,695

  BALANCE AS AT 30 JUNE 2008                                                                -                 24,843
   Consistent with Note 1.1, the NTRB maintains accounts on an accrual basis, however, this statement is
   prepared on a cash basis consistent with the terms and conditions of the Native Title Grant. This includes
   approved expenditure utilising prior year funds carried forward ($83,370). The balance of $24,843
   represents funds approved and committed but unexpended during the period

  Note 6: NON FINANCIAL ASSETS
                                                                              2008                            2007
                                                                                  $                              $
  Note 6(a) - infrastructure, Plant and equipment
  Motor vehicles - at cost                                                551,171                          578,876
  Accumulated depreciation                                               (261,811)                       (270,014)

                                                                          289,360                         308,862

  Plant, furniture and equipment - at cost                                  96,426                        188,537
  Plant, furniture and equipment - at valuation                             92,111
  Accumulated depreciation                                               (155,071)                       (121,130)
                                                                            33,466                          67,407

  Total Infrastructure, plant and equipment                               322,826                         376,269

  At 30 June 2004 an independent valuation on plant, furniture and equipment was completed by Michael
  pankhurst, Senior Valuer, Rodney Hyman Asset Services.


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 Note 6(b) – Analysis of Property, Plant and equipment

Table (A):
                                                            Motor           Plant &         TOTAL
Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of
property, plant and equipment 2007/2008                  vehicles      Equipment
                                                                 $                 $               $
 As at 1 July 2007
    Gross book value                                      578,876          188,537         767,413
    Accumulated depreciation/amortisation                (270,014)        (121,130)      (391,144)
 Opening net book value                                   308,862            67,407        376,269
 Additions
    By purchase                                           122,145                   -      122,145

 Net revaluation increment                                        -                 -
 Depreciation/amortisation expense                       (141,647)         (33,940)      (175,587)
 Recoverable Amount write-downs                                   -                 -
                                                                                                    -

 Disposals
    Disposals gross value                                (149,850)                  -    (149,850)
    Disposals accumulated depreciation                    149,850                   -      149,850

 As at 30 June 2008
 Gross book value                                         551,171          188,536         739,707
 Accumulated depreciation                                (261,811)        (155,070)      (416,881)
 Net book value                                           289,360            33,466        322,826


                                                            Motor           Plant &         TOTAL
Table (B):
Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of    vehicles      Equipment
property, plant and equipment 2006/2007
                                                                 $                 $               $
 As at 1 July 2006
    Gross book value                                      358,394          163,312         521,706
    Accumulated depreciation/amortisation                (152,203)         (69,845)      (222,048)
 Opening net book value                                   206,191            93,467        299,658
 Additions
    By purchase                                                              25,790        250,712
                                                          224,922

 Adjustments Expense                                       (4,441)             (564)        (5,005)
 Net revaluation increment                                        -                 -               -
 Depreciation/amortisation expense                       (117,811)         (51,285)      (169,096)
 Disposals
    Disposals gross value




                                              161        Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08
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                                                                                                   TOTAL
 Table (B): cont                                                     Motor         Plant &
 Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of             vehicles     Equipment
 property, plant and equipment 2006/2007
                                                                           $               $              $
 As at 30 June 2007
 Gross book value                                                   578,876         188,537       767,414
 Accumulated depreciation                                          (270,014)       (121,130)    (391,144)
  Net book value                                                    308,862          67,407       376,269

 Note 7: PROvISIONS                                                    2008                          2007
 Note 7(a): employee Provisions                                           $                             $

 Leave Provisions                                                   227,921                       199,223

 Aggregate employee entitlement liability                           227,921                       199,223

 Employee provisions are categorised as follows:
    Current
                                                                    145,116                       113,223
    Non-current                                                      82,805                        86,000
                                                                    227,921                       199,223
 Note 8 - CASh FLOw RECONCILIATION

 reconciliation of operating deficit to net cash from
 operating activities
 Operating surplus/(deficit) before extraordinary items            (140,668)                       25,349
 Non-Cash Items
 Depreciation of plant & equipment                                  175,587                       169,096
 Gain on disposal of assets                                         (44,000)                            -
 Changes in Assets and Liabilities
 Increase /(Decrease) in employee liabilities                         28,698                       75,239

 Net cash from/(used by) operating activities                         19,616                      269,684

 Note 9 - dIRECTOR REMUNERATION

 There were no director remuneration payments made during the period with NTRB monies.


 Note 10: CASh
 Cash at bank and on hand - NTU account                               24,843                       83,370
 Balance of cash as at 30 June shown in the Statement of
 Cash Flows                                                           24,843                       83,370


 Cash at bank – accounts are recognised at their nominal values. Interest, which is earned at the daily
 prevailing rate (5.975%), is credited to revenue as it accrues and is paid semi-annually.




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Note 11 - AUdITORS REMUNERATION
                                                                            2008                            2007
                                                                               $                               $
Remuneration to the Australian National Audit Office for
auditing the financial statements for the reporting period.

The fair value of services provided was:                                    9,900                         11,000

                                                                            9,900                         11,000
The Audit Fees disclosed above were treated as expenses in the period (FMO 23.1).
Only audit services were provided by the ANAO during the reporting period.

Note 12 - EMPLOYEE NUMBERS
The staffing levels for the NTRB as at 30 June were:                          20                               20

Note 13: FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS
Note 13(a) – categories of financial instruments
Financial Assets
Loans and receivables
  Cash at bank                                                          24,843                           83,370
carrying amount of financial assets                                     24,843                           83,370

The carrying amounts are a reasonable approximation of fair value. The NTRB has not transferred
financial assets whilst maintaining an involvement.
Note 13(b) – Net income and expenses from financial assets and
liabilities
Loans and receivables
   Interest revenue (see note 3(c))                          43,762                                      54,888
Net gain/(loss) loans and receivables                        43,762                                      54,888
Net gain/(loss) from financial assets                        43,762                                      54,888

There was no income or expense to be recognised from financial liabilities of the NTRB.

Note 13(c) – credit risk

The NTRB is not exposed to credit risk as recievables are short term; are due under legislation or
contract; or are recievable from the Australian Taxation Office in the form of a gST refund. As at 30
June 2008 there were no receivables for the NTRB.

Where incurred, all debtors are unsecured and as such, the carrying value of the net receivables
represents the amount exposed to credit risk.

Note 13(d) – Liquidity risk and market risk

The NTRB’s liabilities are employee liabilities. The NTRB in its present form with its present programs is
dependent on Government policy and on continuing appropriations by Parliament. The NTRB manages
its budget to ensure it has adequate funds to meet payments as they fall due. Financial liabitlies at 30
June 2008 are $Nil.

There is no market risk relating to NTRB financial assets or liabilities.




                                                    163              Central Land Council - Annual Report 07 - 08

								
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