9th Grade Debate Continues

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					The Debate Continues
1 Getting Started Home Scenario Steps One of the greatest conflicts of the ancient world, the Peloponnesian War, was between Athens and Sparta. In fact, the history of Greece was dominated by quarrels and rivalries between these powerful city-states. Of the 300 citystates in Greece, Athens and Sparta were by far the most powerful.

Research Cycle Questioning Planning Gathering Sorting/Sifting Synthesizing Evaluating Reporting

Assessment Reflection Rubrics Learning Resources Resouces Tips

The Debate Continues
1 Getting Started Home Scenario Steps

Project Scenario
Imagine that you and your family have just walked through a time portal and that you have been mysteriously transported back to ancient Greece in the year 400 B. C. Suddenly, you are approached by the robed keeper of the portal who tells you that you will never be able to return to the 21st century. You are given a choice between living in the city-state of Sparta with its ordered, disciplined and powerful militaristic society or the democracy of Athens with its emphasis on a rich culture and the development of well rounded citizens. Both city-states were successful and powerful so how will you choose which is best for your family? To help you make the decision the keeper tells you that you will have the opportunity to access the media of the 21st century. Study each city-state carefully so that you can compel your family to reside there. Remember, your family's future is at stake!

Research Cycle Questioning Planning Gathering Sorting/Sifting Synthesizing Evaluating Reporting

Assessment Reflection Rubrics Learning Resources Resouces Tips

The Debate Continues
1 Getting Started Home Scenario Steps

Steps for this Project
You will follow the Research Cycle as you work through this project. The steps are: Questioning Keep referring back to this guiding question: "What are the interrelationships among political systems, cultures, environments, and economies?" In order to answer that question, you will focus in on smaller questions to guide your planning and your research. Planning Study the Elements of Civilization chart and complete your Personal Preference Guide. Divide the tasks among your team members. Gathering Use links to selected web sites and other sources to gather information. Sorting and Sifting Now, it is time to organize and select the information that contributes to your understanding of the two ancient civilizations. Synthesizing Look at your notes sheet. Discuss the facts that you found, and make some initial decisions based on the information that you gathered. Based on the information gathered so far, where will you suggest your family live?

Research Cycle Questioning Planning Gathering Sorting/Sifting Synthesizing Evaluating Reporting

Assessment Reflection Rubrics Learning Resources Resouces Tips

Gather, Sort, Sift, Synthesize Repeat these steps until you have all the information you need. Evaluating Does the researchsupport your decision? How well did you work as a team? Reporting With your team, translate your findings into a persuasive, instructive, and effective PowerPoint presentation.

The Debate Continues
1 Getting Started Home Scenario Steps

Questioning

What do you need to know to solve the problem or make the decision?

Research Cycle Questioning Planning Gathering Geography Economics Sorting/Sifting Culture Ethics/Belief Systems Political Systems Social Systems Synthesizing Evaluating Now, develop several (at least 3) answerable Reporting questions for each category that will yield facts your team can use to compare the city-states. Let your curiosity flow! Assessment These answerable questions should: Reflection Rubrics

In order to decide where your family can live more comfortably, you will need to consider what living conditions are important to you. Think about the basic living conditions listed below.

Learning Resources Resouces Tips

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Call for numbers or data Be precisely written, eg. "What is the average temperature for the month of August?" Concern things you want to know about the city-state. Relate to important information about living in the city-state. Some facts are interesting to know, but don't relate to daily life in the country. Avoid "Yes" or "No" answers Avoid questions that use words such as "good" or "fun."

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1 Getting Started Home Scenario Steps

Planning

Develop your information-seeking strategies.

Research Cycle Questioning Planning Gathering Sorting/Sifting Synthesizing Evaluating Reporting

These documents will guide your decision making. Personal Preference Guide Elements of Civilization Athens vs. Sparta Decision Sheet Now it is time to plan how your team will work together, what resources you will need, and how you will gather your information. What skills will you need to have to be successful? How you will share jobs? How will you determine which elements of a civilization are most important in

Assessment Reflection Rubrics Learning Resources Resouces Tips

selecting a new home for your family? Review what you already know about geographic locations. Complete the Personal Preference Guide describing in detail the elements of a location that most appeal to you and the reasons why. Review the Elements of Civilization chart. The elements of a civilization are:
Culture Ethics/Belief Systems Geography Political Systems Economics Social Systems

What impact will these elements have on your choice? Use the Note Sheet to record your questions. For example:

Elements of Civilization Geography: 1) How did the accessibility to water impact the city-state?

Athens

Sparta

Save your work as directed by your teacher.

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1 Getting Started Home Scenario Steps

Gathering Information

Collect information to answer your questions.

You must now find out if your perfect place is in Ancient Greece. Research each city-state to find out how closely they match your ideal location. Using your search skills, locate at least 3 sources that contain information about the elements of the two citystates. If you use an Internet site, it is important to remember to evaluate each website for accuracy before collecting information from that site. Use the Research Record sheets or notecards to gather information about Athens and Sparta. Use the MLA Citation Format guide to record information on all your sources of information. Models are found on Citing Sources for Writing & Research. (Use as many Research Records sheets as you need for your note-taking. Using the questions that you recorded on the Decision Sheet will help you to stay focused.) Use the MLA Citation Format guide to record information on all your sources of information. Models are found on Citing Sources for Writing & Research. Internet Sites for Reference: (Validated for accuracy)
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Research Cycle Questioning Planning Gathering Sorting/Sifting Synthesizing Evaluating Reporting

Assessment Reflection Rubrics Learning Resources Resouces Tips

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Enjoy the reenactment of battle by Spartan hoplite warriors at Ancient Greece Brought to Life (BBC). Then learn more about Spartan education for both boys and girls and the government of Sparta. Compare Sparta with Athens! See Athens and

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Solon - Sparta (Tourist Guide of Greece) and Sparta (World Civilization by Richard Hooker, Washington State University) is rather difficult to read, but very complete. Spartan Stories and How Lycurgus (king around 885 B.C.) set up the militaristic society. Also see Xenophon's description of Sparta (c. 375 BC.) Everything Spartan, Lakonian and Messenian (by Holly Lorencz, award winning site) has much information of Spartan women, art, poetry, photographs of Sparta, and more. MrDonn.org: Daily Life in Ancient Greece A look at the daily routines, customs, and lifestyle of the Greeks. Includes clip art, maps, and games. Ancient Greece - Daily Life - The British Museum Life in ancient Greece was quite different for men and women. The Ancient Greek World Topics include land and time, daily life, economics, and religion.

The Debate Continues
1 Getting Started Home Scenario Steps

Sorting and Sifting Information

Organize and select information that contributes to your understanding.

Research Cycle

You have gathered information to answer your questions and have investigated each of the city-

Questioning Planning Gathering Sorting/Sifting Synthesizing Evaluating Reporting

states. It’s time to sort through all of this information.
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Assessment Reflection Rubrics Learning Resources Resouces Tips

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Have you found sufficient details about the geographic and cultural features of the locations? Do you have enough economic information? Are you satisfied with the information that you found about the societal systems and the political systems? Do you have enough information about the ethics and the values of the people in these city-states? Do you have any new questions to use in comparing the locations? Can you throw away material that is not useful?

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1 Getting Started Home Scenario Steps

Synthesizing

Think about the best choice using the information you gathered.

Research Cycle Questioning Planning

Keeping in mind your desire to find a place to live that matches your personal preferences, complete the Comparision Chart. Summarize your information and use the completed chart to make

Gathering Sorting/Sifting Synthesizing Evaluating Reporting

your decision. Which city-state will be your best place for your family to live?

Assessment Reflection Rubrics Learning Resources Resouces Tips

Go to your teacher with evidence that you have completed your Comparision Chart!

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Evaluating Your Information

Research Cycle Questioning Planning Gathering Sorting/Sifting Synthesizing Evaluating Reporting

Checkpoint! It is time to assess your progress.

Evaluate your work to be sure you are meeting the requirements of the task. Check the Process Rubric for Project to see how to evaluate your progress. If you discover problems with your process, identify changes you can make before going on.

Assessment

Reflection Rubrics Learning Resources Resouces Tips

When you are confident that you have adequately evaluated your progress and made adjustments where necessary, move on to reporting.

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1 Getting Started Home Scenario Steps

Reporting Your Project

Persuasively present your decisions based on your information.

Research Cycle Questioning Planning Gathering Sorting/Sifting Synthesizing Evaluating Reporting

Your team will report results of your research decision-making, dividing responsibilities between team members.
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Assessment Reflection Rubrics Learning Resources

First person: Write a letter to your parents compelling them to locate in your chosen citystate. Second person: Present your team's selection of "The Best City-State to Live In" using a persuasive and informative PowerPoint presentation. Third person: Create a pamphlet or a travel brochure advertising or extolling your citystate (Sparta or Athens). Tell about its advantages to the prospective visitors or potential home owners. Highlights may include: cultural activities (such as drama,

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music and arts); recreation, athletics and sports; architecture and famous sites; schools; accommodations (like homes where the tourists can stay with some of the locals or homes for sale); transportation; and food. Include a map showing where your city-state is located. In another smaller section you may want to add "travel alerts" which warn the tourist of some of the dangers he/she might encounter while staying in your city-state. 1. Letter to Parents: Create a current event about your city-state using a Greek myth. Reflect on this event as if you were already living in the country and write a letter home to your parents telling them about this event and how it is should impact their decision. Study the writing rubric for more detail on how your letter will be assessed. A sample letter will show you how one student met this task. Your letter should:
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include relevant anecdotes about events taking place in the city-state tell what is happening in their everyday life contain a minimum of 5 connections to research be persuasive give important information that will compel your parents to choose this location may include details that enrich the storyline include an attached page with research citations

2. PowerPoint Presentation: Your presentation should use the information from your Country Matrix to persuade your parents that the city-state you chose is most favorable and the other city-state unfavorable. Refer to the Presentation Checklist and the Persuasive

Presentation rubric. Required Elements:
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Introduction Topic slide Informational slides-give clear evidence that will persuade the audience and reflect sound research Conclusion slide which restates your question Citation of Sources slide using correct citation format Slide design: readable, correct spacing, good use of color and layout Use of proper spelling, grammar and punctuation Prepare and present orally using clear voice, proper posture and good eye contact Turn in your signed Presentation Checklist Form demonstrating all preparation is complete

3. Phamplet: Analyze your country for the Five Themes of Geography and create a pamphlet that represents your city-state. Pamphlets could include a prepared food item, a documentary movie, a commercial, an interview with someone from the country, singing the national anthem, or preparing some other visual display that represents the country. Study the Product/Visual Aid rubric. Be prepared to explain to your audience:
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What is the product? Who first made it? Where does it come from? Why is it eaten, or why does it come from that country? How did you make the product? Explain your process

Create a Poster or and Overhead:
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Analyze your country using the Five Themes of Geography worksheet (see example) Open and save the visual aid form to record your information. Use good design to show the information in a visual, easy to understand manner Balance color, readability, spacing All words spelled correctly Provide citations on your sources of information

All materials required to share the product must be in the classroom and ready before the start of class bell on Presentation Day. On Presentation Day, be prepared to rate other team's presentation with the presentation rubrics. Your yellow sticky tabs will help the class build a bar graph to show visually how all presentations were rated by your peers.

Give your Buddy to the teacher for your final evaluation.

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Getting Started Home Scenario Steps

Reflection

Think about what you have learned and accomplished.

Research Cycle Questioning Planning Gathering Sorting/Sifting Synthesizing Evaluating Reporting

You have just completed an in depth research project and now you need to think about what you learned. Congratulations! Your team has finished an extensive online project. You have used the steps of the research cycle to gain new knowledge and understandings. You have shared your findings and decisions persuasively. You are now experienced information managers and decision makers. Teacher Feedback Form Teachers! Please click on the link and answer the questions about your experience with this project. Email the completed form the Director of Instructional Technology and Libraries.

Assessment Reflection Rubrics Learning Resources Resouces Tips

Graphics: Microsoft Clip Art. Research modules based on use of the Research Cycle, Module Maker, and ideas in Beyond Technology by Jamie McKenzie

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1 Getting Started Home Scenario Steps

Rubrics

Rubrics help make your expectations clear to students.

Students and teachers may use the linked rubrics to evaluate their process and product. Research Cycle Questioning Planning Gathering Sorting/Sifting Synthesizing Evaluating Reporting
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Research Cycle Rubric (Process Rubric) Writing Rubric (Letter Home Rubric) Persuasive Presentation Rubric Phamphlet Rubric Collaboration Rubric for teamwork Presentation Rubric

Assessment Reflection Rubrics Learning Resources Resouces Tips
Graphics: Microsoft Clip Art. Research modules based on use of the Research Cycle, Module Maker, and ideas in Beyond Technology by Jamie McKenzie Rubrics

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1 Getting Started Home Scenario Steps

Standards, Guiding Questions, and Essential Learnings

Research Cycle Questioning Planning Gathering Sorting/Sifting Synthesizing Evaluating

Graphics: Microsoft Clip Art. Research modules based on use of the Research Cycle, Module Maker, and ideas in Beyond Technology by Jamie McKenzie

Reporting

Assessment Reflection Rubrics Learning Resources Resouces Tips

The Debate Continues
1 Getting Started Home Scenario Steps

Project Resources
Student teams in their online research investigation will use the following teacher-created resources: Project Documents:
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Research Cycle Questioning Planning Gathering Sorting/Sifting Synthesizing Evaluating Reporting

Assessment Reflection Rubrics Learning

Buddy Pre-Research Assignment Research Record Form MLA Citation Format Importance to Me sheet Five Themes of Geography Worksheet and example sheet Choosing Your Country worksheet Presentation Checklist PowerPoint example presentation Sample Letter Home Teacher Scoring Sheet

Resources Resouces Tips

Graphics: Microsoft Clip Art. Research modules based on use of the Research Cycle, Module Maker, and ideas in Beyond Technology by Jamie McKenzie

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Teacher Tips for This Project
- The project author encourages the use of the research cycle as part of a semester long program. Each time the students will have a greater understanding of the Research Cycle. This project is meant to be integrated into the social studies curriculum during the study of the Middle Ages and the feudalism. This will act as a wonderful lead-in to the Peasant’s Revolution. Background knowledge of the Elements of Civilization is essential to this project and should be taught as part of the process. It is important for the students to repeat the cycle using other projects so that they learn how to pose well-thought-out questions and find information that helps them state their answers. Selecting the Work Groups: Students are placed in groups of three by the

Research Cycle Questioning Planning Gathering Sorting/Sifting Synthesizing Evaluating Reporting

Assessment Reflection Rubrics Learning Resources Resouces Tips

teacher. The project author assesses each student's personality using a survey and assigns them to a group based upon traits such as: expressive, driver, or amiable. Some established surveys exist on the internet. The project author advocates the use of friendly competition within the group as they research, select, and advocate for the three changes they wish to present to the king. This adds fun and encourages student participation. Cooperative group work could also be used. At the reporting stage, each group member is assigned one major task. 1) Letter to the King 2) A journal entry 3) Letter to the Editor. Saving Files: Set up a folder on a shared drive where teams can save and access their project files. Google Docs is a free resource that students can use for the purpose of sharing. Work with your Library Media Specialist to find the best place. Always have one student backup the team files on their h: drive. Citing Sources: Students are required to cite their information sources during research. See model citations and online modules that can assist students in creating their list of works in Citing Sources for Writing & Research. You may also be interested in the following:
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MLA In-Text Citations provided by Diane Hacker Citation Machine free service from David Warlick's Landmark Project allows the user to click on the type of resource and fill in a form, creating their citation in correct format.

General Information about the project:

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Students refer to their "Buddy" (Research Cycle Rubric) throughout the project. They may give their Buddy a name (i.e. R2D2 or The Hulk). The teacher will assess, score and sign off on each step of their Buddy before students move on. Steps: Questioning, Use of Time, Gathering Information, Sorting, Why is this important to me, and Evaluating. Many lessons should be taught/led by the teacher and completed by all groups as a class. These include but are not limited to: 1. Brainstorming/categorizing factors that make a place livable 2. Creating Thinking Maps. The Thinking Maps help students organize their answerable questions based upon the categories they have identified. 3. Generating answerable questions-This is a major focus for the project. The teacher should be prepared to teach, reteach and model the formation of good answerable questions helping students to grow in their skill. *Try not to squelch student interest in their own questions, even if they seem unanswerable to you. Let them attempt to locate answers for a time. Perhaps the first research session. Then discuss as a class the difficulties they are having relative to some of their questions. Ask the groups to meet and retool, refine their questions. Some questions may need to be eliminated in favor of a more answerable question. 4. Evaluating Websites or Sources is another very important topic of instruction. With the advent of the World Wide Web and the huge amount of information that is contained there, students need to be able to critically evaluate a Web page for authenticity, applicability, authorship, bias, and usability. The ability to critically evaluate information is an important

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skill in this information age. 5. Research Records-(Gathering Step) may require several lesson led by the teacher. Each student is responsible for collecting data about the questions they generated. The teacher may wish to print multiple copies of the Research Record form for students to use in hard copy; however, students may also use the electronic version. To work at the computer students should open and save the Research Record file. They may highlight, copy, and paste blank forms as many times as needed. They may also save their research in several files with two records contained in each. 6. Use the MLA forms for parenthetical citation and the Work Cited page. Teachers will need to review this information with their students. It is especially important for the teacher to ascertain that students know where they can locate the samples as they encounter different types with different publication information. Some activities will be completed by a single team member and some by a collaborative or co-operating team. The teacher should work with groups of students who must focus on a particular task, in order to clarify expectations and teach skills specific to that task.

Time Allocation: The teacher will need to schedule time in a lab or with a mobile lab so that students have access to computers for their research and note taking. Approximately 1/3 of the project will need to be done in a computer lab. Rubrics: Four rubrics are provided which give the student guidelines on the expectations for the project. These

rubrics are for: Research Cycle (Buddy), Presentation, Visual Aid,and Writing. You may also wish to consult the District's Culminating Project Presentation Rubric (.pdf file) and build these characteristics into your work with the students. Another good resource might be the anchor papers for the WASL Writing Assessment. In order to evaluate other teams, each student in the class will receive a number of yellow sticky tabs to give a number rating each team's presentations. On the sticky note, the student writes one positive statement, and one statement for improvement, with their 1-10 rating. When all teams are rated, students place their sticky tabs with ratings, above a 1-10 scale, to build an informal "bar graph" for a visual of how all projects were rated by their peers. Example:

Graphics: Microsoft Clip Art. Research modules based on use of the Research Cycle, Module Maker, and ideas in Beyond Technology by Jamie McKenzie


				
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