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WINSTON-SALEM STATE UNIVERSITY

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					   WINSTON-SALEM STATE UNIVERSITY




          PHASE I RESPONSE TO
THE UNC TOMORROW COMMISSION’S REPORT




              May 1, 2008




                            WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 1
                                    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Winston-Salem State University is excited about the role it will play in addressing the issues
raised by the UNC Tomorrow Commission’s report. This summary explains how the campus
prepared its response and provides an overview of the major initiatives that the campus feels it
can best offer to address these issues.

To prepare its response for Phase I, a series of tasks were devised and executed:

          The Chancellor and Provost made presentations to various groups (faculty, students, staff,
           and community) about the UNC Tomorrow Report and a website was created for posting
           material and responses.
          Individuals and each academic department and administrative unit were asked to respond
           to the Faculty Assembly questions and submit a report by February 20.
          The Provost’s office sent a note to all unit heads asking that they meet with their
           departments and provide a unit response.
          The Provost’s Council and the Chancellor’s Executive Staff and Deans met on February 28 to
           discuss the broad responses from the campus.
          Units prepared their responses to the Phase I plan for those programs/initiatives/activities
           identified and sent them to their respective vice chancellors March 30.
          Unit reports were compiled into a single report posted for faculty and Provost Council
           review.
          The report was revised/edited by deans, associate provosts, the Provost, and the Chancellor
           for May 1 submission to UNC General Administration.

The campus found that it is already addressing many of the issues and strategies found in the
Commission’s report, as it had come to many of the same conclusions in its strategic planning
efforts. More of course can be accomplished and many new initiatives are being proposed.

 GLOBAL READINESS
Winston-Salem State University recognizes concerns about graduates’ mastery of “soft skills” as
described in the UNC Tomorrow Commission’s report and affirms its support for learning
outcomes and a curriculum that promotes these skills for all students. In 2008-2009, the
university will undertake a Foundations of Excellence Self-Study that will analyze its general
education curriculum and the support services for new students as part of its continuing efforts
to improve student learning and mastery of general education outcomes. A new initiative
under development is designed to address the SACS requirement that each institution develop
a plan to improve student learning in a particular area. The report, called a Quality
Enhancement Plan, will have as its focus the development of one of the 21st century skills
across the whole undergraduate curriculum. As a result of this process, we expect to
implement several initiatives across the curriculum, including writing-across-the curriculum and
a foreign language requirement. During Spring 2008, a decision was made to restructure
international programs to expand the opportunities for global awareness and global
competitiveness for students and faculty. A consultant has been brought to campus to
jumpstart this effort. Areas of focus are being identified that build on existing initiatives.


                                                           WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 2
Additionally, faculty members are exploring ways to bring globalization to campus in ways that
are cost-effective and within reach of our students via technology and short workshops and
seminars. In addition to traditional student exchange programs, the university has increased its
agreements and partnerships with institutions abroad and is expanding its offering of
international campus-based activities, including an international business track, virtual world
classrooms, and the integration of a language requirement relating to the needs of the discipline
in key areas such as health sciences, business, and education. Grant proposals will be
submitted to various sponsors to obtain funding to support these and other global readiness
activities.

ACCESS TO HIGHER EDUCATION
Winston-Salem State University has a long and rich history of providing access to higher
education for North Carolina citizens. In its early years, this access was mainly for African
Americans who were at the time denied access to the state’s historically white campuses.
More recently, the university has found innovative ways to create Bachelor of Science in
Nursing programs in communities across the state for students who had two-year nursing
degrees. The university has also partnered with local hospitals to create accelerated programs
in nursing, enabling those with existing baccalaureate degrees to complete another in nursing
within 13 months. Online options have been developed for programs such as clinical laboratory
science, physical education, rehabilitation counseling, and interdisciplinary studies. Programs
in teacher education are also reaching into surrounding communities to facilitate working
adults’ ability to obtain teaching licensure and graduate degrees. The university has recently
developed an Evening and Weekend College for working adults whereby students can earn a
degree through evening, weekend, and online courses in various high-demand disciplines.

The institution is concerned by the low numbers of African American males in higher education.
Under the leadership of its chancellor and in conjunction with the other HBCUs in North
Carolina, the campus is developing initiatives to address issues of higher education preparation,
retention, and graduation in African American males. In addition, several degree programs at
WSSU are relatively unique for HBCUs; each strives to attract, retain, and graduate African
Americans in order to increase the diversity of the workforce.

Expanded program offerings at the undergraduate and graduate levels in the health sciences,
along with graduate programs in business and computer science, have attracted a more diverse
student population, in terms of ethnicity and age. The diversity should continue to grow as
more graduate programs are added and as the university strives to extend its outreach into
neighboring rural counties. Because WSSU is also situated in a community with a growing
Hispanic population, the campus has begun to attract Hispanic students; in line with UNC
Tomorrow, it wants to improve higher education access for this population as well.

IMPROVING PUBLIC EDUCATION
Winston-Salem State University was the first historically black university to offer a degree in
Elementary Education. Currently, there are 11 teacher education programs: Elementary, Birth-
Kindergarten, Special Education, Middle Grades, Physical Education, Spanish, English, Social


                                                        WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 3
Studies, Art, Music, and Mathematics. There are two established graduate programs: Master of
Elementary Education and the Master of Arts in Teaching. The Department of Education has
expanded collaborations with the Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools and Forsyth Technical
Community College to strategically address the shortage of licensed lateral entry teachers and
to create a partnership that facilitates a complete program of preparation offered by the
university and the community college. There are focused collaborative initiatives for middle
grades, math, science, and special education licenses.

More than a year ago the Department of Education—in collaboration with the College of Arts
and Sciences, Academic Affairs, and Enrollment Management—began to examine best practices
for recruiting and retaining students to teacher education programs. From that collaboration, a
Teacher Recruitment Plan was developed, submitted, and approved by the university and UNC
General Administration and is being used to guide recruitment and retention efforts. A full-
time recruiter for education programs has been hired; a Triad Partnership Opportunity (TPO)
program for lateral entry teachers has been put in place; and the Department of Education has
taken advantage of the university’s customer relations management software and processes to
aid in communication with inquiries, prospects, and applicants. Both undergraduate and
graduate programs in education are being offered at sites in the surrounding rural counties to
make it easier for working adults and lateral entry teachers to earn their degrees and/or
licenses. The institution is in the early phases of its plan but is already seeing increased
interest in these programs.

ECONOMIC TRANSFORMATION AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
As in many other areas of the nation, the Piedmont Triad region is experiencing a significant
shift in its economic drivers. The local economy is changing from one driven by tobacco,
textiles, and furniture manufacturing to one based on healthcare, logistics, financial services,
and knowledge management. WSSU has been integrally involved in the economic
transformation of the Piedmont region for many years.

Most recently, through the activities and centers of the School of Business and Economics
(including the Small Business Technology Development Center and the Center for
Entrepreneurship), the inter-institutional Center for Design Innovation, and the Simon Green
Atkins Community Development Corporation, it has accelerated its efforts as a change agent
for the region, with particular emphasis on identifying and meeting the needs of underserved
populations in neighborhoods contiguous to the university, within Forsyth County, and in
surrounding areas.

HEALTH
Winston-Salem State University is a leader in nursing education. Each year, over 100
baccalaureate-prepared nurses enter the workforce. An additional 30 individuals with
undergraduate degrees in unrelated areas who desire a career change complete the
accelerated nursing program in 13 months. The WSSU student pass rate on the NCLEX, the
national certification examination, is consistently above 90%. Through strong partnerships with
community colleges, WSSU enrolls approximately 400 RN to BSN students at its 15 satellite


                                                         WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 4
campuses. This adds 200 additional baccalaureate-prepared nurses annually to the health
community and to magnet hospitals in particular that require such preparation.

The School of Health Sciences has an ethnically diverse student population. African Americans
comprise 48% of the traditional Nursing student enrollment, 30% of Occupational Therapy
enrollment, 40% of Physical Therapy enrollment, and 65% of clinical laboratory science
enrollment. The majority of these graduates are employed in North Carolina, thus contributing
to a more diverse health professions workforce. The Occupational Therapy graduate program
at WSSU is one of four such professional programs in the state and is the only graduate-level
program in the field located at an HBCU. Occupational Therapy is renowned for immersion of
students and faculty in local/regional community experiences related to rehabilitation, health
and wellness, the establishment of diverse cultural partnerships such as with the Latino
community, and the organization and/or participation in international service-learning projects
with Costa Rica (in Central America) and Lesotho (in Africa).

The School of Health Sciences plans to offer several new programs in health care over the next
few years. Given the growth and the potential growth for the health sciences at WSSU,
expanded facilities for teaching labs, research, and faculty/staff offices are going to be
necessary.

Complementing WSSU’s health sciences programs are its core competencies in the life and
physical sciences. Programs in biology, molecular biology, chemistry, and exercise science
produce graduates who work in the region’s labs, matriculate into high-quality graduate
programs, and enter a variety of health science professions, including via professional programs
such as physical therapy, occupational therapy, medicine, and dentistry. The demand for the
support programs in the sciences is such that a much larger facility–needed for classrooms,
laboratories, research spaces, and faculty offices–is high on WSSU’s capital budget request.

 ENVIRONMENT
Winston-Salem State University is concerned about the impact it has on the environment and
its role in promoting environmental literacy among its students, faculty, staff, and community.
The institution is in the early stages of evaluating its impact and formulating actions.

Currently, there are several initiatives headed by Facilities Management to address our carbon
emissions. There are also several courses being offered to students in environmental education
with plans to expand these offerings and to develop programs that will be offered in traditional
formats as well as online delivery formats leading to both degrees and certificates. The inter-
institutional Center for Design Innovation, of which WSSU is a partner, includes environmental
issues in its curriculum development and research initiatives.

OUTREACH AND ENGAGEMENT
Many initiatives already described in sections of the report have an outreach component.
These include the Small Business and Technology Development Center, the S.G. Atkins
Community Development Corporation, the Center of Excellence for the Elimination of Health


                                                        WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 5
Disparities, the Center for Entrepreneurship, and the Center for Design Innovation. The
university is proposing an Institute of Regional Transformation (IRT). Establishing the IRT
would enable WSSU to leverage its mission and resources while enhancing its partnerships to
provide opportunities to make significant and measurable contributions in meeting the
education, research and scholarship, and public service needs facing our state in the 21st
century.

Because of its historical mission, the institution has tended to focus on the needs and
circumstances of urban, minority, and economically disadvantaged populations. The
institution will continue to have this focus, but in part due to UNC Tomorrow, it has begun to
engage issues of the broader region that includes many rural and economically disadvantaged
small communities. The School of Business and Economics has developed or is in the process of
developing centers, initiatives, programs, and a journal in areas related to financial literacy
training, preparation for retirement, investment planning, new business startup, job training,
and economic knowledge dissemination. The School of Health Sciences has more than 350
clinical affiliates throughout the state that provide “hands-on” clinical instruction to health
science students at local hospitals, clinics, doctors’ offices, and other healthcare-related
organizations.

MODEL PROGRAMS
  1. Success in preparing African American nurses on campus and in community locations
     around the state could be the model for other programs in health care and education.
  2. The Accelerated Nursing Baccalaureate Program, with costs underwritten by a local
     hospital, is an example of a private-public partnership addressing regional access and
     workforce issues.
  3. WSSU’s Evening and Weekend College could serve as a model for other programs as
     ways to assist working adults in earning degrees in high-demand fields.

NEW RESOURCES NEEDED
  1. The demand for the support programs in the sciences is such that a much larger facility
     is needed for classrooms, laboratories, research spaces, and faculty offices.
  2. Expanded facilities for teaching labs, research, and faculty/staff offices for growing and
     new programs in the health sciences are going to be necessary.
  3. It is extremely difficulty to find doctorally-prepared faculty in the health sciences,
     especially nursing, so a combination of higher salaries and incentives is needed to
     recruit faculty with doctoral degrees.

COLLABORATIONS FOR SOLUTIONS
   1. WSSU would like to attract and enroll more Hispanic students, as Winston-Salem has a
      large and growing Hispanic population. However, the campus is not really equipped to
      understand this population and what it will take either to attract them to our campus or
      to assist Hispanic students who are not citizens to be able to afford tuition. This is an
      area in which a statewide effort among all the campuses and the appropriate Hispanic
      organizations would be extremely beneficial to the campuses and to the students.


                                                        WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 6
2. Environmental literacy is certainly an area that would benefit from a broad discussion
   among constituents across the university, government agencies, and the private sector.
3. Winston-Salem will be the central North Carolina location for a branch of the NC Center
   for the Advancement of Teaching, a statewide partnership aimed at improving teacher
   quality.
4. Student Loan Forgiveness funded by state or community resources would be an
   incentive for students to go into education.
5. The governor’s widespread marketing of opportunities for high school students to take
   community college classes has repercussions for WSSU as well as the entire UNC
   system. The system and WSSU will soon need to collaborate with community colleges
   to address the status of 18- or 19-year old students who have graduated with an
   Associate’s degree upon matriculation at a four-year institution (i.e., with respect to
   academic advising, major selection, housing availability, campus parking, etc., whether
   these students are freshmen or juniors).




                                                   WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 7
Summary of Initiatives Presented by Issue:

4.1 GLOBAL READINESS
1. 21ST CENTURY SKILLS
Existing:
        WSSU’s General Education Outcomes Support “Soft Skills”
        Reviewing Effectiveness General Education
New:
        Propose New Approaches to Institutionalizing “Soft Skills” through
                SACS Quality Enhancement Plan
                         Writing Across the Curriculum
                         Foreign Language Requirement
                Foundations of Excellence for the First Year of College
2. GLOBAL COMPETITIVENESS
Existing:
        International Programs Offerings
        Curricular Offerings
        Model UN
        Collaborations with International Universities
New:
        Internationalizing the Curriculum
        College and School Initiatives for
                Faculty and Student Exchanges
                Academic Program Exchange and Distance Learning
                Curricular and Co-Curricular Enhancements
        Global Understanding Project

4.2 ACCESS TO HIGHER EDUCATION

1. Distance Site-Based and Online Degree Programs
Existing:
        Distance Site-Based RN to BSN Programs
        Distance Education for Masters in Elementary Education
        Distance Online program in Clinical Laboratory Science
        Distance Online program offering teacher certification in physical education
        Distance Online Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies program

New:
        Distance Site-Based Motorsports Management
        Distance Education in Clinical Laboratory Science (military and laboratories)
        Distance Online program Therapeutic Recreation
        Distance Online program in Birth to Kindergarten Education
        Online Certificate programs

2. Adult Learners
Existing:
        Accelerated Nursing Program
New:


                                                             WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 8
       Evening-Weekend College
       Advanced Practice program in Occupational Therapy
       Joint Admissions Programs with Forsyth Technical Community College
       Advising Initiatives - Community College Interaction
       New Articulation Agreements and 2+2 Programs

3. Underrepresented Populations Including Persons With Disabilities
Existing:
        Therapeutic Recreation, Rehabilitation Studies and Masters in Rehabilitation Counseling
        Center for Design Innovation and Applied Research
New:
        HBCU Chancellors’ Initiatives
        Camp Bones

4. Better Prepared to Enter and Succeed
Existing:
        Accelerated Summer Program
        Life Sciences Bridge and Support Programs, including Project Strengthen
        The Biomedical Research Infrastructure Center
        Center for Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education (CMSTE) programs for students
        Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Scholars Program

4.3 IMPROVING PUBLIC EDUCATION
Existing:
        Teacher Education Advisement Partnership (TEAP) Center
        Triad Partnership Opportunity
        Master of Arts in Teaching
        Distance Education for Masters of Education in Elementary Education
        Center for Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education (CMSTE) programs for teachers
New:
        Recommend that Winston-Salem (Piedmont Triad) be the central North Carolina location for a
            branch of the NC Center for the Advancement of Teaching
        Real Men Teach
        Teach Now
        Enhance Transfers between Community College and WSSU in Early Childhood Education
        Collaborative Grant to Help Teachers’ Literacy Skills
        Professional Development Teleconferences
Proposed Collaborations:
        NC Center for the Advancement of Teaching
        Student Loan Forgiveness

4.4 ECONOMIC TRANSFORMATION AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
1. Small Business and Technology Development Center in the School of Business and Economics
2. Center for Entrepreneurialship in the School of Business and Economics
3. Center for Design Innovation a multi-institutional center of UNC from Winston-Salem State
University, the UNC School of the Arts, and Forsyth Technical Institute
4. S.G. Atkins Community Development Corporation of WSSU
5. Motorsports Management in the School of Education and Human Performance.


                                                            WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 9
4.5 HEALTH
Existing:
        Faculty Practice Plan
        Wound Healing and Dance Rehabilitation
        eCare We Care program (online healthcare learning and literacy)
        Journal of Best Practices in Health Professions Diversity
        Health Disparities and Minority Health
        The Center of Excellence for the Elimination of Health Disparities
        Therapeutic Recreation Program
New:
        Proposed Endowed Chair in Health Disparities
        Health and Wellness across the Lifespan
        CDI Online Educational Programs

Continue to address the shortage of health care professionals through
       Increasing supply of nursing educators
       Site-based and online healthcare education
       Occupational Therapy Advanced Practice

4.6 ENVIRONMENT
Existing:
        Carbon emissions reduction on campus
        Biologically-based lubricant research
New:
        Environmental education
        Center for Design Innovation
        Environmental Sustainability Task Force
        Carbon emissions reduction education and research

4.7 OUTREACH AND ENGAGEMENT
Existing:
        The Center for Community Safety
        The Center of Excellence in Financial Services
        Continuing Education Office
        The Grandparenting Program

New:
        Institute for Regional Transformation
        The Center for Economic Analysis
        American Journal of Retirement Economics
        Career Exploration
        The WSSU Entrepreneurial Fellows Program
        International Center for Motorsport Business Research




                                                            WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 10
4.1 GLOBAL READINESS

INTRODUCTION:

Winston-Salem State University’s general education outcomes reflect the 21st Century skills outlined in
the UNC Tomorrow report. It also has initiatives that enhance globalization for students and faculty.
Both students’ competence in the 21st Century skills and their readiness for living and working in a global
interconnected world can be enhanced.

A new initiative that is being developed that reflects the 21st Century skills is designed to address the
SACS requirement that each institution develop a Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) to improve student
learning in a particular area. Our QEP will focus on the enhancement of one of the 21st century skills
across the curriculum. In 2008-2009, University College—which focuses on supporting new students
and assessing general education outcomes--will undertake a Foundations of Excellence self-study that
will lead to an action plan to improve student academic support services, retention, and graduation
rates. As part of this self-study, the university will begin a phased review of its general education core
curriculum; the assessment of the existing curriculum will occur as part of the SACS reaffirmation
process. To support faculty in their efforts to enhance student learning, the university has expanded the
scope and services of its Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning. Student Affairs is taking the
lead in a “live and learn” project that should support student success and attainment of the general
education outcomes.

To enhance global awareness of students and faculty, the university established an International
Programs Office in 2000. During Spring 2008, international programs on campus were restructured to
expand the opportunities for global awareness and global competitiveness for students and faculty. This
will be accomplished by identifying areas of focus for the curriculum and designating responsible
persons for these activities. In addition to the traditional student and faculty exchange programs, the
university has increased its agreements and partnerships with institutions abroad and is expanding its
offering of international campus-based activities, including virtual world classrooms, an international
business track, and the integration of a language requirement related to the needs of the disciplines.
Additional funds to offset the cost of international activities will be solicited through grant proposals.
WSSU’S RESPONSE:

1. 21ST CENTURY SKILLS – Winston-Salem State University recognizes concerns about graduates’
mastery of “soft skills” as described in the UNC Tomorrow Commission’s report and affirms its support
for learning outcomes and a curriculum that promotes these skills for all students. Described in this
section is the process that WSSU is currently involved in to enhance its general education student
learning outcomes.

a. EXISTING:
1. The General Education outcomes were revised in the late 1990s to reflect nine learning outcomes:
communication, critical thinking, problem solving, inter-personal skills, intra-personal skills, aesthetics,
international perspectives, healthful living, and information literacy. These are similar to the skills noted
in the UNC Tomorrow report: oral and written communication; critical thinking and analytical reasoning;
problem solving; creativity and innovation; teamwork and collaboration; work ethic and
professionalism; financial literacy; information and digital literacy; environmental literacy; science and
math; and global awareness. Using the same set of courses that had been in place, the faculty in each



                                                              WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 11
department with a core curriculum course was asked to develop course-embedded assessments of the
outcomes. A core curriculum committee was formed that reviewed and refined the outcome
statements into more measurable statements, and a matrix for assessment was developed.

Currently, committees are reviewing documentation to determine the extent to which our graduates
have achieved the nine general education outcomes. This is being addressed as part of the institutional
effectiveness requirement of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) accreditation
process. A new initiative under development is designed to address the SACS requirement that each
institution develop a Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) that will improve student learning in a particular
area. Our QEP will have as its focus the enhancement of one of the 21 st century skills across the
curriculum.

Competencies that WSSU graduates will need to be successful were discussed by the QEP Topics
Selection Committee. A survey was administered to all campus constituents (faculty, staff, students,
alumni, and Board of Trustees) to find out what they considered the most important learning outcomes
for our students and their perceptions about our graduates’ competencies. After much discussion
(meetings, focus groups, forums) and data analysis, five core competencies/outcomes emerged as the
most important to address in a first-phase response to enhance learning across the curriculum:
communication, critical thinking and reasoning, mathematics literacy, science literacy, and global
literacy (including foreign language skills).

2. The institution recently reorganized its First Year Experience into a University College to better
support both new students and continuing students. The College consists of the university’s Advising
Center and Learning Centers. It also is responsible for assessing general education outcomes. Many
student services that had been dispersed across campus with varying levels of success were moved
under the Learning Centers, including the Writing Center, Reading Center, Math and Science Center,
Supplementary Instruction, and Tutoring Services. Some of these, such as Supplemental Instruction, are
showing very positive results in helping students perform better in classes. The Writing Center has
grown, is developing an online component, and is assisting more students; however, it currently does
not have sufficient resources to support a writing-across-the-curriculum effort.

b. NEW:
1. The campus community is being asked to submit Quality Enhancement Plan proposals on creative
and innovative ways to realize the objectives of 1) infusing the core competencies/outcomes in general
education courses, majors, and the co-curriculum and 2) enhancing the attainment of 21st Century skills
in graduates. One of these initiatives will be pursued as our QEP, and the others will be pursued in
phases, as part of our continued focus on improving and assessing the general education learning
outcomes for all students across all curricula and co-curricula. Out of this process we expect to
implement several initiatives across the curriculum, including writing-across-the curriculum and a
foreign language requirement.

    Key steps and timeline in the development and implementation of the QEP are listed below:
    1. Selection of QEP Topic and Preliminary Proposal—August 2008
    2. Appointment of QEP Development Committee—September 2008
    3. Assignments to development teams (research/data, student learning outcomes, learning &
        support activities, professional development activities, assessment plan, management plan,
        budget plan)—October 2008
    4. Complete first draft of QEP—May 2009


                                                           WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 12
    5. Complete final QEP report—November 2009
    6. Submit QEP report to SACS—January – February 2010

2. Enhancing the outcomes in “soft” and “hard” skills will not only take a refocused curriculum; it will
also require enhanced support services for both faculty and students. The institution has made a
commitment to enhance the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Leaning (CETL) by bringing in an
internationally-recognized director and adding several positions to support faculty in enhancing their
skills in active learning, new technologies to assist in learning, online learning, collaborative learning,
and action research. Funds are available to assist faculty in redesigning courses, learning new skills, and
traveling to conferences to present and learn. CETL also supports faculty research in teaching and
learning so that what we discover about how to help our students better prepare for the new economy
can be shared with researchers and stakeholders around the country.

3. There is still much more work that needs to be done for University College to be a model program for
supporting students and helping them develop the foundation for success. Its philosophy, activities, and
resources need to be more closely tied to the university’s curricular efforts to improve the general
education outcomes. Therefore, the institution has decided to pursue a nationally-recognized process,
the Foundations of Excellence, which will guide our thinking, discussions, and an action plan around
nine key principles:

    “Foundations Institutions approach the first year in ways that
    1. are intentional and based on a philosophy/rationale of the first year that informs relevant
       institutional policies and practices;
    2. create organizational structures and policies that provide a comprehensive, integrated, and
       coordinated approach to the first year;
    3. make the first college year a high priority for the faculty;
    4. deliver intentional curricular and co-curricular learning experiences that engage students in
       order to develop knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors consistent with the desired
       outcomes of higher education and the institution’s philosophy and mission;
    5. ensure that all first-year students experience diverse ideas, worldviews, and cultures as a means
       of enhancing their learning and preparing them to become members of pluralistic communities;
    6. promote student understanding of the various roles and purposes of higher education, both for
       the individual and society;
    7. facilitate appropriate student transitions through policies and practices that are intentional and
       aligned with institutional mission;
    8. serve all first-year students according to their varied needs; and
    9. conduct assessment and maintain associations with other institutions and relevant professional
       organizations in order to achieve ongoing first-year improvement.” Resource Center for the 1st Year

This year-long process will help tie together the support units' efforts, the faculty efforts, the curricular
efforts, and the co-curricular efforts as we pursue a new paradigm for teaching and learning that will
result in graduates who are ready for the 21st Century global economy and its social and civic issues.
This process will be lead by teams of faculty and University College staff. Resources have been
allocated for a project manager, consultant support, team workshops, and team travel.

The continued review of the General Education Core Curriculum will be linked to the Foundations of
Excellence Self-Study and will support our assessment and continuous improvement requirements for
SACS. The focus of the review will be on all the competencies (outcomes) that students will need to


                                                               WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 13
develop across their years as an undergraduate and how we will systematically provide learning
experiences and assess outcomes. The review will be comprehensive and will address the mission,
guiding principles, curriculum, courses, and supporting initiatives.

SACS Accreditation; General Education Review; Foundations of Excellence Self-Study

The key steps and timelines are listed below:
   1. Input assessment data for general education outcomes and major outcomes in a central
       repository system—May 2008
   2. Generate assessment reports and analyze reports—June-July 2008
   3. Faculty approval of five student learning outcomes that will be developed across the
       curriculum—August 2008
   4. Selection of QEP Topic from preliminary proposals—August 2008
   5. Prepare responses to SACS general education standards and institutional effectiveness
       standards for Compliance Certification Report—September/October 2008
   6. Provost appoints and gives charge to committee to study first year and review the general
       education curriculum and to develop a plan of action to improve the success and retention of
       students in the first year—August 2008
   7. Committee conducts audit of current practices, policies, and assessments (including general
       education core assessments); committee will review and analyze general education
       assessment reports and determine the extent to which WSSU graduates attained published
       general education student learning outcomes and the effectiveness of the current assessment
       plan; holds forums on general education reform—September-December 2008
   8. Preliminary report to Academic Curriculum and Standards Committee on general education–
       October 2008
   9. Committee presents recommendations on general education to campus—January 2009
   10. Committee completes action plan for general education reform– March 2009
   11. Committee completes Self-Study Report and presents recommendations and action plan to
       improve the first year experience—May 2009

3. RAMS Live & Learn is a learning communities initiative designed to engage students, faculty, and
staff in active and collaborative teaching and learning through a residential setting. The program
incorporates all aspects of a student’s collegiate experience with the ultimate goal of cultivating
leadership skills, better oral and written communication skills, higher academic achievement, and a
greater sense of personal responsibility and connectedness to WSSU and the community. Rams Live &
Learn will have an application-based design that encourages students to apply classroom knowledge to
practical, real-life problems and situations.
Cost and Funding:
     Total cost for implementing the course-based learning communities within the four academic
          colleges and the residential learning communities is approximately $25,000.

2. GLOBAL COMPETITIVENESS - Winston-Salem State University recognizes the value and even
necessity for graduates to be comfortable learning, working, and living in interconnected, global
environments.

a. EXISTING INITIATIVES:
1. The International Programs Office works with departments and schools/college to facilitate several
global awareness programs and activities. These include student study-abroad exchange programs, a


                                                            WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 14
visiting scholars program, an African Diaspora FIPSE Program with Brazil, a Benin-Ghana Summer
Program, a Summer Session Abroad in Queretaro (Mexico), the Ralph Bunche Society, a Global
Understanding Project, the Model United Nations Program, and International Education Week.

   a. African Diaspora with Brazil FIPSE. The US Department of Education's Fund for the
   Improvement of Post-Secondary Education (FIPSE) and the Brazilian counterpart, Coordenação de
   Aperfeiçoa-mento de Pessoal de Nível Superior (CAPES), support our four-year US-Brazil Higher
   Education Consortium Project, "The African Diaspora in Brazil and the US: A Comparative
   Approach."
   b. The Summer Session Abroad in Queretaro, Mexico is a language and cultural immersion
   program allowing students to live and study in a foreign country for five weeks during the summer
   and receive four to seven credit hours for their work.
   c. African Diaspora Studies Program in Benin and Ghana. Over the past three years, students
   participated in a five-week African Diaspora Studies Program (ADSP) in Benin and Ghana under the
   auspices of Winston-Salem State University’s Office of International Programs (OIP). The purpose
   of this program is to expose students from the UNC system to the political, economic, social, and
   cultural realities of contemporary Africa while also educating them on the historical legacy of the
   Atlantic slave trade and of British and French colonialism.
   d. Ralph Bunche Society. The WSSU Ralph Bunche Society seeks to create a broader base of
   student participation in the global interests of the United States and to increase minority student
   involvement in international arenas and the expanding global community. The Ralph Bunche
   Society is an organization for students that is designed to promote understanding of principles
   espoused by Ambassador Bunche and to promote greater global awareness, including study
   abroad.
   e. Model United Nations. Winston-Salem State University (WSSU) began its involvement in the
   Model United Nations (MUN) program in 1986 by an agreement with the parent organization, the
   United Nations Association of the United States of America. In 1989, WSSU became one of the
   founding members and signatory to the charter of the consortium named as the North Carolina
   Consortium for International and Intercultural Education (NCCIIE). As further measures to expose
   our students to global affairs and issues, WSSU has structured two Model UN courses, both
   consisting of three hours, that are electives open to majors in all academic disciplines.
   f. WSSU’s School of Health Sciences (SOHS) is working with the National Health Training College in
   Lesotho (Africa) to assist them in expanding their nursing program and to assist in developing other
   health- related programs to meet the needs of that country in the southern Africa region. A
   Memorandum of Understanding was completed in April 2008 and is undergoing review by the
   Ministry of Health in Lesotho for implementation in Fall 2009.
        Cost and Funding:
           SOHS is seeking funding to fund the agreement through the Millennium Challenge
              Corporation.

2. Global Understanding Project. The WSSU Global Understanding Project provides opportunities for
students and faculty from other countries to share cultural knowledge and experiences in a real-time
virtual classroom.
     Currently we are engaged in a pilot course with the University of Santa Paula, Costa Rica. We
         are in the process of developing relationships with five other universities.
     Through the Global Understanding Project, an arrangement will be made to identify a university
         in Nigeria where Middle Grades Education (MGE) faculty will teach a course here and



                                                           WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 15
        collaborate with an instructor in Nigeria. Students from both universities will have some
        common assignments and share experiences using the Video Conferencing Technology.

3. The School of Health Sciences has agreements with institutions in Costa Rica to deliver wheelchairs
to children and to offer exchange experiences between our students and their students.

b. NEW INITIATIVES:

1. Internationalizing the Curriculum - The university is preparing principles of international education
that will be used to guide the internationalization of the curriculum.
     A project to develop a global language requirement as part of internationalizing the curriculum
         will be assigned to a cross-disciplinary faculty committee in Fall 2008.
Cost and Funding:
     Grant Activity - WSSU plans to submit grant applications for the following programs sponsored
         by the U. S. Department of Education and the Council for the International Exchange of
         Scholars: Fulbright-Hays Group Projects Abroad Program, Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad
         Program, Undergraduate Foreign Language and International Studies Program, Business and
         International Education Program, Scholars in Residence Program, Fulbright Seminars for
         International Education Administrators (sponsored by the Council for the International Exchange
         of Scholars - CIES), and the Fulbright Teacher Exchange Program.

2. College and School Initiatives for Faculty and Student Exchange
    a. The School of Health Sciences will hire an ambassador as a visiting professor during the 2008-2010
       academic years to provide lectures in the global understanding course and cultural competence
       course and to offer lecture series to the university and local community. A visiting professor from
       Malawi is being supported.
       Costs and Funding:
          Funds are available to support the ambassador’s appointment through a faculty line at
             $100,000 annually.
          The cost for matching the Fulbright is $40,000.
    b. MAYMESTER IN CHILE. The special two-week study abroad seminar on Society, Culture, and
       Business in Chile is part of an ongoing International Studies Program. The primary purpose of the
       program is to provide on-site business, academic, and field experiences to professors and students
       so that they can increase their knowledge and gain a better understanding of the business,
       economic, and cultural aspects of Chile. The ultimate goal is to overcome stereotypical images,
       provide greater coverage in various courses to the Southern Cone in general and Chile in
       particular, and promote mutual understanding between Chile and the United States through
       educational and cultural interaction.
    c. Reach the World From Within. This project will encourage faculty, staff, and students to identify
       entrepreneurial needs and opportunities in their home region. Along with WSSU’s existing focus
       on countries in Africa, Asia, Central and Central America, and the Caribbean, this project will reach
       out to many regions in need of support and advice, especially concerning small businesses that
       usually depend on entrepreneurial energies rather than well-organized corporate or governmental
       programs. We will create a program of faculty and student exchanges to extend WSSU’s
       entrepreneurial education program to the rest of the world. Also, faculty from the School of
       Business and Economics will design educational programs to “globalize” the business curriculum in
       a partnership with the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.
       Cost and Funding:


                                                             WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 16
            The additional cost for this program includes a new position with a twelve-month salary of
             $50,000 plus benefits.
    d. Motorsports International: Faculty in Motorsports Management plan on conducting industry-
      related research, providing global experiential learning for current students, and finally, informing
      and recruiting potential Hispanic students to WSSU from initiatives in Mexico. The Motorsport
      Management program has begun to directly promote increased partnerships between its own
      campus and international universities and enhance the global awareness of its faculty and
      students. We are doing this through our collaboration with Capital Institute of Physical Education
      in Beijing, China.

3. College and School Initiatives for Academic Program Exchange and Distance Learning
    b. The School of Health Sciences (SOHS) is completing an agreement with the Hubei College of
        Traditional Chinese Medicine in Wuhan, China to prepare nurses from China to complete the RN
        to BSN Program through distance learning. The proposed program will begin in Fall 2009.
        Cost and Funding:
           The proposed program would be self-sustaining and supported by student tuition costs.
    c. The SOHS is in the process of solidifying relationships with universities in China, Costa Rica,
        Africa, and other key partners through educational programs that may include faculty and
        student exchanges, distance learning, video-conferencing, and country-specific projects that are
        of mutual interest.
        Cost and Funding:
           The estimated cost to establish these relationships is $20,000 annually.
    d. The School of Business and Economics (SBE) is in the process of developing and signing an MOU
        with American College of Thessaloniki in Greece and another with Hankuk University of Foreign
        Studies in Korea, each of which will define WSSU’s relationship in terms of establishing
        collaborative education programs and activities; conducting research and other scholarly
        activities in disciplines and on subjects of mutual interest and benefit; implementing student,
        faculty and staff exchanges, training, and related activities; developing and implementing
        extension and technology transfer activities; carrying out planning and institutional
        development; preparing and submitting grant, contract, and other proposals to obtain resources
        to support collaborative activities; and cooperation in research, extension, and transfer of
        knowledge regarding the role of universities, business, and government.

4. College and School Initiatives for Curriculum and Co-curricular Enhancement
    a. International Business track for all business majors—One of the goals of the SBE is to “produce
        graduates who have competencies that are highly sought by businesses and graduate schools
        and which facilitate their advancement into leadership positions.” Under development is an
        international Business track for all business majors. Other items of interest include: some
        courses being taught in Spanish, reinforcing cross-cultural communication through real-time
        classroom experiences utilizing the Global Understanding Program, and including in all majors a
        course covering global/ethical issues.
        Cost and Funding:
         The additional cost for this program includes a new faculty position with a nine-month
            salary of $75,000 plus benefits.
    b. Leadership Elite—In an effort “to provide students with professional development opportunities
        outside the classroom, which enhance leadership and interpersonal skills,” the SBE has an
        existing program that will be redesigned in order to include an international experience
        component to enhance students’ leadership development.


                                                             WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 17
Cost and Funding:
     The estimated annual cost to fund this program is $40,000. Sources of funding will include
       corporate sponsors.




                                                      WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 18
4.2 ACCESS TO HIGHER EDUCATION

INTRODUCTION:

Winston-Salem State University has a long and rich history of providing access to higher education for
North Carolina citizens. Although in its early years, this access was mainly offered to African Americans
who were at the time denied access to the state’s historically white campuses, more recently the
university has found innovative ways to create access for all North Carolinians. The university has an
Evening and Weekend College for working adults whereby students can earn a degree through evening,
weekend, and online courses in several high demand disciplines. New programs in this area include the
Gateway Program and Office of Servicemember & Veteran Degree Opportunities. The university is
proposing Joint Admissions programs with Forsyth Technical Community College, modified articulation
agreements, and enhanced advising models to enhance the opportunity for community college students
to complete their baccalaureate degrees. The recruitment and retention of African-American males will
be addressed by new HBCU Chancellors’ Initiatives. To facilitate working adults and lateral entry
teachers, programs in Education are reaching into the surrounding communities. Also, the university
plans to offer multiple certificate programs, many of which will be delivered online, through the School
of Business and Economics, the School of Education and Human Performance, and in the School of
Health Sciences.

The School of Health Science has existing programs that provide unique access, such as (1) the Bachelor
of Science in Nursing programs in communities across the state for students who have two-year nursing
degrees and (2) accelerated programs in nursing that allow those with non-nursing baccalaureate
degrees to complete a nursing baccalaureate degree within 13 months. These programs and others in
the school have resulted in an ethnically diverse student population and increased minority
practitioners. African Americans comprise 48% of the traditional nursing student enrollment, 30% of
occupational, 40% physical therapy enrollment, and 65% of clinical laboratory science enrollment.

The College of Arts and Sciences offers multiple programs that address student success such as the
Center for Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education (CMSTE); the Science, Technology,
Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Scholars Program; programs of the Biomedical Research
Infrastructure Center; and Project Strengthen in the Department of Life Sciences. There are plans to
enhance Accelerated Summer Programs, Life Sciences Bridge and Support Programs, and Health Careers
Opportunity Programs.

Because of its historical mission, WSSU has always focused on the educational attainment of African
Americans. The degree programs at WSSU that are rare among HBCUs each strive to attract, retain, and
graduate African Americans in order to increase the diversity of the workforce. Examples include:
Therapeutic Recreation, Sport Management, Exercise Science, Motorsport Management, Rehabilitation
Studies, Clinical Laboratory Science, and Molecular Biology at the undergraduate level and
Rehabilitation Counseling, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, and Nurse Practitioner at the
graduate level. Degree programs have been recently added in Health Care Management at the
undergraduate level and Health Care Administration at the master’s level.

Because Winston-Salem and Forsyth County have a large and growing Hispanic population, WSSU would
like to attract and enroll more Hispanic students. As an institution, we have limited knowledge about
Hispanic culture and what it will take to attract Hispanic students to WSSU. What we do know is that
Latino students generally involve family members in the decision-making process when choosing schools


                                                            WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 19
and careers. At the same time, Latino students tend to prefer to remain close to their families. As a
result, we would expect that we could become the institution of choice for many Hispanic students who
remain close at home and attend institutions of higher education in geographic proximity to their
neighborhoods. However, we are not really equipped to understand this population and what it will
take either to attract them to our campus or to assist Hispanic students who are not citizens to be able
to afford tuition. This is an area in which we feel that a statewide effort between all the campuses and
the appropriate Hispanic organizations would be extremely beneficial to both the campuses and the
students.

The Accelerated Nursing Baccalaureate Program, the site-based community RN to BSN programs, and
the Evening and Weekend College could serve as models for other programs as ways to assist working
adults obtain degrees in high-demand fields. In collaboration with the Admissions and Registrar’s offices
and University College, these programs have devised degree-program formats, marketing and
promotional activities, admissions and matriculation services, and advising and student services that are
adult-centered. The underwriting of costs associated with the accelerated nursing program by a local
hospital is an example of a private-public partnership to address regional access and workforce issues.

In responding to the UNC Tomorrow recommendations in this section, we will discuss existing and
proposed programs and initiatives that increase access to citizens in underserved regions, for non-
traditional students, for community college transfers, for students with disabilities, and for underserved
populations, especially African American male students. These include:

1. Distance Site Based and On-Line Degree Programs
Existing:
        Distance Site-Based RN to BSN Programs
        Distance Education for Masters in Elementary Education
        Distance Online Clinical Laboratory Science program
        Distance Online program Teacher Preparation in Physical Education
        Distance Online Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies program
New:
        Distance Site-Based Motorsports Management
        Distance Clinical Laboratory Science program (military and laboratories)
        Distance Online Therapeutic Recreation program
        Distance Online Birth to Kindergarten program
        Distance Online certificate programs
2. Adult Learners
Existing:
        Accelerated Nursing Program
New:
        Evening-Weekend College
        Advanced Practice program in Occupational Therapy
        Joint Admissions Programs with Forsyth Technical Community College
        Advising Initiatives - Community College Interaction
        New Articulation Agreements and 2+2 Programs
3. Underrepresented Populations Including Persons With Disabilities
Existing:
        Therapeutic Recreation, Rehabilitation Studies and Masters in Rehabilitation Counseling
        Center for Design Innovation and applied research


                                                             WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 20
New:
        HBCU Chancellors’ Initiatives
        Camp Bones
4. Better Prepared to Enter and Succeed
Existing:
        Accelerated Summer Program
        Life Sciences Bridge and Support Programs
        The Biomedical Research Infrastructure Center
        Center for Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education (CMSTE)
        Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Scholars Program

WSSU’S RESPONSE:

1. DISTANCE SITE-BASED AND ONLINE DEGREE PROGRAMS

a. EXISTING INITIATIVES

1. Site-Based RN to BSN (EMT to BSN, etc.) degree programs in 15 locations throughout the state.
These programs attract working professionals who only have a two-year degree to complete their
baccalaureate degree in nursing because of the convenience, flexibility, and quality of the program.
Effectiveness:
     These have been very successful both in terms of the number and quality of graduates
        produced.
     Many of these graduates enroll in advanced nursing education programs.
Enhancements:
     These programs could be expanded to other locations, especially rural and medically
        underserved areas, if additional resources (faculty, classroom, and laboratory space) are made
        available.
     With an expanded faculty and staff, the program can recruit more students into this program.
        We have been approached by Mitchell Community College in Statesville and other community
        colleges. The main problem is the need for more staff to manage logistics, to move students
        through the WSSU system and to provide oversight of faculty. There is the potential to grow
        from 400 students to 600 students.
     There is a need to place courses online so that we can begin to reach international markets, i.e.,
        China.
Costs and Funding:
     This program is very labor-intensive as it requires many personal contacts over time to build the
        relationships that are required to help working adults transition back into higher education.
     Fortunately, the funding model takes this into account (nursing is a Category 4) and thus
        adequate resources are being generated for an expanded program. It is difficult to find
        appropriately trained and credentialed faculty and staff.

2. Distance Education for Masters in Elementary Education (site based and on-line) – The M.Ed. in
Elementary Ed program is offered on campus and in three off-campus locations.
     The distance education programs are offered in Davie County with the collaboration of Davie
        County Schools; in Surry County with the collaboration of Surry Community College; and in
        Alleghany County with the collaboration of the Alleghany County Schools.



                                                           WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 21
       The programs have expanded to four sites (Davidson) and are likely to grow in enrollment in all
        four locations.
Effectiveness:
     The program’s quality is assessed via an annual program evaluation including student surveys,
        focus groups, and interviews with the principals of the students who are completing the
        program. Program faculty review the evaluation each year to develop suggestions on how to
        strengthen the program.
     The program’s impact is evaluated by the numbers of students in Forsyth and the neighboring
        rural counties that are recruited into and graduate from the programs.
Enhancement:
     To enhance the program, the School of Education and Human Performance, the School of
        Graduate Studies and Research, and the Office of Distance Education will need to
            o realign resources to provide administrative support to faculty and students at distance
                sites and through online learning,
            o provide resources to develop faculty skills in online learning, and
            o enhance support of online learning (via hardware, software, and technical assistance)
Costs and Funding:
         There will be personnel costs for additional support positions and for faculty as the program
          grows.
         The funds needed should be generated from the enrollment growth of the funding model.
         However, the funding model for distance education may need to be rethought to provide for
          more infrastructure needs.

3. Clinical Laboratory Science was the first in the nation to offer the entire degree program online for
working professionals and continues to refine the program to meet the needs of laboratory technicians
who need a baccalaureate degree.

4. An online teacher preparation program in physical education currently exists.
Effectiveness:
     The courses are comparable to in-classroom courses, as students are required to pass courses
        based on prescribed rubrics and course objectives.
Enhancements:
     The program can be improved by providing more classes during more semesters to increase
        opportunities for students to complete their requirements more quickly.
Cost and Funding:
     Funding model and student tuition

5. The Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies (BIS) program (Integrative Studies) is an online degree
completion program. It admits learners who have an associate’s degree (including the AAS) from an
accredited institution, or at least 60 transferable credits from accredited two- or four-year institutions,
approved assessment measures (such as CLEP), and selected military training. It allows students who
have life commitments to continue their education online to achieve a baccalaureate degree.
Effectiveness:
     Number of graduates produced
Enhancements:
     Transfer Advisor who assesses the credit transfer so that students are able to
         credit their learning accurately.



                                                              WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 22
      Increase the number of concentrations available for students to select.
      Electronic assessment of credits to allow students to perform a self-assessment
       of the opportunities available, thus providing access.
     Marketing efforts and working with Transfer Advisors from the North Carolina Community
       College System.
Cost and Funding:
     New staff position in the registrar’s office supported through enrollment growth funds

b. NEW INITIATIVES:

1. Site-based Motorsports Management program in locations where there are high concentrations of
motorsports activities but low concentrations of college graduates. This would be a great opportunity
for collaboration with community colleges and other four-year schools that offer more technically
oriented degrees to this same population.
Effectiveness:
      The program’s quality will be assessed via an annual program evaluation that will include
         student and motorsport industry personnel feedback to ensure that offerings meet the needs of
         both parties.
Cost and Funding:
        There will be personnel costs for additional support positions and faculty. It is estimated two
         full-time faculty positions would be required.

2. Expand the existing distance learning Clinical Laboratory Science program to military bases and
health laboratories. The US Navy is interested in WSSU upgrading the MLT professionals to BS degree
preparation. An intent to plan will be submitted by the end of Summer 2008.
Effectiveness:
     Number and quality of graduates
Cost and Funding:
Current program can accommodate more students who will pay tuition

3. Establish Therapeutic Recreation (TR) online courses and professional development for those who
are licensed recreational therapists. Under NC licensure laws, all currently licensed recreational
therapists and assistants must accumulate continuing education units (CEUs).
     This would provide access to an allied health care profession for a person who already had a
         degree and needed the coursework to become nationally certified and licensed under the NC
         state regulations.
     There are only a few higher education programs in the country that provide access to certificate
         programs online; Florida International University (http://rtonline.fiu.edu/) is an example.
Effectiveness:
     Number and quality of graduates
Cost and Funding:
     Current program can accommodate more students who will pay tuition.
     Additional funding may be sought through grants or collaboration with other organizations.

4. The Birth to Kindergarten concentration will be placed online Fall 2009 and will be marketed
nationally to Head Start programs requiring bachelor’s degrees for their teachers.
Effectiveness:



                                                           WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 23
     Number and quality of graduates from day cares and Head Start programs
Cost and Funding:
     Current program can accommodate more students who will pay tuition.

5. Develop certificate programs in a variety of disciplines for a variety of target audiences.

a. Certificate programs in Clinical Laboratory Science - Improving courses in our existing program and
strengthening the quality is an important issue we would like to focus on.
    1. Certificate in Microbiology
    2. Certificate in Clinical Chemistry
    3. Certificate in Hematology
    4. Certificate in Immunohematology
b. Certificate programs in the following Motorsports Management areas
    1. Sponsorship Management in Motorsport
    2. Fundraising in Motorsport
    3. Facility Management in Motorsport
    4. Customer Service in Motorsport
    5. Short Track Management in Motorsport
    6. Forensics
c. New Programs for Online Delivery
    1. Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies degree completion (Psychology concentration)
    2. Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies degree completion (Computer Science concentration)
    3. Masters in Rehabilitation Counseling with concentration in deafness and hard of hearing
    4. Bachelor of Education - Birth through Kindergarten Education Early Intervention and Preschool
         Concentration (BKE EI/PS)
d. New Certificates In the School of Business and Economics
    1. Global Cluster Certificates. Each certificate will include a number of applied courses in
         geography, culture, language, business practices, and local regulations. Areas of interest include
         China, India, Korea, Japan, West Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East.
    2. Global Supply Chain Management Certificate. To meet the demands of the new FedEx hub
         scheduled for arrival in 2009, this program will enable persons interested in logistics,
         procurement, and transportation to obtain a certification in Global Supply Chain Management.
    3. Nonprofit Leadership Certificate. This post-baccalaureate certificate will be offered in
         conjunction with American Humanics, targeting those working professionals interested in the
         nonprofit arena.
    4. Pastoral Administration. There is a need in the religious community for an online certificate
         program that will assist ministers in administering the business of their congregations and
         houses of worship.
    5. Certificate in Human Resources. The industry certification for individuals entering into the
         Human Resource Management occupation is the Professional in Human Resource Management
         (PHR), administered by the Human Resource Certification Institute.
    6. The Music Business Entrepreneurship and Technology (Music BEAT). The SBE, through the
         Center for Entrepreneurship, will develop and implement a web-based distance learning
         certificate program in Music Business Entrepreneurship for non-degree professionals in the
         music industry that will also lead to an academic minor in Entrepreneurship for non-business
         majors at WSSU.




                                                              WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 24
e. Birth to Kindergarten and Early Intervention and Preschool online concentrations will be placed
online in Fall 2009 and will be marketed nationally to Head Start programs requiring bachelor’s degrees
for their teachers. The EI/PS online concentration will be one-of-a-kind as it targets Infants and Toddlers
with significant disabilities and also preschool children in all early childhood sectors.
f. Delivery strategies for Center for Design Innovation (CDI) courseware created at CDI is being planned,
and relevant discussions with MCNC and the Division of Continual Learning at UNCG have begun. In the
context of creating CDI's permanent facility and Winston-Salem's nomination as an internationally
ranking Top 7 Intelligent Community, we are developing plans for enabling broad access to CDI
programs.
g. Post-Baccalaureate Certificate Program in Forensic Science is being developed for students who
have completed the BS in Chemistry, Molecular Biology, Clinical Laboratory Sciences, or Biotechnology.
Forensics is a central career theme that prepares students for employment opportunities in law
enforcement, healthcare delivery, biomedical research, and pharmaceutical development.

2. ADULT LEARNERS

a. EXISTING INITIATIVES:

1. The accelerated nursing program provides qualified students (who have non-nursing baccalaureate
degrees) with a BSN in 13 months as opposed to two to three years in a traditional program.
Effectiveness:
     Students are completing the degree and passing the boards at 92% or higher annually. There is
        a waiting list.
Enhancements:
     This program will be expanded by including Forsyth Medical Center. This will provide resources
        for additional student scholarship support.
Cost and Funding:
     Continue to maintain the partnership with North Carolina Baptist Hospital that supports the
        accelerated program at over $1 million annually.
     Fund the $30,000 per student for the 11 students not on scholarship by the Forsyth Medical
        Center.

b. NEW INITIATIVES:

1. Evening-Weekend College (EWC) programs
    a. The Gateway Program for retention and success will assist working adults with the transition to
        college and foster success by providing placement testing services geared specifically toward the
        adult population (including military service members and veterans); providing academic advising
        and counseling services; developing and promoting Prior Learning Assessment activities;
        designing and implementing specific courses or programs (or appropriate modifications of
        existing courses or programs) that offer developmental academic experiences; and developing
        and implementing tutoring activities and services;
    b. The Office of Servicemember & Veteran Degree Opportunities (SVDO) will promote access to
        degree programs for military populations especially in keeping with the “Military Student Bill of
        Rights” and SOCS (Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges Consortium) practices and principles.
    c. EWC will collaborate with the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL) and
        academic units to develop and implement faculty development programs focused specifically on
        adult students.


                                                             WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 25
    d. EWC and Distance Learning (DL) can partner with community colleges to provide degree
        programs (such as Motorsports Management and Health Care Management) on their campuses.
    e. EWC and DL (in collaboration with community colleges) can partner with military bases to
        provide degree programs at their facilities.
2. Establish an advanced practice program in occupational therapy to serve those therapists without
graduate degrees. An intent to plan will be submitted Spring 2009.
Effectiveness:
     Number and quality of graduates
Cost and Funding:
     Current program can accommodate more students who will pay tuition.

3. Joint Admissions Programs with Forsyth Technical Community College – WSSU is working
collaboratively with Forsyth Technical Community College to remove any and all barriers to students
who want to transfer to WSSU. In addition, we plan to launch a new program that is designed to
address both the issue of preparedness and the issue of access. We are designing and implementing a
dual admission program that will enable a student to apply and be admitted simultaneously to both
Forsyth Tech and WSSU.
     Students will apply to both schools, at the same time, and be admitted to both, with the
        understanding that when their deficiencies are corrected (Associate Degree earned) that they
        will matriculate directly to WSSU. Better prepared and without needing to go through the
        admissions process, they will enter WSSU armed with the tools to be successful.
     This program has the potential to be a win-win for everyone involved, with the end result being
        vastly improved educational outcomes for larger numbers of students.
     Advising Initiatives - Community College Interaction
             o To promote interaction with community colleges and to smooth the transition of
                 community college students to the four-year college environment, we are proposing
                 regular advisor meet-ups with community college advising staff. These periodic
                 meetings would allow for a greater awareness of concerns and issues between these
                 symbiotic partners.
             o We propose that some academic advising center staff be designated as Community
                 College Transition Advisors to serve as points of contact for community college
                 students interested in transferring to WSSU. These advisors would be specially trained
                 to address the transitional needs of community college students. Costs would be
                 minimal and would require no additional staff.

4. New Articulation Agreements and 2+2 Programs
       a. The Motorsports Management program has worked closely with Forsyth Technical
       Community College to develop the technical component of our degree program. We have also
       met several times with Rowan-Cabarrus Community College representatives and have received
       a verbal agreement to develop an articulation agreement leading to admission into our program
       at WSSU.
       b. Develop articulation agreements (also known as 2 + 2 programs) with community colleges
       that have an associate degree program in recreation or therapeutic recreation (for example,
       Western Piedmont Community College).
       c. A Memorandum of Understanding among WSSU, Forsyth Tech, and NCSA establishes a 2+2
       program structure enabling students to progress through emerging programs in animation and
       digital techniques in response to the demand for design professionals in the local economy.



                                                           WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 26
        d. Students enrolled in the Associate’s degree program in health management at Forsyth Tech
        will be eligible to transfer into the newly established BS degree program in health care
        management at WSSU starting Fall 2008.
Effectiveness:
     These agreements increase program effectiveness in recruiting new students (from community
        colleges) and by streamlining individual students’ attainment of four-year degrees.
Cost and Funding:
     The primary cost is in work hours needed to identify the appropriate community colleges, to
        consult with the appropriate representatives from each college, to develop the articulation
        agreements, and to implement the use of each agreement. Faculty release may be needed.
        Some travel funds are needed for visiting various colleges as needed.

3. UNDERREPRESENTED POPULATIONS INCLUDING PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES

a. EXISTING INITIATIVES:
1. WSSU has undergraduate programs in Therapeutic Recreation and Rehabilitation Studies and a
masters program in Rehabilitation Counseling. These programs not only prepare graduates to work in
fields that address issues of people with disabilities, but they also intentionally attract students with
disabilities from culturally underrepresented groups.
      The masters program was developed in response to the need for professionals in vocational
         rehabilitation to obtain masters degrees in order to remain in the profession.
      The program will implement new focus areas on serving culturally diverse deaf and hard of
         hearing clients within vocational rehabilitation agencies.
      They also have been very active in the inclusion of persons with disabilities through campus and
         community involvement such as Special Olympics and Disability Awareness Month to raise
         awareness and educate students, faculty, staff, and the community about the abilities and
         needs of people who have disabilities.
      They have also been involved in efforts to raise awareness regarding campus accessibility.
Effectiveness:
      Therapeutic Recreation and Rehabilitation Counseling are accredited programs and graduates
         are sought after by public and private employers.
Enhancements:
      These programs could be extended to a broader audience through more online course
         development and through site-based course offerings in conjunction with community colleges in
         the neighboring counties.
Costs and Funding:
      Basic program needs are met through the funding model.
      Rehabilitation Counseling has received grant funds for program infrastructure and student
         scholarships. Funding sources such as community agency participation, grants, and co-
         sponsorship opportunities should be explored.

2. CDI and Applied Research. Several focuses of the Center for Design and Innovation's project work
will bring unusually high numbers of differently-abled people to CDI.
      People who face challenges in walking and moving will work with physical therapists on research
         projects in the motion capture facility.




                                                            WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 27
      People with limited sight and hearing will help to create computer interfaces employing
       multimodal technologies for representing information in visual, aural, and haptic forms.
       Typically, such research projects will extend over several months' time.
      The building design incorporates various ways to accommodate the needs of these diverse
       participants.

b. NEW INITIATIVES:

1. HBCU Chancellors’ Initiatives – Because of the unique mission of the HBCUs, the five chancellors
have begun to work collaboratively to address the issue of chronic underrepresentation of African
American males in institutions of higher education. There are two issues: (1) How do we engage boys in
education at early ages so that they get the preparation they need to go to college? (2) How do we
engage male students once they matriculate at a campus so that they remain and graduate?

Programs that WSSU is Implementing
     a. Mentoring Males (MM) – Male students in freshmen seminar—especially in physical
     education, the other education majors, sport management, business, and Greek
     organizations—will mentor boys and young men in WSSU partner public schools.
     b. Programs such as Motorsports Management and the Center for Design Innovation have
     unique opportunities to interest boys and young men in learning because of the interest
     many have in cars, computer animation, and games.
          Much of CDI's work focuses on visualizations of different kinds and uses of various
             media to explain ideas and enable access to information. Education research shows
             that such alternative forms are better suited for diverse learning styles than
             traditional lectures and text-based media.
          Planned CDI programs also promote learning about technologies and computer
             programming through the sounds and images of new media forms. Researchers and
             educational practitioners have demonstrated that these strategies can bring girls
             and members of minority groups to technical studies and professions. One of the
             professors is developing a summer program to stimulate high-school students'
             creativity with digital tools and to encourage their enrollment in college. We have
             arranged for some of CDI's public speakers to conduct their sessions on WSSU's
             campus
     c. Black Males for Change – This summer academy for African American males in the
     College of Arts and Sciences offers collaborative, active involvement with parents and
     recreation centers. Related initiatives include focuses on the need for more African
     American male teachers, recruiting more students from the pre-college groups, learning
     about African American history, leveraging students’ interest in languages, offering a
     Conference on African American Males (on University Day), and initiating a study about why
     public schools are using strategies that negatively impact the children.
     d. Real Men Teach (RMT) is a teacher/leader program in the School of Education and
     Human Performance aimed at increasing the academic and leadership capacity of male
     students who are interested in becoming teachers. The focal target groups are existing
     college males who have been admitted and those who have not yet been admitted to
     Teacher Education. Other target groups are African American and Hispanic high school
     junior and seniors with an interest in teacher education as a career.
     Effectiveness:



                                                          WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 28
           Effectiveness will be assessed by male retention numbers and the number of males
            who are successfully admitted to Teacher Education programs.
           Accountability is at multiple levels: at the dean’s level for securing financial support,
            and with the RMT advisors for recruitment and retention of participants.
      Cost and Funding:
           Approximately $15,000 annually.
           Support services for male participants (i.e., books, cultural experiences, seminars,
            paraphernalia, speakers, contractual services, printing, recruitment materials)
           Currently funds to support the program come from the dean’s budget. Academic
            Affairs is pursuing external funding through alumni and WSSU supporters.

2. Camp Bones – The focus of the project is to interest junior high school and high school students of
color in nursing and health careers through hands-on experiences. The participants will include minority
adolescents from single-parent or low-income homes as well as rural, migrant or urban areas. As a
partner, we will address issues of academic preparation, lack of knowledge about health careers, and
the need for mentoring.
     The program admits a cohort of about 10 students per year where they are exposed to certain
         components of the curriculum, such as anatomy (thus the name – Camp Bones).
     Fun activities between students and faculty occur so that they see nursing as a positive career
         option.
     Students visit hospitals and other health agencies, attend public presentations, and learn about
         research in health sciences.
     By the end of the program, students have a better understanding of nursing and other health
         careers.
     It is expected that this project will increase student interest in the health professions and result
         in increased enrollment among students of color. The model was developed at UNC-Wilmington
         and is being replicated at WSSU this year.
Cost and Funding:
     Funded by the North Carolina GlaxoSmithKline Foundation

4. BETTER PREPARED TO ENTER AND SUCCEED
Data presented in the UNC Tomorrow Commission Report show that a disproportionate number of
African American and Hispanic students are attending public school in poor school districts. Those who
complete their high school degrees may well be underprepared for the rigor of higher education.
Winston-Salem State University is currently faced with a challenge in that one out of every four
freshmen will not be retained beyond their first year and many of those who leave do so after
demonstrating poor academic performance. Current institutional assessment data have shown that
there are many factors that influence poor student outcomes; however, the most pressing and far-
reaching challenge is that students are not academically and/or socially primed for college. As was
described previously, WSSU is working with the local community college to create dual admissions
programs and to strengthen articulation agreements so that students can strengthen their academic
readiness through the community college system before transferring to WSSU. Some students who are
admitted directly to WSSU can still benefit from structured programs between high school and college
that connect them to the institution through a peer group and faculty mentors, and that help build
confidence and good academic behaviors that will help them as they move through the university.

a. EXISTING INITIATIVES:



                                                              WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 29
1. Accelerated Summer Program (ASP) – For many years WSSU had a summer bridge program that was
offered to students whose placement scores required them to enroll in at least two developmental skills
courses. This program was taught during summer school and used a learning community model in
which students completed their developmental requirements and at least one university course usually
in the Humanities or Fine Arts. This program was discontinued due to funding issues but is being
considered again.
Effectiveness:
      Students completing the program performed at or above the level of their cohort in subsequent
        classes.
Cost and Funding:
      WSSU paid for the instructors, tuition, and living expenses of students.
      The new funding model is that students will pay for tuition, fees, and living expenses like other
        summer school students and that the institution will pay for faculty and support staff out of the
        summer school budget.

2. Life Sciences Bridge and Support Programs
a. Preparing, Recruiting, and Inspiring Minorities to Enhance their Readiness in Science Institute
 (PRIMERS summer bridge program) is designed to provide assistance to students with marginal
academic preparation. Tinto and colleagues4 suggest that motivation is a major requirement to
stimulate greater competencies in foundational science courses.
     PRIMERS is a coping intervention for all Life Sciences and Chemistry majors in collaboration with
         University College.
     PRIMERS seeks to introduce students to the discipline without the negative consequences that
         students may experience during their first semester.
     PRIMERS introduces students to post-secondary science careers.
Effectiveness:
     It is anticipated that PRIMERS participants will be academically prepared to excel in any
         biological science discipline following targeted onsite and online engagement.
Cost and Funding:
     $20,000 adjunct salaries and supplies
     The Department of Life Sciences is requesting collaborative and budgetary support from the US
         Department of Education and University College for the expansion of student development
         programs.
b. LARES (Learning and Academic Retention to Enhance Scientific Success) is a process created as part
of the recruitment, retention, and readiness model to improve and enhance student knowledge in life
and physical sciences.
     LARES offers a coordinated series of activities designed to increase the percentage of students
         that successfully enroll in courses traditionally associated with extremely high failure rates.
     LARES is an intervention strategy that provides sustainable and systematic guidance for self-
         directed learning and peer-based supplemental instructions in support of the core mission of
         the newly formed WSSU University College.
Effectiveness:
     Outcomes include preparedness for upper level coursework, readiness for internship
         experiences, improved standardized tests scores, increased competencies in basic skills,
         improved problem-based analytical skills, focused career goals, and increased workforce
         productivity.



                                                            WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 30
Cost and Funding:
     $9200 for instructors and supplies from academic support budget

c. Project Strengthen is a university-wide program designed to expand student development and
research activities at Winston-Salem State University.
      Project Strengthen aims to increase the numbers of students entering professional and graduate
        schools and to improve their proficiency in research methods, biological and biomedical
        research techniques, and scientific presentation skills needed for success in biomedical careers.
Effectiveness:
      Students participating in this project demonstrate both technical and professional qualities to
        seamlessly progress into graduate and professional studies and careers in industrial research
        and development.
Cost and Funding
      $25,000 for summer stipends, Eleanor Nunn Lectureship planning, and office supplies.
d. Health Careers Opportunity Program (HCOP) is designed to assist individuals from underrepresented
populations to enter and graduate from a health or allied health program. HCOP is housed in the
Department of Life Sciences and partners with Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston-
Salem Forsyth County Schools, Winston-Salem Urban League, University of North Carolina School of
Medicine, and Campbell University School of Pharmacy. Students enrolled in HCOP include middle
school, high school, and WSSU freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors. A number of student-
centered activities ranging from Saturday academies, summer enrichment programs (day and
residential), and research experiences are provided to participants.
Effectiveness:
      Historically, students completing the HCOP program performed at or above the national average
        SAT and End-of-Grade Score.
      Over 30% of students enrolled in the HCOP matriculate into a two or four year undergraduate
        health or allied health program and 20% of undergraduate students enroll in graduate degree-
        granting programs.
Cost and Funding:
      $80,000 annually for instructors, consultants, travel, and educational supplies.

3. The Biomedical Research Infrastructure Center (BRIC) has provided intensive student development
programs and, for WSSU students majoring in the biomedical sciences, research opportunities with
productive teacher-scholars who are interested in and committed to mentoring promising students in
research.
Effectiveness:
      Obtained external funding to support student research experiences, supplies, and travel.
      Obtained external funding to support students in study-/research-abroad programs, thereby
        providing students with the opportunity to study abroad and work in labs that address issues
        that are global in scope.
Enhancement:
     Enhance the training component for students by providing a full-time Research Technician and a
        Post-Doctoral Student.
     The RIMI labs provided financial support for six students in the faculty labs. Financial support
        should be provided for 12 students with research assistantships.
     The target is two students per year to travel abroad for summer experience.
Cost and Funding:



                                                           WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 31
       $10,000 for student travel and supplies.
       $25,000 for research supplies and maintenance of the lab facilities to be conductive to carry our
        research activities in the labs.
       $120,000 annually for research technician and post-doctoral fellows.

b. MARC-U*STAR Program (Minority Access to Research Careers/Undergraduate Student Training in
Academic Research) is designed to identify, inspire, motivate and train the next generation of
biomedical scientists who hold leadership positions in cutting-edge scientific research in the biomedical
and behavioral sciences.
Effectiveness:
     MARC scholars were accepted in an average of 2 summer internships each.
     Several students will be present posters at national conferences during the summer.
     Historically, students graduating as MARC Scholars have pursued the terminal degrees in their
         areas of specialization at nationally recognized universities.
    Cost and Funding:
     The MARC U*STAR program is supported by an NIGMS/NIH five-year grant totaling $794,950.
c. The U.S.A. Brazil Consortium – Biomedical Sciences Exchanges (BSE), a collaborative project between
WSSU Biomedical Research Center and Wake Forest University School of Medicine, is sponsored by the
U.S. Department of Education Fund for Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) and the
Brazilian Ministry of Education's Office for Improvement of Higher Education Personnel (CAPES). BSE is
designed to train WSSU students in integrative biology and to strengthen the interchanges of cultural
and scientific values to widen the horizons of students through participation in a biomedical research
apprenticeship program in Brazil.
Effectiveness:
     Number of WSSU students participating in the program
Enhancements:
     This program would be expanded to include more WSSU students who wish to take advantage
         of the unique opportunity to integrate their study-aboard experiences with research
         experiences.
     Flexibility in course requirements so that study-abroad opportunities are easily accommodated
         in the course of study paradigm.
Cost and Funding:
     Continue to maintain the partnership with Wake Forest University that supports the program at
         $29,106/year federal funding. WSSU students participating in this program receive financial
         support for housing and travel.
     Student tuition at WSSU while studying abroad.

4. The WSSU Center for Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education (CMSTE) – The mission of
the WSSU CMSTE is to strengthen the quality and increase the number of teachers in mathematics and
science education and to increase the pool of North Carolina high school graduates prepared to pursue
careers requiring mathematics and science.
Effectiveness:
     Effectiveness of CMSTE professional development will be assessed by the number of workshop
        participants and feedback from workshop evaluations.
     Accountability for the effectiveness of the CMSTE professional development rests with the
        Director of the CMSTE, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, and the Provost
Enhancement:



                                                           WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 32
      More consultants with expertise in their field need to be hired to conduct appropriate
       workshops.
     Because of the need for laboratory spaces and computer facilities, continuous collaboration
       between the Center and the STEM departments at WSSU is essential.
Cost and Funding:
     $50,000 to hire consultants and to augment equipment needs for the STEM programs. This is a
       request for new funding. The Center expects to complete a grant proposal for about $20,000 per
       year.

5. The WSSU Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Scholars Program is a
University-supported initiative whose purpose is to prepare undergraduates majoring in the STEM fields
for graduate and professional education.
Effectiveness:
      The number of students (STEM Scholars) who complete the summer bridge program.
            o The completion rate is 100% for STEM Scholars (25), who participated in the summer
                  bridge program.
      The end of term grade point average (GPA) for STEM Scholars.
            o The mean GPA at the end of fall 2007 semester for each cohort was as follows: 2004
                  (3.6); 2005 (3.6); 2006 (3.8); 2007 (3.4). The mean grade point average for all current
                  STEM Scholars (35) is 3.6.
      The number of students that graduate as STEM Scholars and enroll in post-baccalaureate
        programs.
            o The three-year retention rate for the program is 94%. Of the 23 students who have
                  graduated as STEM Scholars, we know that 11 enrolled in graduate degree programs.
      The number of summer research internships that STEM Scholars participate in.
            o Since 2005, STEM Scholars (49) have participated in summer research internships
Enhancements:
      Increasing parental involvement.
      Greater flexibility in selecting general education courses.
      Improved technological efficiency.
Cost and Funding:
      Title III funding which has already been allocated could be used to enhance parental
        involvement in the STEM Scholars Program.

Issues that Could Benefit from System-Wide Collaborations
Preparing for Early College Graduates
The governor’s widespread marketing of opportunities for high school students to take community
college classes has repercussions for WSSU, as well as the entire UNC system. The system and/or WSSU
will soon need to address the status of 18- or 19-year old students who have graduated with an
Associate’s degree from a community college upon matriculation at a four-year institution (i.e., in terms
of academic advising, major selection, housing availability, campus parking, etc., are these students
treated as freshmen or as juniors?).




                                                            WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 33
4.3 IMPROVING PUBLIC EDUCATION

INTRODUCTION:

Winston-Salem State University was the first historically black university in the nation to offer a degree
in Elementary Education. The alumni of what had been known as the Winston-Salem Teachers’ College
have been ardent supporters of the Institution and provide strong evidence of outstanding preparation
as school educators and leaders. Currently, there are 11 teacher education programs: Elementary,
Birth-Kindergarten, Special Education, Middle Grades, Physical Education, Spanish, English, Social
Studies, Art, Music, and Mathematics. There are two established graduate programs: Master of
Elementary Education and the Master of Arts in Teaching. The Master of School Administration is being
planned.

Education programs are administratively located in the School of Education and Human Performance
(SEHP). The identified high needs programs, math education and science education are in the College
of Arts and Sciences; Special Education and Middle Grades programs are located in the Department of
Education. These particular programs are mentioned because they rise to the level of special attention
for recruitment and retention efforts. Within the last six months, the Department of Education has
expanded collaborations with the Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools and Forsyth Technical
Community College to strategically address the shortage of licensed lateral entry teachers and to create
a partnership that facilitates a complete program of preparation offered by the university and the
community college. Although preparation for all programs is offered, the focused collaborative initiative
is on middle grades, math, science, and special education licenses.

The Department of Education—in collaboration with the College of Arts and Sciences, Academic Affairs,
and Enrollment Management—began to re-examine the effective and non-effective strategies that were
being used to recruit students to teacher education programs. We collaborated with Noel Levitz
consultants and UNC General Administration to create new focused recruitment processes that will yield
a better return on our efforts. From that collaboration a Teacher Recruitment Plan was developed,
submitted, and approved by the university and UNC General Administration.

It was determined that more focused marketing strategies were essential and recruitment efforts were
to focus on
    1. lateral entry teachers;
    2. development of stronger relationships with community colleges and local school districts;
    3. critical needs areas, including middle grades, special education, math, science, and Spanish
        secondary education; and
    4. the identification of a Teacher Education Recruiter.

In February 2008, UNC General Administration provided focused growth funds ($55,000) for three years
to support the Teacher Recruitment Plan that currently guides WSSU’s recruitment and retention
efforts.

Listed below are some of the strategies that have been implemented to date. Some of the strategies
were implemented without focused growth funds. Those strategies that are supported by Focused
Growth funds are designated below by (FG):
     a) Hiring of a full-time Teacher Recruiter (FG)



                                                             WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 34
    b) Development of a Master of Arts in Teaching program with specialization in Middle Grades
        (mathematics and science) or Special Education.
    c) Development of the Triad Partnership Opportunity (TPO) program for lateral entry teachers
    d) Development of the Teacher Education Advisement Partnership Center (TEAP-C) which provides
        support for traditional teacher education majors who need assistance in passing Praxis I and
        Praxis II examinations.
    e) Development of a WSSU Teacher Recruitment Committee composed of Academic Affairs,
        Enrollment Management, Department of Education, College of Arts and Sciences, and Office of
        Marketing and Communication. This Committee meets regularly to discuss and implement
        marketing strategies to targeted populations.
    f) Development of a the TPO committee composed of professional personnel from the Winston-
        Salem/Forsyth County Schools, Forsyth Technical Community College, teacher recruiters, and
        the deans of SEHP and Arts and Sciences. This committee meets monthly to plan and
        implement recruitment of early lateral entry teachers.
     g) WSSU’s technical recruitment system (Hobson) has been loaded with teacher recruitment
        literature that is distributed in response to inquiries.

Each of the items listed above has yielded positive results; however, because many of these strategies
are newly implemented, results are inconclusive because data are just now being collected. More
details of some of the above mentioned strategies are detailed in the following narrative.

This section will detail existing programs and initiatives to both improve teacher education at WSSU and
to recruit, retain, and graduate (or provide avenue for licensure) more students into and from teacher
education programs, especially in high-demand areas.

WSSU’s RESPONSE:

For those campuses with education-degree programs, improving the quality of these programs is
consistent with the goals identified by the UNC Tomorrow Commission (Sec. 4.3.1).

Quality of Programs
The Department of Education along with the secondary education programs in the College of Arts and
Sciences have met all national accreditation and state approval standards. Additionally, the programs
are currently being revisited and re-visioned to meet the new North Carolina “Power” Standards.
     This re-visioning process ensures that teacher education candidates upon graduation meet the
        same standards of performance of new teachers already employed by any NC school district.
     Department of Education faculty meet collectively to examine the content of each course in
        every teacher education paradigm.
     Courses are examined for quality and content alignment to four different sets of standards;
        effective sequencing, progression of competencies, expectations of student mastery and
        learning outcomes, and appropriate assessment measurements.
     The College of Arts and Sciences teacher education programs will soon begin the same process.
     The expected outcomes of the re-visioning process are that every paradigm will be cogent and
        standards-based and that teacher education candidates will be better prepared to enter P-12
        classrooms.

Since 2005, the Teacher Education programs have restructured their curricula to better address national
accreditation and state-approved standards.


                                                           WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 35
       The Middle grades program and Special Education programs have been changed to provide
        efficiency of offerings, learner outcomes, and assessments that are research- and standards-
        driven.
       The Special Education curriculum received (2007) Department of Public Instruction’s approval
        for a replacement of a special education curriculum. The new program is Special Education:
        General Curriculum. This program better addresses a wider population of P-12 student with
        more diverse special needs.

b. NEW INITIATIVE:
Collaborative Effort:
1. Recommend that Winston-Salem (Piedmont Triad) be the central North Carolina location for a branch
of the NC Center for the Advancement of Teaching (NCCAT). The new center would leverage the assets
at all the institutions of higher education in the Piedmont and our cultural assets like Old Salem, SECCA,
and Reynolda House.

For those campuses with education-degree programs, increasing the number of education-degree
graduates or alternative completers, especially in the areas of science and math and other high need
areas, consistent with or in excess of currently established benchmarks.

a. EXISTING INITIATIVES:
1. The TEAP-C began operating in 2005. In 2008, the TEAP-C documented an increase in students
preparing and passing the PRAXIS I exam. Although the Department of Education faculty members do
not teach basic skills, the support services for these students are offered by the Department of
Education via the TEAP-C.
     It is important to note that the Praxis I exam is not an education exam. PRAXIS I is a basic skills
        test that serves as an entrance requirement to teacher education programs.
     The TEAP-C sponsors diversity seminars that include school districts and community partners as
        presenters and participants. Instruction-based seminars have included ESL acquisition;
        classroom management; and instructional strategies for main-streamed students. Other
        seminars included the Holocaust, religious diversity in schools, migration of Hispanic students to
        NC P-12 schools, and self image (the “Doll” Study).
Effectiveness:
     The statistics below provide the increased percentage of student participation:
                     Praxis I Workshops         Taking and Passing Percentage of students passing
                                                the exam               who participated in the workshops
 2004-2005           0                          7
 2005-2006           First year - 3             3                      100%
 2006-2007           5                          44                     82%
 2007-2008           5                          58                     86%
 2008 Sp             3                          11                     78%

      There was a mean increase of 84% of students passing the Praxis I exam in 2005 as compared to
       2004.
     There were a significant number of students actively participating in test preparation.
Cost and Funding:
     The TEAP-C is funded by Title II and provides additional services beyond test preparation.




                                                            WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 36
2. Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) – The Department of Education received approval to offer the
Master of Arts in Teaching with specialization in middle grades mathematics and science. An addendum
to offer specialization in special education was submitted and approved (2008) by the NC Department of
Public Instruction. The MAT program is designed in two phases: Phase I prepares teachers to receive the
initial license which secures the necessary credentials for employment, and Phase II (if they choose to
continue) provides an advanced graduate degree that raises their salary pay scale.
      The MAT program specifically addresses high-need areas at the middle grades and secondary
           levels; the focus is on providing initial license and the professional license for lateral teachers
           who do not hold a teaching license but are currently teaching in P-12 schools. Three critical
           areas of the MAT program are being addressed: middle grades, special education, and
           mathematics education.
      Consultation with Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools indicates that there are over 200
           unlicensed teachers in the district. Although these teachers have undergraduate degrees, they
           do not hold a teaching initial license.
      The MAT program can be completed in four semesters.
      Currently, an addendum to the MAT curriculum in mathematics education is being developed by
           the College of Arts and Sciences and the Department of Education. The Office of Marketing and
           Communication is assisting in preparing literature and electronic information to advertise the
           MAT program to lateral entry teachers.

3. Triad Partnership Opportunity (TPO) – The TPO is a collaborative initiative with the local school
district and community college to offer a “one-stop” course preparation leading to the initial teaching
license.
     The Regional Alternative License Center (RALC) provides course evaluation to lateral entry
          teachers. These teachers typically shop from institution to institution for the necessary courses
          identified by RALC. WSSU has developed a program that offers 15 core credit courses to
          teachers in the Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools who that need these courses.
     The TPO offers the core courses in consecutive semesters and summer at reduced tuition and on
          convenient schedules.
     Additionally, we have partnered with the NC Model Teacher Consortium to provide tuition
          reimbursement for teachers who are assigned to Equity Plus schools. This summer will welcome
          the first cohort, and there are 27 teachers already enrolled. With the new district hires, the next
          cohort is anticipated to exceed 50 participants.
Effectiveness:
     The quality of the program is assessed through an annual program evaluation that includes
          student surveys, focus groups, and interviews with the principals of the students who are
          completing the program. The evaluation is reviewed by the program faculty each year to
          develop suggestions on how to strengthen the program.
     The impact of the program is evaluated by the numbers of students in Forsyth and the
          neighboring rural counties that are recruited and graduate from the program.
Enhancements:
     Recruiting more students into the program.
     Increasing the number of courses offered online.
Cost and Funding:
     Although this project is supported through the already existing services of University personnel,
          it is very time consuming. If funds were allocated for this project, the anticipated cost would be




                                                               WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 37
        approximately $10,000 annually. These funds would be used to support teacher participants by
        providing admission fee waivers, book stipends and parking fees.
       Initially faculty positions and support will need to come from existing departmental resources
        that will be replaced with new resources as enrollment grows, assuming that the General
        Assembly continues to fund enrollment growth.

b. NEW INITIATIVES:

1. Real Men Teach (RMT) is a teacher/leader program aimed at increasing the academic and leadership
capacity of male students who are interested in becoming teachers.
     The focal target groups are existing college males who have been admitted and those who have
        not yet been admitted to Teacher Education.
     Other target groups are African American and Hispanic high school junior and seniors with an
        interest in teacher education as a career.
     As leadership and teacher competencies are developed with the RMT participants, the members
        will then serve as recruiters and advocates for males entering the profession. They will be
        assigned strategic middle and high schools to provide teaching demonstrations, conduct
        seminars, talk to other 6-12 males, work with school counselors, and mentor middle school and
        high school males with the intent of entering college and choosing teacher education as a major.
Effectiveness:
     Effectiveness will be assessed by male retention numbers and the number of males who are
        successfully admitted to Teacher Education programs.
     Accountability is at multiple levels: the dean’s level for securing financial support and the RMT
        advisors for recruitment and retention of participants.
Cost and Funding:
     Approximately $15,000 annually.
     Support services for male participants (i.e., books, cultural experiences, seminars, paraphernalia,
        speakers, contractual services, printing, recruitment materials)
     Currently, funds to support the program come from the dean’s budget. Academic Affairs is
        pursuing external funding through alumni and WSSU supporters.

2. “Teach Now” is an initiative to provide mathematics and science majors in the College of Arts and
Sciences an opportunity to obtain a teacher licensure by the end of their senior year.
     The initiative proposes to have these students complete the PRAXIS II exam in mathematics or
        science and complete an application for the Master of Arts in Teaching.
     This initiative will fast-track them into a master’s program and provide them employment with a
        local school district, thus allowing them to complete the MAT within four semesters.
     These students would have already acquired the required content courses at the undergraduate
        level. During the junior year, some pedagogical courses will be added to their curriculum; they
        will be provided a personal interview with the local school district (with an intent to hire); their
        graduate application fee to WSSU’s MAT program will be waived, and tuition for the entire MAT
        program will be provided. Book stipends should be provided by the school district.
     Participants will be contractually obligated to teach a minimum of three years with the
        supporting school district.
Effectiveness:
     Effectiveness will be assessed by the number of math and science students who are admitted to
        the MAT program and the number of MAT completers.



                                                             WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 38
      There are multiple levels of accountability: Deans of the College of Arts and Sciences and School
       of Education and Human Performance; Teacher Recruiters; Mathematics and Science faculty;
       and the School of Graduate Studies and Research.
Cost and Funding:
     Approximately $50,000 annually.
     Funds would be used for books and tuition scholarships for participating students. The students
       must agree to teach one year for every year of full tuition that they receive.
     Other funding sources will be determined, but we will work with local businesses and the
       Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools to identify funds.

Increasing the geographic distribution of education graduates, especially in the areas of science and
math and other high need areas, in rural areas and other areas experiencing high teacher shortages.

a. EXISTING INITIATIVES:

1. Distance Education for Masters of Education in Elementary Education (site-based and online) –
This is a 36-hour graduate program that is taught on campus; in Davie County with the collaboration of
Davie County Schools; in Surry County with the Collaboration of Surry Community College; and in
Alleghany County with the collaboration of the Alleghany County Schools. The program has expanded to
four sites and is likely to grow in enrollment in all four locations. Currently, there are over forty
participants in the program. The M.Ed. program is one of our signature programs. The program
supports the development of application for the National Board of Professional Teachers Standards.
Effectiveness:
     The quality of the program is assessed through an annual program evaluation that includes
         student surveys, focus groups, and interviews with the principals of the students who are
         completing the program. The evaluation is reviewed by the program faculty each year to
         develop suggestions on how to strengthen the program.
     The impact of the program is evaluated by the increased numbers of students in Forsyth and the
         neighboring rural counties who are recruited, retained, and graduate from the program.
Enhancement:
     To enhance the program, the School of Education and Human Performance, the Graduate
         School and the Office of Distance Education will need to
             o realign resources to provide administrative support to faculty and students at distance
                  sites and through online learning;
             o provide resources to develop more online courses to be added to the existing inventory
                  (the continuous development of online courses will increase access for rural
                  populations, working adults, and non-traditional students);
             o enhance support of online teaching learning (hardware, software, technical assistance);
                  and
             o provide support for and opportunities to implement students’ action research projects.
Costs and Funding:
          New personnel positions will be created to support program growth.
          The funds needed should be generated from the enrollment growth of the funding model.
          However, the funding model for distance education may need to be re-distributed to provide
           for more infrastructure needs.

b. NEW INITIATIVES:



                                                            WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 39
1. Enhance Transfers between Community College and WSSU in Early Childhood Education (this is in
development and has the potential to serve as a model program to help displaced workers in rural
counties). An articulation agreement is in place between the designated institutions; also, a state-wide
articulation agreement between the Early Childhood AAS and the WSSU BS is being negotiated. The
proposed activity includes solicitation of grants to minimize transfer difficulties.

       When transferring to the university, students at the community college who have the Associate
        in Applied Science Early Childhood (AAS ECE) degree lack a number of core classes that are
        required in the university’s baccalaureate program.
       The ability to pay for the classes seems to be more challenging for the students rather than the
        need for additional classes. All public schools in Surry County are Title I schools, except for two,
        indicating an economic disadvantage among the Surry county population as a whole. Many of
        the students are dislocated workers seeking a degree as a result of factory layoffs. The North
        American Federal Trade Agreement (NAFTA) often pays for the classes, but generally the AAS
        degrees are those designated as degrees that are funded through NAFTA – the point being that
        AAS is a technical degree that places people in jobs more quickly. NAFTA or other federal aid
        packages will not pay for courses that are not in the regular AAS paradigm. This is true also for
        those taking the AAS in ECE degree.
       In collaboration with the Director of the Surry CC Early Childhood program and the executive
        director of Surry County Smart Start, a plan was developed for initiating a grant proposal, to be
        funded through Surry County Smart Start, for Early Childhood providers working in Surry County
        childcare centers to be awarded funds to offset the cost of the eight core classes. The courses
        are to be taken at the community college before transfer and will be included on the transcript,
        creating the possibility for the AAS ECE student to transfer into the WSSU BKE program as a
        junior. The cost of the Praxis examination has also been discussed as part of the award. If this
        grant is funded, it can be replicated across the state of North Carolina for all Smart Start
        agencies and NC Community College ECE programs wishing to transfer to WSSU.

2. A Collaborative Grant from UNC GA was awarded to Winston-Salem State University for collaborative
efforts with Mount Airy City Schools and a Winston-Salem charter school. The goal is to help elementary
teachers improve their literacy-teaching skills so they can help low-performing students. The university's
School of Education and Human Performance and its College of Arts and Sciences will work with Mount
Airy City Schools and Woodson Charter School. The program will be provided to teachers this summer
and on several weekends in the fall and next spring. The initiative will affect 25 teachers as well as 400
students in Mount Airy and 180 at the charter school.
Cost and Funding:
     $291,000 grant from UNC General Administration

Enhancing professional development programs for public school teachers and administrators, including
content-based, methods-based, and mentoring programs.

a. EXISTING INITIATIVES:

1. The Department of Education provides professional development in curriculum design, math and
science curriculum, classroom management, culturally responsive pedagogy, English as a Second
Language and student religious diversity to WSFCS teachers and to the undergraduate students in
teacher education programs. Our main target group has been the faculty at the Winston-Salem


                                                             WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 40
Preparatory Academy, but the professional development activities, seminars, and workshops are
available to all teachers in the WSFCS district.

Three Department of Education faculty members with specialization in mathematics, science, and
special education are assigned to the Winston-Salem Preparatory Academy and work with the school’s
faculty to enhance the specialty area curriculum.

2. The WSSU Center for Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education (CMSTE), a member of the
North Carolina Mathematics and Science Education Network (NC-MSEN), is committed to providing
high-quality professional development programs in mathematics and science education (preK-12) that
enhance teacher learning and support state and national educational guidelines.
     The mission of the WSSU CMSTE is to strengthen the quality and increase the number of
        teachers in mathematics and science education and to increase the pool of North Carolina high
        school graduates prepared to pursue careers requiring mathematics and science.
     The CMSTE Professional Development Center collaborates with local school districts and other
        programs to meet the needs of teachers in mathematics, science, and technology.
     Currently, the CMSTE offers workshops that meet the criteria for teachers to obtain renewal
        credits for licensure.
Effectiveness:
     Effectiveness of CMSTE professional development will be assessed by the number of workshop
        participants and feedback from workshop evaluations.
     Accountability for the effectiveness of the CMSTE professional development rests with the
        Director of the CMSTE, the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, and the Provost.
Enhancement:
     More consultants with expertise in their field need to be hired to conduct appropriate
        workshops. These consultants bring the knowledge of the current trends in the delivery of STEM
        education and best practices in those areas.
     Because of the need for laboratory spaces and computer facilities, continuous collaboration
        between the Center and the STEM departments at WSSU is essential.
Cost and Funding:
     $50,000 to hire consultants and to augment equipment needs for the STEM programs. This is a
        request for new funding. The Center expects to complete a grant proposal for about $20,000 per
        year. Other grant proposals are under consideration.

b. NEW INITIATIVES:

1. Professional Development Teleconferences – Faculty can reach out to distant school districts by
providing professional development via teleconferencing. By providing the newest methods to in-
service teachers, we help ensure their students’ future access to higher education.
Effectiveness:
     Effectiveness would be assessed by participant and administrator survey.
     Quality of instruction and student learning will be assessed by the school system.
Cost and Funding:
         The cost is dependent on licensing fees and faculty compensation.
         School districts would pay for the cost out of their professional development budgets.
2. Student Loan Forgiveness – The University plans to engage rural school districts and the state to
participate in a student loan forgiveness program in exchange for teaching in one of the districts.



                                                            WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 41
Students who graduate from Winston-Salem State University can take advantage of this program. Such a
program will (1) increase the number of students into teacher education and (2) increase the number of
teachers going to rural districts.
Cost and Funding:
     The cost would be borne through shared grant funding, the rural school district, and the state.




                                                          WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 42
4.4 ECONOMIC TRANSFORMATION AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

INTRODUCTION:
As in other areas of the nation, the Piedmont Triad region is experiencing a significant shift in its
economic drivers. The local economy is changing from one driven by tobacco, textiles, and furniture
manufacturing to one based on healthcare, logistics, financial services, and knowledge management. In
this environment, all institutions of higher learning have been charged with developing the knowledge
resources that drive economic development, helping citizens and communities plan for new industries.
They must equip the workforce with the skills required to drive the new industries. Winston-Salem
State University has recognized this need and, through its academic programs, centers and strategic
planning, has begun to address the needs of both the urban area of Winston-Salem and the rural areas
and counties surrounding the city. New avenues for employment and economic prosperity for
communities and citizens are aggressively targeted with vision statements and strategic goals.

WSSU has been integrally involved in the economic transformation of the Piedmont region for many
years and has played a major role in providing employees for the large healthcare industry. Recently,
through the activities and centers of the School of Business and Economics (SBE), the multi-institutional
Center for Design Innovation, and the Simon Green Atkins Community Development Corporation, it has
accelerated its efforts as a change agent for the region, with particular emphasis on identifying and
meeting the needs of underserved populations in neighborhoods contiguous to the university, within
Forsyth County, and in surrounding areas.

The work of the Small Business Technology Development Center (SBTDC) is well known. It has been a
catalyst for economic development throughout the state. The office located in the School of Business
and Economics (SBE) has served clients primarily within Forsyth County; recently, it has been proactively
seeking clients in the rural areas of Surrey and Yadkin counties. Plans for expansion include meeting the
office’s staffing needs and working more collaboratively with the SBE Masters in Business Administration
program to offer more hands-on, in-class projects that link students with clients and real-life problems.
Those UNC campuses that house SBTDCs will collaborate more closely in order to assess “best practices”
in their individual operations. Once identified, those practices will be shared with other campuses that
do not have SBTDCs. This assessment and sharing will utilize SBTDC as a resource for development in
new locations in the state.

The Center for Entrepreneurship (CFE) has devoted itself to fostering entrepreneurship through
knowledge creation and training for the citizens of the Piedmont region. It has positioned itself to
collaborate with other academic units of the WSSU campus to train students in the basics of
entrepreneurship, no matter what their majors. Its most important task, however, has been the
provision of entrepreneurial training through collaboration for those underserved populations in Forsyth
and surrounding counties who lack a tradition of business ownership or who have inadequate
preparation for grassroots business ownership. It fosters the spirit of entrepreneurship through such
innovative initiatives as a program designed for promoters of music business; an initiative to meet the
entrepreneurial needs of STEM scholars, and the delivery of entrepreneurship and capitalism training to
high school students in the area.

The Center for Design Innovation (CDI) resulted from an economic development study by Angelou
Economics prompted by severe job losses in Piedmont. The study found that in the midst of this
downturn, there was an economic sector associated with design that was not only healthy but growing.
Angelou Economics recommended that a strategy for economic development could be to accelerate the


                                                            WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 43
growth of this creative industry sector. This result led to discussion among universities in Winston-
Salem and Greensboro about creating organizations dedicated to promoting creative and design activity.
The University of North Carolina established CDI largely as an economic development project, aiming to
accelerate the growth of creative enterprises in the Piedmont Triad by supporting new and developing
businesses and by modeling academic collaborations with industry. The General Assembly dedicated
funds for the development of a center in Winston-Salem as a collaboration among Winston-Salem State
University, the North Carolina School of the Arts, and Forsyth Technical Community College.

The Simon Green Atkins Community Development Corporation (SGACDC), a community-based nonprofit
organization named for the university’s founder, was established by Winston-Salem Sate University and
incorporated in 1998 to reverse neighborhood decline and help residents regain control of their
neighborhoods. To date, the CDC has helped eighteen families become homeowners, loaned $77,000 to
small businesses that have created 65 jobs, built 13 new homes, and provided technical assistance to
homebuyers, entrepreneurs and neighborhood associations.

Motorsports Management is a new program that has the potential to attract both those seeking to
further their education and those seeking to expand their businesses’ reach into one of North Carolina’s
emerging employment segments. The motorsports industry has broad reach into many areas of
employment and currently accounts for over 26,000 jobs in North Carolina alone. There are deep
historical roots surrounding racing in the rural counties near WSSU. In fact, Bowman Gray Stadium, the
oldest weekly running track in NASCAR, is home to the Motorsports Management program offices. The
university is in a position to leverage the affinity many have for racing into jobs in existing and new
businesses, in both the traditional populations attracted to racing and to new populations that the
industry is reaching out to attract. Armed with knowledge and experiences in the management and
production of motorsports events, graduates will be able to create businesses in their communities or
expand existing businesses.

Outlined in this section is more information about the initiatives that were introduced and about plans
for those initiatives to expand their scope. These include
     1. Small Business and Technology Development Center in the School of Business and Economics
     2. Center for Entrepreneurship in the School of Business and Economics
     3. Center for Design Innovation, an inter-institutional UNC center supported by Winston-Salem
        State University, the NC School of the Arts, and Forsyth Technical Community College
     4. Simon Green Atkins Community Development Corporation
     5. Motorsports Management in the School of Education and Human Performance

WSSU’S RESPONSE:

1. The Small Business and Technology Development Center (SBTDC), an inter-institutional program
with branches across the state, provides business counseling services to over 15,000 new and existing
businesses statewide, per year, as well as city, county, and regional economic development
organizations.

a. EXISTING INITIATIVES:
1. Business Startup and Management Development. SBTDC serves startup businesses as well as
existing businesses and community organizations.
2. Engagement of Students. SBTDC engages over 500 undergraduate, graduate and professional
students annually in supervised opportunities to work on real world business and community projects.


                                                            WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 44
3. Rural Center Venture Fund. SBTDC is involved in and supports the Rural Center’s Venture Fund.
4. Inception Micro Angel Funds. SBTDC created and manages six Inception Micro Angel Funds
statewide.
Effectiveness:
     The SBTDC has a sophisticated system for data collection, tracking, monitoring and assessing the
        quality and impact of its services including:
        o A robust client tracking Management Information System
        o Client evaluation of services
        o Formal quarterly reporting by operating units
        o External accreditation
Enhancements:
     Cost effective systems for monitoring and assessing program performance are currently in place
        leading to continuous improvement in service quality and customer satisfaction.
Cost and Funding: No additional funding is requested for maintenance of existing initiatives.

b. NEW INITIATIVES:
1. The Rural Business Development Program is a newly proposed SBTDC program designed to provide a
higher and deeper level of service to rural North Carolina.
     The best hope for economic growth and prosperity in these areas is to increase the
        competitiveness and growth of existing businesses and successful new enterprise formation, in
        these areas especially in tier-one counties.
     The proposed program will add 16 counseling positions across the state to more adequately
        serve rural North Carolina with business counselors and students from host institutions.
2. The Teacher Entrepreneurship Curriculum and Individual Experience (TEC-IE) through the CFE, the
Maya Angelou Institute for the Improvement of Child and Family Education, the Early Childhood
Development Center, and the School of Education and Human Performance will provide an
entrepreneurship curriculum and training program for high-school teachers and students in rural and
underserved areas in the region.
     The customized entrepreneurship curriculum will consist of classroom and web-based materials
        in the areas of agriculture, software and information technology, and new product
        development.
     The project will involve distance learning for continuing education, workshops, and the
        opportunity to observe, first-hand, entrepreneurship in action through site visits to businesses
        or participation with students in a business plan competition.
     TEC-IE will sponsor an annual Winston-Salem business plan competition for youth entrepreneurs
        and establish a mentor program to connect local entrepreneurs to students with an interest in
        starting small businesses.
Effectiveness:
     This will be measured by the number of new clients counseled and the number of partnerships
        developed as well as the scope of membership, level of activity, and degree of collaboration.
Enhancements:
     CFE anticipates increasing the level of activity of the club, i.e., the number of projects in which
        members are participating.
Cost and Funding:
     SBTDC Rural Business Development Program: $2,000,000 per year from General Administration
        to enhance the current inter-institutional program. WSSU supports this request.
     TEC-IE: $85,000 over five years from Enrollment Growth and targeted foundations.



                                                            WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 45
       Corporate sponsors
       Membership contributions

2. The Center for Entrepreneurship (CFE) was created and designed to spearhead the efforts of
programs in entrepreneurship education, research, and outreach. The CFE provides entrepreneurial
training for students and citizens in the local area.
     The Kauffman Foundation awarded the CFE the Platinum Award for "dedication and outstanding
         support in shaping the next generation of entrepreneurs.”
     The Director of the CFE and many other faculty from different departments have began an
         active dialogue in creating new courses that “blend” individual course material (i.e., in computer
         science, music, health care, etc.) with entrepreneurial elements.
     Many business ventures and new projects are often spawned outside the boundaries of
         traditional business schools.
     Wake Forest University colleagues are invited to share with us successful programs of a similar
         nature.

a. EXISTING INITIATIVES:
1. The Regional Entrepreneurial Group, composed of members from the Piedmont Triad counties, was
co-founded by the Director of the CFE and is a critically needed organization for the region.
Effectiveness:
     The group’s collaborations have enabled co-applications for regional grants targeted to urban
        and rural populations. To date, two proposals have been created to seek funding from the DOL-
        funded WIRED initiative and the DataMax Foundation.
Enhancements
     Financial support is needed to extend outreach support to populations that often have no
        means or assistance in seeking help in critical stages of new business creation or refinement of
        existing operations.
Cost and Funding:
     The first three years require at least $50,000 to cover costs of operations from remote location
        (downtown Winston-Salem) as well as location-specific training and support.

2. The Students In Free Enterprise (SIFE) chapter at WSSU is geared toward community involvement
and student support of local populations.
     During Spring 2008, in collaboration with Truliant Federal credit union, student teams mentored
        22 urban entrepreneurs in need of coaching and technical detail of how to strengthen credit
        scores and prepare an appropriate and effective business plan for a new startup.
     Other members of SIFE assisted two local elementary schools in delivering economic awareness
        programs in collaboration with Junior Achievement.

b. NEW INITIATIVES:
1. The School of Business and Economics will develop and implement the Scientific Innovation and
Entrepreneurship through Discovery (SIED) project as an interdisciplinary entrepreneurial training
program for all graduate students at WSSU and will offer a certificate program to qualified students.
SIED goals are to
    (1) infuse broad-based knowledge of entrepreneurship across WSSU graduate programs,
    (2) expand entrepreneurship at WSSU via collaborations among academic departments and centers
         on campus, and



                                                             WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 46
     (3) deepen the partnership between WSSU’s entrepreneurship programs in Forsyth County and
          economic development initiatives in North Carolina.
2. A minor program in Entrepreneurship and a series of workshops will be developed that will address
the challenges minority entrepreneurs face in the formation of new ventures.
3. The Science and Technology Entrepreneurship Project (STEP) will be an entrepreneurship program
for students in science and technology fields, jointly offered by the WSSU Center for Entrepreneurship,
Biomedical Research Infrastructure Center, SBTDC, and the WSSU Science, Technology, Engineering and
Mathematics (STEM) Scholars Program. STEP goals are to
     (1) involve students and faculty from across campus in entrepreneurial studies and activities,
     (2) promote entrepreneurship as a career option, and
     (3) provide opportunities for students to meet and work with practicing entrepreneurs in the
          community.
4. The Music Business Entrepreneurship and Technology (Music BEAT) Program will develop and
implement a web-based distance learning certificate program in Music Business Entrepreneurship for
non-degree professionals in the music industry and lead to an academic minor in Entrepreneurship for
non-business majors at WSSU.
      It will involve customized teaching modules (including educational videos) in entrepreneurship
          for industry-specific issues.
      The Entrepreneurship minor for non-business majors will significantly increase WSSU students’
          exposure to the concept of self-employment.
5. The Child-Hood Art, Research and Television (CHART) program will be developed by an
interdisciplinary research team of music education faculty and members of the Birth-Kindergarten
program in the School of Education and Human Performance who are involved in research regarding
early childhood arts impact on literacy.
      Fine Arts Department faculty with experience in film, animation, and sound production will aid
          in CHART, which could be picked up by PBS, Noggin, or another major children's television
          network.
      Previous work with arts-integrated literacy instruction for early childhood was very successful
          with Smart Start of Forsyth County.
      The target groups will be clearly identified, and all scripting will reflect standards-based and
          developmentally-appropriate material.
6. The SBE will offer a Summer Entrepreneurs Program (SEP), a two-week summer day-camp program
for teens (ages 15-18) of Winston-Salem and the surrounding areas incorporating education materials
and hands-on projects.
      It will be a creative “package” of events, activities, field trips, workshops, business training,
          instruction, networking opportunities, community involvement, and incentives, all designed to
          excite these young people about the expectations of small business ownership and how they
          can benefit by becoming active participants in the capitalist system.
      Within the two weeks of continuous learning experiences, students will be exposed to actual
          situations and dilemmas facing entrepreneurs.
      They will learn the consequences of choices being made and the importance of planning.
Effectiveness:
      Each initiative listed above has its own metrics for measuring success and impact. In some
          instances, it is the number of involved teachers and students; in others, it is the number of
          successful enterprises launched and the tracking of businesses through critical milestones.
Cost and Funding:




                                                            WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 47
      Institute of Regional Transformation, $950,000 over five years from Enrollment Growth and
       grants.

3. Through the CENTER FOR DESIGN INNOVATION (CDI), WSSU, NCSA, and Forsyth Tech faculty
members in arts, architecture, animation, filmmaking, music, theater design and production, computer
science, and the life and health sciences can contribute to economic development efforts in the
Piedmont Triad that aim to grow the workforce and economic opportunities in creative enterprises and
applications of digital media technologies for the healthcare and biotechnology sectors.
     CDI stemmed from an economic development study by Angelou Economics which the
        Northwest Piedmont Council of Governments requested after severe job losses in the region as
        traditional economic bases in tobacco, textiles, and furniture manufacturing diminished.
     The study found that in the midst of this downturn, there was an economic sector that was not
        only healthy but growing. Angelou Economics recommended that a strategy for economic
        development to accelerate the growth of this creative industry sector.
     This result led to discussion among universities in Winston-Salem and Greensboro about
        creating organizations dedicated to promoting design activity. By 2005 this effort had led to
        several outcomes:
        o the State's General Assembly released $2,000,000 for planning and equipment for a design
            center, with $10,000,000 to create the permanent facility soon to follow;
        o the Northwest Piedmont Council of Governments contracted a second study by Angelou
            Economics, focusing on creation of a design center with an emphasis on relevant business
            incubation;
        o the UNC Board of Governors established the inter-institutional Center for Design Innovation
            as a partnership among Winston-Salem State University, the NC School of the Arts and
            Forsyth Technical Community College; and
        o the Golden Leaf Foundation awarded funds to begin initial operations of CDI in an interim
            facility.
        o The architectural firm has been selected and they are well into the process of designing
            CDI's permanent facility with a Building Committee that consists of administrators and
            faculty of the constituent schools.
        o CDI's Board has been appointed, the $500,000/year recurring funds for operations are in
            place, and program development is well underway.

      Many of CDI's planned and existing programs will focus on using digital technologies to support
       understanding and growth of the biotechnology sector. CDI will make extensive use of
       broadband and Internet technologies to extend our reach, involving members of communities
       across the region, state, nation and planet. We are already working with WinstonNet and
       beginning discussions with MCNC.
      We are responding to initiatives from the UNC Office of Economic Development Research,
       Policy, and Planning and working with the economic development functions of NCSA and WSSU.
      CDI's model of direct partnership with industry will benefit members of WSSU, and vice versa, as
       faculty find real-world grounding for research projects and students develop relationships
       leading to internships and jobs.
      CDI’s Idea Exchanges are addressing a wide range of topics, including issues such as the digital
       divide, equitable urban design, offshore manufacturing, water conservation, and green building
       design.




                                                          WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 48
       During the past year, this public forum has served more than 900 people and we have ongoing
        sessions planned. We are also expanding to include evening sessions and Internet distribution.
     CDI will help to turn out students ready for the workforce and spin out companies that develop
        from research and design projects.
        o We are considering creation of a shared intellectual property pool that can encourage tech
            transfer, new jobs, and new companies.
        o Through non-exclusive licensing, we can enable many participants to benefit from the
            knowledge we create, thereby increasing likelihoods of success.
        o We are also beginning plans with Wake Forest University to participate in a Nanotech
            Center that will become the basis multiple proposals to federal agencies.
Effectiveness:
     CDI’s initial programs include workshops for the larger community and of participating schools,
        as well as developing programs for the schools including cross-registration, 2/2 and 4/4
        cooperation, and potentially an inter-institutional graduate degree. The Idea Exchange is
        serving as a networking forum as well as an educational/enrichment program, having generated
        a project proposal to the MacArthur Foundation and currently developing proposals to two
        directorates of the National Science Foundation.
Cost and Funding:
     We are conducting CDI programs with $500,000/year recurring operating funds from the state.
        This support is allowing us to conduct initial programs and establish foundational capabilities for
        writing grant proposals for supplemental funds.

4. The Simon Green Atkins Community Development Corporation (SGACDC) is a community-based
nonprofit organization that was established by Winston-Salem State University – the governing agency
for the SGACDC – and incorporated in 1998 to reverse neighborhood decline and help residents regain
control of their neighborhoods.
      With funding from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and construction
         financing from the City of Winston-Salem, the SGACDC aims to revitalize a once-thriving African-
         American neighborhood along the Martin Luther King Jr. Drive corridor.
      By planning and implementing affordable housing, economic development, and beautification
         and preservation efforts, the SGACDC is fueling revitalization, restoring pride, and re-envisioning
         the future.
Effectiveness:
          HUD/HBCU grant awards have helped create affordable housing opportunities for 15
              families while increasing the tax base by over $1.5 million.
          First-time homebuyers have received $125,000 in down payment and closing cost
              assistance.
          New homes have sparked resident participation in neighborhood groups and an interest in
              planning future neighborhood development.
          HUD/HBCU funding has also helped create a small business loan pool that has so far
              provided $77,000 to seven businesses and created 65 jobs.
Enhancements:
      More collaboration with WSSU faculty, students, and staff is needed as resources are invested in
         improving the quality of life in the neighborhoods adjoining WSSU. The program is seeking
         additional funds to acquire vacant substandard homes and underutilized commercial properties
         for redevelopment.
Cost and Funding:



                                                             WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 49
       SGACDC operations are completely grant funded. Five grant proposals have been funded by
        U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Additional funds have been awarded by
        the City of Winston-Salem and the Winston-Salem Community Development Funders
        Collaborative.

5. The Motorsports Management degree program was developed in response to the needs of the
growing motorsport industry primarily in North Carolina. Considering the uniqueness of this program,
there is also the potential to meet the needs of the industry both nationally and globally as well.
     The motorsports industry creates over 26,000 jobs in North Carolina alone. Hundreds of
         thousands of visitors, spending millions of dollars in local economies, come to the state each
         year to attend one of the many NASCAR-related events; hundreds of suppliers and
         manufacturing arms of the industry exist here; and dozens of race teams call North Carolina
         home.
     With the uniqueness of the Motorsports Management program and the economic impact of the
         industry on the state and nation, WSSU should stimulate growth in the management-related
         skill sets and future employment opportunities for students and citizens.
     Motorsports-related companies will have access to participate in WSSU research projects
         designed to enhance motorsport business. The results of this research should provide
         benchmark data that can be applied to existing motorsport industry businesses to more
         efficiently operate in this competitive environment. This should in turn increase potential profits
         and economic expansion of the industry within both rural and urban locations.
     Graduates of the program will also have the necessary skill sets to develop new business
         strategies to address specific unmet needs that may develop as the industry evolves.
     The state legislature also recognizes the importance of the motorsports industry as new
         incentives are being offered to attract these types of businesses to North Carolina.
Effectiveness:
     This will be measured by the impact of graduates in transforming and assisting the current
         regional economies and the ability of motorsports-related research to enhance and transform
         the industry
Enhancement:
     Motorsports Management faculty need to be included in and contribute to regional economic
         summits and legislative committees assigned to motorsports industry topics.
     It will be critical for legislative bodies to understand the impact that academic preparation in
         this area can have to the long-term success of the state with regards to keeping the motorsports
         economy healthy.
Cost and Funding:
     Minimal costs associated with this initiative can be addressed through resources at the
         university and in the industry.




                                                             WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 50
4.5 HEALTH

INTRODUCTION:
As the fourth largest producer of traditional nurses and the largest producer of RN to BSN nurses for the
state of North Carolina, the School of Health Sciences at Winston-Salem State University is a leader in
nursing education. Each year, over 100 baccalaureate-prepared nurses enter the work force. An
additional 30 individuals with undergraduate degrees in unrelated areas who desire a career change
complete the accelerated nursing program in 13 months. Through strong partnerships with community
colleges, WSSU enrolls approximately 400 RN to BSN students at its 15 satellite campuses. This adds 200
additional baccalaureate-prepared nurses annually to the health community and to magnet hospitals in
particular that require such preparation.

The School of Health Sciences at WSSU has an ethnically diverse student population. African Americans
comprise 48% of the traditional nursing student enrollment, 30% of Occupational Therapy enrollment,
40% of Physical Therapy enrollment, and 65% of Clinical Laboratory Science enrollment. These figures
represent more than twice the national averages for student enrollment. The majority of these
graduates acquire employment in the state, thus contributing to a more diverse health professions work
force. This is particularly of interest in physical therapy: 83% of students educated at WSSU remain in
the state, representing the highest retention rate for physical therapy programs in the state. The
Occupational Therapy graduate program at WSSU is one of four professional programs in the state and
is the only graduate-level program in the field located at an HBCU in North Carolina. The program is the
largest enrollee and contributor of minority students and individuals from underrepresented groups to
the workforce of North Carolina (AOTA, 2008) in Occupational Therapy. The current enrollment is 48 %
African Americans (national average among master’s level programs is 5%), 43% Caucasians (national
average: 74%), and 6% Native Americans/Asians or other ethnicity (national average: 5%). Occupational
Therapy successfully prepares future practitioners with over 80% of graduates remaining in the region
and state. Graduates are employment primarily in skilled nursing facilities, medical centers and
hospitals, schools, and rehabilitation centers and community agencies, respectively. OT is renowned for
immersion of students and faculty in local/regional community experiences related to rehabilitation,
health and wellness, the establishment of diverse cultural partnerships such as with the Latino
community, and the organization and/or participation in international service learning projects with
Costa Rica (in Central America) and Lesotho (in Africa).

Over 60% of full-time SOHS faculty is African American and 20% of whom have earned doctoral degrees
in the past two years. The school has plans to offer the following programs in the near future:
      B.S. in Health Care Management (Fall 2008)
      Doctor of Physical Therapy (Spring 2009)
      Doctor of Nursing Practice (Spring 2010)
      B.S. in Pharmaceutical Science (in collaboration with the College of Arts and Sciences – Fall
        2010)
      Certificates in advanced practice of occupational therapy (Fall 2010)
      Orthotics and Prosthetics (Fall 2010)
      Masters in Applied Anatomy (Fall 2011)
Given recent and potential growth in current and proposed programs in the health sciences at WSSU,
expanded facilities for teaching labs, research, and faculty/staff offices will be necessary.




                                                            WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 51
Complementing the large health sciences programs are WSSU’s core competence in the life and physical
sciences. The programs in biology, molecular biology, chemistry, and exercise science produce
graduates who work in the region’s labs, matriculate into graduate programs, and enter various health
science professions, including professional programs such as physical therapy, occupational therapy,
medicine, and dentistry. The faculty teaching in these programs are the institution’s top producers of
research and recipients of research grants. The demand for the support programs in the sciences is
such that a much larger facility is needed for classrooms, laboratories, research spaces, and faculty
offices. This building is high on WSSU’s capital budget request.

Model Programs:
Success in preparing African American Nurses
There is a clear need for nursing personnel at every level including RNs with specialization and advanced
nursing degrees. The need for minority nurses is even more acute. Nationally, only 14% of the RN
workforce were members of racial and ethnic minority groups, compared to 31% of the total US
population in 2000. In North Carolina, 12% of RNs and 26% of LPNs are members of racial or ethnic
minority groups. In contrast, racial or ethnic minorities account for 28% of the state’s population.
Among the 16 constituent institutions of the University of North Carolina, Winston-Salem State
University is the largest producer of minority nurses at both the baccalaureate and master levels. The
university is also meeting the healthcare needs of the region and state by increasing the number of
baccalaureate-prepared nurses in the state’s largest RN-BSN program. Through distance education,
registered nurses who are Associate-degree holders in some of the state’s most medially underserved
areas access the WSSU RN to BSN program. In addition to nursing science, nurses learn leadership skills
that enable them to positively impact the healthcare needs of the clients in their communities.

This section of WSSU’s response will provide more details about existing and new initiatives that
continue the university’s contribution to producing healthcare professionals and healthcare information
and services for the citizens of the state including
Existing:
        Faculty Practice Plan
        Wound Healing and Dance Rehabilitation
        Robot Simulator Laboratory
        eCare We Care program (online healthcare learning and literacy)
        Journal of Best Practices in Health Professions Diversity
        Health Disparities and Minority Health
        The Center of Excellence for the Elimination of Health Disparities
        Therapeutic Recreation Program
New:
        Proposed Endowed Chair in Health Disparities
        Health and Wellness across the Lifespan
        CDI Online Educational Programs
Continue to address the shortage of healthcare professionals through
        Increasing supply of nursing educators
        Site-based and online health care education
        Occupational Therapy Advanced Practice

WSSU’S RESPONSE:

a. EXISTING INITIATIVES:


                                                            WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 52
1. The School of Health Sciences has acquired an approved Faculty Practice Plan from WSSU.
     This will enable faculty to utilize their professional expertise and enhance their competence in
        clinical settings that support the educational programs and the provision of services to diverse
        populations under professional supervision. The Practice Plan will also contribute to the
        financial resources of the School of Health Sciences needed for strengthening the educational
        and research infrastructure.
     Additionally, through a partnership with Forsyth Medical Center and the Charlotte Bobcats, a
        mobile clinic is being proposed to provide health care to under-insured children in Forsyth
        County.

2. Wound Healing and Dance Rehabilitation – The Physical Therapy (PT) department has special
expertise on national and international levels in the area of wound healing through its research and
other scholarly works.
     An interdisciplinary wound management certificate is being prepared for the future.
     The PT department works in partnership with the dance community in creating initiatives to
        address specialized rehabilitation needs of dancers.
     The program is also partnering with the Center for Design Innovation and the North Carolina
        School of the Arts to address the needs of dancers and other athletes.

3. Robotic Simulator Lab – The addition of an adult and pediatric “robot” that can simulate acute care
scenarios through advanced computerized technology has been incorporated into several courses within
the PT and nursing curriculum. Partnerships with Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center and
other centers on embedding robotic simulation into hands-on physical therapist practice promises to be
a significant advancement in computerized medical training.

4. Health Care Information Dissemination –
     Since 2007, the SOHS has received funding from the National Library of Medicine to establish
        the eCare We Care program.
         This program educates community residents on accessing health information on the
            Internet.
         To date, an estimated 100 residents in Forsyth County have undergone training. This project
            is currently funded under the NIH Project EXPORT grant.
     Journal of Best Practices in Health Professions Diversity – The SOHS launched this scholarly
        journal in order to disseminate faculty research to a broader audience.
         It is indexed by EBSCO Publishing Company with an international outreach.
         It is published bi-annually.
     The Therapeutic Recreation Program is contributing to the health and wellness of the citizens of
        North Carolina through educating the students and the community regarding cost-effective
        healthcare alternatives, including prevention.
         Through the use of recreation and leisure as a purposeful means to achieve positive
            outcomes for persons with disabilities or limiting conditions, improved health and wellness
            can be accomplished.
         In collaboration with other healthcare providers, recreational therapists across the state
            work in settings such as behavioral health, physical rehabilitation and long-term care.
         Increased accessibility to health information is also enhanced by the production of
            professionals from underrepresented segments in the overall TR field – males and African
            Americans (http://www.nctrc.org/standardsandpublications.htm).



                                                            WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 53
5. Health Disparities and Minority Health – The SOHS and certain programs in the Department of
Human Performance and Sport Sciences focus academic programs on health disparities among African
American, Hispanic, and aging populations and many faculty conduct research on minority health
disparities.
     The SOHS co-hosted with AHEC the North Carolina Conference on Health Professions Diversity.
     A recommended outcome was to establish an alliance to address the problem. The SOHS will
         likely take a key role with AHEC in establishing the North Carolina Alliance in collaboration with
         Dr. Louis Sullivan to address the need for a more ethnically diverse health care work force.

6. The Center of Excellence for the Elimination of Health Disparities was established to improve
minority health and eliminate health disparities within the community and state through research,
education and community outreach. It is organized into two divisions.
     Division of Quality of Health Care
           o The Division of Quality of Health Care includes a $4.7 million NIH/NCMHD research
                center.
           o This research center is designed to centralize interdisciplinary health disparities and
                health services research activities to improve quality and access, as well as expand
                partnerships with universities, health services institutions, and the community.
     Division of Access to Health Care.
           o The Division of Access to Health Care includes The National Strategy: Building
                Environments for NCLEX Success.

a. The Center for the Measurement and Improvement of Patient-Centered Care, under the Division of
Quality of Health Care shall establish a program to collect, measure, report, and recommend solutions to
increase the patient-centeredness of health services for minority patients by
        (1) advancing knowledge of patient-centeredness’ effect on desired outcomes;
        (2) developing and managing a Provider Patient-Centeredness Skills Lab (PPCSL), a simulation lab
             to increase the prevalence of patient-centeredness and of patient-centered providers in
             caring for minority patients;
        (3) improving health care quality, and
        (4) reducing health care costs. The measurement function of this project will facilitate the
             provision of consulting services to hospitals and other providers.

b. The Minority Alliance to Reduce Deaths from Breast Cancer, under the Division of Quality of Health
Care, is a multi-institutional translational research project of NC Universities, including WSSU, NCA&T
State University, UNC-Pembroke, North Carolina Central University, Johnson C. Smith University, Shaw
University, and Fayetteville State University.
     Female breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in North Carolina, with African
         American women having the highest breast cancer death rate among all racial and ethnic
         groups. Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death for American Indians and
         Alaska Native women, and breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the
         leading cause of cancer death among Hispanic American/Latina women.
     The project supports research in prevention, detection, diagnosis, and treatment of breast
         cancer. The proposed project’s overarching goal is to decrease the mortality rates of breast
         cancer in minority women. The objectives and aims are to:




                                                             WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 54
        1) Create an infrastructure to support interdisciplinary social, behavioral, and epidemiological,
           and basic research as it relates to breast cancer in minority women.
        2) Increase the number of minority researchers and health professionals in the workforce
           specifically targeting minority breast cancer.

c. The National Strategy: Building Environments for NCLEX Success is included under the Division of
Access to Health Care.
     African American patients are more likely to realize improved health outcomes when their care
        is facilitated by African American health providers.
     There is a critical shortage of African American nurses that is counterproductive and undermines
        the state’s and nation’s efforts to the eliminate disparities and improve minority health.
        According to HRSA, of the 2.9 million registered nurses in the country, only 106,644 identify as
        Black/African American.
     To address this serious problem, the Center has taken a leadership role by establishing an
        Alliance of 53 HBCU/PBI Nursing Programs. The goal of this Alliance is to develop academic
        environments and the implementation of a best practices model for the nation’s HBCU/PBI
        Nursing baccalaureate and Associate degree nursing programs.

b. NEW INITIATIVES:

1. The SOHS proposes to establish the Sylvia A. Flack Endowed Chair for Health Disparities.
     The School of Health Sciences (SOHS) plans to submit a proposal to The Delta Sigma Theta
        Sorority, Inc. for the 2008-2010 Distinguished Professor Endowed Chair in the amount of
        $200,000 to establish the chair.
     If funded, this grant will provide support for a resident professor of distinction in the SOHS.
     A matching funding mechanism is in place through UNC and the WSSU Foundation that will
        assist with sustainability.

2. Health and Wellness across the Lifespan – To help address the need for education and leadership in
improving the health of the community, students in physical education, therapeutic recreation, and
exercise science will be required to complete significant volunteer hours at local YMCAs, the YWCA,
Parks and Recreation, Special Olympics, and other venues where they can share their expertise and help
citizens adopt healthy lifestyles. Faculty will engage with the students in action research to explore
methodology for effective partnerships in healthy living between academic and community
organizations.
Effectiveness:
      Number of citizens served; number of models developed
Cost and Funding:
      Falls within the scope of faculty and student responsibilities; may require a staff person to
         coordinate

3. The Center for Design Innovation’s contributions to online educational programs can help with
community awareness of health issues and workforce development in the health care sector.
     Our planned motion capture facility will help with physical therapy studies and prescribed
        activities.
     Together with the rapid prototyping facility, these efforts can lead to design and development of
        orthotic and prosthetic devices.



                                                            WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 55
       Data visualization and modeling will also promote research in life sciences and advances in
        health care.

Other initiatives identified by the campus that respond to this Section of the UNC Tomorrow Commission
report
        4.5.2. UNC should educate more health professionals.

a. EXISTING INITIATIVES:

1. The School of Health Sciences and the Department of Human Performance and Sport Sciences will
continue to prepare high quality graduates for careers in the health professions, to include
undergraduate and graduate nurses, clinical laboratory scientists, physical therapists, occupational
therapists, exercise physiologists, therapeutic recreation specialists, and rehabilitation counselors.
     We will continue ongoing efforts and create new opportunities and programs with the North
        Carolina Community College System.
     This will include expanding the MSN program for Nurse Educators to meet the demand for
        graduate nurse educators in community colleges.

b. NEW INITIATIVES:

1. Increasing supply of nursing educators – Two major challenges in expanding the campus’ nursing
program to address critical shortage of nurses are
    1. the lack of clinical sites for nursing students and the need for programs to help nurse
        practitioners hired as faculty members transition into the academic environment.
           The campus is considering a doctoral-level nursing program (to be implemented beginning
               in 2010) to help address the shortage in nursing faculty;
    2. the campus would need expanded lab resources for research activities that would attract high-
        level doctoral nursing students.

2. Use the RN to BSN model, both site-based and online, to provide healthcare education in WSSU
programs to students and communities that are underserved. This includes expanding the offerings in:
     Therapeutic recreation (Human Performance)
     Rehabilitation Counseling (Human Performance)
     Masters in Health Care Administration (Business and Economics)
     Health Care Management (Health Sciences)
     Health Education (Human Performance)
     Gerontology (Social Science)

3. The profession of Occupational Therapy is migrating to entry-level practice at the master’s level. The
program is planning an additional track aimed at advanced practice.
     This track will be offered to current practitioners who hold a baccalaureate degree using online
        delivery or a blended model.
     The program will incorporate certificates that will be attractive for career advancement in the
        profession. Of particular note is a certificate in Cross Cultural Competence for Health Care
        Providers.




                                                            WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 56
   Additional faculty, training in the delivery of distance learning education, and expanded
    resources for research activities will be required to remain competitive and provide the highest
    quality program.




                                                        WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 57
4.6 ENVIRONMENT

INTRODUCTION:

Winston-Salem State University is concerned about the impact it has on the environment and its role in
promoting environmental literacy among its students, faculty, staff, and community. The institution is in
the early stages of evaluating its impact and formulating actions. Currently there are several initiatives
headed by Facilities Management to address our carbon emissions. A study of pipe insulation by WSSU
chemistry students has already spawned legislation and more research. There are also a few courses
being offered to students in environmental education. There are plans to expand these offerings and to
develop programs that will be offered in traditional as well as online formats that will lead to degrees
and certificates. The Center for Design Innovation is working not only to include environmental issues in
its curriculum development but also to employ sustainable principles and carbon emissions reduction in
its permanent facilty’s design and construction. Environmental literacy is certainly an area that would
benefit from a broad discussion among constituents across the university, government agencies, and the
private sector.

The initiatives that will be discussed in this section include
Existing:
         Carbon Emissions Reduction
         Research
New:
         Environmental Education
         Center for Design Innovation
         Environmental Sustainability Task Force
         Carbon Emissions Reduction

WSSU’S RESPONSE:

a. EXISTING INITIATIVES:

1. Carbon Emissions Reduction
    a. Transportation Issues
            Reduce the number of gasoline-powered service vehicles for grounds, recycling, trades,
               IT, and mail services by increasing the number of electric vehicles.
            Reduce the vehicular miles driven by Facilities staff to local parts suppliers through the
               implementation of an effective centralized Materials Management area.
    b. Building Issues
            Require all new and renovated buildings to use digital controls and connect to the
               university’s central energy management system.
            Retro-commission of HVAC building systems in RJ Reynolds, Hall-Patterson, Thompson
               Center, and Anderson Center. Replace incandescent lighting with fluorescent lighting
               where appropriate. In recent months, we have replaced incandescent lighting in several
               buildings.
    c. Recycling and Waste Reduction
            Enhance recycling program on campus with active participation of students, staff, and
               faculty.



                                                                 WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 58
    d. Water Reduction
             Reduce water consumption by installing electronic low-flow faucets and other reduced-
               flow plumbing in existing buildings.
Effectiveness:
    a. Transportation Issues
             Since 2005, the university has acquired 12 electricity power service vehicles.
             The university measures the gallons of fuel used for service vehicles and reports to the
               State Energy Office on a yearly basis. Fuel consumption will be measured after one full
               year of operations of the central materials management area to determine effectiveness
               of this initiative.
    b. Building Issues
             The university measures and monitors utility consumption on a monthly basis. This
               information is fundamental in assessing effectiveness of energy savings measures such
               as night and occupied set-back strategies and overall energy management strategies.
    c. Recycling and Waste Reduction
             The university measures and monitors waste and recycling tonnage.
    a. Water Reduction
             The university measures and monitors water consumption. In FY 07-08, Facilities
               retrofitted RJ Reynolds and Hall-Patterson with electronic faucets.
Enhancements:
    a. Transportation Issues
             This initiative may be improved as more information is understood from materials
               purchasing trends in order to possible increase the number of inventory items in the
               storeroom. After one year of operation of the centralized materials management area,
               data will be available to make the appropriate decisions.
    b. Building Issues
             Making sure that this requirement is maintained in the project budget throughout
               building construction.
             Making sure that a preventive maintenance program is applied to control systems.
    c. Recycling and Waste Reduction
             Recruit work-study students to participate in recycling activities at residence halls and
               academic and administrative buildings.
Cost and Funding:
    a. Transportation Issues
             Funds will need to be identified in the continuation budget for vehicle replacement and
               reinforced as necessary from other sources.
    b. Building Issues
             These considerations will cost less than 0.5% percent of initial project costs.
    c. Recycling and Waste Reduction
             Purchasing one electric vehicle for use of the students collecting recycling products
               ($14,000). Funds will be identified in Facilities budget for FY 08-09.
    d. Water Reduction
             Approximately $13,000 per building by the identification of state funds on a yearly basis
               to retrofit two buildings per year.

2. Hot Water Pipe Insulation Project - On April 17, 2007, students from the WSSU Chemistry
Department submitted a poster to the Raleigh Symposium showing that hot water lines, when insulated,



                                                          WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 59
save water and energy and also boost production of pipe insulation for our two North Carolina
manufacturers of pipe insulation.
     The idea was so compelling that 50th District Representative Bill Faison put a bill on the docket
       mandating that all hot water lines larger than 1/4 inch would have to be insulated, beginning
       January 1, 2008, for all new construction, subject to NC Building Code Council approval. The bill,
       H1702, was signed by Governor Easley August 31, 2007.
     The Chemistry Department then obtained grants from our two North Carolina pipe
       manufacturers in Mebane and Youngsville to create student test studies, which we presented to
       the NC Building Code Council January 11, 2008.
     The Council continues to examine the issue, waiting for a more comprehensive study which we
       hope to provide if we receive a $433,000 grant to pursue further studies.

b. NEW INITIATIVES:

1. Environmental Education (EE) is a multidisciplinary approach to teaching people of all ages about the
relationships between people and the natural environment. Its goal is environmental literacy, which
promotes informed decisions about our behaviors that affect the natural environment. This is widely
recognized as a critical need for our public school systems.
     Therapeutic Recreation in the School of Education and Human Performance already offers two
        EE courses, and a broader EE curriculum is under consideration.
     The College of Arts and Sciences is developing courses that address environmental issues
        (Environmental Science and Environmental Geography).

Enhancement through Collaboration
    Environmental Consortium - Both of the above strategies can also be enhanced through
      collaboration with other institutions. Several UNC institutions have faculty members with
      expertise in Environmental Education. Creation of a consortium of these institutions would
      enable the offering of entire undergraduate or graduate degree programs in EE. Additionally,
      the NC Office of Environmental Education has EE Certifications that could be met through
      academic coursework.

2. Inter-institutional Center for Design Innovation (CDI)
     The design of CDI's permanent facility incorporates environmental consciousness, as will
        ongoing operation of the facility as we reduce, reuse, and recycle the many materials needed for
        design processes.
     CDI is also introducing the concept of signal-friendly building design as we consider the many
        kinds of electronic signals that our advanced technology projects will require. This is another
        kind of environmental sensitivity that will become increasingly prevalent in architectural
        practice during the next few years.
     Several sessions of CDI's Idea Exchange are devoted to environmental and sustainability issues,
        and CDI collaborators will be modeling how to incorporate these sensibilities into design
        practice. An upcoming CDI Idea Exchange session will explain recommendations from the State
        Energy Office and promote design solutions for water conservation.
     CDI's permanent facility will encourage several aspects of green building design and
        construction:
             o We are encouraging use of alternative vehicles and bicycles. The landscaping will be
                 water-efficient.



                                                            WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 60
            o   Windows will have ozone protection.
            o   Systems will perform with minimal energy requirements.
            o   We are choosing construction materials optimized for environmental friendliness.
            o   We will use sustainable products and materials for cleaning and pest management.
            o   We will provide support systems to encourage occupants to reduce, reuse, and recycle
                all kinds of materials used within the building.
            o Daylight will permeate a substantial portion of the building.
       Many CDI projects will employ sensing technologies that can help to promote public awareness
        of water, air, and environmental quality as well as the STEM skills that researchers need to
        design and implement such devices.
       Because of our green practices and projects, awareness of environmental and sustainability
        issues will increase as CDI collaborators describe, publish, and distribute our practices and
        projects.

3. Establish a University Sustainability Task Force
     Initiate a task force that will evolve into a permanent committee.
     Include students, faculty, staff, and administrators; staff the committee from the Vice Chancellor
        for Finance and Administration’s office.

4. Carbon Emissions Reduction
    a. Transportation Issues
            Reduce the number of gasoline-powered service vehicles by purchasing alternative fuel
               vehicles in applications where the use of electric vehicles is not advisable.
    b. Building Issues
            Require on all new construction and major renovations to provided independent cooling
               for IT closets so that building systems may take advantage of the air side economizer
               mode in the winter months.
            Compliance with SB 668 for all new construction and renovation.
            Training for project managers to become LEED certified: $8000 in order to complete.
            Retrofit existing buildings with occupancy sensors.
            Integrate steam traps and steam control valves into the preventive maintenance
               program.
            Replace outdated pneumatic building controls with digital controls and connect to
               central energy management system.




                                                           WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 61
4.7 OUTREACH AND ENGAGEMENT

INTRODUCTION:
Many initiatives described above have an outreach component. These include the Small Business and
Technology Development Center, the Simon Green Atkins Community Development Corporation, the
Center of Excellence for the Elimination of Health Disparities, the Center for Entrepreneurship, and the
Center for Design Innovation. What we will describe in this section are specific initiatives and
organizational strategies that Winston-Salem State University currently has or has plans to develop in
order to use the knowledge, skills, talents, synergy, and resources that are unique to a higher education
organization to improve participation in issues of importance to the larger community. To this end, the
institution will act as a catalyst in creating and disseminating knowledge through education, research,
and community participation. Because of our historical mission, we have especially focused on the
needs and circumstances of urban, minority, and economically disadvantaged populations. We will
continue to have this focus, but in part due to UNC Tomorrow, we have begun to engage needs of and
issues within our broader region, which includes many rural and economically disadvantaged small
communities. Our students, faculty, and staff spend many hours volunteering in the community. During
the 2006-2007 academic year, students and student organizations reported a total of 17,187 hours of
volunteer service. During the Fall 2007 semester, 12,319 hours of service were reported by students
and student organizations

With the loss of jobs in the tobacco, textiles, manufacturing, and furniture industries, Winston-Salem
has had to reinvent itself. Currently the largest employers are in health care and financial services. Part
of this re-visioning of the community has been the development of the Piedmont Triad Research Park
(PTRP). The PTRP, a master-planned urban business park in the heart of downtown, utilizes a previous
tobacco plant and leverages university research, financial and legal networks, and government to form a
critical mass of intellectual capital for development of new businesses for the new economy. The
institution has a presence in the PTRP through shared research laboratories with the Wake Forest
University School of Medicine and biotech/biomedical companies to conduct bench, translational, and
clinical research in many areas including tissue regeneration research, drug discovery, and minority-
health-related research. The new Center for Design Innovation will be built in the Park.

The Center for Community Safety (CCS) is a university-community partnership program organized as a
public service, research, and training center of WSSU. Its mission is to engage communities in using
research strategically to shape action and response to community safety issues. The CCS is one of only a
few such university centers, particularly at minority-serving institutions (HBCUs), that is so actively
involved in university-practitioner-community collaboration around community safety issues. A primary
goal is to promote the creation, development, and sustainability of successful university-community
partnerships and to create more stable communities where all people are safe to live, learn, work, and
play. Since its inception, the CCS has generated over $10,000,000 in grants and fees in support of its
operations and for the university and its community partners.

The School of Business and Economics has developed or is in the process of developing centers,
initiatives, programs, and a journal in areas related to financial literacy training, preparation for
retirement, investment planning, starting a new business, job training, and economic knowledge
dissemination. The goal of these programs and initiatives is to enhance the potential for economic
development and transformation in the region through work, investment, and sound decision-making.




                                                             WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 62
Because the WSSU has a number of centers and initiatives that have a strong focus on outreach and
because it wants to enhance its community engagement, the university is proposing an Institute for
Regional Transformation (IRT). In May 2008, many of the centers described in this and previous
sections will move into a building in downtown Winston-Salem. While this move initially was out of
necessity for space, the realization that this creates a centralized location from which these centers can
better serve local clients has created a conversation about an organizational structure to link these
entities. Such an organization could both function to better serves clients and could create economies
of scale to maximize resources. The new co-location could also foster collaboration with such
recognized agencies as the Winston-Salem Chamber of Commerce and the Urban League. Establishing
the IRT would enable WSSU to take advantage of its mission and resources as well as to enhance its
collaborative opportunities to make significant and measurable contributions to meet the education,
research and scholarship, and public service needs facing our state in the 21 st century as identified in the
UNC Tomorrow study. These activities would solidify a highly visible and desirable role for WSSU in
helping to shape the future of our city, region, and state.

Included in this section will be discussions of initiatives that have an outreach or community
engagement component including
a. Existing Initiatives
    1. The Center for Community Safety
    2. The Center of Excellence in Financial Services
    3. Continuing Education Office
    4. The Grandparenting Program

b. New Initiatives
    1. Institute for Regional Transformation
    2. The Center for Economic Analysis
    3. American Journal of Retirement Economics
    4. Career Exploration
    5. Entrepreneurial Fellows Program
    6. International Center for Motorsports Business Research
    7. WSSU Forensics Laboratory

a. EXISTING INITIATIVES:
The Center for Community Safety, established in January 2001 as a university-community partnership
program, is organized as a public service, research and training center of WSSU. Its mission is to engage
communities in using research strategically to shape action and response to community safety issues.
The community engagement model could be duplicated in other cities across the state.

CCS Impact Statement: Focus on Underserved, Urban Communities
The CCS recognizes that community safety is inextricably linked to economic empowerment, educational
attainment, improved healthcare, and neighborhood stability. Since its inception, the CCS has developed
a comprehensive set of strategies to sustain crime reduction in predominately underserved urban
(mostly minority) communities, encourage prevention (education) and intervention programs, and
support neighborhood revitalization, thus broadening its mission beyond just violence reduction.
In Winston-Salem, significant public and private resources are being invested in building a strong
economic future for the city and the Piedmont Triad region. Winston-Salem, like many urban areas,
runs the risk of creating an exciting economic future that benefits some but clearly not all. Despite
notable community successes, key segments of our population remain plagued by high crime rates,


                                                              WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 63
poverty, substandard housing, lack of jobs, health issues, and economic disenfranchisement. Many are
cut off from meaningful participation in civic society, with few connections to institutions, social
networks, or community groups and with scarce access to useful information or data to improve their
prospects. These residents will not be able to participate fully in the community’s economic growth
unless they are viewed individually as valuable community resources, their human and social capital is
developed, their access to community resources is maximized, and their ability to make informed
decisions is ensured. Through the CCS, WSSU is able to partner with the community and enable WSSU
resources, faculty, staff and students to contribute their time and talent to increasing opportunities for
all residents to improve their quality of living.

Research and Partnerships
Through the CCS, research, policy, and action are shaped, executed, and then re-evaluated and modified
for greatest success. The CCS promotes and encourages partnerships where both partners and
researchers understand a problem, develop interventions, and evaluate their effectiveness. This model
has set a precedent across the nation. Key accomplishments of the CCS include:
      More than 30 agencies using data to conduct research and develop strategies to assist in
        community problem-solving
      Brings faculty and students together with community partners to address neighborhood
        revitalization, housing, crime prevention, education and healthcare needs of underserved
        communities
      State and national academic and research partners
      The CCS also boasts the Transforming Communities Research Lab (TCRL), a one-stop resource
        equipped with Geographic Information Systems (GIS), a powerful research and analytical tool to
        display opportunities, weigh alternatives, and measure progress toward achieving fair, safe and
        vibrant communities. TCRL puts geographically-coded data within easy view and understanding
        of researchers and advocates.

Training and Technical Assistance
The CCS is a resource nationally for communities working to develop strategic, collaborative approaches
to safety and violence reduction. Utilizing the experiences and practices learned through our research
and involvement with bringing partners together, the CCS actively delivers training and technical
assistance for communities locally, statewide, and nationally in community justice issues and in building
community capacity to reduce crime and build stable neighborhoods.

Effectiveness:
     The CCS is one of only a few such university centers, particularly at minority-serving institutions
        (HBCUs), that is so actively involved in university-practitioner-community collaboration around
        community safety issues. A primary goal is to promote the creation, development, and
        sustainability of successful university-community partnerships to create safer, more stable
        communities where all people are safe to live, learn, work, and play.
Cost and Funding:
     Since its inception, the CCS has generated over $10,000,000 in grants and fees in support of its
        operations and for the university through collaborations with the Departments of Social
        Sciences and Behavioral Sciences and Social Work at WSSU (including internships, service
        learning, practicum, and assistantships) and its community partners, which include the United
        Way, mental health provider agencies, the YMCA and YWCA, Winston-Salem/Forsyth County
        Schools, faith and community-based organizations, the Housing Authority of Winston-Salem,



                                                             WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 64
        Habitat for Humanity, Communities In Schools, law enforcement agencies, and local
        governmental partners.

2. The Center of Excellence in Financial Services (CEFS) is devoted to assisting in the training of WSSU
students to become Certified Financial Planners (CFP), thus helping to fill the gap created by a lack of
qualified minorities in the field. The Center is also devoted to providing financial services assistance to a
community of individuals who find themselves facing the daunting task of having to plan for their own
financial futures for the first time. Many individuals in the Piedmont region are without the security that
was once provided by the dwindling tobacco, textiles, and furniture manufacturing industries that were
once so prominent. Without pension plans and long-term job security, these individuals must assume
responsibility for their own retirement and estate planning, their own investment and tax decisions, and
their own credit and money management. The CEFS provides such services to the community through
the use of interns working under faculty oversight. The School of Business and Economics (SBE) is in the
process of securing certification of its major in finance from the national CFP Board. This will allow the
SBE to offer classes for CFP Certification to professionals in the region. This is a need that has been
identified by members of the Business Advisory Council of the SBE. This outreach will enhance the
number of qualified financial planners available for hire in the region.
Effectiveness:
     The effectiveness of the Center will be measured by the number of internships offered to
         students, the number of community residents assisted through counseling, and the number of
         undergraduate students who pass the CFP exam.
Enhancements:
     Professional Development Series. The SBE currently provides workshops/seminars and will
         continue to do so in order to enhance the economic and professional awareness of the various
         constituents of the community. Topics may include, but are not limited to, women in business,
         networking, political savvy, and emotional intelligence. SBE will collaborate and use the
         resources of the office of career services, sororities and fraternities, retired businesspersons,
         and the CFE.
     Financial Literacy. Another critical statewide issue is financial illiteracy. The SBE proposes an
         initiative that will support the development of an innovative curriculum to teach the basics of
         financial literacy to high school students. The curriculum will utilize multimedia, interaction with
         WSSU students, and innovative teaching methodologies to spur student interest and
         engagement. Students will be bused to after-school sessions to be held at WSSU and will be
         offered site visits to local area businesses so that they can develop an appreciation of the world
         of work. The curriculum will be under the auspices of the Center of Excellence in Financial
         Services. Cost and Funding: $200,000 from BB&T
Cost and Funding:
     $40,000 (above the $200,000) to cover the cost for certification and reimbursement for faculty
         release time to each offer sessions for the professional community

3. The Continuing Education Office of Winston-Salem State University sponsors:
     The Saturday Academy, which houses and provides year-round opportunities to develop new
        skills, expand interest in new and exciting topics, learn job skills, or enjoy enriching sessions in
        the arts. Classes are designed for all ages from elementary youth to retirees and include areas
        of language acquisition, professional and business development, basic education, personal
        enrichment, art, music, dance, drama and recreation.




                                                               WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 65
       The Neighborhood Institute for Community Leadership’s (NICL) training session provides three
        days of capacity-building training for grassroots, nonprofit, faith-based and community leaders.
        The program has two tracks of study: Leadership Development and Community Development.
       Six Sigma training and certification designed for small, medium and large businesses. The
        partnership was formed with Six Sigma Tek whose courses are taught by experienced Six Sigma
        practitioners who have worked as real life engineers solving real problems. Certifications for
        Green Belt, Black Belt, and Master Black Belt are available.
       In partnership with
             o The Center for Legal Studies. This organization has educated thousands of students
                 through over 1000 colleges and universities across the country in the legal and law
                 field. Courses are offered online, DVD, VHS, audio and text-only formats.
             o Gatlin Education Services (GES) offers online open enrollment programs designed to
                 provide the skills necessary to acquire professional level positions for many in-demand
                 occupations.
             o ProTrain, Inc. understands the statewide wide employment challenges and provides
                 training programs to regional and local professionals, whose primary goal is to upgrade
                 their professional skill sets.

4. The Grandparenting Program in the School of Health Sciences at Winston-Salem State University
offers many services for grandparents raising their grandchildren. The program offers direct health and
social services. Case managers also provide referrals to connect caregivers to quality child care services,
after school care, and other caregiver needs. The Grandparenting Program has received funding from
the W. K. Kellogg Foundation to implement a program addressing school readiness for children between
birth and 7 years old. The program is currently funded by Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina and
the NC Department of Health and Human Services.
Effectiveness:
     125 grandparents and 275 grandchildren have participated in the Grandparenting Program. As a
         result of participating in the program, the emotional and physical health of grandparents has
         improved and they are more likely to embrace a more nurturing parenting style. Both
         grandparents and grandchildren are more likely to receive needed healthcare. Children also
         perform better academically.
Enhancement:
     The program can be enhanced through reinstitution of the case management program. It can be
         further enhanced through expansion of services to the Hispanic community. We are currently
         communicating with the Kate B. Reynolds Foundation for these program expansions in the near
         future.
Cost and Funding:
     Since its inception, the program has received $1,350,000 in grant funding.

b. NEW INITIATIVES:

1. Institute for Regional Transformation (IRT).
Proposed is a new organizational structure that would provide a tangible, visible organizational unit that
would promote and enhance interdisciplinary, inter-institutional, and community participatory
collaborations to expand the reach and impact of WSSU’s efforts and to achieve the desired results
identified in the UNC Tomorrow Study. The IRT would report to a senior-level administrator so as to
keep the issues of outreach and engagement at the forefront of institutional priorities.



                                                             WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 66
The plan builds upon the opportunities afforded the university through the co-location of the Center for
Community Safety, the Center for Entrepreneurship, the Center for Financial Empowerment, the Center
for Financial Services, the Simon Green Atkins CDC, the Center of Excellence for Eliminating Health
Disparities and the SBTDC in a downtown office building from which multiple outreach and engagement
activities can be initiated and coordinated (the “Winston Tower Centers”). These activities would solidify
a highly visible and desirable role for WSSU both now and in the future for our city, region and state.
The common thread of all centers of the institute is the focus on improving the quality of life for all
citizens of the region.

The creation of the IRT will establish an infrastructure that would facilitate, coordinate, support, and
measure the individual activities of the Winston Tower Centers and other existing and new centers as
well as permit greater integration and evaluation of all WSSU engagement units. Several initial essential
components of the IRT, each requiring its own implementation plan and timeline, are stated below:
 The development of an assessment and evaluation process and plan within Institutional Planning,
    Assessment, and Research to model and measure WSSU outreach and engagement involvement
    from student (education), faculty (research and scholarship), and staff and community (public
    service) perspectives.
 The organization of an office or process to promote, adopt, coordinate and report on the
    incorporation of service learning and civic engagement curriculum, internships, practicums and
    other experiential learning opportunities throughout all schools and colleges (community service
    programs should be a part of this effort).
 Designation of specific responsibilities to support communication and IT resources (website
    management, publications, marketing and public relations).
 Inclusion of Diggs Gallery as a program component.
 Inclusion of Office of Conferences and Institutes as a program component.
 Designation of specific responsibilities in Lifelong Learning (Distance/Continuing Education).

Suggested Programs and Supportive Services of the IRT

The Winston Tower Centers would include and/or collaborate with the following:
 Center for Community Safety
 Center for Entrepreneurship
 Center of Excellence in Financial Services
 SBTDC
 S.G. Atkins Community Development Corporation
 Center of Excellence for the Elimination of Health Disparities
 Center for Economic and Workforce Development
 Winston-Salem Chamber of Commerce
 School of Business and Economics, WSSU
 North Carolina School of the Arts
 Wake Forest University
 Piedmont Triad Entrepreneurial Network
 Northwest Piedmont Workforce Development Board
 Center for Design Innovation
 School of Health Sciences, WSSU
 Institutional Planning, Assessment, and Research


                                                            WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 67
   Information Resources
   Diggs Gallery
   Office of Conferences and Institutes
   Office of Sponsored Programs
   Pre-College/Bridge Programs
   Lifelong Learning/Distance Education
   Early Childhood Development Center
   Maya Angelou Institute for the Improvement of Child and Family Education

Each of these IRT areas will have directors or coordinators who would be responsible for achieving their
respective goals and objectives as set by Vice Chancellor or Associate Provost of IRT and measured
through evaluation processes and reporting provided by institutional assessment.
Effectiveness:
     A key first step is to name a senior administrator to lead the organizational and structural design
        of the IRT. This person would be responsible for establishing the divisional processes,
        procedures and functions that will ensure that the strategies and goals can be achieved.
Cost and Funding:
     Most of the programs and services generate or have the potential to generate external funding
        through grants, donations, or fees for service. A funding matrix could be created that would
        demonstrate the level of additional financial support needed for startup and to sustain the IRT.
     Several of the administrative services or functions that are may be obtained through a
        realignment of duties so as to minimize the need for additional (new) or resources.
     The IRT could be implemented in phases according to strategic priority ranking of the programs
        and services.

2. The Center for Economic Analysis is being established to ensure that businesses, lobbyists, and
government officials have accurate and up-to-date reports and supporting economic data to make the
decisions that will benefit the competitiveness of this region. Through the use of sophisticated
statistical models, the center will routinely generate valuable assessments of the economic impact of
various local entities, including WSSU; economic forecasts for the city, the county, and the region; and
assorted economic analyses.
Effectiveness:
     Generation of external reports and provision of economic impact analysis to other WSSU
         centers
Cost and Funding:
     $20,000 for one-quarter faculty release time annually

3. American Journal of Retirement Economics (AJRE). The SBE will launch the American Journal of
Retirement Economics. As Winston-Salem becomes known as one of the nation’s primary retirement
destinations, the SBE will establish an academic vehicle that builds on that distinction. This new journal,
targeted to academicians and practitioners in the retirement planning field, will become an industry-
leading means of disseminating cutting-edge knowledge on financial planning. The audience for the
journal consists of libraries, academics, and the general public, all of whom will become better educated
regarding these issues. As retirement planning and funding is a critical need in the region and for the
African American community in particular, this journal can assist policymakers and academics in the
formation of better public policy and effective outreach to the surrounding community regarding the
need for financial planning.



                                                             WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 68
Effectiveness:
     Number of submissions received per quarter
Cost and Funding:
     $15,000 annually from corporate donors

4. Career Exploration. One of the most critical attributes among disadvantaged populations is lack of
formal education and career-related awareness and training. This challenge exists for many urban and
rural North Carolinians, who face high school drop out rates that are at crisis levels. The Guess What I
Do for a Living Project is being proposed as a method by which middle and high school students can be
introduced to the occupations that are available to them in later years. It will be a variation of the
classic game show “What’s my line?” which will be taken to area schools. Actual workers, managers,
and public service employees will be part of the teams that visit hosting locations. Through dynamic
combinations of background video, sound, and direct interaction, they will present gradually and with a
sense of suspense details of their work. Each team from the audience would have a number of questions
to pose with only possible “yes” or “no” answers. Contestants could work in teams to solve the "riddle,"
and accomplish the feat through collaboration, teamwork, and applied leadership roles. The project
could focus on industries or clusters that have been designated as critical by the state and federal
governments. The second phase of the game would invite teams to apply for a scholarship or a grant to
either study intensely (if students) the industry of their choice over a pre-specified period, or to be
involved with apprenticeships or training (if farmers or displaced workers). To advance to the next level,
they would have to provide a report describing the important pieces of the puzzle (i.e., skills,
preparation, work ethic), and suggest ways to improve it. A team of WSSU support personnel (legal,
marketing, finance, accounting, etc.) would mentor the “scholars” every step of the way. We have
faculty across the whole spectrum of knowledge it takes to create and manage an organization.
Effectiveness:
     Number of participants that completed the program and mentored the next generation of
         program participants
Cost and Funding:
     $250,000 from targeted WIRED initiative and Golden Leaf Foundation

5. The WSSU Entrepreneurial Fellows Program (EFP). The Center for Innovation in Health Disparities
Research and the School of Health Sciences will partner with the Piedmont Alliance for Cancer Research
and Education to develop an Entrepreneurial Fellows program. The program will provide innovative,
practical, and interactive management education for WSSU students and healthcare providers to
promote growth in healthcare businesses and to create an entrepreneurial healthcare network for
Forsyth County. EFP goals are to (1) develop and sustain an innovative educational program for resolving
critical management decisions of rapidly growing healthcare entrepreneurs; (2) cultivate an interactive
learning environment via advisory groups responsible for expanding networking relationships to
strengthen healthcare entrepreneurship in Forsyth County; (3) provide Entrepreneurial Fellows with
one-on-one mentoring by experienced, successful healthcare entrepreneurs in North Carolina; (4)
connect stakeholders to an interactive online network of alumni, mentors, and faculty; and (5) provide
supervised opportunities for WSSU students and Entrepreneurial Fellows to apply to healthcare the
same theory, skills and concepts that challenge existing businesses.
Effectiveness:
      Number of successful partnerships and individual projects
Cost and Funding:
      $48,000 from industry partners in healthcare and WSSU internal research seed funds



                                                            WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 69
6. International Center for Motorsports Business Research. The motorsports industry has performed
very little research investigating diverse populations, marketing, facility management, and similar topics.
Therefore, there is great potential for the faculty and students in the Motorsports Management
program to build systems to meet this growing need. The Center would be a clearinghouse for
motorsports-related topics; would publish an academic journal; and would conduct and disseminate
research. Center activities would focus on conducting research with practical application to the global
motorsports industry, the goal being a centralized location where industry professionals and
academicians generate and disseminate new knowledge to enhance the business efficiency of
motorsports in the regional, national, and global marketplaces. The Center would also develop and
conduct industry-related professional development conferences and seminars, international scholarly
gatherings, and the publication of an academic journal for broader distribution of specific motorsports
business content. Finally, the Center would seek out current motorsports businesses in North Carolina
and encourage them to participate in the research opportunities that would be provided to enhance
their current organizations. Ultimately, the benefits of having the Center in North Carolina would
continue to draw motorsports teams, suppliers, and related organizations to the state while establishing
the Center as a hub of motorsports research advancing investigations into new topic areas.
Effectiveness:
      This initiative will be assessed based upon scholarly research production and application of that
          research to the motorsports industry.
      It will also be assessed based upon the number of motorsports-related businesses who use the
          Center’s resources.
Cost and Funding
      Financial investment for an International Center for Motorsports Business Research would be
          substantial, especially if new physical facilities were designed and built. Funding for an
          academic journal could be provided for via the shifting of internal resources within the SOEHP or
          the institution.
      There is great potential from corporate sources to fund the development of these
          improvements. Funding could also result from the reconfiguration and allocation of current
          university resources.

7. The WSSU Forensics Laboratory is designed to support service to law enforcement, scholarly
research activities in genomics, and student training for workforce development. The WSSU Forensics
Laboratory was developed in response to a tremendous interest from students, a large SBI sample
backlog, and a substantial commitment to molecular biology and genomics housed in the Department of
Life Sciences. It contains four distinct laboratory modalities, each with separate and distinct functions,
representing broad categories of forensic sciences. The four functions are biological and genetic
sciences, microscopy, wet chemistry, and analytical instrumentation Most of the laboratory is housed in
a rented facility, the R.J. Reynolds Bowman Gray Technical Center, while computer forensics will reside
in the Elva Jones Computer Sciences Building on campus. The partnering academic units (WSSU’s Life
Sciences, Computer Sciences, Chemistry, Clinical Laboratory Sciences, and Physical Therapy
Departments) enable the Forensics Laboratory to implement cost-sharing and maintain essential
expertise while helping to build a research intensive infrastructure. A wide range of activities are
supported including structural and synthetic chemical characterization; bio-analytical quantification of
environmental pollutants, narcotics, and drug/metabolites; proteomics; DNA synthesis and sequencing;
and human identity testing projects. Operational challenges include the development of accounting
protocols and administrative policies that cross departmental lines to maximize investments and foster
positive contractual and research outcomes.


                                                             WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 70
Effectiveness:
     Provision of analytical support to customers to meet their needs for efficient, timely results.
Cost and Funding:
     A 10,000-square-foot wing in the proposed addition to the existing sciences building is being
        designated for the lab and will cost $300,000.
     Short-term funding ($90,000) for two SPA positions (Laboratory Supervisor and Office Assistant
        III), educational supplies ($35,000), and instrument maintenance agreements ($8000 per year)
        are needed to execute the program until receipts from services and fees exceed expenditures.
        The Department of Life Sciences will contribute one Research Technician I position for
        laboratory support and it is anticipated that other partnering academic units will develop an SPA
        position for ancillary laboratory activities.
     Building a fiscal management process for receipts and fees charge for intra- and extramural
        services and sample analysis could alleviate a significant portion of the operating budget.




                                                           WSSU UNC Tomorrow Response, May 1, 2008; page 71

				
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