Student Handbook Hospitality 2009 2010

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Student Handbook Hospitality 2009 2010 Powered By Docstoc
					Student Handbook


   Culinary Arts
   Hospitality & Tourism Management
   Professional Baking/Pâtisserie




               Fall 2011 / Winter 2012
                                            Table of Contents
MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR...................................................................................................... 1

HOSPITALITY DEPARTMENT CONTACTS ...................................................................................2

PROGRAM OVERVIEW
CULINARY ARTS:
 Your First and Second Semesters..............................................................................................3
 Your Third and Sixth Semesters.................................................................................................3
 Your Fourth and Fifth Semesters ...............................................................................................3
 Culinary Arts Program Maps .................................................................................................. 4-5

HOSPITALITY & TOURISM MANAGEMENT:
 Your First and Second Semesters..............................................................................................6
 Your Third and Sixth Semesters.................................................................................................6
 Your Fourth and Fifth Semesters ...............................................................................................6
 Hospitality & Tourism Management Program Maps ............................................................... 7-8

PROFESSIONAL BAKING/PÂTISSERIE:
 Your First and Third Semester ...................................................................................................9
 Your Second and Fourth Semester ............................................................................................9
 Professional Baking Program Map ...........................................................................................10

PROGRAM SEMESTER DATES ............................................................................................... 11-12

CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION:
 Co-operative Education ............................................................................................................13
 Student Benefits .......................................................................................................................13
 The Role of the Co-op Ed Coordinator .....................................................................................13
 Credit for Prior Co-op Work Placements ..................................................................................14
 Criteria for Co-op Ed Participation ............................................................................................15
      o Academic Requirements ..............................................................................................15
      o Voluntary Withdrawal & Co-op Ed Eligibility .................................................................15
      o Eligibility for Employment..............................................................................................15
      o International Students Work Placement Requirements................................................16
      o Co-operative Education Work Term Dates...................................................................17
      o Work Placement Requirements ...................................................................................17
 Work Placement Procurement Procedures ........................................................................ 17-19
 The Student at Work .......................................................................................................... 19-20
 Evaluation of the Co-op Ed Work Placement ..................................................................... 20-21
 Graduation Requirements ........................................................................................................21
 Some General Advice......................................................................................................... 21-22

DRESS CODE:
 Grooming and Appropriate Attire - Hospitality and Tourism Students ......................................23
 Food Preparation Labs .............................................................................................................24
 Job Interviews and College Sponsored Events - HTM Students ..............................................24
    Grooming and Appropriate Attire - Professional Baking/Pâtisserie and Culinary
     Arts Students ............................................................................................................................25
    Job Interviews and College Sponsored Events - Professional Baking/Pâtisserie
     and Culinary Arts Students .......................................................................................................26
    Uniform Requirements (Illustration) ..........................................................................................27


ACADEMIC STANDARDS:
 Academic Assessment Standards ............................................................................................28
 Honour Roll...............................................................................................................................28
 Attendance ...............................................................................................................................29
 Absenteeism .............................................................................................................................29
 Assignments .............................................................................................................................29
 Exams/Tests ....................................................................................................................... 29-30
 Academic Appeals ....................................................................................................................30
 Academic Appeals Support and Advocacy......................................................................... 30-31
 Academic Integrity ....................................................................................................................31
 Plagiarism and Cheating ..........................................................................................................31
 Inappropriate Use of the Internet and E-mail Accounts ............................................................31
 Course Add/Drop Policy & Section Change Request ......................................................... 31-32
 Program Withdrawal .................................................................................................................32
 Refund Policy ...........................................................................................................................32
 Application for Re-Entry............................................................................................................33
 Transfer of Credits....................................................................................................................33
 Respectful College Policy .........................................................................................................33

HOSPITALITY STUDENT AWARDS: ...................................................................................... 34-42

GENERAL INFORMATION:
 Lockers .....................................................................................................................................43
 Web Advisor .............................................................................................................................43
 Change Of Address ..................................................................................................................43
 Student Service Centre Hours ..................................................................................................43
 Laptop / Computer Services .....................................................................................................44
 Bookstore General Hours .........................................................................................................44
 Buy Your Books Online ............................................................................................................44
 Injury Reporting Procedures .....................................................................................................44
 Workers Compensation Board Claims .....................................................................................45
 Workplace Safety .....................................................................................................................45

PEER TUTORING SERVICES.......................................................................................................45

USE OF PERSONAL INFORMATION ...........................................................................................46

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ............................................................................................47

EQUITRAC FAQs...........................................................................................................................48

COLLEGE MAP..............................................................................................................................49
Message from the Chair
                         It is a pleasure to welcome you to Red River College‟s
                         Hospitality Department. We provide a solid foundation and
                         innovative spark for our graduates to be successful in their
                         chosen field. Whether your program of choice is Culinary Arts,
                         Hospitality & Tourism Management, or Professional
                         Baking/Pâtisserie, you are beginning an exhilarating and
                         rewarding career path. At the outset, let me assure you that you
                         will not be alone in your efforts towards a successful academic
                         and practical journey at Red River College.

Our department comprises a very competent, award winning and reputable faculty and
staff who are in tune with current industry requirements, trends and technology. They
have all the skills and experience at their disposal to help ensure that your needs and
expectations as students are met.

Classrooms are laptop ready and provide students with 24/7 Internet access. As a Red
River College student, you receive a truly multi-faceted, fast-paced hospitality education.
From basic techniques to management theories to interpersonal skills each program is
demanding, requiring students to be diligent and committed.

The Hospitality Department is also involved in the Co-operative Education placement
(Co-op), bringing students together with our industry partners for two 16 week terms of
professional paid work. You will gain plenty of real, practical industry experience during
this placement period. It allows students an opportunity to experience the real world of
work in one of more than 425 first rate restaurants, hotels, clubs or lodges during the
program, and affirms their career choice. Co-op partners often supply part-time job
opportunities for students and full-time employment for our graduates.

Our programs are designed and continuously reviewed so that by the time you complete
your studies you will have acquired the knowledge, skills and abilities needed to
continue a successful career in the hospitality industry. Moreover, you can take
advantage of our various articulation agreements with different universities across
Canada should you wish to further your education.

We invite and encourage you to explore this handbook. It contains beneficial information
about each program and is an invaluable resource. Be sure to keep it in a safe place for
easy access.

Best wishes for a successful journey at Red River College.




John Jörn Reimers C.C.C.
Chair, Hospitality Department


                                                                                         1
Hospitality Department Phone List

                                                               Room    Phone
Staff Name                  Program                            #       #
Reimers, John               Chair                               B185       2309
Houston-Sorokowski, Kelly   Administrative Assistant            B185       2285
Bailey, Trevor              Coop Ed Coordinator                B185B       2465
Garcia, Lina                Coop Ed Assistant                   B185       2362
Lam, Danny                  Hosp. Dept. Help Desk              AB13B       3994
Losics, Amy                 Coop Ed Coordinator                 B185       2572
Yurkiw, Stephen             Program/Curriculum Developer        B185       2598
Culinary Arts
Appleton, Tim               Culinary Arts                       AB83       3968
Ball, Scott                 Culinary Arts                       CM06       2526
Gill, Jeff                  Culinary Arts                       A150       2367
                                                                AB12
Gray, Brad                  Culinary Arts                      (HDC)       2199
Jean, Luc                   Culinary Arts                       CM10       2562
Oman, Karl                  Culinary Arts                       B185       2367
Pattie, Don                 Culinary Arts                       CM07       2134
Pendree, Warren             Culinary Arts                       BB13       2368
Pitt, Tom                   Culinary Arts                       CM06       2562
Tait, Cameron               Culinary Arts                       CM10       2562
Hospitality & Tourism
Management
Hogue, Barb                 Hospitality & Tourism Management    CM12       2262
Lindberg, Brenda            Hospitality & Tourism Management    B185       2109
McDonald, Karen             Hospitality & Tourism Management    B185       2062
Mineault, Blair             Hospitality & Tourism Management    B185       2435
Slater, Laurie              Hospitality & Tourism Management    B185       3757
Townsend, Janet             Hospitality & Tourism Management    CM12       2141
Professional
Baking/Pâtisserie
Bucher, Hugo                Professional Baking/Pâtisserie      A165       2454
Noschese, Chantalle         Professional Baking/Pâtisserie      A165       2454




                                                                       2
Program Overview
Culinary Arts
The program is divided into six semesters, each sixteen or seventeen weeks in duration.
The sequence is set up as follows: (see Program Map)

Your First and Second Semesters
These semesters will be spent in the college. During this period, students will study
several core culinary courses and some related courses.

Students will be assigned to either Section 1 or 2 on registration day, and will receive the
timetable for your respective group.

Your Third and Sixth Semesters (or Fifth if you are a “January Intake”)
These two semesters will be spent off campus in the kitchen of an established restaurant,
hotel, or private club. Students will find this part of the program profitable in that they have
an opportunity to simultaneously learn and earn. Experts say that Co-operative Education
students return to the College following job placements with heightened interest in their
studies and in most cases, academic achievement improves. In Semester 6, students will
be revising their résumé and considering after-graduation employment opportunities.

Your Fourth and Fifth Semesters (or Sixth if you are a “January Intake”)
These semesters differ somewhat from the preceding on-campus terms. Students will be
learning advanced culinary skills and will be expected to work more independently. In both
semesters they will spend time in the Prairie Lights Restaurant kitchen and dining room.
The course will include lunch and evening dining preparation and service.




                                                                                              3
Culinary Arts Program Map (Fall 2011 Intake)
Year 1 Semester One                             Semester Two                 Semester Three
         August 29 – December 16, 2011          January 3 – April 27, 2012   April 30 – August 17, 2012

         Basic Food Preparation                 Cooperative Education        Cooperative Education Work
         Communications                         Preparation                  Placement 1
         Culinary Computer Applications         Human Behaviour
         Garde Manger                           Meatcutting
         Introduction to Culinary Arts          Nutrition
                                                Patisserie 1
                                                Restaurant Cooking

Year 2 Semester Four                            Semester Five                Semester Six
         August 27 – December 14, 2012          January 2 – April 26, 2013   April 29 – August 16, 2013

         Advanced Culinary Skills 1             Advanced Culinary Skills 2   Cooperative Education Work
         Canadian Regional & Seasonal Cuisine   Human Resources Management   Placement 2
         Charcuterie & Buffets                  Kitchen Layout and Design
         Inventory Management                   Patisserie 2
         Menu Development                       Restaurant Service



 st
1 Year Workshops / Seminars – WHMIS, Fire Safety, Food Handler’s Challenge Exam, First Aider
Culinary Arts Program Map (Winter 2012 Intake)
Year 1 Semester One                              Semester Two                 Semester Three
          January 3 – April 27, 2012             April 30 – August 17, 2012   August 27 – December 14, 2012

          Basic Food Preparation                 Cooperative Education        Cooperative Education Work
          Communications                         Preparation                  Placement 1
          Culinary Computer Applications         Human Behaviour
          Garde Manger                           Charcuterie & Buffets
          Introduction to Culinary Arts          Nutrition
                                                 Patisserie 1
                                                 Restaurant Cooking

Year 2 Semester Four                             Semester Five                Semester Six
          January 2 – April 26, 2013             April 29 – August 16, 2013   August 26 – December 13, 2013

          Advanced Culinary Skills 1             Cooperative Education Work   Advanced Culinary Skills 2
          Canadian Regional & Seasonal Cuisine   Placement 2                  Human Resources Management
          Inventory Management                                                Kitchen Layout and Design
          Menu Development                                                    Patisserie 2
                                                                              Restaurant Service

1st Year Workshops / Seminars – WHMIS, Fire Safety, Food Handler’s Challenge Exam, First Aider




                                                                                                              5
Hospitality & Tourism Management
The program is divided into six semesters, each 16 or 17 weeks in duration. The
sequence is set up as follows: (see Program Map)

Your First and Second Semesters
The common first year will provide a mix of general business courses as well as tourism
and hospitality specific courses. This is intended to provide exposure to various aspects of
the hospitality/tourism industry before selecting a second year major in either Hotel and
Restaurant Management or Tourism Management.

Students will be assigned to either Group A or Group B on registration day and will receive
the timetable for the section within their respective group.

Your Third and Sixth Semesters
These two semesters are spent off-campus in a Co-operative Education placement.
Students will be away from the classroom but the learning process continues, and often
intensifies. Experts say that Co-operative Education students return to the college from
work assignments with heightened interest in academic studies and, in most cases, their
academic achievement improves. Success in the first co-op placement will have a
significant bearing on the second placement, which in turn may lead to full-time
employment in the chosen major.

Your Fourth and Fifth Semesters
In the second year of the program, students will select either a Hotel and Restaurant
Management major or a Tourism Management major.

Hotel and Restaurant Management majors will focus on food and beverage courses,
evening restaurant service in the Prairie Lights Restaurant, housekeeping, group projects
as part of an on-going hospitality management simulation, plus the continuation of general
business courses.

Tourism Management majors will study courses focused on specific sectors or disciplines
of the tourism industry as well as more business courses.

HTM students in their 2nd work term must choose a position relevant to their selected
major of either Tourism or Hotel & Restaurant Management.




                                                                                          6
Hospitality & Tourism Management Program Map (Fall 2011 Intake)
Year 1         Semester One                          Semester Two                          Semester Three
               August 29 – December 16, 2011         January 3 – April 27, 2012            April 30 – August 17, 2012
Group A
               Customer Service                      Bartending                            Co-operative Education
               Communications 1                      Communications 2                      Work Placement 1
               Front Office                          Co-operative Education Preparation
               Hospitality Computer Applications 1   Hospitality Computer Applications 2
               Introduction to Tourism               Human Behaviour
               Introductory Accounting A             Introductory Accounting B
               Tourist Destinations & Geography      Interpretation & Tour Guiding
               Restaurant Service                    Meetings & Conventions

Year 1         Semester One                          Semester Two                          Semester Three
               August 29 – December 16, 2011         January 3 – April 27, 2012            April 30 – August 17, 2012
Group B
               Bartending                            Communications 2                      Co-operative Education
               Communications 1                      Co-operative Education Preparation    Work Placement 1
               Customer Service                      Hospitality Computer Applications 2
               Front Office                          Human Behaviour
               Hospitality Computer Applications 1   Introductory Accounting B
               Introduction to Tourism               Interpretation & Tour Guiding
               Introductory Accounting A             Meetings & Conventions
               Tourist Destinations & Geography      Restaurant Service


1st Year Workshops / Seminars – Serving it Safe; First Aider; Professional Development




                                                                                                                    7
Hospitality & Tourism Management Program Map (Fall 2011 Intake)
Year 2        Semester Four                               Semester Five                   Semester Six
              August 27 – December 14, 2012               January 2 – April 26, 2013      April 29 – August 16, 2013
Hotel &
              Basic Food Preparation                      Advance Restaurant Service      Co-operative Education
Restaurant
              Hospitality Management Accounting           Cross Cultural Communications   Work Placement 2
Management    Human Resources Management                  Economics
Selected      Menu Development                            Hospitality Law
Major         Marketing, Public Relations & Advertising   Hospitality Simulation
              Restaurant Design                           Rooms Management
              Wine                                        Sales & Catering

                                           Inventory Management


Year 2        Semester Four                               Semester Five                   Semester Six
              August 27 – December 14, 2012               January 2 – April 26, 2013      April 29 – August 16, 2013
Tourism
              Special Events                              Ecotourism                      Co-operative Education
Management
              Human Resources Management                  Cross Cultural Communications   Work Placement 2
Selected      Tour Development                            Economics
Major         Tourism Management Accounting               Entrepreneurship
              Tourism Research and Marketing              Hospitality Law
              Writing for the Marketplace                 Selling Tourism
              Administration and Office Procedures        Attractions
                                                          Special Events




2nd Year Workshops / Seminars –WHMIS (HRM); Food Handler’s (HRM)



                                                                                                                   8
Professional Baking/Pâtisserie
The program is divided into three semesters, up to seventeen weeks in length. The
sequence is set up as follows: (see Program Map)

Your First Semester
The first part of the semester will be spent in the college studying several core baking
courses and some related courses.

Your Second Semester
The second semester will differ somewhat from the preceding on-campus term. Students
will be learning advanced baking skills and will be expected to work more independently.
Students will learn to produce product through an order system that is student managed
and operated under instructor supervision. The semester will also include lunch and
evening dining preparations. Students will also be revising their résumé and considering
after-graduation employment opportunities.

Your Third Semester
The final semester will be spent in the industry, in a co-operative education work
placement. This is a good opportunity to apply the theory and knowledge gained at the
college during the previous two semesters and initiate long-term career plans.




                                                                                      9
Professional Baking & Pâtisserie Program Map (Fall 2011 Intake)
(Program only one year)

               Semester One                   Semester Two                        Semester Three

  August 29 – December 16, 2011               January 3 – April 27, 2012          April 30 – August 17, 2012

  Communications 1                            Bakery Management                   Cooperative Education Work
  Introduction to Baking                      Cakes & Desserts                    Placement
  Introduction to Baking Ingredients          Inventory Management
  Professional Baking Computer Applications   Nutrition
  Quick-Breads & Cookies                      Pastries
  Yeast Goods & Artisan Breads                Cooperative Education Preparation


Workshops / Seminars – Fire Safety, WHMIS, Food Handler’s Challenge Exam, First Aider




                                                                                                               10
Program Semester Dates – (Fall 2011 Intake)
Culinary Arts (August 2011 – August 2013)
Hospitality & Tourism Management (August 2011 – August 2013)

   Semester One:          August 29 – December 16, 2011
   Christmas Break:       December 19, 2011 – January 3, 2012
   Semester Two:          January 3 – April 27, 2012
   Semester Break:        February 20 - February 24, 2012 inclusive
   Semester Three:        (Co-op Placement 1) April 30 – August 17, 2012
   Semester Break:        August 20 – August 24, 2012
   Semester Four:         August 27 – December 14, 2012
   Christmas Break:       December 17, 2012 – January 2, 2013
   Semester Five:         January 2 – April 26, 2013
   Semester Break:        February 18 – February 22, 2013 inclusive
   Semester Six:          April 29 – August 16, 2013


Professional Baking/Pâtisserie (August 2011 – August 2012)

   Semester One:          August 29 – December 16, 2011
   Christmas Break:       December 19, 2011 – January 3, 2012
   Semester Two:          January 3 – April 27, 2012
   Semester Break:        February 20 - February 24, 2012 inclusive
   Semester Three:        (Co-op Placement 1) April 30 – August 17, 2012




                                                                           11
   Program Semester Dates – (Winter 2012 Intake)
Culinary Arts (January 2012 – December 2013)

   Semester One:          January 3 – April 27, 2012
   Semester Break:        February 20 – February 24, 2012 inclusive
   Semester Two:          April 30 – August 17, 2012
   Semester Break:        August 20 – August 24, 2012
   Semester Three:        (Co-op Placement 1) August 27 – December 14, 2012
   Christmas Break:       December 17, 2012 – January 2, 2013
   Semester Four:         January 2 – April 26, 2013
   Semester Break:        February 18 – February 22, 2013 inclusive
   Semester Five:         (Co-op Placement 2) April 29 – August 16, 2013
   Semester Break:        August 19 – August 23, 2012
   Semester Six:          August 26 – December 13, 2013




                                                                              12
Co-operative Education Work Placements
Co-operative Education
Co-operative Education (Co-op Ed) is an educational strategy, which integrates classroom
learning with on-the-job experience by alternating semesters of academic study with semesters
of paid employment. During Co-op placements, students will be employed in positions related to
their particular fields of study.

Co-op Ed extends the learning process beyond the College and into the real world of work by
blending theory and practical work into a partnership between the student, the employer and
the College.

Student Benefits
In Co-op Ed the student is required to play an active role and assume responsibility in the
learning process. Co-op Ed enables students to relate classroom study to real life work
settings. It provides opportunities to experience the practical aspects of a chosen field and to
get a clearer understanding of the requirements of employment and the expectations of
employers.

In the process of finding a co-op work placement, students will have opportunities to learn and
practice important job search and interview skills. While obtaining valuable on-the-job
experience, students gain knowledge that will help to realistically evaluate their individual
choices of study and career. Employers will pay at least minimum wage to students on their
coop work term.

The work experience students receive will enhance personal development in oral and written
communication skills, responsibility, self-confidence, independence and the ability to relate and
work well with others. Co-op Ed provides opportunities to establish relationships with potential
long-term employers.

Today, many employers are demanding more than just the academic and technical skills
required for graduation from an academic program. Because of keen competition amongst
available employees, relevant work experience and communication skills often become key
factors in hiring decisions. By combining practical work experience with academic study, the
Co-op Ed student is a good candidate for full-time employment upon graduation.

The Role of the Co-op Coordinator
To optimize the benefits of Co-operative Education for students and employers, a co-operative
partnership must be established between the student, the employer and the College. The Co-op
Ed Coordinators‟ responsibilities include the development of Co-op Ed work placements, the
management of the job procurement process; the preparation of students for their employment
experience and the monitoring and evaluation of students' work experience.




                                                                                                   13
The Co-op Ed Coordinators are responsible for maintaining and developing relationships with
current and potential employers to market the program; evaluating work placement positions for
students; assisting in arranging job interviews; and providing a liaison between the College and
the employer during and following the work experience.

The Co-op Ed Coordinators‟ responsibilities also include communicating information about the
Co-op Ed program and specific employment opportunities to students; assisting and supporting
students in the application and interview process; counseling students on career goals; and
monitoring and evaluating the work experience in consultation with students and their
employers.

Co-op Education Prep Classes
To support the application and interview process there will be a minimum of six classes in which
the Coordinators will update students on possible co-op placements and deal with issues
relevant to applying for jobs, performing well during interviews and preparing to enter the work
place. Attendance and completion of assignments are mandatory to qualify for a co-op work
placement.

Credit For Prior Co-op Work Placements
Credit will be considered for a Co-operative Education work placement if the following criteria
are met:

   1. The work placement has met the six criteria used to define Co-op Education by the
      Canadian Association for Co-operative Education (CAFCE). Follow this link for more
      information: http://www.cafce.ca/en/coop-defined

   2. The student has been given credit for a Co-op work placement in the same discipline at
      another post-secondary institution.

The documentation necessary to accompany a request for credit must include:

     a)      a copy of the completed assignments necessary for the Co-op work placement
     b)      a copy of the job description or job offer for the work placement
     c)      proof of the duration of the work placement, the number of hours worked, and the
             wage paid (e.g. pay stub, letter from Co-op coordinator, letter from employer,
             severance documents)
     d)      a copy of the employer's evaluation of the student's performance during the work
             placement
     e)      a copy of the student's transcript with the mark obtained for the Co-op placement.

Although credit will be considered, it is strongly recommended that all students take
advantage of the coop work placement through Red River College in order to further
their industry experience, and gain new contacts in industry.




                                                                                              14
Criteria for Co-op Ed Participation
Because Co-op Ed is an essential component of Hospitality Department programs, all students
enrolled in Hospitality programs are required to participate.

Academic Requirements and Eligibility for Co-op Ed Placements
Each term, all students must maintain a minimum Weighted Grade Point Average of 2.0,
and pass all practical exams/lab courses to be eligible to continue into the next
semester; regardless if it is an academic semester or a Co-op Ed work placement. (as
per Academic Assessment Standards). These grade point averages will be calculated at the
mid-point of each semester. Students meeting these criteria will have equal access to positions
developed by the Co-op Ed Coordinators.

A student preparing for a Co-op placement who does not have the required average at the mid-
point of the semester will be placed on probation and encouraged to improve their grades over
the balance of the semester. If a student on probation meets the Co-op eligibility requirements
before the end of the semester, he/she will have access to interviews for any unfilled positions.
The program cannot guarantee a job for a student under these circumstances; however, the
Co-op Coordinators are obligated to work with the student to find employment. It will be
necessary, under these circumstances, for the student to play an active role in the job search
and be flexible regarding the position and type of work.

Any student who does not achieve the required GPA of 2.0 by the end of any semester
will be suspended from the program, for a minimum of one semester, with an option to
return in the next appropriate semester pending course availability. The student may
choose to take related courses through General Studies or Continuing Education as a
means to explore other career options.

It should be noted that as an applicant from a college program, a student‟s academic standing
may be of interest to employers who may ask for transcripts or grade point averages if they
judge this information to be important to their hiring decision. Conversely, a student with a high
grade point average is encouraged to use this information in the application process. From
either perspective, it is in the student's best interest to maintain the highest academic standing
possible.

Voluntary Withdrawal and Co-op Ed Eligibility
To ensure a student is adequately prepared for employment in industry, voluntary withdrawal
from a course is limited to one course per semester. By voluntarily withdrawing from any
course with a pass mark of 70%, in any semester preceding a Co-op Ed placement, a
student would be considered ineligible for placement. (For more information on Voluntary
Withdrawal refer to policy A27, „Voluntary Course / Program Withdrawal‟ in the Student
Association planner and / or the Red River College website under College Policies.)

Eligibility for Employment
Students who have Canadian citizenship, landed-immigrant status or visa students are eligible
for participation in the program.

                                                                                                15
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS REQUIREMENTS

Work Permit
Many college programs offer off-campus paid work experience as part of the program of
studies. If you are in a Cooperative Education Program at RRC, the work experience placement
will be a paid position with an employer that will provide practical skills training in your field of
studies. As an international student, Citizenship & Immigration Canada regulations require you
to have a Work Permit for this purpose; see Citizenship and Immigration Canada link -
  http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/study/work-coop.asp

Application Forms are also available at the International Education Office.

The Work Permit that you will receive will be restricted. Students will only be allowed to use this
Work Permit to participate in the work experience (co-op placement) as it relates to their
academic program. It cannot be used for any other employment purpose. The International
Education Office will provide a letter once the dates of the Co-op placement are confirmed. It is
required to submit this letter as part of the Work Permit. The letter will indicate that the work
experience is an integral part of the program of study and a requirement for graduation. This
type of Work Permit is free of charge. The application process should begin at least 8 weeks
before Co-op placement.

Social Insurance Number (SIN)
Once the Work Permit has been received, a Social Insurance Number (SIN) will be required to
give to the Employer.
A Social Insurance Number (SIN) is a nine-digit number used in the administration of various
Canadian government programs. You will require a SIN to work in Canada or to receive
government benefits.
Students must apply for a Social Insurance Number in person at the federal government office
called Service Canada Centre. There is a Centre located downtown at 391 York Avenue,
Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3C 0P4. Take Passport and Work Permit as identification documents
for the application. For further information on Social Insurance Numbers view the following
website link: http://www.servicecanada.gc.ca/eng/sc/sin/index.shtml

**Students must have a Work Permit and a Social Insurance Number to provide to an
employer in order to be eligible to work in Canada.

Post-Graduation work permits for International Students in Canada
For further information please visit the website link:

http://www.canadavisa.com/post-graduation-work-permit-program.html




                                                                                                  16
Co-operative Education Work Term Dates

Professional Baking /Pâtisserie
Co-op Placement – April 30 – August 17, 2012

Culinary Arts / Hospitality & Tourism Management
Co-op Placement 1 – April 30, 2012 – August 17, 2012
Co-op Placement 2 – April 29 – August 16, 2013

Work Placement Requirements
To qualify for a Co-op Ed work placement, the job in which the student is placed for the May to
August term, must provide a minimum of 400 hours over the duration of the placement and pay
the student at least "minimum wage." Due to the nature of the hospitality/tourism industry, the
Hospitality Department defines full-time work as between 25 and 40 hours per week for 16 weeks.
In Professional Baking, the fall winter Co-op Ed work placement, the job in which the student is
placed must provide a minimum of 125 hours, 5 weeks over the duration of the placement and
pay the student at least "minimum wage."

It is essential that the work experience provide learning relevant to the student's program of study.
 (HTM students in their 2nd work term must choose a position relevant to their selected major of
either Tourism or Hotel & Restaurant Management). The Co-op Ed co-ordinators will monitor that
each position meets these criteria.

It is expected that students will work full time for the duration of the Co-op placement.
Students cannot quit a co-op position when the minimum hours or weeks have been
achieved; unless there are extenuating circumstances approved by the Co-op
Coordinators.

All Co-op education students must complete at least one work placement in Manitoba.

Work Placement Procurement Procedures
In order to receive a diploma or certificate, a Hospitality student is required to complete two
co-operative education work placements.

The following guidelines are to be followed to ensure that Co-op Ed work placements are obtained
in a fair and equitable way.

   1. Students will check the Hospitality Website “Co-op Job Board” for available positions and
      job descriptions.

   2. Students should only apply for jobs they are sincerely interested in as they will be
      expected to accept a job if it is offered to them. Students who decline a job offer must
      contact the co-op office prior to pursuing other offers.

   3. Students will submit a Co-op Ed Interview Choice Form to the Coordinators indicating
      companies/jobs in which they are interested and they will also submit a copy of the resume
                                                                                                  17
       they intend to use in soliciting a Co-op Ed placement according to the deadline given in the
       Coop Prep Class/Course Outline. Late submissions will not be given priority.

   4. Students will meet individually with a Co-op Ed Coordinator to determine eligibility for work
      placements and discuss career goals prior to applying for any position.

   5. The Co-op Ed Coordinators will submit resumes on the student‟s behalf for all jobs posted
      on the online “coop job board”. Interviews may be set up either through the coordinator or
      initiated by the employer directly with applicable students, after the employer has selected
      their chosen candidates. Employers may choose to interview students at their place of
      business or on the College campus.

   6. Students going to an interview will take a copy of their résumé, and a list of references.

   7. The second work term placement should be a different company, position and supervisor,
      in order to broaden the student‟s experience as much as possible. Doing both work terms
      for the same company is discouraged. If the student makes a request in writing to the Co-
      op Ed Coordinator, specifying how an opportunity with the same company will provide new
      responsibilities for them in a second work term, the Coordinator will evaluate the
      opportunity with the employer to determine if it will be eligible for Co-op.

   8. Students must pay all Co-op Ed fees as set by the College prior to the beginning of the
      work term placement. These fees are used to partially offset the administration costs
      involved in the delivery of Co-operative Education. These fees are subject to the same
      regulations as regular tuition fees, and if they are not paid, your participation in the
      program can be terminated. If the payment of fees in advance present a serious problem,
      it is imperative that you contact Student Services before the beginning of your Co-op work
      term.

"Own Source" Co-op Jobs
Students who have personal contacts with potential employers are encouraged to use their
contacts to secure a Co-op Ed work placement.

To ensure that such "own source" positions will meet the requirements for Co-op Ed work
placements, students planning such contact must inform the Coordinators no later than mid term.
A coordinator will provide a Co-op Ed information package for the employer including a job
description form and a sample evaluation form.

When an "own source" job offer is made, a job description must be submitted in writing to the Co-
op Ed Coordinators. The Coordinators will determine its suitability for a Co-op position and contact
the employer to finalize arrangements for their participation in Co-operative Education. If a student
is successful in securing his or her own employment, that position is not open to competition from
other students.

Students will be allowed to complete only one Co-op work placements at a business where a
relative is directly involved in the training and evaluation of that student.

                                                                                                   18
“Own Source” Out-of-province Co-op Positions
Student planning an out-of-province placement must meet all criteria for “Own Source”
positions. On approval and confirmation of an out-of-province placement, the student is
responsible for making appropriate travel and accommodation arrangements and must provide
proof of coverage for medical and accident insurance where applicable.
Exam dates will not be changed to accommodate early start dates or travel arrangements.

Students must notify the Co-op Ed Coordinators immediately when a job offer is accepted. A letter
of confirmation will be provided for the student and the employer indicating the position the
student has been hired for and the dates of the Co-op work term.

The Student at Work
The Co-op Ed Coordinators will maintain contact with the employer and the student on the job
site. The Coordinators will monitor each student's progress and performance. If there is a
problem with a work placement that the student is unable to resolve on his / her own, it is
STRONGLY recommended the student contact the Co-op Ed coordinator. Do not wait for a
Co-op Ed coordinator to contact you. In cases like this, it is the student‟s responsibility to alert
the Co-op office of issues and situations as soon as possible.

Students participating in a Co-op Ed work placement are representing Red River College. The
performance and behaviours exhibited by the student will reflect on the college, the program and
future students.

Failure to Report: Once accepting a Co-op Ed position, the student is expected to report to the
job site as required by the employer. Failure to report for work will result in serious repercussions,
including possible suspension from the program.

On the Job: Co-op Ed students should expect to be treated like any other employee and are
expected to observe all rules and regulations of the employer. Students are encouraged to ask
questions and be accountable for their actions (i.e., not covering up mistakes.) Students are
reminded to be friendly, considerate and tactful with co-workers and supervisors.

Transportation and Accommodation: Students are responsible for their own transportation to
and from the workplace, as well as any accommodations required, unless other arrangements
have been made.

Holiday and Time Off: Time off from work must be approved by the employer in advance,
normally prior to the start of the work placement. Co-op Ed Coordinators must also be notified of
requested absences longer than two consecutive days.

Restriction of Hours: If a student restricts his/her hours (making themselves unavailable to the
employer to schedule as necessary) that student may not be able to complete the required hours.
If this situation occurs, a student could receive a FAIL grade and will have to repeat the Co-op Ed
work placement at a later date. Each case will be reviewed separately; and consequence may
include suspension from the program.


                                                                                                    19
Labour Issues: Decisions regarding workplace issues and concerns will be made in consultation
with the Co-op Education coordinator and the Chair of the Hospitality Department and the
consequences of the decision will be carefully considered. In the event of a strike, Co-op students
will be removed from the work placement and other arrangements will be made to complete the
semester.

Injuries: If a student is injured on the job, he/she should notify the employer immediately and ask
if Workers Compensation covers them. If not, students will contact a Co-op Ed coordinator and
the RRC Health Centre (phone: 632-2238) to submit a Workman's Compensation report through
the College. All injuries should be reported to the Coordinators. Extra insurance coverage may be
required for out of Province/International work placements.

Resignation: Students are expected to finish the Co-op Placement by the dates predetermined
by the Co-op Coordinators and the employers. Premature resignation from a Co-op Ed placement
may result in not receiving credit for the course. Co-op co-ordinators must be notified and
consulted with before a student decides to resign from a work placement.

Terminations: If a student is terminated from their position, the student is required to notify a Co-
op Ed coordinator immediately. Each case of termination will be reviewed separately; suspension
from the program may be a consequence. If employment is terminated by an employer for “just
cause”, the student will receive a fail grade and have to apply to repeat the coop work term at a
later date. "Just cause" will be determined through consultation with all parties involved.

How to Handle Problems: During the work placement, a student is first and foremost, an
employee of the company for which he / she works and is expected to deal with many work-
related problems independent of the Co-op Coordinators. For the most part, this will be done
through discussion with a supervisor at the workplace. However, if situations and issues arise
which make the student uncomfortable in approaching management or if the problem is
specifically related to Co-op Ed, the student will contact a Co-operative Education coordinator
IMMEDIATELY.

Evaluation of the Co-op Work Placement
Work placement assignments are due the first day of the next academic semester.
The Co-op Ed work placement is graded on a PASS/FAIL basis. To receive a PASS grade a
student must complete all of the following requirements:


   1. Successful completion of training based on the employer's job description which is
      acceptable to the specific program and monitored by the Co-operative Education
      Coordinators.
   2. Completion of the required number of weeks with an average of at least 25 hours per
      week over the placement.
   3. An employer evaluation of the student of at least a "satisfactory" rating.



                                                                                                   20
   4. Satisfactory written completion of the Co-operative Education assignments:
        a)      Co-op Placement 1:
                1)   Student self-evaluation
                2)   Student evaluation of the Co-op Ed work placement
                3)   Co-op portfolio (including Goals & Skills statements)
                4)   PowerPoint presentation of Co-op experience

        b)      Co-op Placement 2:
                1)   Student self-evaluation
                2)   Student evaluation of the Co-op Ed work placement
                3)   Co-operative Education goals
                4)   Skills statements
                5)   Submission of PowerPoint presentation of Co-op experience

The Co-op Ed Coordinators will assign a PASS or FAIL grade following an evaluation interview
with each student in which each of the requirements will be considered. This interview will be
conducted after all the assignments have been submitted and evaluated.

If any of the assignments are not completed to a satisfactory standard at the time of the
evaluation interview, the student will have one week to resubmit these items for evaluation.
Where conditions are beyond the control of the student, the Chair of the Hospitality Department
may use his or her discretionary powers, in consultation with the Co-op Ed Coordinators, in
determining the student's grade.

Graduation Requirements
In order to graduate from a Hospitality program, the following requirements must be met:

   1. Successful completion of all academic courses, workshops and professional development.
   2. Successful completion of both Co-operative Education work placements.

Graduating students must fill out an application form to participate in the convocation. Forms are
available in the Student Centres at NDC and PSC or you can visit the following link:

http://www.rrc.mb.ca/files/file/admissions/AppGradform.pdf


NOTE:        It is the responsibility of each student to verify completion of all course work prior to
             attending graduation ceremonies. The department will not notify potential non-grads
             of their status. Check Web Advisor and your final semester instructors for your
             posted grades.


Some General Advice
This section has been developed to ensure that all students in Hospitality programs have access
to the information they require to participate fully in securing and maintaining a Co-op Ed work
placement. It is the responsibility of the student to become familiar with the contents of this
                                                                                                    21
handbook. It is also strongly recommended that students stay in close communication with the
Co-op Ed Coordinators in the semester prior to the Co-op Ed placement and during that
placement. If there are any questions or concerns students are encouraged to contact the
Coordinators immediately.

Amy Losics
Coordinator
Co-operative Education
Hospitality Department
Ph: 632-2572
Email: alosics@rrc.mb.ca

Trevor Bailey
Coordinator
Co-operative Education
Hospitality Department
Ph: 632-2465
Email: tgbailey@rrc.mb.ca

Catalina Garcia
Educational Assistant
Co-operative Education
Hospitality Department
Ph: 632-2362
Email: cgarcia@rrc.mb.ca




                                                                                               22
Dress Code
Grooming and Appropriate Attire – Hospitality and Tourism Students
Good grooming and appropriate dress are essential factors in a hospitality industry career,
students are asked to observe the following guidelines.
Shoes and socks must be worn in all Food Service areas for safety and sanitation
reasons.

For Restaurant Service - Prairie Lights Restaurant
Uniforms
Uniform should be neat, clean, pressed and in good repair. Students are responsible for
supplying the following for Restaurant Service in the Prairie Lights:

       o Male students:
                  Two plain, white long-sleeved dress shirts with collar
                  One black tie and tie clip
                  One pair of black dress pants
                  Black socks and black shoes; clean, polished and in good repair
                  Undershirts/T-shirts must be neutral colour or white (no printing or
                   designs on t-shirts).
       o Female students:
                  Two plain, white long-sleeved dress shirts with collar
                  One black tie and tie clip
                  One pair of black dress pants or black skirt
                  Neutral or dark hose and black low heeled, closed-toe shoes; clean,
                   polished and in good repair.
                  Undergarments must be neutral colour or white (no printing or designs
                   on t-shirts).

Grooming

Personal Hygiene: No perfume or cologne; fresh breath and daily bathing and use of
deodorant essential.

Hair: Neat, clean, natural looking colour, tied back with proper restraint if touching
shoulder.

Facial Hair: Males – Well-trimmed mustaches or beards are allowed but must not be
grown while working (must shave daily before shift); sideburns neatly trimmed and should
not extend below middle of ear.

Fingernails: Trimmed, clean, no nail polish allowed.

Makeup: Minimal and conservative.

Jewelry: One watch, wedding and engagement ring and one set of earrings allowed.
Earrings may be no larger than a dime and in the lower ear only. The following are not
allowed: chokers, pins, bracelets.


                                                                                          23
Body Piercing: No visible piercing, including tongue piercing, eyebrows, nose etc. (other
than lower earlobes). Clear spacers may be used.

Tattoos: No visible tattoos. Any tattoos that cannot be covered with clothing must be
covered with make-up.

Other: No gum chewing during set-up or service.

For Food Preparation Labs
Appropriate clothing is mandatory for all students attending classes in food preparation
labs. Health regulations stipulate a clean uniform and hairnet or hat. Health regulations
also stipulate that students will not wear nail polish or jewellery during food preparation.

Uniform should be neat, clean, pressed, in good repair and should be purchased from the
College bookstore. All grooming standards expected in the Prairie Lights also apply in
food service labs. Students are responsible for supplying the following:

   o Uniforms/supplies:
                      One chef‟s jacket (College issued)
                      One pair chef‟s pants (College issued)
                      One white apron (College issued)
                      A hairnet and Chef hat (College issued)
                      Socks and closed-toe, non-slip shoes
                      Knives (see booklist for requirement and instructor before
                       purchasing)

For College-Sponsored Events, Tours, Guest Speakers and Job Interviews
Inappropriate behavior or attire will result in the student being excluded from the event and
may result in the student being excluded from any future industry presentations. Should
the student be excluded from industry presentations, it will be the student‟s responsibility
to obtain any information or certification on their own.

Male students
Appropriate dress is considered to be a business suit or dress pants and jacket, shirt and
tie. Hair, beards and moustaches should be neatly trimmed.

Female students
Appropriate dress is considered to be a business suit, or dress pants/skirt, blouse and
jacket.




                                                                                               24
Grooming and Appropriate Attire - Professional Baking/Pâtisserie Labs &
Culinary Arts

Students should be neatly groomed and appropriately dressed every day. Please refer to
the diagram of the required dress code for Culinary Arts and Professional
Baking/Pâtisserie on page 27.

To ensure uniform cleanliness and prevent contamination of food and equipment, students
must refrain from sitting on the floor in hallways and other public areas while dressed in
uniform or regular street clothing as per HACCP regulations.
Students must change from their street clothes, into clean uniform in allocated change
rooms. Changing in hallways, toilets, store rooms etc. is strictly prohibited.

Professional uniforms are required. Uniforms should be neat, clean, pressed and in good
repair. Uniforms must be a proper fit. (Including pant length) Students are responsible for
supplying the following as a uniform:
   o 3 white chef‟s jackets with logo
   o 2 pairs of black and white checkered pants
   o 3 white aprons (minimum)
These three items can be obtained in the book store
   o Chef‟s hat and hair nets as outlined by the instructor on first Introduction Day
   o Kitchen shoes; must be black, closed-toed, non-slip. Only work shoes are
        acceptable, no runners, high heels, sandals etc. Student must wear socks.

Undergarments/T-shirts: must be a neutral colour or white.

Jewelry: No jewelry allowed in practical labs, including watches.

Hair: Neat, clean, natural looking colour, tied back with proper restraint (rubber band, no
pins) if touching shoulders. Hair net is required; all hair has to be covered.

Personal Grooming: No perfume or cologne; fresh breath, daily bathing and use of
deodorant essential.

Facial Hair: Males - well trimmed mustaches or beards are allowed but must not be grown
while in the program. Beard net must be worn by any students with a beard. Student is
required to shave daily. Sideburns should be neatly trimmed and should not extend below
the middle of the ear.

Fingernails: Trimmed, clean, no nail polish allowed.

Make-up: Minimal and conservative.

Body Piercing: No visible piercing, including tongue piercing, eyebrows, nose etc. (other
than lower earlobes). Clear spacers may be used. Piercings may not be acquired during
program.

Tattoos: No new tattoos to be acquired during program.



                                                                                          25
Other: No chewing gum, eating or drinking during class time or on college sponsored
events.

If student does not adhere to the above grooming and appropriate attire they will not be
allowed in the lab, and will be marked absent.

For College-Sponsored Events, Tours, Guest Speakers and Job Interviews
Inappropriate behavior or attire will result in the student being excluded from the event and
may result in the student being excluded from any future industry presentations. Should
the student be excluded from industry presentations, it will be the student‟s responsibility
to obtain any information or certification on their own.

Male students
 Appropriate dress is considered to be dress pants and shirt. Hair, beards and mustaches
should be neatly trimmed.

Female students
Appropriate dress for college-sponsored tours and excursions is considered to be a dress,
skirt and blouse or dress pants and blouse.




                                                                                           26
Uniform Requirements for Culinary Arts




Chef pants checkered 2pairs         Chef Coats 3 Jackets minimum (with Logo)




    Minimum of 3 required                        Chef Hats (disposable)




        Kitchen shoes (must be a non-slip sole and have to be black)

     All Items are available in the Bookstore here at Red River College.




                                                                           27
Academic Standards
Academic Assessment Standards
The Hospitality Department programs consist of very heavy course loads and a full
schedule, which requires regular daily attendance and attention to assignments.
Eligibility to progress in these programs will be determined at the end of each
semester and will be based on your academic achievement. Each situation will be
judged on its own merit.

The program courses have a 50%, 60% or a 70% pass mark. Your final mark in each
course is calculated by weighting your marks from a variety of tests, assignments,
project and/or a final exam.

Each semester, all students must maintain a Weighted Grade Point Average of 2.0
and pass all practical exams to be eligible to continue into the next semester -
academic or co-op placement. Any student who does not achieve the required GPA of
2.0 by the end of any semester will be suspended from the program for a minimum of one
semester. The student may choose to take related courses through General Studies or
Continuing Education as a means to explore other career options.

The following table shows the equivalent grade scale, grade letter, and grade point for all
courses:
    Grade % Scale           Grade Letter          Grade Point           Description
       90 – 100                    A+                 4.5               Outstanding
       80 – 89                      A                 4.0                 Excellent
       75 – 79                     B+                 3.5                Very Good
       70 – 74                      B                 3.0                  Good
       65 – 69                     C+                 2.5              Above Average
       60 – 64                      C                 2.0                 Average
       50 – 59                      D                 1.0                 Marginal
        0 – 49                      F                 0.0                   Fail

Honour Roll
To be on the term Honour Roll, you must achieve an overall term grade point average of
3.8, be enrolled in a minimum of 50% of the full course load, and not failed any courses.

To be an Honour Roll graduate, you must achieve a cumulative grade point average of
3.8 in the program and not have failed any courses.




                                                                                        28
Attendance
Students who are absent from a lab situation without an excused absence (without proper
documentation) will be subject to the following penalties:

        One missed day – 2 marks deducted from the final course mark.
        Two missed days – 5 marks deducted from the final course mark.
        Three missed days – 10 marks deducted from the final course mark.
        An additional 5 marks will be deducted per day for any additional absence.
        (Deductions are based on a total course value of 100 marks)

After 3 missed days, the student must set up a formal meeting with the instructor.
After 4 missed days, the student must set up a formal meeting with the Department Chair,
John Reimers and cannot return to the lab until after the meeting.

In a lab situation, if a student arrives late or leaves early, including breaks, the student will
be penalized for an unexcused absence, as stated above. Two late arrivals, or two early
departures, or a combination thereof, equals the penalty of one unexcused absence.

If a student misses 20% or more of lab class time (excused or otherwise) the
student will fail that course.

Absenteeism
Students are responsible for all information and assignments given in class. Should a
student be absent, for whatever reason, the student is not relieved of this responsibility.
Please note personal vacation dates are not considered an excused absence.

Assignments
Assignments are to be submitted to the instructor on the due date and time specified by
the instructor. Assignments submitted after this time are considered late and will be
penalized 10% per day and will not be accepted after three days. (Weekends count as
two days late.) Due dates will only be extended if students provide proper documentation
such as a medical certificate. (For example, if a medical certificate says you are away for
three days, you get a three day extension.) Students who miss an assignment due date
are responsible for contacting their instructor within 48 hours from the assignment due
date. Students who do not contact their instructor will forfeit their mark on the assignment.

Exams/Tests
Students who miss a test or practical exam will not be allowed to take the test unless the
absence can be justified with proper documentation such as medical certificate. Students
who miss a test are responsible for contacting the instructor within 48 hours from the test
date. Students must schedule their re-write within 5 days of the test date or the students
return. Students who do not contact their instructor will forfeit their mark for the test.

Courses, such as Communications, with a pass mark of 50% may have a supplemental
exam. Students need to achieve a 1.5-Weighted Grade Point Average for the semester
to be eligible for a supplemental exam. Supplemental exams will only be offered where
the final exam is worth 50% or more of the final course mark. Students can download a

                                                                                              29
Supplemental Exam Payment Form from the College website. The fee for a
supplemental exam is $30.00.

One supplemental will be permitted on any final practical cooking/baking lab exam (where
applicable). The instructor will determine the timing of the supplemental and an alternative
instructor will mark it. The highest grade that a student can achieve on a supplemental
practical exam is 70%.

Students who do not obtain a passing mark in a Hospitality Department course
will be required to repeat the course when it is next offered to be eligible for
graduation.

Academic Appeals
If a learner is dissatisfied with a grade or evaluation, he or she must first contact the
instructor to discuss the disputed grade/evaluation and, with the instructor, attempt to
resolve the matter. The learner must complete the informal appeal within five (5)
working days of receiving the grade/evaluation in question.
6.2 Informal resolution of the matter must be attempted first before a formal grade appeal
will be permitted.

Should a student wish to appeal a mark, the formal college appeal process will apply.
Appeals must be made in writing to the Departmental Chair within five days of receiving
the mark.

According to college policy, students may appeal a grade if they have reason to believe
any of the following.
    The grade/evaluation has been miscalculated.
    Not all the required components were considered in rendering the
        grade/evaluation.
    The grading criteria were unclear, inconsistent or vague.
    The evaluation/grading criteria or the value of the assignment/question was not
        specified.
    An academic deadline was missed due to extenuating circumstances.

The Grade/Evaluation Appeal Forms are available from Students Service Centres at the
Notre Dame and Princess St. Campuses; the Students‟ Association Office, CM-20 and on
the College web site, www.rrc.mb.ca. Learners must consult with a College Academic
Advisor, D101, before proceeding with the formal appeal.

Here is a link to the appeals policy:

http://www.rrc.mb.ca/index.php?pid=1762




                                                                                         30
And the form you need to fill out and have the Academic Advisor from Student Services
sign:

http://www.rrc.mb.ca/files/File/admissions/GradeAppealForm.pdf

Academic Appeals - Support and Advocacy
College Academic Advisors, D102, provide information on academic policies and appeal
procedures and assist students in arriving at informed decisions regarding their appeal
by exploring with them the full dimension of the problem. College Academic Advisors
are available to assist students with the appeal process including the completion of the
appeal form.

The Students‟ Association office can provide the student with support and advocacy
service throughout the informal and formal appeal process.

Academic Integrity
An academic integrity violation will disqualify the student from any college scholarships
or competitions.
The link for penalties and violations is:
http://www.rrc.mb.ca/files/File/policies/new/S4%20Academic%20Integrity.pdf

Plagiarism and Cheating
Significant academic penalties are imposed for these offences as stated in the College
Policy and Procedure Manual under “Student Academic Misconduct.” The policy is as
follows:
       “Academic standards and the reputation of students and the College
       are based on, among other things, academic honesty.                  The
       unacknowledged use of ideas or published material of others
       constitutes plagiarism. Other forms of dishonesty include cheating
       on exams, aiding and abetting cheating, the use of work prepared by
       others, accessing unauthorized computer accounts/files and/or
       software, falsification of laboratory results, falsification of academic
       records, violation of copyright laws, and the like. Any of these
       activities are unacceptable and will minimally result in a failing grade
       in the particular assignment or course and may include disciplinary
       action up to and including expulsion from the program.”

Please refer to the College Policy regarding violations and penalties.

Inappropriate use of the Internet and e-mail accounts
Inappropriate use will not be tolerated. Examples of inappropriate use include visiting
pornographic sites, threatening e-mail, etc.

Course Add/Drop Policy & Section Change Request
Students enrolled in a Full-Time program who wish to add/drop a course or change
sections in a course for the term, must first meet with their department chair/Co-ordinator,

                                                                                         31
then submit a completed Course Add/Drop & Section Change Request Form for Full-Time
Programs to the Student Service Centre or Registrar‟s Office, D105 by the end of the
add/drop period which is the first 5 working days of the term.

If students add/drop a course within the add/drop period, the course will not appear on
their transcript and fees MAY be adjusted. Voluntary withdrawal from a course is limited
to one course per semester. By voluntarily withdrawing from any course with a
pass mark of 70%, in any semester preceding a Co-op Ed placement, a student
would be considered ineligible for placement. (For more information on Voluntary
Withdrawal refer to policy A27, „Voluntary Course / Program Withdrawal‟ in the Student
Association planner and / or the Red River College website under College Policies.)
If students drop/withdraw from courses after the add/drop period, the course(s) will be
listed on their transcript with a grade of VW and no adjustment will be made to fees. If
students withdraw from a course 3 weeks from the first day of the final exam, it will be
listed on the transcript with a grade of “F”.

The Course Add/Drop & Section Change Request Form for Full-Time Programs can be
printed off the College website, and is also available from the Student Service Centre,
D101.

Program Withdrawal
Students withdrawing from their program of study are responsible for submitting a
completed Student Withdrawal Form to Enrolment Services.

The effective withdrawal date will be the date the Student Withdrawal Form is received by
Enrolment Services. Students who do not follow this process will be responsible for all fees
owing and will not be eligible for any refund of fees.

Sponsored students should consult with their agency prior to withdrawing from the
program.

Student Program Withdrawal forms can be printed off the College website, and are also
available from the Student Service Centre, D101.

Refund Policy
For detailed information regarding eligibility for refund, refer to the college web site at:
http://www.rrc.mb.ca/files/File/admissions/ProgramWithdrawalForm.pdf

Application for Re-entry
An application for re-entry must be completed by Red River College students who have
withdrawn or have been terminated and who wish to apply for re-entry into the full-time
program in which they had previously been enrolled. An application fee of $30.00 must
accompany the Application for Re-entry form. Applications for Re-entry can be obtained
from the Student Service Centre in Building D101 or can be printed off the college website.




                                                                                               32
Transfer of Credit
Credit may be granted for some courses completed at another educational institution.
Credit will not be granted for academic courses taken at high school and other non-post
secondary institutions. (E.g. Communications and Accounting) A written request for credit
must be submitted to the Hospitality Chair prior to midpoint of the course. The request
must include a subject outline and an official transcript indicating the grade received in
each subject. Forms are available from the Student Services Centre in D101 or can be
downloaded from the College website. Please refer to the College Request for Prior
Learning (RPL) Policy, http://www.rrc.mb.ca/prior.

Students are strongly advised to continue attending classes until the credit request has
been approved.

Respectful College Policy
The Respectful College policy (Policy H1) requires that RRC has a learning and working
environment for students and staff, that is free of Disrespectful Behavior, Harassment,
and Discrimination.

The Respectful College policy (Policy H1) can be found on the RRC website at
http://www.rrc.mb.ca/files/File/policies/new/H1RespectfulCollegeJuly09.pdf.

Complaints and concerns can be discussed with Faculty members, the Respectful
College Officer (blockie@rrc.mb.ca or 632-2107) , and any other trusted member of the
RRC community.




                                                                                        33
Hospitality Student Awards
Several competitions and awards are available to Hospitality Department students.
Recognition of recipients is given at an annual awards luncheon held in the fall.

The following annual awards are currently offered, but may be subject to change. (Check
the College Website for other student awards.)

Canadian Culinary Federation (CCF)                               Apprentice Cook
Two awards of $175 each and a one-year CCF Winnipeg Branch and
membership will be awarded to two second year Culinary Arts Culinary Arts
students with the best overall evaluation in the industry terms.

              Automatic Selection – Application Not Required

Horizon Milling (Division of Cargill)                             Professional
$200 is awarded annually for superior achievement to a student in Baking/Pâtisserie
Professional Baking.

              Automatic Selection – Application Not Required

Bakemark Canada                                                Professional
One $200 award is presented annually to a dedicated student in Baking/Pâtisserie
Professional Baking who demonstrates leadership and
professional skills.

              Automatic Selection – Application Not Required

Shannon Ellis Outstanding Student Memorial Award                 Professional
An award of $1000 is awarded annually to a Professional Baking/Pâtisserie
Baking/Pâtisserie student who has displayed commitment to the
baking profession by volunteering their own time to learning new
skills, while maintaining an above average GPA and exceptional
lab skills.

              Automatic Selection – Application Not Required

Academic Award                                                     Professional
An award of $600 is given to a student who has an outstanding      Baking/Pâtisserie
GPA, in the Professional Baking/Pâtisserie program

              Automatic Selection – Application Not Required




                                                                                       34
Practical Skills Achievement Award                                Professional
One award of $400 is presented to a Professional Baking/Pâtisserie
Baking/Pâtisserie student who has displayed exceptional practical
skills in the lab of the Professional Baking program

              Automatic Selection – Application Not Required

Harvest Bakery Award                                              Professional
One award of $500 will be given to a student who has Baking/Pâtisserie
demonstrated exceptional abilities in the bread making section of
the Professional Baking/Pâtisserie course. The student also
shows strong work ethic, commitment and passion for making
bread.

              Automatic Selection – Application Not Required

Manitoba Canola Growers Association                                Professional
An annual award of $600 will be given to a Professional Baking or Baking/Pâtisserie
Culinary Arts student who has developed the most innovative
baking recipe using Canola Oil, as the main fat, with the emphasis
on using local products. An award of $400 will be given to the
runner up.
                                           Application Required

Garland Commercial Ranges Ltd.                                    Culinary Arts
Two awards of $125 will be given to outstanding students enrolled
in the second year of the Culinary Arts program.

              Automatic Selection – Application Not Required

Culinary Arts Bridging Awards                                     Culinary Arts
Two awards of $1000 will be awarded to 2 students in the
September intake and 2 students in the January intake. They
must have completed their first year of Culinary Arts and be
entering their second year. The awards will be based on good
academic standing in the first year as well as financial need.


Culinary Cooperative Awards                                     Culinary Arts
Two awards of $500 will be awarded to one student from the
September intake and one from the January intake. The awards
are based on good academic standing, successful completion of
a coop placement with a very good or better employer rating and
financial need. Applications must be submitted before Sept 15


                                                                                      35
Skills Manitoba – Cooks Trade Award                               Culinary Arts
One award of $500 will be awarded to a Red River College
culinary arts student who has achieved a Provincial gold medal at
the skills competition and be willing to go to the National
Competition.

               Automatic Selection – Application Not Required

Culinary Arts Graduating and Leadership Award                   Culinary Arts
Two awards of $750 will be awarded to one graduating student in
December and one graduating student in June. The awards are
based on completed academic requirements, a successful
academic record of with honors status with no failures or
voluntary withdrawals and professional promise will also be
considered as demonstrated by successful cooperative education
placements and professional student behaviour.

               Automatic Selection – Application Not Required

Zep Inc.                                                             Culinary Arts
An award of $250 will be given to a first year Culinary Arts student
who has demonstrated outstanding sanitation and safety
practices in the kitchen labs.

               Automatic Selection – Application Not Required

Manitoba Pork                                                Culinary Arts
Annual awards of $500, 300 and $200 will be given to three
deserving Culinary Arts students who have developed the most
innovative pork recipes.

                                           Application Required

Manitoba Turkey Producers Award                             Culinary Arts
Annual awards of $300, $200, $100 will be given to three
deserving Culinary Arts student who have developed the most
innovative turkey recipe.

                                           Application Required

McCain Foods Canada                                                Culinary Arts
Two awards of $250 each will be presented to a first year Culinary
Arts student and a second year top graduate Culinary Arts
student. Emphasis will be on practical performance.

               Automatic Selection – Application Not Required



                                                                                     36
Queen’s Jubilee Culinary Award                            Culinary Arts
Two awards of $250 are given to second year Culinary Arts
students, one for each intake. The recipients must have a
minimum GPA of 3.5 and demonstrated exceptional
organizational and leadership skills in the program.

               Automatic Selection – Application Not Required

Chef’s Hat Inc.                                                        Culinary Arts
Three awards are given: 1st place-$500; 2nd -$300; 3rd -$200.
Recipients must demonstrate commitment to the industry, team
spirit, and a positive attitude, display team spirit and a willingness
to go the extra mile.

               Automatic Selection – Application Not Required

Culinary Arts Legacy                                              Culinary Arts
An award of $250 will be presented to a second year Culinary Arts
student who has displayed leadership, community involvement
and a satisfactory academic performance. Financial need will also
be a factor.

                                            Application Required

Manitoba Restaurant and Foodservice Association                       Culinary Arts and
Two $300 awards are offered to graduating students: one in            Hotel & Restaurant
Culinary Arts; the other in Hotel & Restaurant Management             Management
who reside within Manitoba. The award is based on high
academic achievement, a successful cooperative work placement
within Manitoba, ability to get along with others, as well as a
preference for work in restaurants.

               Automatic Selection – Application Not Required




                                                                                       37
Chaîne des Rôttiseurs Award                                  Culinary Arts and
Two annual awards are given: one to a Culinary Arts graduate Hotel & Restaurant
and one to a Hotel & Restaurant Management graduate who Management
demonstrate outstanding professional promise, have an above
average Co-op work term evaluation and above average
academic work.     Each award will be cash and/or culinary
equipment to a value of $1,000.

              Automatic Selection – Application Not Required


Russell Food Equipment                                         Culinary Arts and
Two $250 awards presented to students entering their second Hotel & Restaurant
year: one in Culinary Arts and the other in Hotel & Restaurant Management
Management. Culinary Arts recipient must have an above
average first Co-op assessment and lab practical assessment;
volunteer involvement in the industry and must show an
eagerness to learn about the industry. Hotel & Restaurant
recipient must have an above average first Co-op assessment,
volunteer involvement in the industry, and must show an
eagerness to learn about the industry

              Automatic Selection – Application Not Required

Champs Food Systems – Phil Hiebert Memorial                        Hotel & Restaurant
The $250 Phil Hiebert Memorial Award is presented by Champs Management
Food Systems Ltd. to a second-year student in the Hotel &
Restaurant Management program. Selection is based on a
demonstrated affinity for the industry as indicated by the Co-op
employer evaluation, plus financial need. Academic ability is also
a contributing factor in selection.

              Automatic Selection – Application Not Required




                                                                                   38
Canadian Hospitality Foundation                                        Culinary Arts and
Culinary Excellence Awards                                             Hospitality &
Hospitality Excellence Award                                           Tourism
The Canadian Hospitality Foundation offers several awards each Management
year. One award of $3000 is offered to a high school student
entering the Hospitality and Tourism program. Two awards of
$2000 each are offered to students who are completing their first
year and are entering the second year of the Tourism or Hotel
and Restaurant Management programs. One award of $2500 is
offered to a Culinary student who is currently enrolled in their first
year of a two year Diploma program. The selection is by
application and based on work experience, academic
achievement, leadership and ability to get along with others and
professional promise. Applications, along with reference letters
are due by May 1.
                                            Application Required

Ron Long Memorial Scholarship                                        Culinary Arts
Two awards of $250 each are available annually for students who
are entering the second year of the Culinary Arts program.
Selection will be based on financial need and satisfactory
academic progress. Some consideration will be given to volunteer
service related to the hospitality sector. Awards will be applied to
tuition.

                                            Application Required

Red River Exhibition Foundation Inc. Tourism Industry                 Hospitality &
Scholarship                                                           Tourism
A scholarship of $1000 will be awarded to a student entering or       Management
continuing in the Hospitality /Tourism program at Red River           or
College, Assiniboine Community College or St. Boniface College.       (2nd year selected
 Applicants must provide proof of successful completion of last       major) Tourism
level of education; acceptance to one of the stated diploma           Management
programs; and submit a letter of reference and an essay.

                                            Application Required

Skills Manitoba Award                                                 Hotel and
A maximum of $500 will be given to two or more students who           Restaurant
participate in the Skills Manitoba Restaurant Service competition     Management
and achieve gold, silver or bronze ranking. The student must be
enrolled in a Hospitality or Tourism program. Awards are given in
April after the competition results are known.

              Automatic Selection – Application Not Required


                                                                                           39
Hospitality Bridging Awards                                             Hospitality and
Three or more awards with a minimum value of $500 are offered           Tourism
to first year students enrolled in Hospitality and Tourism              Management
Management. Students must have completed the first academic
year and be entering their second year. The awards are based
on good academic standing, professional goals and financial
need. Applications must be submitted before May 1 with a 250
word explanation of their second year major choice, and career
goals. Awards will be given in May and applied to tuition unless
the amount is paid in full, and then it will be given to the student.


                                              Application Required

Hospitality Cooperative Education Awards                                Hospitality and
Three or more awards with a minimum value of $500 are offered           Tourism
to students who have completed their first term of cooperative          Management
educations and entering either Tourism Management or Hotel and
Restaurant Management second year program. The awards are
based on good academic standing, successful completion of a
coop placement with a very good or better employer rating and
financial need. Applications must be submitted before Sept 15
with a 250 word explanation of their coop goals and how they
were successful in meeting those goals. Awards will be given in
the first week of October.

                                              Application Required

Hotel and Restaurant Management Graduate Scholarship                    Hotel and
One scholarship of $750 will be given to a graduating student in        Restaurant
the HRM program. The scholarship is awards based on the                 Management
successful academic record of with honors status with no failures
or voluntary withdrawals. Professional promise will also be
considered as demonstrated by successful cooperative education
placements and professional student behaviour. Awards will be
given in September.

               Automatic Selection – Application Not Required




                                                                                          40
Tourism Management Graduate Scholarship                              Tourism
One scholarship of $750 will be given to a graduating student in     Management
the Tourism Management program. The scholarship is awarded
based on the successful academic record of with honors status
with no failures or voluntary withdrawals. Professional promise
will also be considered as demonstrated by successful
cooperative education placements and professional student
behaviour. Awards will be given in September,

               Automatic Selection – Application Not Required

Hospitality Professional Leadership awards                           Hotel and
Three or more awards with a minimum value of $750 are offered        Restaurant
to students who have completed three academic terms in either        Management and
Tourism Management or Hotel and Restaurant Management.               Tourism
The awards are based on leadership, as demonstrated in group         Management
projects, professional student behaviour, and a commitment to
the hospitality and tourism industry through volunteerism,
mentorship and employment. Awards will be given in January.

               Automatic Selection – Application Not Required


Hospitality Departmental Bridging Award                              Hospitality and
One or more awards with a minimum value of $500 are offered to       Tourism
student who have completed one Hospitality diploma and are           Management and
enrolling to complete a second diploma. The awards are based         Culinary Arts
on good academic standing, professional goals and financial
need. Applications must be submitted before September 15 with
a 250 word explanation of their reason for completing a second
diploma and career goals. Awards will be given the last week of
September and applied to tuition unless the amount is paid in full
and then it will be given to the student.

                                            Application Required




                                                                                       41
SKAL Tourism Industry Scholarship                                       Tourism
                                      nd
SKAL offer on award of $1,000 to a 2 year student in the                Management
Tourism Management Program. Applicant must be committed to
pursuing a career in the tourism industry and must demonstrate
the SKAL vision of promoting tourism and the idea of goodwill and
friendship. Applications must contain an official current transcript,
two letters of reference/ recommendation, one from faculty and
one from industry, outlining how the applicant demonstrates SKAL
idea of goodwill and friendship, as well as an indication as to the
applicants understanding of the tourism industry and a 150 - 200
word essay. Application deadline is the last Friday in September

Victoria Inn Award                                                      Hospitality and
A minimum $500 award will be presented annually to an                   Tourism
employee of the Victoria Inn who is enrolled in the first or second     Management
year of a full-time program at Red River College (preference will
be given to student in the Hospitality and Tourism Management).
Family members of a Victoria Inn employee are invited to apply,
although preference will be given to employee applications.
Applicants must be maintaining satisfactory academic
performance (a minimum of one term/semester must have been
completed by the application deadline. Application forms should
be submitted to the Student Service Centres by January 31.

                                             Application Required




                                                                                          42
General Information
LOCKERS
Lockers will be rented and managed for the Notre Dame Campus by the Print &
Graphic Centre, DM19 phone 632-2284 and for the Princess Campus by the Copy
Centre, W104 phone 949-8470. Locks are issued with the locker rental, and require a
$10.00 deposit. The deposit is returned when the lock has been returned to the Print &
Graphic Centre or Princess Street Copy Centre.

Locker fees are as follows:
    Three months $17.50 (plus .88 GST)
    Six months $27.50 (plus $1.38 GST)
    Ten months $35.00 (plus $1.75 GST)
    Twenty-Two months $70.00 (plus $3.50 GST)

Only one student is assigned per locker and cannot be transferred.

It is the student‟s responsibility to remember their lockers expiry date, and to renew their
rental, or vacate the locker on or before the expiry date. Please ensure that you remove
the lock and your belongings, if you leave the program, when you are employed on a work
term during the summer months, and when you graduate. Contents retrieved from
expired or vacated lockers will be disposed of by the Print & Graphic Centre.

WEB ADVISOR
Each student will be issued a College Web account and password, which can be used to
access student records such as marks and T2202A Tuition and Education Tax Credit
Certificate.

CHANGE OF ADDRESS
College correspondence and student records are sent to the address given on your
application form. If you have a change of address to report before or after you graduate,
you must complete and sign an Address Change Request Form and submit it to Student
Services in order for the change to be processed. Changes can be made online using
Web Advisor, or through the Student Services Centre in D101.

STUDENT SERVICE CENTRE HOURS - NOTRE DAME CAMPUS (ROOM D101)
   Monday – Thursday                       8:00am – 6:30pm
   Friday                                  8:00am – 4:00pm
   The Centre is closed for all statutory holidays.




                                                                                         43
LAPTOP / COMPUTER SERVICES
Students are now to provide their own laptop for the programs. The specifics are any
PC laptop with a dual core CPU, minimum 2GB RAM (recommended 4GB), DVD drive,
wireless capability, Windows 7 operating system (Home or better), with the following
notable exclusions: NetBooks, Apple laptops (MacBooks, MacBook Pros) and tablet
devices (e.g. iPads) are not acceptable.

   Contact Danny Lam                          Room AB13B
   Monday – Friday                            7:30am – 3:30pm
                                              Phone: 632-3994
                                              E-mail: dlam@rrc.mb.ca

For service after hours or weekends, please e-mail Danny, leave a voicemail message
or open a case log by clicking on the Case Log System link on the Hospitality website
http://xnet.rrc.mb.ca/hospitalityweb/ .

CAMPUS BOOKSTORE GENERAL HOURS
September – May
   Monday to Thursday 8:00am – 6:30pm
   Friday             8:00am – 3:30pm
June – August
   Monday to Thursday 8:00am – 5:00pm
   Friday             8:00am – 3:30pm

   The Notre Dame Campus Bookstore is located in the mall level to the right of the
   bus loop entrance, across from the Buffalo cafeteria.

   The Bookstore offers extended hours during term starts. Please call the Bookstore
   for further information.

   Telephone:          632-2351
   Fax:                694-9746

BUY YOUR BOOKS ONLINE
Avoid long lineups by purchasing your books online and having them delivered to your
door or packaged for pickup. It‟s convenient and secure. See the Bookstore page on the
College website. www.rrc.mb.ca

INJURY REPORTING PROCEDURES
All College-related injuries, regardless how minor they appear, must be promptly reported
to the College Health Centre. The Health Centre hours of operation are Monday to Friday,
8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. and the phone number is 632-2238.

Health Centre staff will treat minor injuries, document the necessary information and report
it accordingly.


                                                                                         44
College-related injuries include any injury to a student that is or may be in any way
associated with a College activity whether on campus or not (i.e. Co-op placement).

WORKERS COMPENSATION BOARD CLAIMS
WCB claims are initiated through the Health Centre. An injury results in a claim when:

      an injured student consults a medical practitioner about the injury, or
      time-loss results from an injury (other than the day of the injury)

Late or non-reporting of an injury may jeopardize an individual‟s claim for related
compensation.

WORKPLACE SAFETY
If students have a safety concern concerning their surrounding or recognize one, they
can download a Safety Report Form, available on the Hospitality Website under
Workplace Safety, and submit the completed form to the Hospitality Department Office
for proper disposition.


Peer Tutoring Services
All students are entitled to Peer Tutoring at no cost. Students enrolled in programs
presented in a semester format are entitled to 12 hours of peer tutoring per semester.
(Please note: these totals are per semester and not per course.)
Students seeking tutorial support should register at Tutoring Services, where they will be
given names and phone numbers of peer tutors qualified and willing to work with the
student. It is the student‟s responsibility to contact the peer tutor and arrange a session.
The student may contact the tutor by phone or by e-mail to set up an appointment.
Peer tutors are usually students currently enrolled at RRC, most often who have
completed the material the previous term. Instructors are always welcome to refer a
student for peer tutoring or suggest that a student become a peer tutor. Peer tutors are
paid for their services through a joint project by the Learning Assistance Services and
the RRC Students‟ Association. Training is also provided
Every effort will be made to locate tutorial supports for all courses and programs. In
some rare situations with highly specialized subjects, locating a peer tutor can be
extremely difficult. In these types of situations tutoring may not be readily available.
For additional information please contact:
Ron Hamerling, Coordinator
Tutorial Services
D110 Notre Dame Campus
632-2251




                                                                                         45
Use of Personal Information
Red River College complies with The Manitoba Freedom of Information and Protection
of Privacy Act (FIPPA) in the collection and use of student information.

Red River College will not divulge any information about your academic progress,
student records, the location of your classes, or any personal information.

You may sign a release authorizing Red River College to discuss academic standing or
permit contact while on campus with specifically identified individuals. A Release of
Personal Student Information form can be downloaded from the college website or from
the Student Services Centre in D101

For additional information, refer to your Student Planner (Security of Academic Records)
or the College Calendar (Use of Personal Information).




                                                                                     46
Frequently asked Questions
Where do I go to arrange parking?
Parking can be arranged at the Student Services Centre in Building D, Room D101.

Where is the best location for parking?
According to the second year students, the best location in relation to your classes is in
North 1.

Where are the classrooms?
We will be taking you on the tour to show you where all your classes are located.

Where do I rent a locker?
You may arrange to rent a locker at the Print and Graphic Centre where they will assign
a locker based on availability.

Where do I get a photo ID? Do I need one?
Your photo ID is free and it is available from the Student Services Centre, D101. You
should get one in order to use any of the facilities on campus, including the Library, labs,
or even the Gym. Avoid the lineups; get it as soon as possible

Where can I buy a bus pass?
The passes may be purchased at “The Ox”, and you get the discounted student rate.
You may also purchase all sorts of other items there, including used books, lottery
tickets and snacks.

Where can I purchase used books?
Limited quantities of used books are available at the “Book Store” or at “The Ox”. Check
the bulletin board in the Hospitality hallway for notices of used books available from
other students. Check with your instructors to make sure you are buying the correct
edition.

Where do I go to eat?
We will tour some of the locations just so that you have an idea of locations. Food
Services operate 5 outlets in addition to those operated by the Hospitality Department.

If I lose something what should I do?
Report your loss to Security in the Plaza level of “C” building. The phone number is
632-2323.

If I feel sick or hurt myself what should I do?
When you are on campus, there is a Health Centre in the mall level opposite to the
Hospitality offices.




                                                                                         47
Equitrac FAQs
How much will it cost to print?
The cost to print is 0.10 per page.

Can I print double sided?
No. Classroom printers are not configured for double sided printing, plus the cost to print
is per page not per sheet.

How do I pay for printing?
Each student will have a user account set up. Students can deposit funds into their user
accounts at the Print & Graphic Centre DM19, or at the Equitrac pay station located on
the mall level of Building C (next to the Security Office).

How do I know how much money is left in my user account?
Similar to viewing the details of a bank account online, the user account will allow
students to view their balance at all times. Students will have to click on the Equitrac
Web link located on the menu bar of our website, once there they will have to enter in
their network username and password (academic\username or admin\username and
then their password).

If there is a problem with my print-out or with the printer, who should I contact?
Any concerns or issues regarding printing should be directed to the Print and Graphic
centre at DM19.

Can I e-mail my assignment to my instructor instead of printing it?
Students should check with their instructors to find out how assignments should be
submitted.

Can I bring in my own printer?
When printing at the college, students will only be able to use the printers connected to
the college‟s internal server.

If I bring my own paper will I still have to pay for printing?
You will still be charged 0.10 per page even if you use your own paper. The cost of
printing covers does not only include the use of paper, but also the use and
maintenance of the college‟s printing equipment.

Will I be able to print from my laptop while in the library?
Students will not be able to print directly from their laptops to the library printers using
their individual user accounts. If students would like to use a library printer, they will
have to first obtain a user code from the library.




                                                                                         48
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