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Editing and Fine Tuning

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					Editing and Fine Tuning


 ITSW 1410
 Presentation Media Software
 Instructor: Glenda H. Easter
 Guidelines for Editing
Software Documentation

   Know Your User: A clear idea of
    the needs of people who will put
    the manual or help system to
    productive work.
   Take a Constructive Attitude.
   Don’t Edit Your Own Work.



              Editing and Fine Tuning,
                       Chp. 7            2
 Guidelines for Editing
Software Documentation

   Use Editing Forms if you are
    working on documentation with a
    group of a corporation.
   Edit Strategically to pace yourself
    in the job.
    • Edit for only one document feature at
      a time.
   Develop an Editor’s Reading Skills
               Editing and Fine Tuning,
                        Chp. 7            3
 Guidelines for Editing
Software Documentation
   Develop an Editor’s Reading Skills
    (Continued):
    • Do a flip test: ten seconds per
      manual to get the overall
      organization.
    • Skimming (six to ten pages per
      minute) for spelling, mechanics, and
      punctuation.
    • Reading selectively (two to three
      minutes per page.
                Editing and Fine Tuning,
                         Chp. 7              4
 Guidelines for Editing
Software Documentation

   Develop an Editor’s Reading Skills
    (Continued):
    • Read analytically (five pages per
      hour). Missing information, technical
      inaccuracies, paragraph organization
      and unity.
    • The long look (one to two minutes
      per page; errors will not appear until
      after the first minute.)
                Editing and Fine Tuning,
                         Chp. 7            5
 Guidelines for Editing
Software Documentation

   Consult Standard Style Guides for
    spelling and word usage
    guidelines.
   Don’t Confuse Editing with Other
    Tasks:
    • Don’t supply missing material:
      procedures, definitions explanations.


                Editing and Fine Tuning,
                         Chp. 7               6
 Guidelines for Editing
Software Documentation

   Don’t Confuse Editing with Other
    Tasks (Continued):
    • Don’t supply missing screen
      captures.
    • Don’t write more than short
      passages.
    • Don’t edit a manuscript more than
      once.

               Editing and Fine Tuning,
                        Chp. 7            7
    Writing versus Editing

   Usually you write first, then you
    edit or get the material edited.
   Systematic editing usually
    occurs after you complete the
    whole document.



              Editing and Fine Tuning,
                       Chp. 7            8
    Various Types of Edits

   Coordination Edit which is to
    plan and manage.
   Policy Edit where the document
    conforms to the policy of the
    organization or department.
   Integrity Edit ensures that the
    parts of a document match one
    another.
             Editing and Fine Tuning,
                      Chp. 7            9
    Various Types of Edits
            (Continued)
   Screening Edit which means
    identifying and correcting errors
    in the texts and visuals.
   Copy Clarification Edit involves
    reworking illegible text and
    artwork so that persons
    involved in production will not
    make mistakes.
              Editing and Fine Tuning,
                       Chp. 7            10
Various Types of Edits
        (Continued)
• No one likes to read copyright
  notices, manual part numbers,
  legal disclaimers, official FTC
  notices, and lists of trademarks,
  but you should confirm that these
  are induced and that they are up to
  date.
• Make sure that the company’s
  address and phone number are
  correct, also. and Fine Tuning,
            Editing
               Chp. 7              11
    Various Types of Edits
            (Continued)
   Format Edit ensures that all
    instances of typography, style,
    and page layout conform to the
    style guidelines for the document.
   Mechanical Style Edit makes sure
    that the document mechanics
    conform to whatever style
    specifications you use.

               Editing and Fine Tuning,
                        Chp. 7            12
    Various Types of Edits
           (Continued)
   Language Edit or how clearly
    and precisely do sentences
    express explanations, steps,
    definitions, elaborations, and
    other language elements.
   Substantive Edit where you pay
    close attention to the
    meaningful content of a
    document.Editing and Fine Tuning,
                  Chp. 7            13
            Integrity Edits

   Integrity Edit which requires
    policing the format: (Continued)
    • Art
      • Does every piece have a caption?
      • Are the callouts in the right font and
        position?
      • Is all the art the same size or one of
        the authorized sizes?


                Editing and Fine Tuning,
                         Chp. 7                  14
          Integrity Edits
            (Continued)
   Policing the format: (Continued)
    • Headers and Footers
      • Are they in the right place?
      • Are they styled correctly?
      • Is the right information in them?
      • Do page numbers jibe?




                Editing and Fine Tuning,
                         Chp. 7             15
          Integrity Edits
            (Continued)
   Policing the format: (Continued)
    • Headings
      • Are they all capitalized in the same
        way?
      • Do all the headings of the same level
        look the same
      • Are any headings placed at the
        bottom of the page, announcing no
            thing but the footer?

                 Editing and Fine Tuning,
                          Chp. 7                16
          Integrity Edits
              (Continued)
   Policing the format: (Continued)
    • Lists
      • Are all items punctuated the same
        way (beginning with a capital letter or
        not, ending with a period or not)?
      • Do all lists use the same indentations,
        bullets, numbering?
      • Do they follow the company policy
        (which may assign different formats
        to different types of lists?)
                Editing and Fine Tuning,
                         Chp. 7              17
          Integrity Edits
            (Continued)
   Policing the format: (Continued)
    • Product Names
      • Are they all spelled and capitalized
        the right way?
      • Do trademarks appear where they
        should (usually after the first
        reference to the product in the book,
        but your lawyers may disagree?)


                Editing and Fine Tuning,
                         Chp. 7                 18
          Integrity Edits
            (Continued)
   Policing the format: (Continued)
    • Punctuation
      • Are there spaces before some periods
        or commas?
      • Are there too many spaces after a
        period, commas, colon, semicolon,
        dash?
      • Are hyphens used in place of dashes?
      • Are periods used in some areas, but
        not in others?
               Editing and Fine Tuning,
                        Chp. 7             19
     Being a Good Screen
            Editor

   Check the English:
    •   Circle any typos
    •   Check for misspelled words
    •   Look for repeated words (let, let)
    •   Phrases that don’t sound correct.
    •   Two idioms canceling each other out.
    •   For professional writers, you should
        be able to point out problems without
        correcting it.
                  Editing and Fine Tuning,
                           Chp. 7            20
     Being a Good Screen
            Editor

   Check the English (Continued):
    • Check for spelling. Use spell
      checker on the file if you have the
      file available.
    • Recognize that even the best
      spell-check dictionaries don’t
      recognize the misuse of a
      correctly spelled word.

               Editing and Fine Tuning,
                        Chp. 7            21
     Being a Good Screen
      Editor (Continued)

   Check the English (Continued):
    • Watch for popular confusions,
      such as its and it’s, effect and
      affect.
    • Check for grammar.
    • Check for punctuation, even more
      carefully that you may have done
      for a regular edit.

              Editing and Fine Tuning,
                       Chp. 7            22
     Being a Good Screen
      Editor (Continued)

   Check the Formatting
    • You must review the formatting of
      each element separately, even more
      painstakingly than you may have
      done for a regular edit.




              Editing and Fine Tuning,
                       Chp. 7            23
     Being a Good Screen
      Editor (Continued)

   Typos
    • These are usually lurking in the big
      type, such as the book title,
      chapter titles, and major headings,
      which ever other reviewer has
      skipped, assuming that anything
      that large must be right.
    • Typos also tend to cluster at the
      tops and bottoms of pages and in
      closing paragraphs.
                Editing and Fine Tuning,
                    Chp. 7              24
     Being a Good Screen
      Editor (Continued)
   Pages as wholes
    • Make sure that every time a reader
      opens the book, the two facing
      pages work together or at least
      don’t conflict with each other.
    • Whenever you get to look at made-
      up pages, scan for irregular
      spacing between paragraphs,
      between headings and text,
      between the headers and footers
      and the rest of the text.
                Editing and Fine Tuning,
                   Chp. 7             25
     Being a Good Screen
      Editor (Continued)
   Pages as wholes (Continued):
    • Make sure that no page has a
      widow or orphan--a page break that
      leaves a heading at the bottom of
      the page, with no following text, or
      that abandons a paragraph’s last
      line at the top of the next page.




               Editing and Fine Tuning,
                        Chp. 7            26
     Being a Good Screen
      Editor (Continued)
   Gaps in sequence
    • Are there any steps missing?
    • If a paragraph announces three
      items, does the bulleted list have
      three items?
    • Do the figure numbers proceed in
      order?
    • Check pagination and any
      alphabetical or numbered
      sequences to make sure there are
      no gaps. Editing and Fine Tuning,
                   Chp. 7              27
     Being a Good Screen
      Editor (Continued)

   Gaps in sequence (Continued):
    • Gaps creep in when the writer
      deletes one item without
      renumbering the rest.




               Editing and Fine Tuning,
                        Chp. 7            28
           Format Edits

   Type styles, leading, column
    widths, headings, indention's.
   Continuity instructions
   Progress indicators and
    navigational tools.
   Running headers and footers
   Margins, spacing, rules, fonts,
    page numbers, binding, tabs
               Editing and Fine Tuning,
                        Chp. 7            29
    Mechanical Style Edit

   Capitalization of acronyms (pc
    versus PC).
   Look for the same word spelled
    two different ways (gray, grey).
   Word compounding (“online or on-
    line)



              Editing and Fine Tuning,
                       Chp. 7            30
    Mechanical Style Edit
            (Continued)
   Form and construction of
    numerals and terms (“drive A:”
    versus A:-drive”
   Form and use of acronyms and
    abbreviations.
   Use of cuing patterns (bold, script,
    color) for specific words.

               Editing and Fine Tuning,
                        Chp. 7            31
     Revising Someone
       Else's Manual

1.   Define goals
2.   Edit don’t rewrite
3.   Make edit fit audience
     • The level of detail seems right for the
       audience.
     • The tone matches the audience’s
       expectations.
4.   Untangle prose
               Editing and Fine Tuning,
                        Chp. 7               32
    Revising Someone
      Else's Manual
5. A list of potential stylistic
   messes to Watch Out For:
    • Disagreement
      • Singular subject followed by many
        prepositional phrases containing plural
        objects then a plural verb.
      • Combinations such as “Everyone...they,”
      • The customer...they.”
    • Irrelevancies
      • Examples that don’t match what was said
        about them, illustrations that don’t
        illustrate.
              Editing and Fine Tuning,
                       Chp. 7                     33
       Revising Someone
         Else's Manual
   Potential Stylistic Messes
    (Continued):
      • Lack of energy
        • Sentences that trail off, parallels that are
          not set up but not completed, contrasts
          that aren’t carried out.
      • Negative thinking
        • Paragraphs that start with a caution or a
          restriction.
        • Double negatives
        • Statements that could be phrased in
          positive terms.
                 Editing and Fine Tuning,
                          Chp. 7                      34
       Revising Someone
         Else's Manual

   Potential Stylistic Messes
    (Continued):
      • Noun clumps
        • Grab-bag sequences of three or more
          nouns in a row that make the reader
          wonder which words should be considered
          together and which should be thought of
          as forming a modifying phrases.
      • Sexism
        • Any use of he or she should trip the alarm.

                 Editing and Fine Tuning,
                          Chp. 7                    35
       Revising Someone
         Else's Manual
   Potential Stylistic Messes
    (Continued):
      • Passive Voice
        • The verb to be should signal trouble.
        • Read carefully any sentence that contains
          some for of is .
        • The sentence may turn out OK, but
          probably not.
      • Sequential goofs
        • Paragraphs that don’t follow chronological
          sequence, are missing steps, have topics
                                  when
          that get in the way Tuning, you expect to go
                 Editing and Fine
          from Topic A to Topic B.
                          Chp. 7                     36
       Revising Someone
         Else's Manual

   Potential Stylistic Messes
    (Continued):
      • Unclear references
        • a that clause that appears long after the
          object it refers to, dangling modifiers,
          pronouns without clear references.
        • Unexplained terms, abbreviations, and
          acronyms




                 Editing and Fine Tuning,
                          Chp. 7                      37
       Revising Someone
         Else's Manual

   Potential Stylistic Messes
    (Continued):
      • Future tense
        • Usually not needed and has less energy
          than present tense.
        • It creeps in by accident or through
          laziness.
      • Verbosity or wordiness



                Editing and Fine Tuning,
                         Chp. 7                    38
    Revising Someone
      Else's Manual

6. Doing a Reproduction Edit
   • Access
     • Make sure people can find their way
       around the book using tables of content,
       headers and footers, page numbers and
       the index.
   • Completeness
     • A book is a collection of pieces. Is all the
       art really here?
     • Is every appendix really in place?
     • It’s astonishing how many little parts can
       turn out to be half done, mysteriously
               Editing and Fine Tuning,
       missing, or “still to come.”
                        Chp. 7                     39
    Revising Someone
      Else's Manual

6. Doing a Preproduction Edit
   (Continued)
   • Cross-references
     • Once you have completely prepared
       pages, you need to make sure that the
       table of contents’ headings and page
       numbers match those of the document,
       that figure numbers march references,
       that the indexes sends people to the right
       place.

              Editing and Fine Tuning,
                       Chp. 7                   40

				
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