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CABLE Gram Collecting and Broadcasting for Law Enforcement

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					                                     CABLE Gram
                   Collecting and Broadcasting for Law Enforcement
                Subscription information available at www.cablegram.org
                               Publisher, Zhi Hamby-Nye


The CABLE Gram is a weekly publication started in July 2004, currently distributed at no
charge to members of the law enforcement, operations security and intelligence
communities. The CABLE Gram is produced by and is the intellectual property of Real
Trends, Inc. Please feel free to redistribute this issue of the CABLE Gram (in it’s entirety
only) to interested parties. If you would like to be on the CABLE Gram distribution list,
please send an email containing your name, place of employment, phone number, and
email address to zhi@cablegram.org Back issues are available online at
http://www.cablegram.org.


CABLE Gram Volume 2 Issue 18

21 March 2005 CABLE Gram™

Good Morning All,

In the Current Update:

FEDERAL
1. Look Out Below—The Terror Threat From the Sea (Newsweek, 28 March 2005 Issue)
2. Russian Trace In U.S. Arms Smuggling Scandal? (RIA Novosti, 19 Mar 2005)
3. U.S. report catalogs nightmare scenarios - Reports lists possible terror attacks to help
security agencies plan (AP, 16 Mar 2005)
4. Deportation of alleged Cuban spy upheld (UPI, 17 Mar 2005)
5. TSA fears targeting of crowds at airports (by Thomas Frank, USA TODAY, 16 Mar
2005)
6. States and Communities Battling Another Round of Base Closings (New York Times,
20 Mar 2005)
7. Agroterrorism: Pilot animal ID program uses GPS technology (AP, 15 Mar 2005)
8. CTIA: Experts call for homeland security, wireless industry cooperation
(ComputerWorld, 17 Mar 2005)
9. Officials criticize system for tracking foreign students (by Chloe Albanesius, National
Journal's Technology Daily, 18 Mar 2005)
10. Wal-Mart to pay fine for employing illegal immigrants (New Kerlala, 19 Mar 2005)
11. Homeland security funds often spent to meet political needs (Baltimore Sun, by Greg
Barrett, 20 Mar 2005)
12. Neglected security – An Opinion Piece by the Pittsburgh Trivune-Review (20 Mar
2005)
13. 'Security freeeze' can thwart identity theft (By Jennifer Saranow And Ron Lieber, The
Wall Street Journal, 20 Mar 2005)
14. U.S. needs to watch extremists, Fox says (Republic Mexico City Bureau, 17 Mar
2005)

STATE AND LOCAL NEWS
15. CA: Managing a bug-borne doomsday--Jerry Street prepares Solano County for
biological terrorist attacks (Daily Republic, 19 Mar 2005)
16. CO: El Paso County led state change on permits for concealed guns (The Gazette, 20
Mar 2005)
17. CT: Instead Of Mock Disaster, Region Needs Real Security (The Day, by Scott Bates,
20 Mar 2005)
18. CT: Scare in Milford - Powder found in mail forces office to close; tests pending
(Connecticut Post, 16 Mar 2005)
19. DC: Expanded Security Checkpoint Featuring US Airways Priority Queue and
Shuttle Ticket Counter Now Open at Reagan National (PRNewswire, 17 Mar 2005)
20. ATA: D.C. hazmat ordinance amounts to illegal routing (The Trucker, 16 Mar 2005)
21. FL: General Physics Corporation to Provide Emergency Response and Crisis
Management Services to Pinellas County Florida School District (Business Wire, 17 Mar
2005)
22. IL: Will County wants disaster center (Daily South Town, 15 Mar 2005)
23. IL: State accuses charity of identity theft (Chicago Sun Times, 17 Mar 2005)
24. NV: Identity theft in Las Vegas raises terror concerns (by Steve Friess, Globe
Correspondent, 19 Mar 2005)
25. NM: Deadly crash in N.M. linked to smuggling (AP, 20 Mar 2005)
26. NY: Saratoga shows off haz-mat trucks (The Saratogian, 16 Mar 2005)
27. NC: AG Cooper supports bill to thwart identity theft (AP, 19 Mar 2005)
28. OR: District plan another mock emergency drill (By Terry Dillman Of the News-
Times, 18 Mar 2005)
29. TX: Deadly Smuggling Case to Head to Jury (AP, 18 Mar 2005)

GANG ACTIVITY
30. Homeland Security bureau goes after gangs (GovExec.com, by Chris Strohm, 14 Mar
2005)
31. CA: Hmong Community Pleads For Help On Asian Gang Problem (The KCRA
Channel, 18 Mar 2005)
32. VA: The Most Dangerous Gang in America (Newsweek, 28 March 2005 Issue)

NARCO TRAFFICKING
33. Inhalants rather than Marijuana: Hair spray, deodorants contain harmful substances,
expert says (AP, 17 Mar 2005)
34. TX: Honduran Gang Leader Indicted (KGBT4, 20 Mar 2005)
35. Mexican Drug Cartel Members Arrested by U.S. Agents - Drug ring distributed 100
kilograms of cocaine per week (by Eric Green, Washington File Staff Writer, 17 Mar
2005)
36. Treasury Dept. Designation Targets Colombian Drug Cartel Leader - Action helps
undermine drug cartel's financial network, official says (Dept. of State, 17 Mar 2005)

CYBERTHREAT & THEFT
37. FDIC Wants Banks to Notify Customers of Identity Theft (ConsumerAffairs.com, 20
Mar 2005)
38. ChexSystems and the War of Banking Rights (ConsumerAffairs.Com, 17 Mar 2005)
39. MA: College computer hacked; 120,000 at risk (AP, 17 Mar 2005)
40. Identity Theft protection company receives second grant from Maine Technology
Institute (Maine Today, 17 Mar 2005)
41. Internet phones a hacking risk? - Low-cost services may attract identity thieves
looking to turn stolen credit cards into cash (Reuters, 18 Mar 2005)
42. Cybersecurity spending estimated to grow to $7.1 billion by 2009 (GovExec.com,
Daniel Pulliam, 18 Mar 2005)

COUNTERFEIT
43. 36% of Global Counterfeiting is IP Theft: Survey (i-Newswire.com, 15 Mar 2005)
44. Global anti-counterfeit group points finger at Canada (Xinhuanet, 17 Mar 2005)
45. Scam artists using internet to find victims - Post offices on alert for counterfeit money
orders (Outer Banks Sentinel, 20 Mar 2005)
46. AL: Feds Arrest 22 In Counterfeit Crackdown (NBC13.com, 15 Mar 2005)
47. IN: Counterfeit bills being passed in area (The Madison Courier, 20 Mar 2005)
48. PA: Local Kmart Reports Counterfeit Money Being Wired To Colombia (The WGAL
Channel, 18 Mar 2005)
49. SC: Number Of Counterfeit Bills Reported Here Called Unusual (The Greeneville
Sun, 19 Mar 2005)

TECHNOLOGY
50. GAO pushes for bomb detector study (FCW, Aliva Sternstein, 16 Mar 2005)
51. DHS to use MetaCarta (FCW, Dibya Sarkar, 14 Mar 2005)
52. TSA awards explosive contracts (FCW, Aliya Sternstein, 14 Mar 2005)
53. Web satisfaction dips (FCW, David Perera, 14 Mar 2005)
54. Fla. county secures wireless (FCW, Dibya Sarkar, 16 Mar 2005)
55. TX: Defense shield built in Texas (My San Antonio, 20 Mar 2005)
56. TX: D/FW bags to zip by with new system - $139 million system to check for
explosives to save time, money (The Dallas Morning News, 18 Mar 2005)

RESOURCES
57. New Information System Aids Emergency Responders - Personal digital assistant
software can help identify hazardous materials (Dept. of State, 17 Mar 2005)
58. Decontamination Involving Weapons of Mass Destruction (Firehouse Magazine, 20
Mar 2005)

OPPORTUNITIES
59. Terrorism and security college classes spreading (AP, 17 Mar 2005)
FULL REPORTS
60. U.S., Mexican Officials Open Remodeled Tecate Port of Entry - Updated facility will
provide better border security (Dept. of State, 14 Mar 2005)
61. Anti-Corruption Group Targets Construction, Procurement - $300 billion lost
annually to bribery in contracting, report says (by Berta Gomez, Washington File Staff
Writer, 16 Mar 2005)
62. DoD Official Outlines Homeland Defense Progress (By Sgt. 1st Class Doug Sample,
USA American Forces Press Service, 16 Mar 2005)

Take care,

Zhi

The CABLE Gram is a weekly publication, distributed in PDF format and is currently
included as a benefit of membership in the OPSEC Professionals Society and the
National Military Intelligence Association.

Issues covered in the CABLE Gram include: Homeland Defense, Homeland Security,
Terrorism, Federal Law Enforcement, First Responders, Money Laundering, Identity
Theft, NBC Weapons, Cybercrimes, Smuggling, Narco Trafficking, Hazardous Materials
and other related topics.

We search the topics and Websites that you request, so it is important for you to provide
feedback. We are in our infancy and the CABLE Gram will be as useful as you help make
it. Please let us know the topics and keywords that will assist you in your professional
endeavors. Send all comments and suggestions to zhi@cablegram.org – please type
CABLE Gram in the subject line.

Please forward the CABLE Gram to all people you feel will find it useful!


FEDERAL

1. Look Out Below—The Terror Threat From the Sea (Newsweek, 28 March 2005
Issue)
Al Qaeda frogmen sound like one of the more exotic terrorist threats—but Homeland
Security chiefs are preparing, just in case. Last month the Coast Guard launched a special
program to train members of its seagoing SWAT teams how to protect U.S. ports against
scuba-diving attackers. Members of Coast Guard commando teams based at 12 ports on
the U.S. coastline will be taught underwater fighting techniques and how to use secret
weapons. NEWSWEEK has learned that team members will try to master the proper use
of "entanglement nets." The nets are meant to be thrown over an underwater intruder,
who then becomes ensnared in the mesh. The commandos are also supposed to be taught
how to operate special sonar the Coast Guard is developing that should be able to tell a
diver from a dolphin or seal. Sonar rigs will be deployed at strategic locations so they can
be rapidly set up around ports or ships in the event of specific threats. Commandos will
also get access to a special underwater sound system to send out verbal warnings to
underwater intruders.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7244239/site/newsweek/

2. Russian Trace In U.S. Arms Smuggling Scandal? (RIA Novosti, 19 Mar 2005)
NEW YORK - An arms dealer arrested this week in the USA claimed that he could buy
grenade launchers in Russia and then ship them over to the United States by sea, a source
in the New York Attorney's Office told RIA Novosti on Friday. Last Tuesday, U.S.
authorities arrested members of an international arms smuggling ring including nationals
of Armenia, Georgia, Russia, Eastern European countries and South Africa. Most of the
detainees resided in the USA, some of them illegally. Law enforcers named Armenian
Artur Solomonyan, 26, as the ringleader. The authorities charged 18 individuals with
conspiring to smuggle shoulder-fired anti-aircraft missile systems, grenade launchers,
mortars and other weapons into the USA. "In the course of the talks Solomonyan told a
potential buyer that the weapons would be shipped by sea and delivered to the ports of
Los Angeles, New York and Miami. After the two sides have agreed on the price,
quantity and models of weapons the latter were to be delivered within two months," the
source from the New York Attorney's Office told RIA Novosti.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://makeashorterlink.com/?E24F136BA

3. U.S. report catalogs nightmare scenarios - Reports lists possible terror attacks to
help security agencies plan (AP, 16 Mar 2005)
WASHINGTON - The agency charged with protecting homeland security developed an
elaborate, confidential report to alert states to a host of terror-strike scenarios, but the
document was inadvertently posted on several states' public Web sites before being
removed. The department has been working for a year on a National Planning Scenarios
plan that outlines a number of plausible attacks -- including by nerve gas, anthrax,
pneumonic plague and truck bomb. The report, still confidential, was requested by a
presidential directive in December 2003 and will be made public in upcoming months,
Homeland Security spokesman Brian Roehrkasse said Tuesday.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.cnn.com/2005/US/03/16/terror.attacks.ap/index.html

4. Deportation of alleged Cuban spy upheld (UPI, 17 Mar 2005)
Atlanta, GA - The 11th Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta has upheld a Miami
deportation order for a man accused of being a spy for Cuba. The order to deport Juan
Emilio Aboy was issued in 2002 and he lost a final bid to remain in Miami three weeks
ago, The Miami Herald reported Thursday. He was arrested in 2002 by agents who said
he was a covert agent for the Fidel Castro regime and has been in a federal detention
center west of Miami since then.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://washingtontimes.com/upi-breaking/20050317-101800-8480r.htm
5. TSA fears targeting of crowds at airports (by Thomas Frank, USA TODAY, 16
Mar 2005)
Air travelers could be a terrorist target when they group together in airport lobbies
waiting for their luggage to be screened, a government report said Tuesday. The
Transportation Security Administration (TSA) told investigators that the luggage-
screening system it set up at airports across the USA "increases security risks," according
to the report by the Government Accountability Office. The office is the investigative
arm of Congress. TSA officials interviewed for the report said that "crowded airport
lobbies have been the scenes of terrorist attacks in the past" and could be targeted by
terrorists in the United States.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.usatoday.com/travel/news/2005-03-15-tsa-screeners_x.htm

6. States and Communities Battling Another Round of Base Closings (New York
Times, 20 Mar 2005)
WASHINGTON, March 19 - For the first time in a decade, communities across the
country are bracing for a major round of military base closings, and they are mounting
aggressive lobbying campaigns to stave off cuts and other changes that some independent
experts say could dwarf the previous four rounds combined. Pentagon officials say all
425 domestic bases are under scrutiny, as the military looks to squeeze efficiencies and
billions of dollars in savings from a cold-war network that has nearly 25 percent more
capacity than what the armed services say they need. After more than two years of
exhaustive study, Pentagon analysts are putting the finishing touches on a list of
recommendations that Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld will present to a nine-
member independent commission for review. Scores of Pentagon analysts and auditors
have been poring over data and dozens of options as part of an effort that is intended to
mesh with Mr. Rumsfeld's broader goals to make the military more agile and responsive
to security threats.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://makeashorterlink.com/?B3FF416BA

7. Agroterrorism: Pilot animal ID program uses GPS technology (AP, 15 Mar 2005)
WICHITA, Kan. - On any given day on the remote roads of Kansas, hundreds of tractor-
trailers are hauling cattle across the state’s vast rangelands, headed for feedlots and
slaughterhouses. And in an era of mad cow disease and the threat of agroterrorism,
federal agriculture regulators want to be able to locate within 48 hours — or sooner —
the whereabouts of each of the nation’s 100 million-plus head of cattle. Enter a Kansas
proposal that would combine GPS, cellular and radio frequency technologies to track
cattle as they are in transit. It is one of the ideas the U.S. Department of Agriculture is
testing and one that could shape the nation’s emerging animal identification system.
“People were excited about the Kansas proposal,” said Amy Spillman, spokeswoman for
the department’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. “They wanted to integrate
the ability to track cattle as (they) came on and off the trucks.” The department is
spending $11.6 million in 29 states to test various ideas, such as proposals from
Wyoming and Idaho to expand on their existing branding methods of identifying cattle.
Kansas was given $805,000 for its one-year test project on a transportation-based system,
which could have broad applications in an industry that ships 90 million animals by truck
annually.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.landandlivestockpost.com/technology/031505gps.htm

8. CTIA: Experts call for homeland security, wireless industry cooperation
(ComputerWorld, 17 Mar 2005)
NEW ORLEANS - To bolster the value of wireless voice and data communications for
U.S. homeland security purposes, industry and government officials need to work closer
together, security experts at CTIA Wireless 2005 said this week. The consensus among
five experts who took part in a panel discussion was that wireless technologies have
improved since the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. But they said much remains to be
done to set up effective warning systems in the event of a terrorist or natural disaster and
to improve interoperability of wireless devices for emergency responders. The toughest
issue for police, firefighters and other emergency responders may be the widespread lack
of interoperability between public safety networks and devices, experts said.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://makeashorterlink.com/?J300257BA

9. Officials criticize system for tracking foreign students (by Chloe Albanesius,
National Journal's Technology Daily, 18 Mar 2005)
A system intended to track foreign students has been improved since its 2003 inception,
but personnel issues are causing delays and potentially deterring students from pursuing
degrees in the United States, witnesses at a joint hearing of two House subcommittees
warned Thursday. The Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS),
operated by the Homeland Security Department, was created as part of a 2001 anti-
terrorism law known as the USA PATRIOT Act. It was initially plagued by technical
mishaps but since has been improved, according to the department and the Government
Accountability Office. "Indications are that SEVIS performance has improved and
continues to improve," Randolph Hite, director of GAO's information technology
architecture and systems issues, said at the hearing of the House Education and the
Workforce Select Education and 21st-Century Competitiveness subcommittees.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.govexec.com/dailyfed/0305/031705tdpm1.htm

10. Wal-Mart to pay fine for employing illegal immigrants (New Kerlala, 19 Mar
2005)
Washington - Wal-Mart, the largest department store in the US, will pay USD 11 million
to settle accusations that it used hundreds of illegal immigrants to clean its showrooms.
Wal-Mart argued unsuccessfully that it did not employ any illegal immigrants but the
contractors employed to clean up the stores may have done so. The USD 11 million
dollar payment was four times higher than any other single payment to the government in
an illegal immigrant employment case. Wal-Mart had USD 288.2 billion dollars in sales
last year. The settlement grew out of enforcement actions in which 100 illegal immigrants
were arrested in 2001 at Wal-Mart stores in Missouri, New York, Ohio and Pennsylvania,
and an additional 245 were arrested in October 2003 at 60 stores in 21 states. Federal
investigators said they decided not to bring criminal charges against Wal-Mart because it
is cooperating and has taken action to prevent future employment of illegal immigrants at
its 3,600 stores in the US.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.newkerala.com/news-daily/news/features.php?action=fullnews&id=88183

11. Homeland security funds often spent to meet political needs (Baltimore Sun, by
Greg Barrett, 20 Mar 2005)
Three days after Washington announced plans to award $2.5 billion this year in homeland
security grants, the city council of a suburban Alabama city voted to create its own
Department of Homeland Security and Immigration. It didn't matter that some residents
and a council member, Mike Natter, argued that Hoover (population 65,000) was under
no threat from terrorism. Newly elected Hoover Mayor Tony Petelos, a former
Republican state lawmaker, expects his new office to be like like flypaper for homeland
security grants. After the terrorism attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, politics couldn't help itself.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://makeashorterlink.com/?E310157BA

12. Neglected security – An Opinion Piece by the Pittsburgh Trivune-Review (20
Mar 2005)
By asking for only 200 new border patrol agents next year instead of the 2,000 minimum
that Congress authorized, President George Bush perverts the meaning of national
security. To its everlasting credit, Congress says this nation must increase the number of
border agents by not fewer than 2,000 annually through fiscal 2010. To his everlasting
shame, Mr. Bush has said no for next year and probably for those following. In light of
the very real fears voiced by America's national security agencies regarding terrorist
infiltration through the virtually defenseless southern border -- and the millions of illegal
aliens who already have breached our security by simply walking into the country -- the
president's 10 percent piecemeal proposal is beyond incomprehensible. A newly-minted
agent costs about $100,000 annually, according to the Department of Homeland Security.
Two hundred agents would cost $20 million; 2,000 agents would cost $200 million.
That's not even a drop in the bucket for the president's proposed $2.57 trillion budget.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://pittsburghlive.com/x/tribune-review/opinion/archive/s_314888.html

13. 'Security freeeze' can thwart identity theft (By Jennifer Saranow And Ron
Lieber, The Wall Street Journal, 20 Mar 2005)
In an effort to combat the rapidly escalating outbreak of identity-theft crimes, a handful
of states including California and Texas have passed legislation that allows consumers to
put a "security freeze" on their credit history. Some 20 other states this year have
considered or are considering adopting similar laws, which make it nearly impossible for
criminals to use stolen information to open bogus new accounts. The measures are so
effective because once frozen, a merchant is unable to review an applicant's credit
history. Lacking such information, most companies refuse to open a new account, greatly
devaluing stolen personal data.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.southcoasttoday.com/daily/03-05/03-20-05/d01bu943.htm

14. U.S. needs to watch extremists, Fox says (Republic Mexico City Bureau, 17 Mar
2005)
MEXICO CITY - Anti-immigrant sentiment appears to be growing in the United States,
Mexican President Vicente Fox said Wednesday, and he urged U.S. officials to act
quickly to control movements such as the 950-member-strong Minuteman Project on the
Mexico-Arizona border. Fox said he plans to push for U.S. immigration reform during a
meeting with President Bush in Texas next week. He also said the two leaders, along with
Canadian Prime Minister Paul Martin, likely will announce a plan to expand the scope of
the North American Free Trade Agreement. Mexico's National Human Rights
Commission recently issued a warning about several new grass-roots movements inspired
by Arizona's Proposition 200. Other Mexican officials have cited the Minuteman Project,
a plan by activists to patrol the border during April, as a sign of rising extremism.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/0317fox17.html

STATE AND LOCAL NEWS

15. CA: Managing a bug-borne doomsday--Jerry Street prepares Solano County for
biological terrorist attacks (Daily Republic, 19 Mar 2005)
FAIRFIELD - In a nondescript county government building on the west side of Fairfield,
a man quietly sits in his office and contemplates Solano County's own version of 9-11.
What he envisions isn't pretty. Except in this case, Jerry Street, the county's bioterrorism
response manager, isn't really worried about hijacked airliners plowing into the few tall
structures to be found in Solano County. No, Street focuses his time on the idea of
terrorism in the form of biological attack - highly contagious and horrific diseases and
viruses intentionally transported here via human or mechanical agents with one goal: To
kill as many people as possible. And while bioterrorism might not have the sheer tragic
spectacle that comes from a jet full of fuel and passengers slamming into a building, it
brings its own unique variety of unimaginable horrors.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.dailyrepublic.com/articles/2005/03/19/local_news/news01.txt

16. CO: El Paso County led state change on permits for concealed guns (The
Gazette, 20 Mar 2005)
John Anderson thought he was simply keeping a campaign promise. What the then-
sheriff of El Paso County didn’t know is that in making it easier for county residents to
carry concealed handguns in 1995, he was helping set in motion a change in permit laws
that would sweep the state — and eventually became law.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.gazette.com/display.php?secid=2

17. CT: Instead Of Mock Disaster, Region Needs Real Security (The Day, by Scott
Bates, 20 Mar 2005)
Southeastern Connecticut is about to become the center of America's homeland security
efforts with the arrival of the TOPOFF 3 training exercises. While the region has
America's leading homeland security officials as its guests, it's timely to ask some
important questions about how serious they truly are about protecting us from terrorist
attack. More than three years after the attacks of Sept. 11, America remains vulnerable to
attack from sea, land and air. Further, officials in Washington are not taking the basic
steps needed to prepare for potential attacks or provide security inside America.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://makeashorterlink.com/?J120357BA

18. CT: Scare in Milford - Powder found in mail forces office to close; tests pending
(Connecticut Post, 16 Mar 2005)
MILFORD Concerns about bioterrorism prompted the city to temporarily close and
quarantine a downtown business Tuesday after a worker found a powdery substance
while opening office mail. Health inspectors, police and firefighters flooded Stirling &
Stirling Inc. at 20 Armory Lane to inspect the building for any noxious substance that
could pose a threat to the firm's nearly 40 workers. Two agents from the FBI's Joint
Terrorism Task Force and the New Haven Fire Department's hazardous-material response
unit assisted the investigation. Although there is no evidence linking the powder to
bioterrorism, the city wants to take all precautions to ensure the building is safe, officials
said.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.connpost.com/news/ci_2609314

19. DC: Expanded Security Checkpoint Featuring US Airways Priority Queue and
Shuttle Ticket Counter Now Open at Reagan National (PRNewswire, 17 Mar 2005)
ARLINGTON, Va. - An expanded Transportation Security Administration (TSA)
Security Checkpoint and a US Airways priority queue line is now open at Ronald Reagan
Washington National Airport. Additionally, the full-service US Airways Shuttle ticket
counter has been relocated back to the Departure Level at Reagan National's North Pier,
beginning this week.The TSA Security Checkpoint has expanded from four to six lanes,
which will assist in reducing wait times for customers during peak travel periods. As with
other airports with US Airways priority queue lines, the queue is available during peak
travel times for First Class and Envoy Class customers, as well as Dividend Miles
Preferred and Star Gold members.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://biz.yahoo.com/prnews/050317/dcth047_3.html

20. ATA: D.C. hazmat ordinance amounts to illegal routing (The Trucker, 16 Mar
2005)
ALEXANDRIA, Va. - The American Trucking Associations stated that an ordinance
which would make it illegal to transport certain hazardous materials through a restricted
area called the "Capitol Exclusion Zone" amounts to an illegal routing requirement. On
March 14, ATA petitioned the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration requesting
that the Department of Transportation preempt the District of Columbia's ordinance.
ATA argued that the ordinance is an illegal routing requirement that was enacted in
violation of the federal hazardous materials routing regulations. ATA officials are
concerned that other jurisdictions will seek to enact similar restrictions which, it stated,
would create an unreasonable burden on interstate commerce and frustrate the safe and
efficient transportation of hazardous materials throughout the United States.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.thetrucker.com/stories/03_05/0316_ata_hazmat.html

21. FL: General Physics Corporation to Provide Emergency Response and Crisis
Management Services to Pinellas County Florida School District (Business Wire, 17
Mar 2005)
ELKRIDGE, Md - Global workplace solutions provider General Physics Corporation
(GP), a subsidiary of GP Strategies Corporation (NYSE:GPX), was selected by the
School Board of Pinellas County, Florida to provide training and exercise programs to
enhance the Emergency Response and Crisis Management Program of Local Educational
Agencies. The scope of services includes the assessment of existing materials, the
development and delivery of training materials, and the development and delivery of
exercise drills that test the emergency and crisis management plans. School
administrators, teachers and other school personnel, as well as selected students and
parents will participate in the training and exercise programs. These services are similar
to those delivered by GP to Brevard County, Florida under the same grant program.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://makeashorterlink.com/?V130217BA

22. IL: Will County wants disaster center (Daily South Town, 15 Mar 2005)
Will County will partner with a private security firm to build an operations center to
respond to terrorist attacks and natural disasters. Slated to open this summer, the New
Lenox facility will include a helipad and a triage area for treating widespread injuries and
fatalities. The building also will act as a sort of communications clearinghouse for
emergency planning among several towns and government agencies. The county is
joining forces with Patron Systems Inc., a Chicago company currently under
investigation by the Securities and Exchange Commission concerning payments made to
consultants.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.dailysouthtown.com/southtown/dsindex/15-ds2.htm

23. IL: State accuses charity of identity theft (Chicago Sun Times, 17 Mar 2005)
In a lawsuit filed Wednesday, the Illinois attorney general's office alleged that a
Downstate charity stole the identity of a failed Harvey charity in order to claim the assets
and property of the defunct organization as its own. Three months after the United Way
of Harvey was dissolved by the Illinois secretary of state's office last June, Alex M.
Brooks named himself an officer of the charity and filed to reinstate the United Way of
Harvey as a charitable organization, the suit alleges.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.suntimes.com/output/news/cst-nws-idtheft17.html

24. NV: Identity theft in Las Vegas raises terror concerns (by Steve Friess, Globe
Correspondent, 19 Mar 2005)
LAS VEGAS - The burglars may be common thieves or specialists in identity theft. Or,
in the most harrowing but plausible of scenarios, they could be terrorists. None of these
prospects can be ruled out as investigators probe a bizarre break-in last week at a
Department of Motor Vehicles office in the suburb of North Las Vegas that is being
treated as a possible homeland security threat. Burglars rammed a vehicle through a back
wall at the DMV early on March 7 and drove off with 1,700 blank Nevada licenses, the
equipment needed to make licenses, and a computer hard drive that contained the Social
Security numbers and other personal information of more than 8,000 people who had
obtained licenses there since November. ''Think of the ripple effect this could have," said
Tim Mohr, director of investigations for BDO Seidman LLC, an accounting firm based in
New York. ''Say it's a terrorist cell that ends up with this information. They can use it to
rent cars or trucks. They don't run a driver's license when you rent a vehicle, they just ask
to see it. The ripple effect is that it doesn't just affect Nevadans."
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://makeashorterlink.com/?I240537BA

25. NM: Deadly crash in N.M. linked to smuggling (AP, 20 Mar 2005)
GRANTS, N.M. – A traffic accident that killed three people on Interstate 40 near Grants
is a deadly case of human smuggling, investigators say. A sport utility vehicle carrying
up to 15 illegal immigrants collided with a tractor-trailer Thursday night 18 miles east of
Grants, in western New Mexico. Based on statements from witnesses to the crash, state
police believe at least five passengers climbed out of the wreckage and fled on foot.
Immigration officers combed nearby hills but came up empty-handed.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://makeashorterlink.com/?A250157BA

26. NY: Saratoga shows off haz-mat trucks (The Saratogian, 16 Mar 2005)
SARATOGA SPRINGS - In the past few weeks, Saratoga County's hazardous materials
response team has dealt with everything from a buildup of potentially deadly Freon gas at
the Price Chopper in Mechanicville to an incident where an Edinburg man mixed
chemicals in his toilet and passed out from the fumes. 'He made hydrochloric acid,' said
Mike Aufiero, a volunteer firefighter in Ballston Spa and a chief of the county's haz-mat
response team. 'We haven't had a full-on response yet, thank goodness.' Aufiero and
salaried firefighters from the Saratoga Springs Fire Department demonstrated the county
haz-mat truck Tuesday for New York Secretary of State Randy Daniels at the city's West
Avenue fire station.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://makeashorterlink.com/?Z660227BA

27. NC: AG Cooper supports bill to thwart identity theft (AP, 19 Mar 2005)
RALEIGH, N.C. - To help fight the burgeoning crime of identity theft, state Attorney
General Roy Cooper plans this month to unveil a proposal to reduce the amount of
personal information that governments and businesses release, starting with Social
Security numbers. Cooper said the initiative aims to balance the public's right to
government information against individual's privacy. "We want to make sure that we
don't thwart access to public information," he said. "But identity theft is the fastest-
growing crime we've got. Government needs to do its part to fight it, just like we're
asking businesses to do." Cooper's staff lawyers have discussed details of the proposed
bill with press lawyers, who still have some concerns about it.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://makeashorterlink.com/?A270217BA

28. OR: District plan another mock emergency drill (By Terry Dillman Of the
News-Times, 18 Mar 2005)
Lincoln County School District will conduct another mock emergency drill involving
local police and other emergency management agencies at a Newport school sometime
during Spring Break. This drill - the second in a planned series of preparedness exercises
for county emergency responders - will feature an armed intruder scenario, according to
Sue Graves, LCSD safety coordinator. Graves is withholding the exact time, date, and
location for the staged event to "preserve an element of surprise" for participants, and to
"add to the realism" of the scenario. "We wanted to alert the public about the event in
hopes of minimizing alarm or confusion," said Newport Police Chief Mark Miranda. "If
they see a large concentration of police cars, fire vehicles, and ambulances heading for a
school, they can assume the training exercise is underway." Community members can
hear more specific information broadcast by local radio stations at the start of the event.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.newportnewstimes.com/articles/2005/03/18/news/news16.txt

29. TX: Deadly Smuggling Case to Head to Jury (AP, 18 Mar 2005)
HOUSTON - The driver of a tractor-trailer in the nation's deadliest smuggling attempt
was blinded by greed to the suffering of more than 70 illegal immigrants packed inside
the sweltering, airless truck, prosecutors said Friday in closing arguments. Tyrone
Williams' lawyer depicted him as an inexperienced pawn of a smuggling ring who didn't
know 17 immigrants were slowly dying in the trailer because he didn't speak Spanish and
couldn't hear them banging on the walls to get out. Two more immigrants died later. The
case went to the jury Friday but deliberations were to begin Monday.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uslatest/story/0,1282,-4876602,00.html

GANG ACTIVITY

30. Homeland Security bureau goes after gangs (GovExec.com, by Chris Strohm, 14
Mar 2005)
The Immigration and Customs Enforcement bureau announced Monday the launch of an
operation focused on helping state and local law enforcement go after the nation's most
violent gangs. ICE officials said the bureau is uniquely suited for the effort because it can
combine immigrations and customs enforcement powers to target, disrupt and, if
necessary, deport members of violent gangs in the United States. "We have incredible
immigration authorities and customs authorities under one roof right now, and we're able
to bring that to the table," said Assistant Secretary Michael Garcia, who is in charge of
ICE. "We not only can take them off the streets and detain them, but we can deport them
from the United States, and that is an incredibly powerful tool in going after a criminal
organization."
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.govexec.com/dailyfed/0305/031405c1.htm

31. CA: Hmong Community Pleads For Help On Asian Gang Problem (The KCRA
Channel, 18 Mar 2005)
SACRAMENTO, Calif. - A spike of Asian gang violence has hundreds of Hmong
parents -- some of whom can't speak English -- preparing to speak out at a public forum
Friday night. Over 200 Hmong families are expected to sit face to face with police and
school officials, demanding and pleading for help because of the gang problem. Chai
Vang fled the Vietnam War and refugee camps in Laos 25 years ago to bring his family
to the United States in search of a better life. But now, he says his daughter is involved in
a rapidly growing Asian gang problem at a time when Hmong-on-Hmong violence is
exploding.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.thekcrachannel.com/news/4299814/detail.html

32. VA: The Most Dangerous Gang in America (Newsweek, 28 March 2005 Issue)
The signs of a new threat in northern Virginia emerged ominously in blood-spattered
urban streets and rural scrub. Two summers ago the body of a young woman who had
informed against her former gang associates was found on the banks of the Shenandoah
River, repeatedly stabbed and her head nearly severed. Last May in Alexandria, gang
members armed with machetes hacked away at a member of the South Side Locos,
slicing off some of his fingers and leaving others dangling by a shred of skin. Only a
week later in Herndon, a member of the 18th Street gang was pumped full of .38-caliber
bullets, while his female companion, who tried to flee, was shot in the back. The
assailant, according to a witness, had a large tattoo emblazoned on his forehead. It read
MS, for Mara Salvatrucha, the gang allegedly responsible for all these attacks.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7244879/site/newsweek/

NARCO TRAFFICKING

33. Inhalants rather than Marijuana: Hair spray, deodorants contain harmful
substances, expert says (AP, 17 Mar 2005)
Experts say a higher percentage of youngsters ages 12 to 13 used inhalants rather than
marijuana in the past year. And they say that points to a need for more attention to the
problem. Westley Clark, director of the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, says the
dangers of inhalants must be underscored, especially since they’re readily available and
legal. Hair spray, deodorant, nail polish remover and paint thinner all can be dangerous.
They are common products that are legal, but contain substances that affect how a brain
works.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7218894/
34. TX: Honduran Gang Leader Indicted (KGBT4, 20 Mar 2005)
A Honduran gang leader arrested in South Texas last month has been indicted and
charged with entering this country illegally after he'd been deported. United States
Attorney Michael Shelby announced that Lester Rivera-Paz, 29, also known as Franklin
Jairo Rivera-Hernandez, of Honduras, has been indicted by a federal grand jury in
Houston on March 2. He is reportedly the national president of the Mara Salvatrucha
gang.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.team4news.com/Global/story.asp?S=3088202&nav=0w0vXaKn

35. Mexican Drug Cartel Members Arrested by U.S. Agents - Drug ring distributed
100 kilograms of cocaine per week (by Eric Green, Washington File Staff Writer, 17
Mar 2005)
Washington - Ten members of a Mexican drug cartel have been arrested by U.S. agents
on charges of drug smuggling, money laundering, and other offenses, announced the U.S.
Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency.

In a March 16 statement, ICE, which is part of the U.S. Department of Homeland
Security, said a squad of U.S. agents in Dallas, Texas, made the arrests after indictments
against the individuals were unsealed that day.

The arrests marked the culmination of an 18-month international drug-smuggling and
money-laundering investigation, which involved members of the drug cartel based in
Nuevo Leon and Piedras Negras in Mexico.

Contraband seized in the criminal investigation, code-named "Operation Black Eagle,"
included more than $1.6 million, 194 kilograms of cocaine and seven kilograms of
methamphetamine. The cartel is believed responsible for importing and distributing more
than 100 kilograms of cocaine per week and for large-scale smuggling of bulk U.S.
currency into Mexico, said ICE.

ICE indicated that the investigation of the drug cartel is ongoing, and additional arrests
and seizures are anticipated.

The agency also announced that it had deported 118 foreign nationals -- most of them
Mexicans -- on a March 11 U.S. government flight that removed criminal aliens from the
United States. The flight also included four Filipinos, three Guatemalans, one Honduran,
and one Salvadoran, all of whom were transferred to other flights at the Mexican border.

ICE said the deportations, which occur weekly, reflect its commitment to restoring
integrity to the U.S. immigration system. ICE formally removed from the United States
more than 160,000 aliens in fiscal year 2004.

The aliens are deported aboard both U.S. commercial and government aircraft. The
government's aircraft is run by the U.S. Marshals Service, under its program called the
Justice Prisoner and Alien Transportation System (JPATS). JPATS is one of the largest
transporters of prisoners in the world and handles hundreds of requests every day to move
prisoners and criminal aliens between judicial districts and correctional institutions in the
United States, and on international flights for removing deportable aliens.

ICE said deported aliens face an automatic 10-year ban from legally re-entering the
United States.

(The Washington File is a product of the Bureau of International Information Programs,
U.S. Department of State. Web site: http://usinfo.state.gov)

36. Treasury Dept. Designation Targets Colombian Drug Cartel Leader - Action
helps undermine drug cartel's financial network, official says (Dept. of State, 17
Mar 2005)
The U.S. Department of the Treasury has added the name of North Valle drug cartel
leader Carlos Alberto Renteria Mantilla, a Colombian national, to its list of Specially
Designated Narcotics Traffickers, along with 11 front companies and individuals
operating on his behalf.

In a March 17 press release, the Treasury Department's Robert Werner explained that the
designation "is a fundamental step in our battle to undermine the financial network of this
notorious Colombian drug cartel."

According to the Treasury Department, "today's action freezes any assets found in the
United States and prohibits all financial and commercial transactions between the
designees and any U.S. person."

Following is the text of the Treasury Department press release, with further details:

(begin text)

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY
Washington, D.C.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 17, 2005

TREASURY DESIGNATION TARGETS NORTH VALLE DRUG CARTEL LEADER

In another step aimed at depriving Colombian narcotics traffickers of capital, the U.S.
Department of the Treasury today added the name of North Valle drug cartel leader
Carlos Alberto Renteria Mantilla ("Beto Renteria") to its list of Specially Designated
Narcotics Traffickers (SDNTs), along with 11 front companies and individuals operating
on his behalf.

"Designating Beto Renteria as a leader of North Valle cartel is a fundamental step in our
battle to undermine the financial network of this notorious Colombian drug cartel," said
Robert Werner, Director of the Treasury's Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC).
"The North Valle drug cartel depends on its financial network to stay in businesses, and
actions like today's can deal a serious blow to those resources."

Beto Renteria is a leading member of the North Valle drug cartel, and his involvement in
narcotics trafficking has been documented back to the late 1970s. Beto Renteria is the
subject of two federal criminal indictments in the United States. In 2004, the District
Court for the District of Columbia charged Beto Renteria with violations of the Racketeer
Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO). Ten years prior, an indictment was
filed in the Southern District of Florida charging Beto Renteria with conspiracy to import,
possess and distribute cocaine in the United States. The United States is offering up to $5
million for information leading to his arrest.

This action also targets a financial network of 11 front companies and individuals that act
for or on behalf of Beto Renteria. The four Colombian businesses identified today are
Dimabe Ltda., Inversiones Agroindustriales del Occidente Ltda., Compania Agropecuaria
del Sur Ltda. and Colombo Andino Comercial Coalsa Ltda. All four businesses are
located in Bogota, Colombia. The seven Colombian individuals designated today include
Beto Renteria's wife, Maria Nury Caicedo Gallego, and their key financial front man,
Mauricio Pardo Ojeda.

Today's announcement is a result of OFAC's close working relationship with U.S. law
enforcement authorities, and particularly in this case, the Drug Enforcement
Administration (DEA).

SDNTs are subject to the economic sanctions imposed against Colombian drug cartels in
Executive Order 12978. Today's action freezes any assets found in the United States and
prohibits all financial and commercial transactions between the designees and any U.S.
person.

The U.S. government continues to work with and support the Colombian government in
attacking the finances of Colombia's drug cartels. In February 2005, the Colombian
government seized the airline Intercontinental de Aviacion, which had been designated
by OFAC in October 2004 because it was owned and controlled by North Valle cartel
leaders Gabriel Puerta Parra and Luis Hernandez Zea.

The assets of a total of 1,159 business and individuals in Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador,
Panama, Peru, Spain, Vanuatu, Venezuela, the Bahamas, the British Virgin Islands and
the Cayman Islands are now blocked under E.O. 12978. The 428 SDNT businesses
include agricultural, aviation, consulting, construction, distribution, financial, investment,
manufacturing, mining, offshore, pharmaceutical, real estate and service firms. The
SDNT list includes 17 kingpins from the Cali, North Valle, and North Coast drug cartels
in Colombia, including North Valle cartel leader Carlos Alberto Renteria Mantilla.

A complete list of the entities identified today can be found at:
http://www.treas.gov/offices/enforcement/ofac/actions/.
(end text)

(Distributed by the Bureau of International Information Programs, U.S. Department of
State. Web site: http://usinfo.state.gov)

CYBERTHREAT & THEFT

37. FDIC Wants Banks to Notify Customers of Identity Theft
(ConsumerAffairs.com, 20 Mar 2005)
The FDIC's five directors have voted to order banks to warn customers of suspected
identity theft. The provision applies only to banks, not to data aggregators like
ChoicePoint. Under the FDIC's proposed new policy, banks would be required to notify
customers when they detect unauthorized access to customer information and determine
that there is a "reasonable possibility" that the information was or could be misused. The
changes have already been approved by the the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency
and the Office of Thrift Supervision. They must still be approved by the Federal Reserve
Board. The ruling follows several highly publicized consumer privacy breaches that were
disclosed over the last few weeks, including the loss of backup tapes containing the credit
card information of 1.2 million federal workers by Bank of America; the loss of 145,000
customers' personal information to identity thieves at ChoicePoint, an aggregator and
reseller of personal information; the loss and possible theft of customer credit card
information from over 100 DSW Stores, a nationwide shoe retailer; and the disclosure
from Lexis-Nexis, a compiler of legal and consumer information, that the Social Security
numbers, names and addresses of 30,000 people may have been stolen by identity
thieves.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.consumeraffairs.com/news04/2005/fdic_id_theft.html

38. ChexSystems and the War of Banking Rights (ConsumerAffairs.Com, 17 Mar
2005)
Information-seller ChoicePoint's embarrassing hijack by identity thieves and Bank of
America's loss of thousands of data tapes containing customers' private information, have
shocked Americans into taking a closer look at the dangers of data mining and wholesale
sales of personal data. It's a watershed moment for any frustrated citizen who's tired of
faceless, anonymous companies controlling one's personal life. But one of the most
infamous and entrenched organizations in the business is still operating generally free of
public oversight. Even though its practices have spawned a Web-based subculture of
horror stories, tell-all websites, and vocal opponents, the average American still doesn't
know anything about it, or how severely it can affect your life. This is the mysterious
"banking clearinghouse" known as ChexSystems. To be placed in ChexSystems' records
can deprive you of any opportunity to open a checking account, write checks, use an
ATM card -- all the basics of personal finance we take for granted. Anyone on
ChexSystems' list becomes an "unperson" -- locked out of the opportunities for financial
well-being we all strive for.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.consumeraffairs.com/finance/chex01.html

39. MA: College computer hacked; 120,000 at risk (AP, 17 Mar 2005)
Boston College officials have warned 120,000 alumni that their personal information may
have been stolen when an intruder hacked into a school computer containing the
addresses and Social Security numbers of BC graduates. BC spokesman Jack Dunn told
The Boston Globe on Thursday that officials don't believe the hacker accessed the
personal information, but instead planted a program that could be used to launch attacks
on other machines. Still, amid rising concerns about identity theft, the school sent letters
to its alumni.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7221456/

40. Identity Theft protection company receives second grant from Maine
Technology Institute (Maine Today, 17 Mar 2005)
Portland, Maine – Identity Cops Inc. received a second grant from the Maine Technology
Institute this week, demonstrating its viability and the importance of its new technology.
Identity Cops first applied for and received grant funding just three months ago in March,
and now is awarded an additional round of funding in February. Identity Cops is a
cutting-edge company tackling a very serious and growing problem, identity theft. The
unique patent pending PrivacyProBot™ technology searches hundreds of electronic
databases you cannot get to alone. It finds information that may invade your privacy and
lead to identity theft - information you did not know was out there!
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://business.mainetoday.com/newsdirect/release.html?id=1604

41. Internet phones a hacking risk? - Low-cost services may attract identity thieves
looking to turn stolen credit cards into cash (Reuters, 18 Mar 2005)
WASHINGTON - Internet phone services have drawn millions of users looking for rock-
bottom rates. Now they're also attracting identity thieves looking to turn stolen credit
cards into cash. Some Internet phone services allow scam artists to make it appear that
they are calling from another phone number -- a useful trick that enables them to drain
credit accounts and pose as banks or other trusted authorities, online fraud experts say.
"It's like you've handed people an entire phone network," said Lance James, who as chief
technology officer of Secure Science Corp. sees such scams on a daily basis. The
emerging scams underline the lower level of security protecting Voice Over Internet
Protocol, or VOIP, the Internet-calling standard that has upended the telecommunications
industry over the past several years.
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42. Cybersecurity spending estimated to grow to $7.1 billion by 2009 (GovExec.com,
Daniel Pulliam, 18 Mar 2005)
An information technology consulting firm predicted this week that the federal
government will spend $7.1 billion on cybersecurity in fiscal 2009, an increase of 27
percent over the $1.9 billion for fiscal 2005. The report estimates that increased attention
to homeland security will cause the government cybersecurity market to grow 5 percent
annually. The forecast from the Reston, Va.-based IT consulting firm INPUT is another
in a series of reports that show cybersecurity is a rising concern among agency leaders.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
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COUNTERFEIT

43. 36% of Global Counterfeiting is IP Theft: Survey (i-Newswire.com, 15 Mar
2005)
Intellectual property theft (brands, trademarks and copyrights) surged to 36% of global
counterfeiting during the month of February. More than 95% of all counterfeit items
seized by customs, law enforcement and brand enforcement agents related to IP theft,
accounting for $55 Million USD. As reported by Gieschen Consultancy, the total value of
fake items sold and seized was $76.2 Million from 268 incidents.

Calgary, Canada -- Based on the past month of worldwide counterfeit enforcement
activity (investigations, raids, seizures, arrests, charges, convictions, sentences, civil
litigation, public announcements), as reported through the DOPIP Security Counterfeit
Intelligence Report, more than 268 incidents were analyzed from 48 countries.

The most profitable counterfeits (based on seizures and losses):

1. Clothing & Accessories, $38 Million, 21 incidents, average age of the counterfeiter 33.
2. Entertainment & Software, $18.1 Million, 50 incidents, average age 32. (CDs, DVDs,
software, games)
3. Drugs, $12.9 Million, 8 incidents, average age 29. (medicine)
4. Financial Instruments, $4.3 Million, 96 incidents, average age 29. (currency, checks,
money orders, treasury bonds, credit/debit cards)
5. Other Goods, $1.1 Million, 4 incident, average age 38. (golf equipment, pottery,
gambling equipment)
6. Cigarettes, $0.9 Million, 3 incidents, average age 33.
7. Industrial Goods & Supplies (average age 25), Electrical Equipment & Supplies, Food
& Alcohol, Other Documents (average age 38), Identification (average age 36),
Computer Equipment & Supplies, $1 Million, 86 incidents.

For more information: http://www.goldsec.com/Security_Research.htm
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
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44. Global anti-counterfeit group points finger at Canada (Xinhuanet, 17 Mar 2005)
OTTAWA, March 16 - A global anti-counterfeit group has claimed that Canadian market
is a home to fake designer clothes, counterfeit software and countless other fraudulent
goods,it is reported here Wednesday. In a report to the United States Trade
Representative (USTR), the International Anti-Counterfeiting Coalition (IACC) estimates
that "20 percent of the Canadian market is now pirate product," and accuses Canada of
doing little to stop the illegal industry. The USTR already put Canada on its Special 301
Watch List in 2003, a list identifying countries deemed by the United States as failing to
provide adequate protection or enforcement of intellectual property rights.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2005-03/17/content_2707692.htm

45. Scam artists using internet to find victims - Post offices on alert for counterfeit
money orders (Outer Banks Sentinel, 20 Mar 2005)
The United States Postal Service is warning U.S. residents about foreign-based scam
artists attempting to cash counterfeit postal money orders. "We've been informed about
people who have purchased items on online auctions who sent the seller of an item too
many money orders," said Manteo Postmaster Gene Garrison. "The scam artist would
then ask the seller to wire them the difference and would immediately get the cash before
the seller attempted to cash the money order. These situations usually occurred with high-
priced items such as a vehicle." The fraud scheme has been making the rounds through
Internet chat rooms and auction sites, in e-mail messages and over the telephone and has
been costing victims time, money and issues with bank and law officials.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://obsentinel.womacknewspapers.com/articles/2005/03/19/top_stories/tops2873.txt

46. AL: Feds Arrest 22 In Counterfeit Crackdown (NBC13.com, 15 Mar 2005)
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - Twenty-two people -- all but one in their 30s or younger -- have
been indicted on federal counterfeiting charges in a string of cases authorities said
showed a trend toward more youthful money makers than in the past. U.S. Attorney Alice
Martin said Tuesday that individuals are producing real-looking bills that involved the
use of printing presses. Officials said the 22 defendants manufactured more than $20,000
worth of money throughout north Alabama on computers, scanners and ink-jet printers. A
49-year-old Birmingham woman accused of possessing counterfeit bills while trying to
sell methamphetamine is the oldest person charged. The other 21 people were all 39 or
younger, and two were 19.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.nbc13.com/news/4287967/detail.html

47. IN: Counterfeit bills being passed in area (The Madison Courier, 20 Mar 2005)
Counterfeit $10 and $20 bills are being circulated in southern Indiana, according to the
Indiana State Police. In the past few weeks, bills have been passed at convenient marts,
grocery stores and restaurants. Police advise cashiers to be on the alert for the phony
bills. Patrons who receive change also should double-check the bills they receive from
cashiers. Because of the high volume of customers at these types of businesses,
counterfeiters know they can take advantage of the cashiers being busy, police said.
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48. PA: Local Kmart Reports Counterfeit Money Being Wired To Colombia (The
WGAL Channel, 18 Mar 2005)
Some counterfeit money that police say is hard to distinguish from genuine bills recently
turned up in the Susquehanna Valley. The Kmart on Jonestown Road called Lower
Paxton Township police on March 9 to report that someone had wired nine $100 bills to
Colombia. It turns out all the money used for the wire transfer was fake. The counterfeit
money used was hard to detect because it passes all the visible security measures,
including a popular pen test. Investigators said they believe the paper is made in
Colombia. They believe people are turning paper into genuine dollars by using the
counterfeit money to wire dollars back to Colombia.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.thewgalchannel.com/money/4298402/detail.html

49. SC: Number Of Counterfeit Bills Reported Here Called Unusual (The
Greeneville Sun, 19 Mar 2005)
Since the first of the year, a number of counterfeit bills have been reported in this
community. Detective Capt. Terry Webb, of the Greeneville Police Department, said on
Thursday that since Jan. 1, his agency has received 36 reports of counterfeit currency
being passed at local businesses. At the Greene County Sheriff’s Department, Detective
Captain John Huffine said it has received “less than half” of the reports coming to
Greeneville police on counterfeit bills since Jan. 1. The GPD’s Webb said passing of
bogus bills here apparently reached its high point in February, although reports of
counterfeit currency are continuing to “trickle in” this month. Webb said most of the
bogus bills passed in Greeneville have been in $100 and $20 denominations, although
some counterfeit $10 notes and one bogus $1 bill have been found here.
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TECHNOLOGY

50. GAO pushes for bomb detector study (FCW, Aliva Sternstein, 16 Mar 2005)
Transportation officials can do a better job of showing how much money can be saved
with newer bomb detection systems, Congressional auditors said this week. The
Government Accountability Office recommends that the Homeland Security Department
direct the Transportation Security Administration to do a cost-benefit analysis for
installing in-line conveyor-belt explosive detection systems (EDS). GAO also called for
analyzing the feasibility of replacing explosive trace detection (EDT) machines with
stand-alone EDS machines at other airports. In a report released March 15, GAO auditors
wrote that TSA has made “substantial progress” in installing EDS and ETD systems in
the nation’s 450 commercial airports, as mandated by Congress, but many ETD and
minivan-sized EDS machines reside in lobbies, separate from airport baggage conveyor
systems. This ad-hoc solution results in more screeners, a slower throughput rate per hour
and more job injuries than conveyor systems, as workers must physically lug each bag to
and from the stand-alone detectors, auditors found. GAO's study did not evaluate airport
security.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.fcw.com/article88319
51. DHS to use MetaCarta (FCW, Dibya Sarkar, 14 Mar 2005)
Homeland Security Department officials will use an application that mines data for
geographic references that can be depicted on a map. Officials at the Information
Analysis and Infrastructure Protection Directorate recently signed a one-year license to
use a geographic information system application developed by MetaCarta, which is
headquartered in Cambridge, Mass. Randy Ridley, the company’s vice president and
general manager for federal systems, said several software applications provide similar
functions but none can bridge the gap between so-called unstructured content and digital
mapping. About 90 percent of data within an organization is unstructured, such as e-mail
messages, reports, interviews and other documents.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.fcw.com/article88302

52. TSA awards explosive contracts (FCW, Aliya Sternstein, 14 Mar 2005)
The Transportation Security Administration chose General Electric InVision and L-3
Communications to maintain bomb detectors in airports. TSA on March 14 announced
two separate contracts for General Electric InVision and L-3 Communications to
maintain explosive detection systems in the largest U.S. airports. GE’s indefinite
delivery, indefinite quantity in contract is worth up to $36 million, while L-3’s IDIQ
contract has a maximum value of $28 million. Both are four and a half years long. Earlier
this month, Siemens won a four and a half year, $46.9 million deal to maintain explosive
trace detection machines, X-ray machines and metal detectors at all commercial airports.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.fcw.com/article88303

53. Web satisfaction dips (FCW, David Perera, 14 Mar 2005)
The latest quarterly poll of public satisfaction with government Web sites shows a slight
but statistically significant drop compared to December. The release of the University of
Michigan’s American Customer Satisfaction Index finds that overall public satisfaction
with federal Web sites was 71.9 out of a possible score of 100. That’s less than the
satisfaction rating of 72.1 the index found users to have in late 2004. In addition to the
decrease in overall satisfaction number, the proportion of Web sites with declining
satisfaction scores, 35 percent of the total, was greater than the number with increased
scores, 31 percent of the measured total.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.fcw.com/article88294

54. Fla. county secures wireless (FCW, Dibya Sarkar, 16 Mar 2005)
Cautious about the security of its wireless network, a Florida county government has
installed devices in its buildings to detect and prevent wireless intrusion. By using such
devices to secure about 3 million square feet of airspace across 15 of Sarasota County’s
200 buildings, it is easier for information technology personnel to spot any unauthorized
vulnerabilities or attacks on the wireless infrastructure. “This type of government is very
risk-averse,” Bob Hanson, Sarasota County’s chief information officer, said. “We
minimize the risk that occurs through these devices.”
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.fcw.com/article88313

55. TX: Defense shield built in Texas (My San Antonio, 20 Mar 2005)
In secluded shipyards near Corpus Christi and Brownsville, government contractors
quietly are finishing work on a mammoth piece of space-age weaponry. The floating
radar platform, the only one of its kind in the country, will stand 25 stories and weigh 4
million pounds. It will track incoming warheads so that remote rockets might destroy
them. If that sounds familiar, it should. The project is reminiscent in some ways of the
Star Wars missile-defense system President Reagan proposed in 1983. Reagan's proposal,
which would have placed satellites in space capable of shooting down nuclear missiles
with laser beams, largely was criticized both at home and abroad for its potential to derail
arms-control negotiations with the Soviet Union. Critics contended it would lead to a
buildup of weapons in space. While President Bush's missile shield won't rely on space
lasers and particle beams, it will use the latest in radar and rocket technology.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://makeashorterlink.com/?P29F216BA

56. TX: D/FW bags to zip by with new system - $139 million system to check for
explosives to save time, money (The Dallas Morning News, 18 Mar 2005)
The underground system to screen checked bags for explosives at Dallas/Fort Worth
International Airport is expected to save the government about $250 million over the next
seven years, according to a federal report released this week. D/FW is putting the final
touches on the $139 million explosive-detection system that will replace the minivan-
sized machines that have crowded terminal lobbies since 2002. Parts of the system will
begin operating in mid-April. The new conveyor system will save money because it will
require fewer security employees, the report says. The new machines can screen bags
more than twice as fast as the current ones, which require employees to feed in bags by
hand. In addition, the system would cut in half the number of bags that must be opened
for additional screening because new machines will give screeners a clearer look inside
bags to prevent false alarms, the report by the Government Accountability Office said.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://makeashorterlink.com/?S5B0317BA

RESOURCES

57. New Information System Aids Emergency Responders - Personal digital
assistant software can help identify hazardous materials (Dept. of State, 17 Mar
2005)
The National Library of Medicine (NLM), part of the National Institutes of Health, has
released software for personal digital assistants (PDAs) that is designed to help first
responders when they arrive at a hazardous-materials incident, such as a chemical spill.

The Wireless Information System for Emergency Responders (WISER) gives emergency
responders information on hazardous materials (hazmat), including physical
characteristics, human health data, and containment and suppression information,
according to a March 11 NLM press release.
"First responders in general, and Hazmat units in particular, must make decisions quickly
in handling hazardous-materials incidents," said Jack Snyder, NLM Associate Director
for Specialized Information Services. "They need accurate information about hazardous
substances, emergency resources available and surrounding environmental conditions to
save lives and minimize environmental impacts. WISER provides this lifesaving service."

Operational versions of WISER for Palm OS and Pocket PC are available without charge
at http://wiser.nlm.nih.gov/. A desktop version will be available this spring and a Web-
based version is being developed.

WISER is customized for easy navigation and quick access to key information required
by first responders. A useful feature of WISER is support for identifying an unknown
substance.

NLM is collaborating with regional and local emergency response organizations and
using their feedback as input for future enhancements to the software.

58. Decontamination Involving Weapons of Mass Destruction (Firehouse Magazine,
20 Mar 2005)
Incidents involving weapons of mass destruction (WMD) require special consideration
involving decontamination. Many responders believe that the standard wet
decontamination as taught during our hazardous materials response classes is sufficient,
but this is not necessarily the case. Moreover, many believe that a gross decontamination
will suffice in an incident involving mass casualties and WMD, but in some cases this
does not hold true itself. Strategic guidelines must be in place for all departments that
specifically state which forms of decontamination should be used for certain incidents.
The determining factor is the type of agent involved. This article will provide information
to formulate a guide in dealing with some of the potential agents.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://cms.firehouse.com/content/magazine/article.jsp?id=1829

OPPORTUNITIES

59. Terrorism and security college classes spreading (AP, 17 Mar 2005)
DAYTON - The students' hands are up in the air as the classroom discussion at the
University of Dayton heats up over whether it's moral or wise to assassinate terrorist
leaders. Geoff Pipoly, a senior from Sylvania, Ohio, said assassination should not be
ruled out given the terrorist threat to the United States after the 9/11 attacks. "I think we
need a full bag of tools," he said. Pipoly is among 15 students in the class called Human
Rights in the War on Terrorism, which the university started this winter as its second
class on terrorism. Colleges across the country are adding terrorism and homeland
security courses because of student curiosity about the topics and interest in careers in
homeland security.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://makeashorterlink.com/?P2C0127BA
FULL REPORTS

60. U.S., Mexican Officials Open Remodeled Tecate Port of Entry - Updated facility
will provide better border security (Dept. of State, 14 Mar 2005)
An updated Tecate port of entry in eastern San Diego County was officially opened
March 11 by U.S. and Mexican officials, according to the U.S. Customs & Border
Protection (BCP) agency.

The remodeled port of entry, located along the U.S.-Mexico border, features high-
technology tools such as License Plate Readers, Radiation Portal Monitors and Gamma
Ray inspections systems that will enhance border security by facilitating legitimate
commerce and travel "while denying entry to dangerous people and contraband," BCP
said in a March 11 press release. BCP is part of the U.S. Department of Homeland
Security.

The border-station improvements are part of a three-year, $18.8-million construction
projection to modernize the Tecate facility and to provide "safer, more efficient
processing of cross-border passenger, pedestrian and cargo traffic," BCP explained.

Following is the text of the BCP press release, with further details:

(begin text)

U.S. CUSTOMS & BORDER PROTECTION
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday, March 11, 2005

U.S. Customs and Border Protection and Mexican Officials Officially Open Remodeled
Tecate Port Of Entry

SAN DIEGO -- Officials representing U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. General
Services Administration and local government on both sides of the border on Friday,
March 11, officially opened a new, larger and more modern Tecate port of entry in
eastern San Diego County.

In addition to new facilities with five times as much space as before, the remodeled
border station benefits from new high technology tools such as License Plate Readers,
Radiation Portal Monitors and Gamma Ray inspections systems that will provide better
border security.

The official opening ceremony was a community event as children from a Mexican
school sang the Mexican national anthem and a Border Patrol agent sang the U.S.
anthem. A group of Kumeyaay Indians chanted a birdsong to bless the dedication
ceremony and local officials from San Diego and Tecate, Mexico, discussed the
importance of the new facilities.

The improvements are the result of a continuing three-year, $18.8-million construction
project to modernize an aging facility built in 1933 to provide safer, more efficient
processing of cross-border passenger, pedestrian and cargo traffic.

"The traveling public, trade community and indeed the nation will benefit from a more
modern, spacious, secure and technologically sophisticated Tecate port of entry," said
Jayson Ahern, CBP assistant commissioner of field operations in Washington, who
officiated at the ceremony on Friday. "Our officers now possess the enforcement tools
they need to facilitate legal traffic while denying entry to dangerous people and
contraband."

The newly rebuilt port began processing laden cargo trucks entering the U.S. immediately
following the ceremony on Friday morning. Passenger vehicles, pedestrians and empty
commercial truck traffic began using the new facility last month.

The two-phase project to modernize a small three-lane facility built in 1933 will provide
for safer, more thorough and more efficient processing of the over 1 million vehicles and
2.7 million people who annually cross the border at Tecate, officials said.

"This spacious new facility will provide better service to the public as the region
continues to grow," said Adele Fasano, director of field operations for U.S. Customs and
Border Protection in San Diego. "We've finished the first crucial phase of a
comprehensive rebuilding project that, when complete, will offer a modern, safe
environment that incorporates various new technologies to facilitate legitimate traffic and
improve border security."

The former port building, which will be renovated next, is listed on the National Register
of Historic Places. Seventy years ago, it replaced Customs facilities in the adjacent
general store dating to the 1880s, the old adobe ruins of which are still visible to the east
of the facility.

The first phase has created a new port facility that will be used to process truck,
passenger-vehicle and pedestrian traffic. The subsequent phase calls for renovation and
upgrading of the old structure by the summer of 2005 to house additional offices, training
and conference areas, and detention space, officials said. The new facilities, when
complete, will total 20,000 square feet, an increase of over 16,000 square feet over the
old facility.

"The project improves the safety of our officers and the public by separating the various
modes of transportation such as passenger cars, trucks and pedestrians, which up until
now have had to share the existing small facility," said CBP Port Director Paul Henning.
"Historically, we have had room to examine only three cars at the same time in our
secondary inspection area. The new facility has three secondary inspection spaces added,
giving us a total of six."

Additionally, a variety of high-technology tools are being installed to improve border
security. They include Radiation Portal Monitors to passively detect any radiological
sources entering the port; License Plate Readers to record the entry of vehicles; and a
Gamma Ray scanner to non-intrusively inspect the inner areas of cars and trucks for
narcotics or other contraband.

Architecturally, the new administration building matches the historic structure and
includes adequate office space for employees, a pedestrian inspection area and a
processing center for violators. Additionally, the new structure allows for safer secondary
inspection of passenger cars, and a new cargo building will facilitate intensive
examinations of cargo trucks, Henning said.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection is the agency within the Department of Homeland
Security charged with the protection of the nation's borders. CBP unified Customs,
Immigration and Agricultural inspectors and the Border Patrol into one border agency for
the United States.

(end text)

(Distributed by the Bureau of International Information Programs, U.S. Department of
State. Web site: http://usinfo.state.gov)

61. Anti-Corruption Group Targets Construction, Procurement - $300 billion lost
annually to bribery in contracting, report says (by Berta Gomez, Washington File
Staff Writer, 16 Mar 2005)
Washington - Rampant corruption in the construction sector costs at least $300 billion a
year and undermines sustainable development worldwide, says Transparency
International (TI), the leading international anti-corruption organization.

TI's "Global Corruption Report 2005," released March 16, focuses on construction and
post-conflict reconstruction, and includes sections on Iraq, Afghanistan and the countries
devastated by the December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami.

TI chose to concentrate on the construction sector because of the size, complexity and
potentially huge cost of large construction projects -- and because problems in the sector
affect both developed and developing countries, the report said.

The organization found that the construction sector is especially vulnerable to corruption,
the report said. Not only is there fierce competition for major contracts, but the need for
multiple approvals and permits leaves the process open to abuse. The unique nature of
some large projects makes price comparisons difficult, and contractors are often able to
conceal poor-quality work under concrete or cladding, TI said.
Between $3 trillion and $4 trillion are spent on construction procurement annually and TI
estimates that about 10 percent of the total is wasted through bribery and corruption, TI
head of research Robin Hodess said at a March 16 panel discussion in Washington on the
launch of the report.

"The stakes are just very high," she said.

And although TI surveys of business executives worldwide show that construction-
related corruption is a problem in both rich and poor countries, the poorest are affected
most dramatically because crucial infrastructure projects are never completed, or are built
with shoddy equipment and under poor management, Hodess said.

In most cases, she said, "earthquakes do not kill people; collapsing buildings kill people."

TI advisory panel member Peter Vogel said that the organization's estimate that 10
percent of construction spending is lost to corruption is "very misleading." That figure is
a global average and reflects both extreme corruption in some countries and minimal
waste in countries such as Finland, he said.

In some countries, the percentage of construction funds lost to corruption "may be huge"
and procurement practices a form of "daylight robbery," Vogel said. Widespread
corruption in public procurement is one of the reasons there is so little electricity in much
of Africa despite the billions of dollars that have been spent on electrification projects
over the years, he said.

In the chapter on Iraq, the TI report calls for the adoption of more aggressive anti-
corruption measures as the country rebuilds. "Corruption thrives in a context of confusion
and change," the report says. Iraq is especially vulnerable due to its recent history of
conflict, tyranny and mismanagement as well as the sizable reconstruction funds that
have been pledged by the international community.

TI urges the new Iraqi government, coalition forces and international donors to place
more emphasis on decentralizing governance and aid projects and to support Iraq's local
media as an independent watchdog. The report also identifies management of Iraq's oil
revenue as a priority.

"Funds poured into rebuilding countries such as Iraq must be safeguarded against
corruption. Transparency must also be the watchword as donors pledge massive sums for
reconstruction in the countries affected by the Asian tsunami," TI Chairman Peter Eigen
said in a news release accompanying the report.

To coincide with the publication of the "Global Corruption Report, 2005," Transparency
International also launched an international initiative designed to prevent corruption in
construction projects.

The full text of the TI report is available on the Internet.
(The Washington File is a product of the Bureau of International Information Programs,
U.S. Department of State. Web site: http://usinfo.state.gov)

62. DoD Official Outlines Homeland Defense Progress (By Sgt. 1st Class Doug
Sample, USA American Forces Press Service, 16 Mar 2005)
WASHINGTON – Citing the final report of the 9/11 Commission, DoD’s top homeland
defense official cautioned a House subcommittee March 15 that “America can be
attacked in many ways and has many vulnerabilities. No defenses are perfect.”

But Assistant Secretary of Defense Paul McHale also told the lawmakers that the Defense
Department has made the defense of the country the main requirement of the global war
on terrorism, and outlined how it plans to protect the American people.

“There is no ‘home game.’ There is no ‘away game.’ We are engaged in a global conflict.
And in that global conflict, the defense of the U.S. homeland is the pre-eminent duty,”
McHale told the House Terrorism, Unconventional Threat and Capabilities
Subcommittee.

“Therefore, homeland defense must be seen as an integral part of a global, active, layered
defense – a defense in depth – that has as its single goal to secure the United States and
its citizens from attack,” he said.

McHale noted the main elements of DoD’s strategy in the terror war include protecting
the homeland, disrupting and attacking terrorist networks and countering ideological
support for terrorism, “the ideological fight we see as the key to victory.”

In detailing his department’s layered defense for the country, the assistant secretary
outlined specific strategic defenses DoD now has in place. He said the department is
working with other agencies, in particular the Department of Homeland Security, to help
make the country safer.

The department’s plan includes strategies for air, land and sea, he said.

McHale pointed out that the North American Aerospace Defense Command has been
patrolling and monitoring the skies over the United States and Canada daily. He also
noted that since Sept. 11, 2001, more than 39,500 fighter, aerial refueling, and airborne
early-warning sorties have been flown in defense of the United States. Also, more than
1,900 fighter air patrols have responded to unknown aircraft and other suspicious flight
operations.

Maritime defenses have included Navy and Coast Guard ship patrols of U.S. sea
approaches and international waters and territorial seas, McHale said.

“Additionally, in multiple theaters in the global war on terror, the Navy is conducting
maritime interception operations to deter, delay and disrupt the movement of terrorists
and terrorist-related materials at sea before they can reach our shores,” he said. “Over the
course of the last year, the Navy monitored, queried and boarded more than 2,200
merchant vessels.”

On land, he said, the Defense Department is working with civil agencies such as the
Department of Justice, the FBI and other law enforcement agencies at federal, state and
local levels “to identify, track, and capture terrorists who may have penetrated our
nation’s borders.” However, he noted, “in these activities, DoD’s role is to provide
support to civil authorities, when appropriate and as permitted by law.”

DoD’s plan to assist civilian law enforcement agencies goes even further, McHale said,
as the department stands ready to provide “direct defense” to assist civil authorities in the
event of an emergency.

Those defenses include quick- and rapid-reaction forces made up of Army and Marine
units ready to respond to a wide range of potential threats to the country. Also, he said,
several joint task forces have been created to provide consequence management and civil
support to state and local authorities in the case of a crisis or threat, such as weapons of
mass destruction attack.

Joint Task Force Civil Support, with headquarters at Fort Monroe, Va.; Joint Task Force
Consequence Management East, with headquarters at Fort Gillem, Ga.; and Joint Task
Force Consequence Management West, with headquarters at Fort Sam Houston, Texas,
were among many such task forces he mentioned.

McHale emphasized the close working relationship DoD has with the Homeland Security
Department. In 2003, he said, DoD and DHS signed a memorandum of agreement that
authorized detailing some 64 DoD personnel to DHS to fill critical specialties, principally
in the areas of communications and intelligence.

DoD continues to maintain a “24/7 presence” in DHS’ Homeland Security Operations
Center, McHale said, providing planning teams when needed for the DHS Interagency
Incident Management Group – a group of senior federal department and agency officials
focused on incident response.

There is also a DoD advisory and liaison office -- the Homeland Defense Coordination
Office -- within DHS headquarters, he noted.

McHale said DoD also has an important role in DHS plans to protect the nation’s critical
infrastructure. In this capacity, he said, “DoD must work closely with private-sector
owners of critical defense infrastructure to deter, mitigate or neutralize terrorist attacks in
order to sustain military operations.”

Protecting that infrastructure, “is essential to ensuring the mission readiness of our
military forces to protect the United States and to project power globally,” he
emphasized.
Another way DoD is improving homeland defense is by working with the intelligence
community in helping to “maintain maximum awareness of threats to the United States,”
McHale said.

He also expressed confidence that the global war on terrorism would be won. “The
citizens of this nation, its institutions and our brave men and women in uniform have
repeatedly demonstrated the patriotism, toughness, innovation, determination and
resiliency to defeat our enemies while retaining our freedoms,” he said. “There is no
doubt in my mind that those capabilities will be tested against this newest enemy threat –
nor is there any doubt of our inevitable triumph.”

ABOUT CABLE GRAM SOURCES

The CABLE Gram is intended to be non-biased in its news coverage and we strive to use
sources that we consider reliable. For any story that might be considered controversial or
“unbelievable”, we always ensure that more than one reputable news service has included
that story in its’ public offering. It is important for you, the reader, to remember that press
services around the world may interpret news differently than do press services in the
United States. It is equally important to remember that the readers of foreign press
services believe those news stories as readily as we believe stories from US sources. As
defense and security professionals, you know the value of understanding the beliefs of
people we are trying to either protect or protect our citizens from – it’s vital. We do not
endorse any particular publications or coverage, but we certainly feel you need to know
what’s being written.

				
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