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					                                 Rock It Man
             YEAR                      CURRICULUM LEVEL                    NCEA LEVEL
              11                              6                                1



   This unit was created using the NCEA Interactive Unit Planner
AIM:
The aim of this unit is to foster the ability of students to inquire and
reflect on their own and others' values (moral, social, cultural,
aesthetic and economic) and appreciate artistic diversity through
the analysis of a selection of New Zealand contemporary rock and
popular music from a range of styles and genres. Students will also
investigate the historical, social and cultural contexts in which the
music was written and performed. They will also consider and
reflect on how the music studied may influence their own music
creating and making.

DURATION:
20 lessons (approximately)



SUMMARY OF UNIT FOCUSING QUESTIONS:
   What kinds of expression (e.g. personal and group identities, values, musical, extra-musical)
    are found in rock/popular music culture?
   How does New Zealand's rock and popular music reflect the cultural diversity (as found in
    our different cultures, languages and heritages), values and traditions of our inhabitants?
   How will analysing a range of songs from various genres/styles help us to appreciate music
    more and make us more reflective in our own music creating and making?
   How can examining Kiwi rock/popular music help us to learn about our own and others'
    values?
   What processes do we need to learn about to be able to critically evaluate sources of
    information that will help build our understanding of rock/popular music in New Zealand?



SUMMARY OF UNIT LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Students will:

   Listen to, view, read about, research and analyse a range of New Zealand rock/popular
    music from several eras to gain a broad knowledge of the development of New Zealand
    music.
   Reflect on the power/influence of music in helping us to learn about our own and others'
    values.
   Identify features of music (from a selected era in New Zealand rock/popular music history)
    that could be described as particularly 'Kiwi flavoured."
   Listen to, view, read about, research and analyse a range of New Zealand rock/popular
    music from several eras to gain a broad knowledge of the development of New Zealand
    music.
   Consider the knowledge and processes needed to be able to evaluate sources of information
    that will help build more in-depth understanding of New Zealand rock/popular music.
   Explain the main musical features of music (in rock and popular songs) from a selected era
    in New Zealand rock/popular music history.
   Identify key repertoire and artists from a selected era in New Zealand rock/popular music
                                                                                                 2


    history.
   Describe the performance styles of a performer/s from a selected era in New Zealand
    rock/popular music history.
   Consider relationships between rock music, arts, fashion, industry, culture and society in
    New Zealand from particular eras and share ideas about how identity is expressed in popular
    culture.
   Share ideas about how New Zealand rock and popular music reflects the cultural diversity,
    values and traditions found here.
   Analyse the elements and features of selected New Zealand rock/popular songs considering
    beat/tempo, speed/feel, tone colours, rhythm, melody, key, compositional devices,
    from/structure, mood/impact/meaning and production techniques.
   Apply knowledge of the features and stylistic conventions of a range of New Zealand rock
    and popular music through an integration of aural perception and practical and theoretical
    skills.
   Recall (sing or play back, and/or notate) rhythm patterns, without syncopation, of four bars
    length in simple time (2/4, 3/4 or 4/4).
   Recall (sing back or play back, and/or notate) melodies of four bars length in a major key.
   Identify (orally or in written form) chords I, IV, V and VI in a major key.
   Present a case study from one category of New Zealand music, one aspect of case study in
    detail, and an individual profile of one musician from the case study.
   Consider how new learnings from this unit of work may helps us to interpret music with
    depth and provide models for future music creating and making.


         ACHIEVEMENT OBJECTIVES: MUSIC - SOUND ARTS


                                                 Students will:


                                                       Level 6: analyse music from a range of
Understanding Music - Sound Arts in Context             sound environments, styles, and
                                                        genres, in relation to historical, social,
                                                        and cultural contexts.
                                                       Level 6: consider and reflect on the
                                                        influence of music in their own music
                                                        making and in their lives.


                                                 Students will:


Communicating and Interpreting in Music -              Level 6: reflect on the expressive
Sound Arts                                              qualities of music and evaluate their
                                                        own and others' music, both live and
                                                        recorded.


                                                 Students will:


                                                       Level 6: apply knowledge of expressive
Developing Practical Knowledge in Music -               features, stylistic conventions, and
Sound Arts                                              technologies through an integration of
                                                        aural perception and practical and
                                                        theoretical skills and describe how they
                                                        are used in a range of music.
                                                                                                   3


ACTIVITY ONE (2-3 lessons)

Focusing Question

   What kinds of expression (e.g. personal and group identities, values, musical, extra-
    musical) are found in rock/popular music culture?

Learning Outcomes


   Listen to, view, read about, research and analyse a range of New Zealand rock/popular
    music from several eras to gain a broad knowledge of the development of New Zealand
    music.
   Reflect on the power/influence of music in helping us to learn about our own and others'
    values.
   Identify features of music (from a selected era in New Zealand rock/popular music
    history) that could be described as particularly 'Kiwi flavoured."

Activity 1a

Introduce the unit of work on New Zealand rock/popular music by asking students to list their
Top NZ 10 rock/popular songs of all time. Ask them to give reasons for their choices. Have
them complete the values reflection, below. Consider playing a range of songs (eg from
Nature’s Best CD) and use the copy-master from "Sweet II: Another Taste of New Zealand
Music" in order for students to record their impressions, especially if they are unfamiliar with
key repertoire.

Assessment Approach – Reflecting on our values

SELF-REFLECTION: What do I value in NZ rock/popular music that has influenced my choice?
(e.g. driving beat, melody, instrumentation, lyric content, artist presentation, song video,
and artist‟s 'real life' actions.) Why might this be so? (Consider influence of parents, peers,
and the media.)



Activity 1b

Locate the APRA Top 100 NZ songs of all time: http://www.sergent.com.au/apratop100.html
and listen to the Top 10 Songs. In groups of 5, ask students to suggest criteria that may
explain the APRA Top 10 ranking. Share perspectives with the class. In different groups of 5,
use one of the criteria shared by a group, or develop new criteria to come up with a clearly
defined Top 10 listing that everyone in the group agrees matches the criteria.
Share the criteria (and perhaps ranking of songs known) with the class. Have students
complete the reflection, below.

Assessment Approach – Relating to Others & Participating & Contributing

SELF-REFLECTION: I contributed to my group's creation of a selection criteria for explaining
the APRA Top 10 ranking by:
                                              5         4          3           2           1

1. staying on task

2. encouraging others to stay on task

3. accepting other people's ideas
                                                                                                 4


4. challenging other people's ideas

5. negotiating and/or clarifying other's ideas

Rate yourself out of 5 for each using: 5=always; 4=mostly; 3=sometimes; 2=rarely;
1=never. Describe your actions (evidence) that led you to making decisions about how you
scored yourself.

Activity 1c

Share ideas and discuss the notion of IDENTITY. Share ideas about the identities of students'
favourite bands/artist. Consider the following questions as part of a classroom or small group
discussion - How is identity expressed through music and lyrics, the artists' image or the
artist's image through the lens of the media? How do we define our own identity? How do we
define the identity of others - what indicators might we use? What is the relationship between
influence and identity? Consider viewing a You Tube video on 'Influence and Identity':
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRDzyT3ogjE&feature=related
Is identity an individual or a group phenomenon? Does identity remain static or does it
change - how, why? How is „New Zealand-ness‟ or what it means to be a New Zealander
expressed in rock/popular music? What songs can you think of are particularly kiwi
flavoured? Why?

Assessment Approach - Thinking

SELF-REFLECTION: As you listened, contributed to and thought about the discussion on
identity, think about your own attitudes, values, skills and ways of seeing the world. In this
discussion, were you:

1. Self-aware - acknowledging when your thinking may have been influenced by self-interest,
others or your emotions?

5       4        3       2        1

2. Genuine - being honest in what you believe to be true?

5       4        3       2        1

3. Careful and prudent - knowing your own ideas; not being judgemental when others
present new ideas and information?

5       4        3       2        1

4. Curious and inquisitive - looking for reasons, new meanings to broaden your
understanding?

5       4        3       2        1

5. Logical - not jumping to conclusions, but using the information presented to make sense of
things?

5       4        3       2        1

6. Creative - offering alternative insights or suggesting new ways of thinking about things?

5       4        3       2        1

Rate yourself for each using: 5=always; 4=mostly; 3=sometimes; 2=rarely; 1=never.
Share with a partner what actions (evidence) led you to how you to decide on your scoring.
                                                                                                5



ACTIVITY TWO (4-5 lessons)

Focusing Question

   How does New Zealand's rock and popular music reflect the cultural diversity (as found in
    our different cultures, languages and heritages), values and traditions of our inhabitants?

Learning Outcomes

   Listen to, view, read about, research and analyse a range of New Zealand rock/popular
    music from several eras to gain a broad knowledge of the development of New Zealand
    music.
   Consider the knowledge and processes needed to be able to evaluate sources of
    information that will help build more in-depth understanding of New Zealand rock/popular
    music.
   Explain the main musical features of music (in rock and popular songs) from a selected
    era in New Zealand rock/popular music history.
   Identify key repertoire and artists from a selected era in New Zealand rock/popular music
    history.
   Describe the performance styles of a performer/s from a selected era in New Zealand
    rock/popular music history.
   Consider relationships between rock music, arts, fashion, industry, culture and society in
    New Zealand from particular eras and share ideas about how identity is expressed in
    popular culture.
   Share ideas about how New Zealand rock and popular music reflects the cultural diversity,
    values and traditions found here.

Activity 2a

Listen to and view (on video or DVD) a variety of NZ rock/popular music from the 1960s to
the present day. Consider using the MoE/NZ Music Industry Commission resource Give It A
Whirl. For each song listened to and/or viewed, get students to share their first impressions
and analyse the characteristic musical features of each song. Use the 'Listen' copy-master
from "Sweet II: Another Taste of New Zealand Music" for students to record their ideas and
observations. Consider modeling the analysis of several songs and then have student
complete analyses in groups, then pairs and then individually. Share back ideas.

Assessment Approach – Managing Self

ANALYSIS SELF-REFLECTION:
1. I am able to get to grips with the meanings of lyrics. What strategies do you use to help
  you understand lyric content (eg. text analysis, relating text to emotion of the music.
  through talking with others, specific literacy strategies.)
  5        4          3          2           1

2. I am able to analyse the structure/form of songs.
   5         4         3         2          1


3. I am able to sing or playback or notate the melody of songs.
   5         4         3         2           1

4. I am able to hear or work out the chords used in songs.
   5         4         3         2          1

5. I am able to say what recording techniques are used in songs (eg. reverb, distortion, EQ
                                                                                                 6


  etc.)
   5         4        3           2          1
Circle the number which best represents your responses using: 5=with ease; 4=most of the
time; 3=sometimes; 2=rarely; 1=never.
From this, consider goals that will help you to improve in aspects where you need to. What
strategies might be helpful for you to improve? (e.g. working in groups, practise in specific
aspects etc.)



Activity 2b

Consider the images and messages that rock and pop videos portray. Get students, in
groups, to imagine they were in a rock band about to make a music video for TV or the web.
Decide what style of music the band plays, the target audience, and then consider what 'look
and feel' they want for the video to effectively portray the image and message to their target
audience.

Focus on NZ rock and popular of the 1970s. This was the time of growth in the pub band
culture. Discuss the musical and social impact of pubs being open later as opposed to the six
o'clock closing during the 1960s. What were the pros and cons of the 'six o'clock swill'?

Assessment Approach – Participating and Contributing

SELF-REFLECTION: I contributed to my group's creation of a music video concept and
contributed to classroom discussion by:
   1. staying on task
   2. encouraging others to stay on task
   3. accepting other people's ideas
   4. challenging other people's ideas
   5. negotiating and/or clarifying other's ideas
   6. contributing my own ideas
   7. making connections to what we have learned so far in this unit of work

Give yourself a score out of 5 for each. 5=always; 4=mostly; 3=sometimes; 2=rarely;
1=never.
Describe your actions (evidence) that led you to making decisions about how you scored
yourself.



Activity 2c

View a variety of music videos from the 1970s - especially by Space Waltz, Dragon, Split Enz,
Shona Laing, Netherworld Dancing Toys and Hello Sailor. Divide students into 4-5 groups or
pairs. Ask each group/pair to select one of the following topics: 1. Rock/pop music in NZ in
the 1970s; 2. The visual or the fine arts in NZ during the 1970s; 3. Fashion in NZ during the
1970s; 4. The NZ Music Industry in NZ in the 1970s; OR 5. NZ culture and society during the
1970s.
Use MOE resources, Digistore, year-books and the internet to support the students as they
research information about their topic. Each group/pair is to give a five-minute presentation
to the class on what they found out in relation to their topic.

Assessment Approach – Critically Evaluating Sources of Information

RESEARCH SELF OR GROUP REFLECTION:
1. I/We chose the topic because ...
2. I/We collected information from the following source(s): ...
                                                                                                 7


3. The most valuable sources of information for my/our research was ... because ...
4. I/We selected information from our sources by ...
5. I/We found the most useful sources were ... because ...

Activity 2d

Follow this up with an in-class discussion where students consider the relationships between
rock music, arts, fashion, industry and culture and society in New Zealand during the 1970s.
Students may also want to make such links with rock music and other aspects of culture in
the present day. Get them to talk to relations and friends about this and follow up with a
further discussion that draws in other perspectives.
Share ideas, debate and discuss how New Zealand rock/popular music reflects the cultural
diversity, values and traditions found here now. Ask students to keep notes from the
discussion to help them prepare for Task 1 of AS 90017. Share this task with students so that
they may begin preparations for completing it. Refer to page 15.

Assessment Approach - Relating to Others & Participating & Contributing

DISCUSSION SELF-REFLECTION:
In this discussion, I was able to:

                                                        5       4       3        2       1
1. Recognise other people's points of view

2. See the relationships, links with other ideas

3. Listen when I needed to

4. Challenge others' ideas respectfully

5. See the bigger picture

6. Expand on my own knowledge and understandings

Rate yourself out of 5 for each using: 5=with ease; 4=most of the time; 3=sometimes;
2=rarely; 1=never.
Consider the aspects that you scored highly in. What has helped you to relate to others so
effectively? Share your ratings with a peer - do they agree with you? Why/why not?



ACTIVITY THREE (6-8 lessons)

Focusing Question

   How will analysing a range of songs from various genres/styles help us to appreciate
    music more and make us more reflective in our own music creating and making?

Learning Outcomes

   Analyse the elements and features of selected New Zealand rock/popular songs
    considering beat/tempo, speed/feel, tone colours, rhythm, melody, key, compositional
    devices, from/structure, mood/impact/meaning and production techniques.
   Apply knowledge of the features and stylistic conventions of a range of New Zealand rock
    and popular music through an integration of aural perception and practical and theoretical
    skills.
   Recall (sing or play back, and/or notate) rhythm patterns, without syncopation, of four
    bars length in simple time (2/4, 3/4 or 4/4).
                                                                                                  8


   Recall (sing back or play back, and/or notate) melodies of four bars length in a major key.
   Identify (orally or in written form) chords I, IV, V and VI in a major key.

Activity 3a

Cooperatively analyse a range of songs from 'The Little Black Kiwi Songbook' to co-construct
deeper understandings about the music and lyric content, and in particular focusing on the
kinds of values embedded within lyrics:

1. Listen to 'French Letter' several times. Use the 'Listen' copy-master from "Sweet II:
Another Taste of New Zealand Music" for students to record their ideas and observations.
Discuss the meaning of the lyrics. Consider how the message in this song reflects individual
and collective values regarding a nuclear free New Zealand. What might be the moral, social,
political and economic implications of holding such values?
Listen to the song 'There is No Depression in New Zealand'. What connections, if any, are
there between this song (musically and lyrics-wise) and 'French Letter'?

2. Listen to 'I'll Say Goodbye (Even Tho I'm Blue)' several times. Use the 'Listen' copy-master
from "Sweet II: Another Taste of New Zealand Music" for students to record their ideas and
observations. Discuss the meaning of the lyrics with the students. have them sing along with
the song. Get them to try and work out the melody of the chorus, which starts on E and is in
E major. Have them work out the chord sequence for the chorus, which uses A, B, E and
C#m. In pairs - using a guitar and voice (or a keyboard) - get them to put the melody and
chords together. Have them try the verses once they have experienced success with the
chorus.
Consider recreating the songs as a class or in several groups. Try the song in F or Eb major.

3. Listen to 'Violent' several times. Use the 'Listen' copy-master from "Sweet II: Another
Taste of New Zealand Music" for students to record their ideas and observations. Discuss the
meaning of the lyrics with the students. Have them sing along with the song. Get them to try
and work out the melody of the chorus, which starts on F and is in C major. Have them work
out the chord sequence for the chorus, which uses Eb, F, Bb and C. In pairs - using a guitar
and voice (or a keyboard) - get them to put the melody and chords together. Have them try
the verses once they have experienced success with the chorus.
Consider recreating the songs as a class or in several groups. Try the song in D major.

4. Listen to 'April Sun in Cuba' several times. Use the 'Listen' copy-master from "Sweet II:
Another Taste of New Zealand Music" for students to record their ideas and observations.
Discuss the meaning of the lyrics with the students. What connections, if any, are there
between this song (musically and lyrics-wise) and 'French Letter' or 'There is No Depression
in New Zealand'? Have them sing along with the song. Get them to try and work out the
melody of the chorus, which starts on F# and is in D major. Have them work out the chord
sequence for the chorus, which begins on G (maj7). In pairs - using a guitar and voice (or a
keyboard) - get them to put the melody and chords together. Have them try the verses once
they have experienced success with the chorus. Consider recreating the songs as a class or in
several groups. Try the song in another key.

Consider using similar processes to examine and analyse some of the following songs:
'Bring Change' by Shapeshifter from the album 'Soulstice' (p28);
'Dance All Around the World' by Blerta (p34)
'Long White Cross' by Pluto (p79)
'No Ordinary Thing' by Op Shop (p92)
'One Step Ahead' by Split Enz (p98)
'Reverse Resistance' by King Kapisi (p120)
'Verona' by Elemeno P (p146)

Assessment Approach – Managing Self
                                                                                                   9


ANALYSIS SELF-REFLECTION:
1. I am able to get to grips with the meanings of lyrics. What strategies do you use to help
  you understand lyric content (eg. text analysis, relating text to emotion of the music.
  through talking with others, specific literacy strategies.)
  5         4          3          2           1

2. I am able to analyse the structure/form of songs.
  5         4         3          2         1

3. I am able to sing or playback or notate the melody of songs.
  5         4          3         2          1

4. I am able to hear or work out the chords used in songs.
  5         4         3         2          1

5. I am able to say what recording techniques are used in songs (eg. reverb, distortion, EQ
  etc.)
  5         4         3         2          1

Circle the number which best represents your responses using: 5=with ease; 4=most of the
time; 3=sometimes; 2=rarely; 1=never.
From this, consider the goals that you decided on in Activity 2a. How have you improved?
What strategies helped you to improve? (e.g. working in groups, practise in specific aspects
etc.)



Activity 3b

Practise comparative analyses of songs using the 'Compare' copy-master in "Sweet II:
Another Taste of New Zealand Music". This will enable students to prepare for Task 2 of AS
90017. See page 15. Give out the task at completion of this activity. Students must complete
individual analysis of two songs not cooperatively analysed in class.

Consider using any of the songs analysed in Activity 3b, or any other TWO songs from 'The
Little Black Kiwi Songbook' (ensuring that they are in 2/4, 3/4 or 4/4 and that they are in
keys up to and including three sharps or three flats) for assessing Element 1 of US 18816.
You may need to consider transposing the songs. Melodies need to include intervals that fall
within the octave only. Chords to assessed are I, IV, V and VI. If the song uses chords
outside of this range, then supply these to the students. Refer to assessment tasks on page
21.

Assessment Approach – Managing Self: Preparing for US 18816

After having tried to work out melodies and chords of songs that we have listened to and
analysed in class, I need to set goals for working towards US 18816. Write 3 goals focused
on:

1. Recalling a 4 bar rhythm - can I do this by ear and clap back? Can I represent this
   graphically? Can I write this out using traditional notation? Do I find this easy, moderately
   difficult or really challenging? Why is this so?
2. Recalling a 4 bar melody - can I do this by ear and sing or playback? Can I represent this
   graphically? Can I write this out using traditional notation? Do I find this easy, moderately
   difficult or really challenging? Why is this so?
3. Recalling a chord progression - can I identify chords I, IV, Vi and VI and/or play them back
   on a guitar or keyboard? Do I find this easy, moderately difficult or challenging?
   Why is this so?
4. What do I need to do now? (What strategies will I use to improve my ability?) What is the
   time-frame I have set to achieve this? What resources will I use to help me achieve my
                                                                                                  10


    goals?




ACTIVITY FOUR (4-5 periods)


Focusing Questions

   How can examining Kiwi rock/popular music help us to learn about our own and others'
    values?
   What processes do we need to learn about to be able to critically evaluate sources of
    information that will help build our understanding of rock/popular music in New Zealand?

Learning Outcomes

   Present a case study from one category of New Zealand music, one aspect of case study
    in detail, and an individual profile of one musician from the case study.
   Consider how new learnings from this unit of work may helps us to interpret music with
    depth and provide models for future music creating and making.

Prepare students for their case study, as a requirement of US 12831. Before they begin work
on the case study, they will need to submit a short (250 words) report outlining:
• how and why they have selected the category for the case study
• the resources they will use, and how will obtain access to these
• personnel support required (e.g. teacher(s), librarian, etc.)
• music required for listening and analysis (Recordings, scores)
• support agencies they may contact to help them in their work (e.g. SOUNZ)
• decide how they will present their work and why?
• A description of the process they will undertake to complete the case study – this might
include a time-line with the goals they need to work towards, when they will achieve these
and how they will achieve these.

Discuss the categories of case study available to the students: Maori music OR Ethnic music
other than Maori (e.g. Pacific Island, Asian, Fijian Indian) OR Popular music OR Art music
(e.g. „ serious‟ /contemporary music – choral, orchestral, chamber, electronic etc) OR Music
Industry (e.g. Film/TV/radio music, music engineers, music in the media, song writers etc),
emphasising that Popular Music, the Music Industry and perhaps Maori or Polynesian music
best reflects the categories studied in this unit. Make available to the students the resources
listed in this unit. Have students work in groups to research, using the internet, the music
examples they might use in their case study. Consider presenting information on the various
industry agencies that support the case study topic the students have selected.

Show students how to reference the materials (using APA -
http://citationmachine.net/index.php?reqstyleid=) they access and use information from:
When recording where they have got their information from – they should follow the format
below:
Acknowledge the source of all ideas, words and images copied (quoted from), paraphrased or
adapted. Abusing intellectual property is THEFT.
Referencing involves stating:
• WHO it belongs to
• WHAT it‟ s called
• WHERE it was found

Lead a discussion on how best to present the case study. Students may choose from 1.
Seminar with music examples that you will share with others; 2. Booklet with a list of music
examples that you have listened to; 3 Script for a C4 or MTV programme; 4. Website, blog or
                                                                                                11


wiki; 5. CD Rom or 6. Radio programme. Consider the pros and cons of each presentation
method asking students to share ideas on this. Provide students with starters or questions to
consider for each aspect in each of the three elements being assessed. Refer to the US12831
Task and Schedule on the Arts Online Teacher Resource Exchange. See
http://arts.unitec.ac.nz/resource-exchange/view_resource.php?res=273

Ensure that students have set a time-frame for working towards the various aspects in the
assessment, considering what they will need to do and where they might get information or
ideas from. Share work in progress and provide time for students to share with each other
and time for questions. Refer to assessment tasks on page 24.

Create a work-plan that will enable you to manage your time and preparation for achieving
the three elements for US12831.

Element 1: Present a case study of one category of New Zealand music.
1.1 Presentation provides brief chronological overview of study, including significant
musicians and their contributions.
• How will you obtain this information and how will you present it?
1.2 Presentation describes significant musical characteristics of selected study, including
repertoire and performance style.
• How will you decide what the significant musical features are - through listening, research,
reviews?
1.3 Presentation identifies features, which may be described as specifically „ New Zealand‟.
• How will you decide what is specifically 'New Zealand' - performance style, lyric content,
talking to others?

Element 2: Present one aspect of the case study in detail.
2.1 Presentation provides brief overview of aspect.
• What will you include in your overview?
2.2 Presentation identifies at least three musical features of aspect in terms of their
significance to aspect and case study.
• How will you decide on what musical features are significant?
2.3 Presentation identifies at least three musicians of aspect in terms of their contributions to
aspect and case study.
• What criteria will you use to select three significant musicians?

Element 3: Present an individual profile of one musician from the case study.
3.1Presentation provides historical setting of musician, including major influences on
musician‟ s musical output.
• Where will you locate this information and how will you know what the major influences
might be?
3.2 Presentation provides brief musical biography of musician.
• What will you include? Leave out?
3.3 Presentation evaluates contribution of musician to New Zealand music history.
• What criteria will you use to decide this?

In groups, write descriptors for the kind of evidence you will provide for each element, which
you deem fair and reasonable in order to gain an achievement for each element. For
example: 3.2 Clear and concise information on the training, experience, compositions and/or
performances of the chosen musician will be provided.

PERSONAL REFLECTION:
How has discussing, researching, analysing and playing a range of New Zealand rock/popular
music helped you in your learning?
Think about:
1. Your understanding of the development of NZ rock/popular music;
2. The kinds of things that NZ songwriters write and sing about;
3. How songs are put together or structured;
                                                                                                 12


 4. How you might apply what you have learned in your own performing and composing;
 5. How the choice of musical style from an artist can affect the way we feel and relate to that
    music;
 6. What you have learned about yourself and others throughout this unit.




KEY TERMINOLOGY
Students may want to add their won definitions to the following terms:


 Term                         Definition

 elements and musical         Elements are the key ingredients of music (e.g. beat, rhythm,
 features                     pitch, tempo, tone colour or timbre, dynamics). Composers
                              feature these in distinctive and unique ways in their
                              compositions.

 musical                      The way that composers use the elements and language of
 features/characteristics     music is distinctive and therefore their music often displays
                              particular musical features or characteristics that are
                              „fingerprints‟ of their style.

 performance style            The performance conventions that are associated with a
                              particular style of music and that affect how a musical work is
                              interpreted and presented.

 compositional devices        Devices used in constructing a piece of music (e.g. motif,
                              phrase, sequence, repetition, variation, cadence).


 genre                        A broad category of music (e.g., rock, jazz, choral music); or a
                              particular type of music that has a tradition or history and is
                              identifiable by specific characteristics (e.g. the sonata, rock
                              opera)




     SUMMARY OF KEY COMPETENCIES EMBEDDED IN UNIT

  Thinking           Consider the kinds of values that are expressed through rock/popular
                     music in New Zealand and how this contributes to a wider understanding
                     of the music. Consider how personal experiences and challenges to our
                     own personal values system can be a stimulus for creative thought and
                     action. Consider personal goals in music and how the knowledge shared
                     and built upon in this unit may be integrated into own personal practice,
                     identity and expertise.

  Participating      Consider how sharing ideas with others helps to build our own
  and                perspectives. Consider how respecting other people's ideas builds our
  contributing       capacity to listen more intently, recognise different points of view and
                     negotiate solutions. Consider how the way we relate to others in
                     discussion can challenge our own thinking and lead to new approaches,
                     ideas and ways of thinking.
                                                                                                13


 Using               Consider how lyrics and music combine to express and communicate
 language,           ideas, emotions and experiences. Consider how the language of music
 symbols, and        and its symbolic representation are to communicate musical
 texts               understandings. Consider how choice of musical language can affect the
                     way people feel and relate to music. Consider how music can help us to
                     tap into experiences, thoughts and actions and help us to make meaning
                     in our lives.

 Managing self       Consider readiness for assessment, particularly US 18816, deciding in
                     consultation with the teacher, preparation and readiness for playback
                     aural tasks. Consider how we set personal goals, make work plans and
                     manage our time to meet work goals in order to achieve and experience
                     success. Consider the effectiveness of the strategies we devise to help us
                     reach our goals and our disposition to ask for help and support from our
                     peers and teachers when we need to.

 Relating to         Consider our ability to effectively listen to what others say in and through
 others              their music to help us recognise other ways of being. Consider how we
                     share ideas with our peers, which can lead to the creation of new
                     understandings, approaches and ideas.




RESOURCES

Print

       New Zealand Music Industry Commission & Ministry of Education. (2002, 2004). Sweet:
        A Taste of New Zealand Music, and Sweet II: Another Taste of New Zealand Music.
        (Book, CD, poster, and CD-ROM).
       New Zealand Music Industry Commission & Ministry of Education (2005). Making Music:
        Te Puoro: New Zealand musicians play their songs and talk about their work. (Book and
        videos).
       New Zealand Music Industry Commission (2004). Give it a Whirl. Wellington: Learning
        Media. (Book, videos and DVD).
       Peter, S. (Ed.). (2007). The Little Black Kiwi Songbook. Victoria: Wise Publications.
       Dix, J. (2005). Stranded in paradise: New Zealand rock and roll 1955 to the modern era,
        Auckland: Penguin.
       Eggleton, D. (2003). Ready to fly: the story of New Zealand rock music. Nelson: Craig
        Potton Publishing.
       Spittle, G. (1997). Counting the beat: a history of New Zealand song. Wellington: GP
        Publications.
       Staff, B., Ashley, S. (2002). For the record: a history of the recording industry in New
        Zealand. Auckland: David Bateman.

Arts Online

       Teacher Resource Exchange – AS 90017 Task and Schedule
        http://arts.unitec.ac.nz/resource-exchange/view_resource.php?res=351
       Teacher Resource Exchange - US 18816 Task and Schedule
        http://arts.unitec.ac.nz/resource-exchange/view_resource.php?res=273
       Teacher Resource Exchange - US 12831 Task & Schedule
        http://arts.unitec.ac.nz/resource-exchange/view_resource.php?res=272
       Teacher Resource Exchange - US 12831: Student Workbook and Mark-sheet
        http://arts.unitec.ac.nz/resource-exchange/view_resource.php?res=280
                                                                                          14


     Teacher Resource Exchange - Counting the Beat
      http://arts.unitec.ac.nz/resource-exchange/view_resource.php?res=295

Web Resources

     NZ Musician - www.nzmusician.co.nz
     NZ History - www.nzhistory.net.nz/the_history_classroom
     NZ Music Month - www.nzmusicmonth.co.nz
     NZ Music Chart - www.lovemusic.co.nz
     NZ On Air - www.kiwihits.co.nz
     NZ Music Month: 2005 - www.tki.org.nz/r/hot_topics/nzmm_e.php
     NZ Music - www.noizyland.com/
     More on NZ Music - www.cheeseontoast.co.nz
     My Space Music - www.myspace.com/
     NZ Music Services Directory - www.musicnz.co.nz/
     Centre for NZ Music - www.sounz.org.nz
     NZ Music Industry Commission - www.nzmusic.org.nz/
     APRA - www.apra.co.nz/
     RIANZ - www.rianz.org.nz/rianz/rianz_homepage.asp
      APRA Top 10 of all time - http://www.sergent.com.au/apratop100.html
     TVNZ On Demand - http://tvnzondemand.co.nz/
     Christchurch Gig Scene - http://www.christchurchmusic.org.nz/
     NZ Music of the 60s, 70s and 80s - www.sergent.com.au/nzmusic.html
     Music Industry Related Stuff - www.stuff.co.nz/4355865a1860.html
     Links to Alternative NZ Rock - www.scaruffi.com/vol6/geo.html
     Failsafe Records site - www.failsaferecords.com/history/intro.htm
     NCEA Programme Planning - http://arts.unitec.ac.nz/resources/planning/ncea/
     NCEA Planning and Assessment Resources -
      http://arts.unitec.ac.nz/resources/NCEA/Music/

School/Community Resources

     Community Artists for Education - http://arts.unitec.ac.nz/arts-cafe/
     Artists in Schools Project - http://arts.unitec.ac.nz/artistsinschools/
     There may be Kiwi music buffs on your staff that may be a valuable source of knowledge
      and inspiration!

Other Resources

     New Zealand Music Downloads - http://music.download.com/2001-8601_32-0.html
     Freeware and Software - http://arts.unitec.ac.nz/resources/ict/Music/
     Commercial Resources - http://arts.unitec.ac.nz/resources/commercial/Music/
     Software for Learning - http://www.tki.org.nz/r/ict/software/
     Digistore - http://www.tki.org.nz/r/digistore/


TEACHER BACKGROUND READING
   Assessing in the Arts
     http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/arts/whatmeasure.asp
   Strategies for Success: Engaging Students in Secondary Schools
     http://www.cal.org/resources/digest/0003strategies.html
   Effective Instructional Practices Enhance Student Achievement
     http://www.ncela.gwu.edu/pubs/forum/1604.htm
   Gender Bias in Education
     http://www.edchange.org/multicultural/papers/genderbias.html
   Te Kotahitanga
     http://www.minedu.govt.nz/index.cfm?layout=document&documentid=8771&data=l&go
                                                                                 15


   to=00-01#P27_4452
 Towards Making Achieving Cool: Achievement in Multi Cultural High Schools (AIMHI)
   http://www.minedu.govt.nz/index.cfm?layout=document&documentid=6146&indexid=4
   329&indexparentid=2107
 Pasifika Friendly Pedagogy: Relationship Building and Cultural Inclusiveness
   http://english.unitecnology.ac.nz/resources/units/pacific_pride/pedagogy.html
                                                                                               16



   ONGOING ASSESSMENT TOWARDS ACHIEVING AS 90017
         Demonstrate knowledge of music works

 Achievement Standard           90017      Version     2          Level       1

 Assessment Mode                Internal   Credits     4          Due Date



Submission Requirements
Students will submit their response to both tasks on their own written paper. They may use a
template in the form of a comparative table, supplied by the teacher, for Task 2
Note: This assessment contributes evidence towards the final grade of Achievement Standard
90017 (Music 1.6). The final grade will be determined on completion of this activity and an
assessment activity involving score analysis.

CONDITIONS
Pre-requisites: There are no pre-requisites or co-requisites for AS 90017. Duration: 4-5 weeks
Homework: Regular homework will be required for both tasks for AS 90017.
Presentation of Work: For Task 1 of AS 90017 students must present their work in written
paragraphs. For Task 2, students must use a comparative analysis template provided.

Assessment for AS 90017 will come towards the end of a unit of teaching and learning on rock
and popular music in New Zealand, Aotearoa. Students must have had the opportunity to have
listened to, discussed and analysed a range of Kiwi rock and popular music from the 1960s
through to the present day. They should also have had the opportunity to research, debate and
discuss the relationship between rock music, arts, fashion, industry, culture and society in New
Zealand during this period. Through doing this, students will explore the values that underpin
the beliefs of individuals and groups who are involved in the creative industries. Task 1 for AS
90017 requires classroom time - opportunity should be given for students to access information
and discuss and debate points researched. Task 2 for AS 90017 requires classroom and
homework time. Audio recordings should be made available to the students
                                                                                                     17


       AS 90017 – Demonstrate knowledge of music works

                                    STUDENT TASKS:

Students must present evidence of their response to the following two tasks.

Task 1: Historical Context – Kiwi Rock Music from a Selected Era - This task requires students
to select a particular era in NZ rock music history (i.e. the 60s, 70s, 80s, 90s or 00s) and
demonstrate their knowledge of the significant musical characteristics of this era, including key
musicians/bands, repertoire and performance style/s and to identify any musical features that
may be specifically identified as being „ kiwi‟ .
This task is to be completed in class over 1 week.

Choose a particular era in NZ rock music history (i.e. the 60s, 70s, 80s, 90s or 00s).

Find out about this particular era. Listen to some music from this period. Carry out some
research into the era using texts and websites suggested by your teacher, and any other
resources you find. Consider the relationship between rock music, arts, fashion, culture and
society in New Zealand during this period. Keep notes of any points you find that are relevant –
you will need these to answer the task below.

Once you have completed the above, demonstrate your knowledge of Kiwi rock/popular music
from this era.
Explain the:
• Main musical features of the music from the chosen era. This should be a broad general
statement. Eg in NZ pop music of the 19xxs, the music was usually simple and catchy. Songs
were short and had predictable structures. There were many solo acts. Rock n‟ roll still had an
influence on the styles of the music in terms of instruments used. NZ musicians tended to copy
what was happening overseas, and there was very little originality…
Write a one to two pages of A4 on this.
• The sort of repertoire from this era – list the key pieces of music and artists and say why you
think they were important. You may like to consider referring to the musical content of pieces to
back up your comments on the musical features you have described in the first bullet. You may
do this by: annotating a score, providing a recording accompanied by notes that explain the
musical features and clearly refer to sections of the music using timings. E.g. From 1‟ 12” – 1”
45” you can hear the „ ice cream‟ chord progression.
Write two pages of A4 on this.

• The performance style/s in this era – if you can, view videos of performances and describe the
style of the music (eg soul) and the on-stage style of the performer(s) (eg Ray Columbus and
the Invaders – these performers were static on stage, except for the classic 60s head
movement. Dance movements were not innovative, and reflected learnt patterns with very little
original, „ free‟ movement. Dress codes were very formal, reflecting the fact that NZ was
concerned that pop idols would present a respectable image for teenyboppers to follow.)
Write one page on this.

Identify any features of the music that could be described as particularly „ Kiwi flavored‟ . This
may include:
• Lyric content of songs (eg referring to aspects of Kiwi way of life)
• Musical features that suggest an aspect of New Zealand (e.g. geography)
• Performance venues (e.g. pubs, town halls, universities)
Write up to one page on this.


Task 2: Listening Analysis of the Elements and Features of the Music - this task requires
students to demonstrate an knowledge of the elements and features of TWO songs, selected by
the student, through listening, using a comparative analysis template.
This task is to be completed in class or for homework over 1 week.
                                                                                             18


This task requires you to demonstrate your knowledge of the elements and features of TWO
songs, selected by you, through listening, using a comparative analysis template.

Consider the elements of:
• Beat/Tempo/Speed/Feel
• Tone Colours – voices, instruments, effects
• Rhythm – smooth, spiky, even, quavers, dotted, even etc.
• Melody – think about how you would describe it.
• Key – major/minor/modal
• Compositional devices that extend and develop the musical ideas in the song
• Form/Structure
• Mood/Impact/Meaning
• Other: this is your choice, eg purpose of the song, production techniques such as multi-
layering, reverb, EQ etc.

Analyse and describe how these elements are featured in the TWO songs using the template on
the next page.
                                     19


 Distinctive     SONG 1    SONG 2
  Features       Title:    Title:
                 Artist:   Artist:
Beat/Tempo/
Speed/Feel



Tone Colours




Rhythm




Melody




Key




Compositional
devices



Form/Structure




Mood/Impact/
Meaning



Other
                                                                                                20


         Achievement               Achievement with Merit               Achievement with
                                                                           Excellence

  Demonstrate knowledge of        Demonstrate knowledge of a        Demonstrate knowledge of a
  elements and features of        range of elements and             wide range of elements and
  music works.                    features of music works.          features of music works.

  TASK ONE:                       TASK ONE:                         TASK ONE:
   Responses identify valid,     • Responses explain a range       • In-depth responses explain
  factual information about       of valid, factual information     a wide range of factual
  Kiwi rock music from a          with some detail about Kiwi       information with detail about
  selected era; Personal          rock music from a selected        Kiwi rock music from a
  response describes some         era; Personal response            selected era; Perceptive and
  features as particularly „      describes with some detail        insightful personal response
  Kiwi flavoured‟                 features as particularly „ Kiwi   describes features as
                                  flavoured‟                        particularly „ Kiwi flavoured‟

  TASK TWO:                       TASK TWO:                         TASK TWO:
   Knowledge of features of      • Some depth of knowledge         • Depth of knowledge of
  TWO songs demonstrated          of features of TWO songs          features of TWO songs
  through valid, accurate         demonstrated through some         demonstrated through
  responses to musical            detailed and accurate             detailed, accurate and wide
  elements.                       responses to musical              ranging responses to
                                  elements.                         musical elements.

  EVIDENCE:
  Task One provides information on Kiwi rock music from a selected era
  Task Two provides description of elements and features of TWO songs using comparative
  analysis template.


The assessment contributes evidence towards the final grade of Achievement Standard 90017
(Music 1.6). The final grade will be determined on completion of this activity and an assessment
activity involving score analysis.

AUTHENTICATION: The work that has been submitted for assessment is entirely my own
work.


 Student                                      Date:
 signature



TEACHER'S COMMENT
 FORMATIVE                                    Resubmission
 GRADE                                        Date:

 Student’s                                    Date:
 signature

 Teacher's                                    Date:
 signature
                                                      21


               Self-Assessment   Teacher Assessment

Strengths




Next Steps -
ways to
improve
                                                                                               22


   ONGOING ASSESSMENT TOWARDS ACHIEVING US 18816
    Demonstrate aural recall skills to an elementary level

 Unit Standard                   18816       Version    2          Level       1

 Assessment Mode                 Internal    Credits    3          Due Date




Submission Requirements

Students will present themselves for individual assessment when they are ready. They may use
their own instrument, piano or guitar to try out the rhythm, melody or chord progression before
they play back, identify and/or notate their responses.
Note: This assessment contributes evidence towards the final grade of Unit Standard 18816.
The final grade will be determined on completion of this activity and Element 1.4:
Demonstration displays ability to identify the application of a range of performance directions,
and Element 2.1: Identify music materials through listening to music without complexity -
Identification demonstrates knowledge of timbre, texture, and form in a music excerpt of no
more than 12 bars.

CONDITIONS
Pre-requisites: There are no pre-requisites or co-requisites for US 18816. Time signatures
assessed in this unit standard will include 2/4, 3/4, 4/4. Key signatures will be up to, and
including, three sharps or three flats. Chords covered are based on the primary triads of tonic
(I), sub-dominant (IV), dominant (V), and sub-mediant (VI). Intervals include the octave, and
those that fall within the octave.

US 18816 requires ongoing collection of student evidence throughout the unit that shows that
students can: Task 1 - Recall (sing back, play back or write down) two rhythm patterns without
syncopation in simple time (2/4, 3/4 or 4/4); Task 2 - Recall (sing back, play back or write
down) two melodies in a major key; Task 3 - Identify (orally or in written form) chords I, IV, V
and VI in a major key. Evidence of achievement should be collected over the 8 weeks of the
unit. Readiness to be assessed for each task should be determined by the student in
consultation with the teacher. Student work should be retained in a portfolio. If a student is
assessed though play back or orally, student responses must be recorded and kept as evidence.
Note that this is not the complete list of elements required for this unit standard.

Duration: 6 -8 weeks to practise aural recall skills.

Homework: No specific homework is required for US 18816, however students should be
encouraged to play the melodies and chords of the songs they listen to, to give them further
practice for in-class assessment.

Special requirements: Teachers will need audio or audio-visual equipment to record evidence for
US 18816.

Presentation of Work: For US 18816, students must present their work through live playback.

Note: This assessment contributes evidence towards the final grade of Unit Standard 18816.
The final grade will be determined on completion of this activity and an assessment activity for
1.4 and Element 2.
                                                                                               23


 US 18816 – Demonstrate aural recall skills to an elementary
                          level

                                    STUDENT TASKS:

Assessment Task 1.1

You must playback a simple rhythm of 4 bars length using the note values and time signatures
listed below. The pattern will be played as necessary within a 5-minute time limit. You may hear
the pattern as many times as you need within a 5-minute period. Crotchet clicks will be given
each time the extract is played. The time signature will be given.

Notes:
• Whole note (semibreve)
• Half note (minim)
• Quarter note (crotchet)
• Eighth notes (quavers)
• Sixteenth note (semiquaver)
• Dotted minim, dotted crotchet and dotted quaver

Rests:
• Semibreve, minim crotchet only

Time signatures:
• 2/4, 3/4 or 4/4

The rhythm will start on the first beat of the bar.

Judgement Statement showing Evidence required to Achieve 1.1

You will recall a rhythmic pattern without syncopation in simple time. The rhythmic pattern will
be recalled with complete accuracy in three of the four bars.




Assessment Task 1.2

You must recall a melody in a major key using the following keys, note values, time signatures
and rests listed below. The extract will be in a key up to 3 sharps or 3 flats. You will be given
the key signature for the melody and asked to name the key of the extract. The time signature,
key signature and starting note(s) will be given.

You will individually recall the melody in one of the following ways:
• By playing back on an instrument. The melody will be transposed up or down an octave as
necessary, to fall within the range of the chosen instrument, but will stay in the same key.
• By singing back. The starting note may be transposed to ensure the melody falls into a
comfortable range for the student to sing.

The extract will be played as necessary within a 5-minute time limit. You may hear the extract
as many times as you need within a 5-minute period.

Keys:
• Major keys of up to three sharps and flats

Note values:
• Semibreve, minims, dotted minims crotchets and quavers only.
                                                                                               24


Time signature:
• 4/4 or 3/4
• The melody may begin on the first or last beat of the bar.

Melodic Range
• All leaps will be within an octave
• The melody may move above or below the tonic

Judgement Statement showing Evidence required to Achieve 1.2

You will recall a melody in major key, with no more than three errors of pitch, allowing for
minor errors in intonation when playing or singing back.


Assessment Task 1.3

You will identify and recall chords in root position.

Chords must be recalled accurately, within the parameters below:
• I, IV, V, vi in major keys of up to three sharps and flats
• Chords may be identified using Roman numerals (I, IV, V and vi) or by using jazz/rock
terminology (eg C, F, G, Am)

You will identify and recall 6 chords played on guitar, piano or keyboard with melody above. The
assessment will be a melody up to 8 bars in length with chords underneath. The opening chord
and some other chords in the extract will be given. You will individually identify and recall each
of the chords in one of the following ways:
• By playing back the chords on keyboard or piano (voicing of the chords may be in close
position or any position convenient for you)
• By playing back the chords on guitar (voicing of chords may be in any way convenient for
you)
• By writing them down (using Roman numerals or jazz/rock chords)

For those choosing to identify the chords by transcription, the extract will be played as many
times as you wish within a 5 minute span with a 15-30 second gap between each playing. For
those choosing the playback option, you will be given a recording of the music and five minutes
to prepare your answer.

Judgement Statement showing Evidence required to Achieve 1.3
You will accurately recall four of the six primary chords in root position.

Note: This assessment contributes evidence towards the final grade of Unit Standard 18816.
The final grade will be determined on completion of this activity and an assessment activity for
1.4 and Element 2.

TEACHER'S COMMENT




 GRADE FOR                                       Resubmission
 ELEMENT 1                                       Date:

 Student                                         Date:
 signature

 Teacher's                                       Date:
 signature
                                                                                                25


                 SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT FOR US 12831

 Demonstrate rudimentary knowledge of New Zealand music


 Unit Standard                  12831       Version     3           Level       1

 Assessment Mode                Internal    Credits     3           Due Date




Submission Requirements

Students need to submit a report showing work undertaken in preparing for this standard.
Students may present their work in a number of ways. See presentation of work.


CONDITIONS
Assessment for US 12831 will occur after a significant period of listening to New Zealand music
and reading/researching a chosen category of New Zealand music. Students should know and
be conversant with the terminology used in the assessment and the standard, and have
prepared a case study selection after discussions in class with the teachers and their peers.
Students will need to document this preparation in a report submitted with their case study.
This assessment will be individually assessed. It will involve classroom work (through discussion
and research) and homework.

Three - four weeks should be spent on preparing for and writing up the case study. Students
will be offered the opportunity to resubmit any elements that are not achieved. Teachers will
support students with appropriate resources. Students need to submit a report showing work
undertaken in preparing for this standard, at least a week before embarking on the case study.
This will enable the teacher to assess their readiness to undertake the task. This is a vital part
of the process, where critical feedback can be given to the student, and clarification of the
requirements can be given.

Pre-requisites: There are no pre-requisites or co-requisites for US 12831.

Duration: 8 weeks

Homework: Students will have to spend homework time preparing for and writing up the New
Zealand music case study for US 12831.

Presentation of Work: For US 12831, students may present their case study as ONE of the
following:(1) Seminar with music examples that can be shared with others; (2) Booklet with a
list of music examples listened to; (3) Script for a C4 or MTV programme; (4) Website; (5) CD
Rom or (6) Radio programme
                                                                                                    26


    ELEMENTS AND PERFORMANCE CRITERIA FOR US 12831

  Element 1

  Present a case study of one category of New Zealand music. Range: one of Mãori, ethnic
  music other than Mãori, popular, art music, music industry

  1.1 Presentation provides brief chronological overview of study, including significant
  musicians and their contributions.

  1.2 Presentation describes significant musical characteristics of selected study, including
  repertoire and performance style.

  1.3 Presentation identifies features, which may be described as specifically „New Zealand‟.

  Element 2

  Present one aspect of the case study in detail. Range: one of: musical style, historical
  period, genre, activity

  2.1 Presentation provides brief overview of aspect.

  2.2 Presentation identifies musical features of aspect in terms of their significance to aspect
  and case study. Range - at least three musical features

  2.3 Presentation identifies musicians of aspect in terms of their contributions to aspect and
  case study. Range - at least three musicians

  Element 3

  Present an individual profile of one musician from the case study. Range: any New Zealand
  musician, alive or dead

  3.1 Presentation provides historical setting of musician, including major influences on
  musician‟s musical output.

  3.2 Presentation provides brief musical biography of musician. Range - training, experience,
  compositions and/or performances

  3.3 Presentation evaluates contribution of musician to New Zealand music history.




Students seeking credit for this unit standard will be expected to submit a report showing work
undertaken in preparing for this standard.
                                                                                                  27


   US 12831 – Demonstrate rudimentary knowledge of New
                     Zealand music

                                   STUDENT TASKS:
Assessment Task 1.1


You are to present a case study of New Zealand Music. Choose ONE topic from:
• Maori music
• Ethnic music other than Maori (e.g. Pacific Island, Asian, Fijian Indian)
• Popular music
• Art music (e.g. „ serious‟ /contemporary music – choral, orchestral, chamber, electronic etc)
• Music Industry (e.g. Film/TV/radio music, musician engineers, music in the media, song
writers etc)

You may consider using the music we are listening to, analysing and playing in class. In any
case, after you have chosen your topic, let your teacher know, so that they can support you
with resources, information and helpful tips!

1.1 Provide a brief chronological overview of study, including significant musicians and their
contributions. You will need: An opening paragraph stating what topic you have chosen with
relevant information about this … and how you are going to narrow it down to something
manageable that you will examine in more detail. Eg You might decide that you are going to do
NZ Rock music, but narrow it down to 1960s pop music, which shows the influence of The
Beatles for example. Then you would have to work out who the important Kiwi musicians of the
1960s were and investigate why they were important by looking at the things they did and the
influence of their music (their contribution to the development of Kiwi rock music.) What ever
you decide to do, all information must be presented in chronological order – this must be done
as a time-line.

Judgement Statement showing Evidence required to Achieve 1.1

Presentation provides brief chronological overview of study, including significant musicians and
their contributions. This is evidenced through:
• An opening paragraph
• Key information shown as chronological time-line.




Assessment Task 1.2

1.2 Describe the significant musical characteristics of selected study, including repertoire and
performance style.
Once you have narrowed down your topic of investigation, you now need to find lots of musical
examples and listen carefully to all of them, listing your ideas using the following headings:
• Main musical features of the music from the chosen era/topic of study. This should be a broad
general statement. Eg in NZ pop music of the 1960s, the music was usually simple and catchy.
Songs were short and had predictable structures. There were many solo acts. Rock n‟ roll still
had an influence on the styles of the music in terms of instruments used. NZ musicians tended
to copy what was happening overseas, and there was very little originality…
• Repertoire – list the key pieces of music and say why you think they were important. You
may like to consider referring to the musical content of pieces to back up your comments on the
musical features you have described, above. You may do this by: annotating a score, providing
a recording accompanied by notes that explain the musical features and clearly refer to sections
of the music using timings. E.g. From 1‟ 12” – 1” 45” you can hear the „ ice cream‟ chord
progression.
                                                                                                   28


• Performance style – if you can, view videos of performances and describe the style of the
music (eg soul) and the on-stage style of the performer(s) (eg Ray Columbus and the Invaders
– these performers were static on stage, except for the classic 60s head movement. Dance
movements were not innovative, and reflected learned patterns with very little original, „ free‟
movement. Dress codes were very formal, reflecting the fact that NZ was concerned that pop
idols would present a respectable image for teenyboppers to follow.)

Judgement Statement showing Evidence required to Achieve 1.2

Presentation describes significant musical characteristics of selected study, including repertoire
and performance style. This is evidenced through:
• Relevant musical features are noted
• Key repertoire list provided
• Brief statements on performance style




Assessment Task 1.3


1.3 Identify features, which may be described as specifically „ New Zealand‟
You need to identify features of the music (refer to 1.2) that could be associated with the
uniqueness of New Zealand. This may include:
• Lyric content of songs (eg referring to aspects of Kiwi way of life)
• Musical features that suggest an aspect of New Zealand (E.g. geography)
• Performance venues (e.g. pubs, town halls, universities)


Judgement Statement showing Evidence required to Achieve 1.3

Presentation identifies features, which may be described as specifically „ New Zealand‟. This is
evidenced through:
• Brief discussion/personal response on considered interpretations of this element




Assessment Task 2.1


From the information you have collected and written about, now choose and present ONE of the
following aspects of the case study in detail.
• Musical style (eg rock n‟ roll, blues, soul, pop, disco, punk, serious, contemporary etc)
• Historical period (eg 1960s pop)
• Genre – which is a category of a music form that has a tradition or kaupapa and is identified
by certain characteristics (eg opera, pop song, concerto, symphony)
• Activity – eg making CDs/videos, touring, promotion, roadies etc

Your presentation of this aspect must include:

2.1 A brief overview, you may summarise this using bullet points. You should include at least
FIVE major points in this. (e.g. 1960s – The 1960s saw a loosening up of attitudes and morals.
Rock and popular music was emerging, and parents were starting to become aware of the
power of this phenomenon. NZ Rock stars were starting to emerge. It was an age of huge
technological advance with the introduction of TV to NZ, and significant world events (eg
assassination of President Kennedy, moon landing)…
Judgement Statement showing Evidence required to Achieve 2.1

Presentation provides brief overview of aspect. This is evidenced through:
                                                                                                  29


At least five relevant points provided that show some understanding of the selected aspect.




Assessment Task 2.2


2.2 identify at least THREE musical features of the aspect (eg genre) in terms of their
significance and the relationship to the case study as a whole (eg 1960s pop).
You need to be more specific here and back up your comments referring to music examples.
Consider using the elements of music to help structure your ideas in this section.
(e.g. In 1960s, NZ Pop music – tempi were usually pretty fast, to encourage dancing. Limbo
Dancing was typical. Rhythm was regular and uncomplicated. Harmonies were uncomplicated,
with few chords used, but repeated in progressions in the songs. Melodies were simple,
repetitive, and memorable. The range was narrow. The instruments used were… .

Judgement Statement showing Evidence required to Achieve 2.2

Presentation identifies musical features of aspect in terms of their significance to the aspect and
case study. This is evidenced through:
At least three musical features provided that show some understanding of the selected aspect
and case study.




Assessment Task 2.3

2.3 Identify at least THREE musicians in terms of their contributions to the chosen aspect (eg
genre) and case study (eg 1960s pop). e.g. Three „ big‟ musicians, that led the way in the 60s
were… .. Musician A continued with using the typical features of 60s pop (as described above).
This musician followed overseas trends, though sold xx thousand copies of sheet music, and
stayed at number one for several weeks with their hit, “ NCEA Blues” . Musician B… … .


Judgement Statement showing Evidence required to Achieve 2.3

Presentation identifies at least three musicians in terms of their contributions to aspect and case
study.




Assessment Task 3.1

The last thing to do is to choose and present an individual profile of one New Zealand musician
(alive or dead) from the case study.

The profile must provide:
3.1 The background of the musician, including major influences on musician‟ s musical output.
Here, you should state the styles of music that the musicians was in to, and relate this to the
musician‟ s own musical work. Make THREE clear and relevant statements.
Judgement Statement showing Evidence required to Achieve 3.1

Presentation provides historical setting of musician, including major influences on musician‟ s
musical output. This is evidenced through:
Clear and concise information on the background of the musician chosen including major
                                                                                                30


influences on their style and musical output




Assessment Task 3.2

3.2 Give a brief musical biography of musician, including training, experience, compositions
and/or performances. Here, you should give dates of birth/death, family background,
educational background, area(s) of interest, work experience, musical talents (eg instruments
they play) and track their music career. List significant compositions/performances and the
dates they were written/performed. Write a maximum of 200 WORDS on this.
Judgement Statement showing Evidence required to Achieve 3.2

Presentation provides brief musical biography of musician. This is evidenced through:
Clear and concise information on the training, experience, compositions and/or performances of
the chosen musician




Assessment Task 3.3

3.3 Provide an evaluation of the contribution of the chosen musician to New Zealand music
history. Here you are to refer to critics who have made statements on their contribution to the
NZ music scene. You should agree or disagree with such statements, giving clear reasons. You
may also like to give your own personal view on this as well, as long as it is backed up with
valid evidence from the music, or from other sources.
Judgement Statement showing Evidence required to Achieve 3.3

Presentation evaluates contribution of musician to New Zealand music history. This is evidenced
through:
A brief, supported statement explaining the significance of the chosen musician within NZ music
history


AUTHENTICATION: The work that has been submitted for assessment is entirely my own
work.


 Student signature                                      Date:


STUDENT COMMENT



TEACHER'S COMMENT




 GRADE                                         Resubmission
                                               Date:

 Student                                       Date:
 signature

 Teacher's                                     Date:
 signature
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EVALUATION

Next Learning Steps

 Students might:
 • Perform a selection of rock/popular music in groups, contributing evidence towards
   AS90013
 • Transcribe a selection of rock/popular music in preparation for AS 90015
 • Study scores from a selection of rock/popular music in preparation for AS 90016
 • Increase their knowledge of the music industry in New Zealand and prepare for US 12832
 • Recreate a cover version of a selection of rock/popular music studied in the unit in
   preparation for US 20747
 • Choose a rock/popular song studied during that unit and create an instrumental version
 • Compare and contrast a selection of New Zealand rock/popular music with similar genres
   originating from Australia, Britain or the USA




 Strengths                                     Further Development

 Evaluate delivery strategies that             Identify delivery strategies to revise or
 worked effectively                            implement
 To be completed by the teacher                To be completed by the teacher

 Evaluate learning experiences that            Identify learning experiences that need
 worked well                                   development
 To be completed by the teacher                To be completed by the teacher


 Identification of students: Use assessment information to identify students
 underperforming, and those who could be challenged further.

 Students/groups                               Strategies to meet student needs:

 To be completed by the teacher                To be completed by the teacher




 To be completed by the teacher                To be completed by the teacher




 To be completed by the teacher                To be completed by the teacher




Moderation Feedback

 To be completed by the teacher once a moderation report for any of the standards has been
 received.

				
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