Docstoc

THREE YEAR IMPROVEMENT PRIORITIES

Document Sample
THREE YEAR IMPROVEMENT PRIORITIES Powered By Docstoc
					                            CONTENTS

GENERAL GUIDANCE

Acknowledgements
LEA Statement of Purpose
Introduction
LEA School Improvement Priorities (EDP priorities and themes)
Good Practice in School Improvement Planning
Using the School Improvement Planning Framework
The School Improvement Action Plan Model
Statutory and LEA Requirements
How Performance Management Can Support School Improvement
Planning


SCHOOL CONTEXT PRIORITIES

School Context and Aims
School Strengths and Good Practice
Analysis of School Performance Information
Review of Progress (previous school plans)
Self-Evaluation Guidance
Three Year Improvement Priorities
Post-OFSTED Action Planning
Monitoring and Evaluating Action Plans
Budget, Best Value


ANNUAL SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN

Priority 1         School Improvement Sections
                   1.1  Literacy
                   1.2  Numeracy
                   1.3  Science
                   1.4  Religious Education
                   1.5  ICT
                   1.6  Foundation Subjects
                   1.7  Teaching and Learning
                   1.8  Foundation Stage
                   1.9  SEN
                   1.10 Gifted and Talented
                   1.11 Out-of-Schools-Hours Learning
                   1.12 Work Related Learning

Priority 2         Improve Transition, especially at Key Stage 2-3

Priority 3         Improve the achievement of underachieving pupils

                                                                     SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!              Contents
                            CONTENTS


Priority 4         Improve behaviour, motivation and self-esteem,
                   including attendance

Priority 5         Strengthen school capacity, including improving
                   teacher recruitment and retention


Priority 6         School determined priorities



TRAINING PRIORITIES

Staff development priorities
Governor training priorities
Resources and costing summaries


APPENDICES

1.   Asset Management
2.   Guidance on the completion of OFSTED pre-inspection S4 form
3.   Health and Safety
4.   Initiatives In Schools 2002 - 3 (Extract from Update 38)
5.   Keeping Your Balance (OFSTED)




                                                                     SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!              Contents
                       ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Thank you to everyone who has contributed to the production of this
document:

School Improvement Planning Working Group
Mandy Austin             Head Teacher, Westglade Junior School
Jo Bell                  Head Teacher, Robin Hood Infant School
Barbara Breakwell        Head Teacher, Croft Nursery School
Den Corrall              Head Teacher, William Sharp School
Linda Claxton            Head Teacher, Sycamore Junior School
Helen Farrell            Head Teacher, Our Lady and St Edward‟s
                                       Catholic Primary School
Andy Fox                 Head Teacher, St Ann‟s Well Junior School
Sheila Johnson-Marshall  Head Teacher, Nethergate School
John Pearson             Head Teacher, Rosehill School
Sharon Richmond          Deputy Head Teacher, Top Valley School

LEA Support to the Working Group
Robin Aldridge            Acting Assistant Director,
                          Standards and Effectiveness Division
Editors
Alison Day                Adviser
Jenny Digges              Adviser
Alison Traska             Adviser

Consultants
Laurence Andrew              Standards Fund Officer
Margaret Clarke              Nottingham Gateway Curriculum Manager
Louise Kugel                 Nottingham Gateway Curriculum Manager
Barbara Coombs               Arts Co-ordinator
Brian Crossman               Adviser
Malcolm Edmonds              e-Learning Strategy Manager
Ivor Elliott                 Gifted and Talented Co-ordinator
Sue Griffiths                KS3 Science Consultant
Ros Hamer                    RE Consultant
Andrew Hindley               Team Leader, Data and Research
Frank McDonald               Senior Literacy Consultant
Leonie Meikle                Head of Service, Governors
Gillian Ransby               Senior Adviser,
                             (Achievement and Best Practice)
Sue Rook                     Policy Development Officer
Di Smith                     Assistant Director, Inclusion
Ian Todd                     Study Support Co-ordinator
Carolyn Waterstone           Development Officer (Behaviour/Attendance)
Dick Woolley                 Adviser

Publication
Chris Burns
Marlene Cook
Julia Harrison
Ruth Sherrington             LEA Secretarial Team
Suzanne Taylor
Sharon Ventrella

                                                                          SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!         Acknowledgements
                 LEA STATEMENT OF PURPOSE

               Nottingham City Council is committed to
                 raising educational standards for all


  Our purpose is to challenge and support schools to continuously
improve and to work with all partners to create solutions and achieve
                              success.

  We believe that:

     All children can learn and achieve success;

     Education is at the heart of the City's future;

     Learning is for everyone.



  Our objectives are to:

     Give all children an excellent start in education so that they have a
      better foundation to learning;

     Enable all young people to develop and equip themselves with the
      skills, knowledge and personal qualities needed for life and work.



  To achieve these objectives we will:

     Support and challenge all schools to raise standards and promote
      inclusion;

     Work with all partners and the community to spread best practice
      and create solutions;

     Value diversity;

     Continuously train and develop our staff;

     Provide or secure high quality, best value services;

     Be energetic and optimistic.




                                                                        SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!        General Guidance
                           INTRODUCTION

I am delighted to introduce Seeing the Difference in our Schools –
a Practical Framework for School Improvement Planning designed to
be used by managers and governors in Nottingham City schools.

This document has been developed by a working group of Nottingham
Head Teachers and senior managers – with LEA Advisers and officers –
to support all the City's schools in raising achievement. The willingness of
these colleagues to share their good practice with others across the City is
very much appreciated!

All schools have new statutory targets, and are expected to have
development plans which reflect national and LEA priorities. The remit of
the working group was to develop a framework which would help schools
to meet these planning and target setting requirements.

The original SIP framework was well received by Head Teachers and was
successful in lining up school improvement plans with the EDP (1998-
2002). This new framework updates the original and brings the priorities
into line with EDP (2002-2007). It seeks to support the key processes
which will enable all schools to know:

             how they are performing in relation to pupil
              achievement;

             how they are performing in relation to similar schools;

             what they are aiming to achieve and by when;

             how to plan and implement strategies which work;

             how to monitor and evaluate progress.

The framework aims to:

   help link each school's improvement priorities with LEA priorities;
   provide a structural framework for school improvement plans;
   bring coherence to the complex statutory planning requirements on
    schools;
   effectively link school improvement planning and school
    self-evaluation;
   provide practical tools helpful to both senior managers and governors;
   refocus workload in schools by providing clear models and guidance;
   spread good self-evaluation and improvement planning practice across
    the City;
   draw together key recent national publications as a reference resource.


                                                                        SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!       General Guidance
                            INTRODUCTION

Schools are responsible for their own self-review, target setting and
improvement planning. The use of this framework will depend on each
school's preferred way of working. It offers:

             a point of reference to support school review and planning
              processes;

             a place to keep and organise school action plans and their
              related support materials;

             an actual School Improvement Plan framework.

The structure of the framework identifies six LEA priorities for school
improvement which reflect the EDP. It also reflects the requirements of
schools for various plans focused on raising standards. The format is
offered as a model which builds on existing good practice.

It is expected that the framework will develop over time. It will draw in
contributions from schools, the LEA and other educational partners. The
format has been chosen to enable additional information, support
materials and action plans to be easily inserted and regularly updated.
The framework will also be available via the Intranet.

Developed by practitioners, I feel sure that you will find this framework of
practical use. I am confident that it will make a major contribution to
seeing the difference in our schools and to improving standards of
achievement!




Robin Aldridge
Acting Assistant Director
Standards and Effectiveness Division




                                                                         SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!         General Guidance
              LEA SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PRIORITIES

The Education Development Plan (EDP 2002-2007) outlines a school
improvement programme which has 8 key priorities. These are:

          School Improvement in the Foundation Stage and at Key
           Stages 1 and 2, especially Literacy and Numeracy
          School Improvement at Transition Key Stage 2 - 3
          School Improvement at Key Stage 3
          School Improvement at Key Stage 4 and 14 - 19
          Raising the achievement of underachieving pupils
          Schools requiring support and intervention
          Improving behaviour, motivation and self-esteem, including
           attendance
          School capacity and self-improvement, including ICT and
           teacher recruitment and retention.


The School Improvement Planning Framework incorporates the LEA
priorities into 6 priorities for school-based planning which are:

Priority 1:    School Improvement Sections:
               1.1   Literacy
               1.2   Numeracy
               1.3   Science
               1.4   RE
               1.5   ICT
               1.6   Foundation subjects
               1.7   Teaching and Learning
               1.8   Foundation Stage
               1.9   SEN
               1.10 Gifted and Talented
               1.11 Out-of-school-hours learning
               1.12 Work Related Learning/alternative curriculum
                     assessment

Priority 2:    Improving transition, especially at Key Stage 2 - 3

Priority 3:    Improve the achievement of underachieving groups

Priority 4:    Improve behaviour, motivation, self-esteem, including
               attendance

Priority 5:    Strengthen school capacity, including improving
               teacher recruitment and retention

Priority 6:    School determined priorities


                                                                        SIP
               Seeing the difference in our schools!        General Guidance
 GOOD PRACTICE IN SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLANNING

Schools are familiar with the process of School Improvement Planning and
at the heart of the most successful schools is the fundamental premise of
reviewing where the school is at and planning the next stages of its
development.

The DfES publication “From Targets to Action” extended this premise to
provide a five stage model of school self-improvement focused clearly on
pupil performance. It encourages schools to employ suitable improvement
strategies by using evidence as a basis for development planning.

Additionally, this five stage cycle helps to clarify the link between quality
teaching, pupils‟ learning and subsequent performance.




            Act and review


                                                 How well are we doing?

                             Pupil
What will we do to        Achievement
make it happen?

                                                   How well should we be
                                                   doing?



                           What more can we
                           hope to achieve?



Annually, schools produce a SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN. Towards
the end of the school improvement planning cycle, schools will wish to
begin auditing activities to find out what impact has been made by the
improvement strategies implemented during the year. They will wish to
consult with relevant groups such as parents and governors about the
perceived strengths or weaknesses of the school and to gather evidence
about pupil achievement.

As soon as information is available, a critical examination of pupils‟
achievements can be made. This will focus upon whether school

                                                                           SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!          General Guidance
    GOOD PRACTICE IN SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLANNING

projections were achieved and involve a comparison between the
achievements of the school and those in similar schools through using
national and local benchmarking information, with the outcomes from other
school self-review procedures.

Schools will review their progress towards meeting their statutory targets,
and modify or reset these, as appropriate. They may then use this
information to identify their improvement priorities and key objectives for
the coming year, taking into account their three year school improvement
priorities.

School priorities should reflect national and LEA priorities as well as the
school‟s own needs. The LEA‟s priorities are identified in the Education
Development Plan (EDP) and offer a structure of the school‟s annual
School Improvement Plan.

Once each key objective for the coming year has been identified, schools
will determine:

    the steps (activities) that need to be taken to achieve the objective;
    when the activities will be undertaken giving the start and completion
     dates (timeline);
    who will lead the work (key personnel);
    any specific resource implications and an estimate of how much it will
     cost (resources and costing);
    the measure that will be used to decide how successfully the objective
     has been met (success criteria);
    the activities that will be used to monitor progress (monitoring
     systems);
    the ways in which the school will record and report the extent to which
     it has met its objective (evaluation evidence).

This framework provides an Action Plan format which includes the above
elements.

If school improvement planning is to make an impact on the standards
achieved by pupils then effective planning processes must be at the heart
of the school and drive its development. To achieve this, everyone who
has a stake in the school‟s future will have an opportunity to contribute to
the school priorities. Staff and governors will be included in decisions
about what, when and how new initiatives will be implemented and targets
should be set through consultation.

Through this process pupils‟ standards of achievement may be raised
within a school and across the City as a whole.


                                                                         SIP
               Seeing the difference in our schools!        General Guidance
      USING THE SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLANNING
                    FRAMEWORK


Two copies of this framework are provided for each school. It is
suggested that one copy may be used as a working document, and the
second kept as a staff and governors‟ reference file.

The framework is organised into three main sections.



1. SCHOOL CONTEXT AND PRIORITIES

The first section is designed to offer a framework for contextualising the
School Improvement Plan. It provides prompts, forms and good practice
exemplars in relation to a school‟s:

             context and aims;
             strengths and good practice;
             analysis of performance information;
             review of progress in relation to previous plans;
             three year improvement priorities;
             Post-OFSTED Action Planning;
             statutory and school targets.

These aspects are critical to effective school self-improvement. They
cover key issues which are explored through OFSTED Inspection in
relation to the school‟s priorities.

The file allows a school to retain statements on each of the aspects. This
may include copies of extracts from the school prospectus or other
documents. The Post-OFSTED Action Plan itself may be inserted in the
relevant space. Contents may be removed and replaced to ensure that
the file is always up-to-date.

As the local Intranet develops, many schools will increasingly use an
electronic version of the file.




                                                                        SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!        General Guidance
               USING THE SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT
                   PLANNING FRAMEWORK

2.     ANNUAL SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN

This second section includes a planning structure closely aligned to
the priorities of the LEA Education Development Plan. It seeks to:

          highlight up to 6 improvement priorities for school-based
           planning;

          combine guidance, practical planning and self-review tools;

          provide space for specific action plans to be placed within
           a structured framework.

Each improvement priority has the following structure:

          Key elements to consider (guidance);

          Self-review statements (guidance);

          Success criteria, monitoring and evaluation (guidance);

          Action Plan Grid;

          Reference materials (additional forms and guidance).


This section also includes support in relation to the school‟s:

          Current year priorities;

          Staff development and governor training priorities;

          Resources and costing of plans.




                                                                         SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!         General Guidance
SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT ACTION PLAN MODEL

The LEA recommends the following action plan
model for School Improvement and post-OFSTED
Action Plans.




                                                           SIP
     Seeing the difference in our schools!     General Guidance
                            SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN

Key Issue / Priority:


Objectives          Activities     Timeline   Key         Resources and       Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                              Personnel   Costing             Criteria   Systems      Evidence




                                      Seeing the difference in our schools!
                                  SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN
Objectives               Activities         Timeline   Key         Resources and    Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                       Personnel   Costing          Criteria   Systems      Evidence




Parents / carers and community links


Governors‟ involvement and responsibility


Other implications




                                                  Seeing the difference in our schools!
            STATUTORY AND LEA REQUIREMENTS

In relation to school self-review, target setting and improvement
planning schools are required by law to:

      Carry out Baseline and end of key stage tasks, tests and
       examinations;

      Set and publish statutory targets (refer to Summary of
       Statutory and School Targets Section of this framework)
       with regard to the LEA‟s Education Development Plan targets,
       to enable the LEA to meet those targets;

      Assess and monitor the impact of its policies on pupils,
       parents and staff including different racial groups, particularly
       the impact on the attainment levels of pupils;

      Discuss with the LEA school improvement and target setting
       annually.



The LEA is required to include each school‟s statutory targets in the
Education Development Plan and compare the aggregate of schools‟
targets with the LEA target to determine where the LEA should be
focussing its support.

OFSTED require schools to have a Post-OFSTED Action Plan.
Specific development plans are also required to validate Standards
Fund grants.




                                                                           SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!                   General
                                                                     Guidance
   HOW PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT CAN SUPPORT
         SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLANNING

How can Performance Management support your
School Improvement Planning?


Performance Management can be effective in:

      Raising standards
       Reflecting critically on our own practice and using this information to
       address areas for improvement

      Continuous Professional Development
       Promoting professional growth and taking account of teachers‟
       individual needs

      Involvement
       Encouraging teachers to be fully engaged in school planning



How can Performance Management objectives inform
School Improvement Planning?

Objectives would be expected to cover pupil progress and professional
development and should be linked to whole school priorities for the coming
year.




                                                                         SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!                  General
                                                                    Guidance
    HOW PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT CAN SUPPORT
          SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLANNING

EXAMPLES


Pupil Progress Objectives

-     pupil progress objectives agreed for the class/year group
      teacher will relate to whole school targets cited in the School
      Improvement Plan.


Professional Development Objective

-     may include an objective linked both to a teacher‟s individual needs
      and the School Improvement Plan.


Management and Leadership Objective

-     this may include specific responsibilities for co-ordinating
      strategies for raising achievement in areas identified as a priority in
      the School Improvement Plan.


Continuing Professional Development Record

Continuing Professional Development is a way of identifying future
learning needs and priorities and informing and planning prospective
development.

It enables teachers and staff development co-ordinators to:

-     plan future training and development;

-     build on existing good practice;

-     meet the identified needs, both within the school and for the
      individual.


School Improvement Planning will be most effective where the School
Improvement Plan and individual CPD records share a common purpose
for whole school and individual progress and achievement and where
identified strengths are built on and identified needs addressed.




                                                                         SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!                   General
                                                                    Guidance
                  SCHOOL CONTEXT AND AIMS

The purpose of this section is to help place the school‟s priorities for
development within the context in which the school works and to provide a
clear statement of what the school is aiming to achieve.

The most likely source of school context will be the summary provided
within the Characteristics of the School section of the school‟s most
recent OFSTED report. However, if the school has had a significant
change in school context since its last OFSTED inspection, this will need
to be reflected in this statement.

The school aims included within this section will be those which are
published in the school brochure. Schools might find it helpful to review
these aims annually, prior to agreeing new development priorities, and to
ensure that the aims are a vision which is shared by the school community
as a whole. Whilst undertaking this process, schools should ensure that
their aims relate to the academic achievements of the pupils.




                                                                       SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!          School Context
                                                              and Priorities
                 SCHOOL CONTEXT AND AIMS
EXAMPLE

SCHOOL CONTEXT

This infant and nursery school was built nine years ago and is a semi
open-plan design. It is situated in an inner city area of Nottingham.
There are 172 pupils on roll in the infant school, aged from five to
seven years. Pupils are organised into two reception classes and
five classes of pupils from Year 1 and Year 2. One hundred children
attend the nursery on a part-time basis. This puts the school into the
below average size category when compared with infant schools
nationally. The immediate area consists of mainly older houses,
some council owned and many divided into flats. The pupils in the
school reflect the ethnic, social and religious diversity within
Nottingham.

Although attainment on entry to the nursery class is below that
expected of children of this age, attainment on entry to the infant
school is in line with that expected nationally, except in language and
literacy where it is below. There are forty pupils identified with
special educational needs and of these two pupils have Statements
of Special Educational Needs. Eighty-three pupils are entitled to free
school meals and this is very much above average when compared
with schools nationally.

The school’s aims are appropriate for pupils of this age. The current
whole school focus is to raise literacy skills, particularly reading.

SCHOOL AIMS

   To be an inclusive school which welcomes all children from its
    community and provides challenging educational experiences for
    each individual.
   To provide an interesting and stimulating environment which
    reflects the cultural diversity of the school and its community.
   To help each individual to strive to reach his/her full academic
    potential through the provision of a motivating and relevant
    curriculum which concentrates on providing children with good
    literacy and numeracy skills whilst ensuring enriching learning
    experiences.
   To provide a welcoming atmosphere, based on positive
    relationships, where everyone is valued and any discrimination is
    always challenged.
   To promote a culture of life-long learning which promotes
    education beyond the confines of the classroom and engaged
    parents in the learning process as individuals and in support of
    their children.

                                                                   SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!      School Context
                                                          and Priorities
        SCHOOL STRENGTHS AND GOOD PRACTICE

In this section, schools have the opportunity to identify, record and share
their strengths. The basis for the judgements will be the school‟s own
self-evaluation, feedback from LEA advisers, consultants and officers,
other schools, feedback from other agencies, views of pupils and parents
and the findings of OFSTED inspections. Sharing successes should be an
integral part of the work of an improving school. There are aspects of
every school‟s work which reflect the best of practice which others can
learn from. This section provides an opportunity to identify such areas and
register them with the LEA who will:


      link schools and teachers to address specific training needs and
       develop networking opportunities;

      work with schools to develop materials and guidance for others;

      involve best practitioners in the LEA‟s training programme and
       networks;

      work with schools to develop school improvement projects;

      use schools‟ best practice in published guidance such as
       newsletters;

      support schools and teachers in the appointment of Advanced Skills
       Teachers, Fast Track Teachers and identifying Leading Teachers;

      support Excellence in Cities, Beacon, Specialist and Education
       Action Zone programmes and links with Higher Education
       Institutions;

      publicly share successes in schools.


To help establish a Good Practice Register, schools are asked to include
the form provided in this section in their School Improvement Plan.




                                                                         SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!          School Context
                                                              and Priorities
        SCHOOL STRENGTHS AND GOOD PRACTICE

Terminology


Good Practice        -    that which is professionally judged to be
                          effective (for example, by a school or LEA
                          personnel) which requires further evidence or
                          validation.


Best Practice        -    that which is proven over time and backed up
                          by supporting evidence.


Innovative Practice -     new and interesting ways of doing things with
                          early indications of success.



Three Stages to the Process

      School self-evaluation – schools identify good practice within
       school as an integral part of self-review.

      Developing a climate of openness and sharing, within school and
       across schools.

      Sharing Practice within the school and beyond.



Questions to ask

      How do we identify good practice?
      How do we moderate and ensure quality?
      How do we share it?
      How do we monitor and evaluate the impact?




                                                                        SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!         School Context
                                                             and Priorities
        SCHOOL STRENGTHS AND GOOD PRACTICE

Key activities might include:


   Developing an open climate.

   Developing networking systems within school and between schools.

   Using Excellence in Cities, Beacon Schools, Specialist Schools and
   Education Action Zones and work with Higher Education Institutions.

   Considering role of:

   Advanced Skills Teachers;
   Leading Teachers;
   Fast Track Teachers.

   Considering research and development opportunities including the
   teacher sabbatical scheme.

   Developing tutoring/mentoring opportunities.

   Publicising school‟s successes.




                                                                      SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!        School Context
                                                            and Priorities
        SCHOOL STRENGTHS AND GOOD PRACTICE


EXAMPLE

SCHOOL STRENGTHS IDENTIFIED BY OFSTED


Primary – This section might include:

      Leading Mathematics Teachers particularly skilled in using and
       applying mathematics.

      The relationships with parents and the community particularly the
       adult learning opportunities it provides.

      The emphasis placed on the teaching of basic skills, especially
       related to the teaching of reading.

      The school‟s ethos and strategic vision, which is shared by all staff,
       governors, pupils and parents and how it is secured by the head
       teacher.

      The quality of subject leadership by curriculum co-ordinators
       especially in the core subjects. Monitoring programme is
       particularly well developed.


Additionally identified by the school:

      The teacher‟s medium-term planning which involves a team
       approach and focuses on the development of key skills.

      The use of marking as an aid to assessment, including setting
       individual pupil‟s targets.

      The quality of nursery provision and the links with the Reception
       class.

      Continuity in planning the curriculum across the Foundation Stage.

      The use of homework – links to class work, parents‟ involvement in
       children‟s learning.




                                                                         SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!                  Example
        SCHOOL STRENGTHS AND GOOD PRACTICE

GOOD PRACTICE

The school has particularly good practice in:

      The teaching of reading especially guided approaches and the use
       of literacy volunteers.

      Foundation Stage provision – ensuring continuity and progression.

      Using parents to support learning within school and through
       supporting their children‟s learning at home.




                                                                      SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!         School Context
                                                             and Priorities
        SCHOOL STRENGTHS AND GOOD PRACTICE


EXAMPLE

SCHOOL STRENGTHS IDENTIFIED BY OFSTED


Secondary – This section might include:

      The quality of provision for pupils with special educational needs
       and particularly the use of IEPs across the curriculum by all staff.

      The literacy programme in Key Stage 3 and particularly the
       provision for pupils with English as an additional language and the
       use of teaching assistants.

      The standards achieved in science are above national expectations
       due to particularly innovative teaching strategies in investigational
       work.

      The use of performance data to set targets for individual pupils
       across Key Stages 3 and 4 which are well shared with pupils and
       parents.

      The involvement of older pupils in mentoring younger pupils with
       behaviour difficulties and the links with learning mentors and the
       LSU.



Additionally identified by the school:

      Standards of achievement in GCSE A* - C and A* - G have steadily
       risen over the last 3 years due to increased quality of teaching
       through a rigorous monitoring programme by Heads of Department.

      Literacy volunteers supporting in classrooms has improved pupils‟
       attitude and motivation.

      ICT access in all classrooms. ICT used across the curriculum as an
       effective tool for learning.




                                                                         SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!                  Example
        SCHOOL STRENGTHS AND GOOD PRACTICE



      Good links with feeder primary and special schools due to
       increased joint work on Transition – greater progression in teaching
       and learning.

      Good extra-curricular programme of activities in particular the
       Drama Club which attracts a high number of participants and
       produces high quality performances which are well attended by the
       community.



GOOD PRACTICE

The school has particularly good practice in relation to:

      The teaching of science (investigative and exploratory work
       particularly).

      Learning support for pupils with special educational needs including
       peer monitoring, learning mentors and work in the LSUs.




                                                                       SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!         School Context
                                                              and Priorities
       SCHOOL STRENGTHS AND GOOD PRACTICE

FORM

SCHOOL STRENGTHS




GOOD PRACTICE




                                                  SIP
         Seeing the difference in our schools!   Form
          SCHOOL STRENGTHS AND GOOD PRACTICE

FORM

School:

Telephone:                            Fax:

Contact:

WE HAVE IDENTIFIED THESE   WE WOULD BE PREPARED TO
AREAS AS MODELS OF GOOD    SHARE THIS GOOD PRACTICE
PRACTICE WITHIN OUR SCHOOL THROUGH
                                     HOSTING THE      BEING AN LEA
                     CONTACT         VISITS TO THE     REFERENCE
                                        SCHOOL            POINT




Additional Information e.g. innovative practice




Please return to the Assistant Director, Standards and Effectiveness

                                                                 SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!              Form
  ANALYSIS OF SCHOOL PERFORMANCE INFORMATION

This section is designated to contain the analysis or your findings from
data generated by your school prior to target setting.



Schools may wish to include analysis of data and information such as:

      Baseline Assessments
      National Standards and Targets
      GCSE or National Curriculum predictions
      City standards and targets
      Cohort data and information
      Teacher forecasts
      Optional SATs
      NFER English and mathematics tests
      Cognitive Ability Tests (CATs)
      Reading diaries
      Reading scores
      Samples of pupils‟ work
      Individual Educational Plans and programmes
      Attendance and sanctions data
      Key Stage National Curriculum test results
      School comparative data provided by the authority
      National benchmarking data
      ANSAT 1-2-3 analysis of maths and science papers




                                                                           SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!           School Context
                                                               and Priorities
  ANALYSIS OF SCHOOL PERFORMANCE INFORMATION

ANALYSIS OF SCHOOL PERFORMANCE DATA

The five stage cycle of school self-improvement enables schools to effectively
analyse school performance data. The key questions for the school to ask are:

How well are we doing?
How well should we be doing?
What more can we hope to achieve?
What will we do to make it happen?
Implementing and reviewing plans.


How well are we doing?

This stage requires the school to prepare a clear statement of past and current
key stage tests, GCSE examinations and other assessments. For example, a
Secondary school might produce a results history in a format similar to this:

                    1998         1999         2000           2001          2002
 % 5+ A*-C        e.g. 26%
 % 5+ A*-G
 No passes
 Average point
 score

Primary schools might produce a results history in a similar format focused on the
appropriate key stages. The results used would include at least the school‟s
statutory targets.

The LEA‟s Data and Research team provide all schools with performance history
information by gender and ethnicity.


How well should we be doing?

This stage enables all schools to compare their own school‟s performance with
that achieved by similar schools using national and local benchmark information.
Schools should also refer to value-added data. The LEA‟s Data and Research
team will provide all schools with the appropriate information summaries.

For example, a Secondary school might produce a benchmark history in a format
similar to this:

                                 1998       1999      2000      2001        2002
 % 5+ A*-C                       e.g. D
 % 5+ A*-G
 No passes
 Average point score




                                                                               SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!                 School Context
                                                                      and Priorities
  ANALYSIS OF SCHOOL PERFORMANCE INFORMATION
What more can we hope to achieve?

In this stage whole school targets are determined. The use of national benchmark
data enables schools to set targets from a „top-down‟ whole school perspective,
particularly so that underachieving schools rated an E or E*, set targets that bring
them into line with other similar schools.

Performance information may also be analysed to focus on the achievement of
specific groups of children. Areas of interest and comparison could be related to
gender and ethnicity. Schools may also compare performance across subjects,
departments and across class and year groups. In this way, groups which are
underachieving can be identified and targeted.

As well as analysing whole school data for groups of pupils, schools are also able
to set targets for individual children. Primary schools will use teacher forecasts
informed by National Curriculum levels, and results from Optional SATs and
NFER tests. Secondary schools may refer to the chances tables in the DfES
Autumn Package to forecast Key Stage 4 results.

Generating targets for individual pupils enables schools to develop a
complimentary „bottom-up‟ approach to target setting.

The school target is arrived at by identifying the borderline pupils who will bridge
the gap between the bottom-up target, and the top-down target.


What will we do to make it happen?

To achieve the targets set, the school will identify a range of improvement
strategies to be implemented at whole school and classroom level. These will be
summarised in the School Improvement Plan, providing a focus for practical
action throughout the school.


Implementing and reviewing plans

The School Improvement Plan will be reviewed and action plans adjusted every
year. Staff and Governor training and development needs will need to be
identified and met to ensure that improvement strategies are effectively
implemented. Performance data will need to be regularly collected and analysed
to check progress in relation to the targets which have been set.




                                                                                SIP
               Seeing the difference in our schools!                School Context
                                                                     and Priorities
   ANALYSIS OF SCHOOL PERFORMANCE INFORMATION

TARGET SETTING – POSSIBLE QUESTIONS:

 Teacher Forecast                        Cohort data

 Questions                               Questions

 What information is the forecast        What are the aggregated teacher
 based upon?                             forecasts indicating about the ability
                                         of the year group?
 Does the forecast take into account
 planned curriculum improvement?         Have you used other data such as
                                         baseline assessments or
 Have the individual child forecasts     standardised test data?
 been discussed with a senior
 manager?                                What is the balance between
                                         boys/girls and levels of SEN on the
 Are there differences between           Code of Practice?
 teachers‟ forecasts related to
 high/low expectations?                  Is this an above average, average
                                         or below average year group for the
                                         school?


 Analysis of National Curriculum data    Benchmarking

 Questions
                                         Questions
 What do statistics tell you about the
 progress of all children?               What does the QCA benchmark
                                         data tell you about relative school
 Is there any significant variation?     performance?

 What factors have affected              What does LEA data tell you about
 attainment and progress?                performance based on Free School
                                         Meal bands?
 What is the trend over 4 years?
                                         What does local data tell you about
 Can the trends be linked to changes     schools you identify as similar?
 in the curriculum and teaching and
 learning?


 National Expectations                   LEA Standards

 Where is the school in relation to      Where are you in relation to LEA
 national standards?                     standards?

 Is the school making progress at a      Are you making progress at a
 similar rate to schools nationally?     similar rate to City schools?



                                                                               SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!          School Context and
                                                                     Priorities
                 SELF-EVALUATION GUIDANCE

The guidance on self-evaluation in the OFSTED Inspection Handbook for
Schools is very useful –

       “Self-evaluation complements inspection with a constant
       process of identifying priorities for improvement, monitoring
       provision and evaluating outcomes.”

Internal evaluation is concerned with demonstrating an accurate appraisal
of the quality and standards of the school and “diagnosing what needs to
be done to improve them”.

The handbook outlines four questions that are at the heart of evaluating
achievement in school:

   -   are all pupils in my school learning as much as they are capable of
       learning?
   -   what can I do to find out?
   -   when I answer this question how do I know I am right?
   -   what do I do about it when I have the answer?


To ensure that self-evaluation has the maximum impact on standards the
handbook sets out three clear criteria for success:

   -   take an objective look at pupils‟ achievements and pinpoint areas of
       underachievement;
   -   account for outcomes in your school by identifying strengths and
       weaknesses in teaching, before looking at what else you provide to
       support learning;
   -   use this information to devise the School Improvement Plan, which
       is at its best when seen simply as a means to raise standards.


The handbook also offers sections on the evaluation of standards and
teaching and offers support, examples and information on giving feedback,
performance management and using inspection to complement
self-evaluation.

 “It is essential to recognise where the school is doing well, and to
compliment those involved as well as to tackle matters that need to be
improved”.

Quotes from Handbook for Inspecting School-OFSTED, January 2000
onwards.




                                                                         SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!          School Context
                                                              and Priorities
                  SELF-EVALUATION GUIDANCE

OFSTED Handbook for Inspecting Schools:


                     KEY ELEMENTS OF
            SCHOOL SELF-EVALUATION IN A NUTSHELL


     Start now

     Accept that we can all improve

     Place the raising of standards at the heart of all your planning

     Measure standards

     Compare yourselves with others

     Regularly observe each other teaching to a set of agreed and
      rigorous criteria

     Evaluate the effect that teaching has on learning

     Be completely open in feeding back what you find

     Think, discuss and consult

     Set targets for everyone‟s improvement

     Ensure that action is supported, monitored and reviewed

     Never stop evaluating




                                                                         SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!           School Context
                                                               and Priorities
                         REVIEW OF PROGRESS
                         (previous school plans)


This section supports the school‟s review of progress in relation to the
previous year‟s School Improvement Plan and targets.

The guidance for school self-review included in this framework are
intended to support this process in all of the following priorities:


Priority 1       School Improvement

Priority 2       Improving transition

Priority 3       Improving the achievement of underachieving groups

Priority 4       Improving behaviour, motivation, self-esteem and
                 attendance

Priority 5       Strengthening school capacity, including improving teacher
                 recruitment and retention

Priority 6       School determined priorities


Schools will select priorities as appropriate to their stage of development.



Schools will also need to:

             -   evaluate progress towards meeting published targets;

             -   review the effectiveness of their staff and governors
                 development activities;

             -   review progress in relation to Post-OFSTED action plans.



A model is provided for summarising the school‟s review of progress.




                                                                           SIP
                 Seeing the difference in our schools!          School Context
                                                                  and Priorities
                         REVIEW OF PROGRESS

FORM

The improvement priorities last year were addressed as follows:

       Key Issue             Action Taken                Outcome




Progress towards
published targets




Staff and governor
development activities




Post-OFSTED action
plan




                                                                    SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!                Form
     CURRENT YEAR PRIORITIES




                                        SIP
Seeing the difference in our schools!
           THREE YEAR IMPROVEMENT PRIORITIES

All schools are expected to have a school improvement plan.

Good practice in school improvement planning requires schools to think
about their likely development priorities on two levels. On one level, to
have a vision of the priorities that need to be addressed over the next few
years. On a second level, to have very clear and precise priorities and
plans which map out key activities for the forthcoming year.

LEAs are also required to have a development plan which outlines
five year priorities and detailed annual plans. School and LEA priorities
need to be closely aligned in relation to longer term and current year
priorities.

This section supports schools in setting out their three year improvement
priorities linked to LEA priorities which are:


LEA Five Year Priorities

      School Improvement in the Foundation Stage and at Key Stages 1
       and 2, especially Literacy and Numeracy
      School Improvement at Transition Key Stage 2 - 3
      School Improvement at Key Stage 3
      School Improvement at Key Stage 4 and 14 - 19
      Raising the achievement of underachieving pupils
      Schools requiring support and intervention
      Improving behaviour, motivation and self-esteem, including
       attendance
      School capacity and self-improvement, including ICT and teacher
       recruitment and retention



A number of themes will run through these priorities. These are:

      Attainment of ethnic minority groups
      Gender issues, including boys‟ underachievement
      Children with SEN
      Social Inclusion
      Underperformance in particular geographic areas
      Gifted and talented
      ICT
      Integration of early education and childcare
      Continuing professional development
      Involving parents, carers and pupils (local theme)


                                                                        SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools           School Context
                                                               and Priorities
          THREE YEAR IMPROVEMENT PRIORITIES


FORM

This form sets out the LEA priorities as outlined in the Education
Development Plan, and invites schools to summarise their own specific
priorities within that context.


LEA Five Year Improvement Priorities are:

      School Improvement in the Foundation Stage and at Key Stages 1
       and 2, especially Literacy and Numeracy
      School Improvement at Transition Key Stage 2 - 3
      School Improvement at Key Stage 3
      School Improvement at Key Stage 4 and 14 - 9
      Raising the achievement of underachieving pupils
      Schools requiring support and intervention
      Improving behaviour, motivation and self-esteem, including
       attendance
      School capacity and self-improvement, including ICT and teacher
       recruitment and retention


The School‟s Three Year Improvement Priorities are:




                                                                    SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!                 Form
               POST-OFSTED ACTION PLANNING

Following inspection or re-inspection by OFSTED, schools are required to
produce a Post-OFSTED Action Plan. This section of the framework
provides an opportunity to ensure the action plan is considered in relation
to other development priorities within the school.

Effective action plans are concise and contain objectives which are linked
to specific activities. Best practice in action planning sees objectives
which are clear, specific and relevant. The plan should outline objectives
which are realistic, achievable, easily measured and monitored.

This section provides guidance on constructing, monitoring and evaluating
the Post-OFSTED Action Plan. The basic principles outlined can be
applied to the processes of School Improvement Planning in general.

Further support and guidance on these matters are available from the
Standards and Effectiveness Division through the school‟s Link Adviser.




                                                                        SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!           School Context
                                                               and Priorities
                 A POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN

When constructing the Post-OFSTED Action Plan, schools need to ensure
that each of the key issues identified in the OFSTED report are clearly
addressed. Issues that arise from the main body of the report should not
be addressed in the Post-OFSTED Action Plan but may be included within
the School Improvement Plan.

Post-OFSTED Actions Plans need to detail how, when, who and in what
ways the school will address the key issues from the OFSTED report.
They also detail what the resource implications of this will be, how well the
school is doing in developing the key issues, who is checking on the
progress and how are they doing this.

This framework offers to schools an Action Plan format which fulfils the
above requirements. The format is included in all sections and has the
following elements:


Key           Within the Action Plan, each key issue must be clearly
Issues        identified at the top of the page. If the key issue has
              several component parts then the school should decide
              whether each component should be addressed as an
              objective of the main key issue or addressed as a key issue
              in its own right.


Objectives    For each identified key issue there will be several
              objectives related to school targets. These
              objectives need to be realistic and achievable and
              contribute to the overall achievement of the key
              issues.


Activities    Each objective should be broken down into specific
              activities.


Timeline      It is helpful to be clear about the start and finish
              dates of the work. Careful consideration should be
              given to which priorities need addressing first, pacing
              the work so as not to overload particular times and
              fitting it in alongside existing planned developments.




                                                                         SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!           School Context
                                                                and Priorities
              POST-OFSTED ACTION PLANNING

Key          The plan should identify the key person for leading
Personnel    the development of each objective. Other staff who
             may also be involved should also be noted.


Resources    All resources costs need to be recorded. It is helpful
and          to record staff time in monetary value by converting
Costing      time to hourly rates.


Success      The success criteria are the indicators against which
Criteria     progress will be determined and should therefore be
             achievable and measurable. They need to indicate
             how children‟s learning and achievement will benefit
             from changes as a result of meeting the targets.


Monitoring   Systems for measuring progress towards targets and
Systems      objectives should be identified.


Evaluation   This is evidence to indicate where judgements are recorded
Evidence     about how effective the work has been in meeting the
             target.




                                                                       SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!
                                                            School Context
                                                              and Priorities
            POST-OFSTED ACTION PLANNING

FORM
Does the action plan address all the key issues?                  Y/N

Have other issues been included from the body of the report       Y/N
that were not in the key issues?

If key, have they been chosen appropriately?                      Y/N

Have success criteria been set for each of the key issues?        Y/N

Are the success criteria appropriate to the issue?                Y/N

For monitoring purposes, will the success criteria enable the
school to check whether:

It is making progress?                                            Y/N
What progress it has made?                                        Y/N

For each key issue (and other issues) does the action plan
include targets which are:

short-term                                                        Y/N
medium-term                                                       Y/N
long-term                                                         Y/N

Are the timescales for each of the targets appropriate?           Y/N

Are the resources required to implement the plan identified:

financial costs?
staff time?                                                       Y/N
allocation of resources?                                          Y/N
                                                                  Y/N
Are there procedures for monitoring progress to implement         Y/N
the action plan?

Does the plan identify the people / posts responsible for         Y/N
monitoring?

Is there a person(s) responsible for co-ordinating monitoring?    Y/N

Is the school using an outside agency to assist with
monitoring?                                                       Y/N



                                                                  SIP
           Seeing the difference in our schools!                 Form
               POST-OFSTED ACTION PLANNING

Is there a scheme for evaluation of the action plan?          Y/N

Have the governors been involved in the preparation of the    Y/N
action plan?

Has the LEA helped the school prepare the action plan?        Y/N

Has the Diocese helped the school prepare the action plan?    Y/N

Has anyone else –                                             Y/N

parents?
pupils?
consultant?

been involved in the preparation of the plan?

If yes, who?


Conclusion

Does the action plan contain sound strategies for raising     Y/N
pupils‟ standards of achievement?

List here the main strengths and weaknesses of the plan:




                                                              SIP
          Seeing the difference in our schools!              Form
EXAMPLE

                                                                 POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN

Key Issue / Priority: Improve continuity and progression of learning through developing the knowledge and skill of curriculum co-ordinators


Objectives               Activities               Timeline       Key             Resources and     Success                 Monitoring            Evaluation
                                                                 Personnel       Costing           Criteria                Systems               Evidence
To increase curriculum      Provide subject      From           Head Teacher    £2,000               Enhanced               Performance          Quality assurance
co-ordinators’ subject       co-ordinators with   Autumn 2002    and external                          subject                 Management            data
knowledge                    a professional       (annual        providers                             knowledge               /professional
                             development          programme)                                           supports match          development          Pupil data
                             programme                                                                 of work to              interviews
                                                                                                       pupils’ abilities      Termly analysis      Review lesson
                            Establish a                         Curriculum      £1,500 annually      Raised                  of planning,          observation notes
                             programme to                        co-ordinators   (internal cover       standards of            teaching and
                             collect and                                         costs)                pupils’                 pupils’ work
                             analyse                                                                   attainment
                             information about                                                         throughout the
                             continuity and                                                            school
                             progression in all
                             subject areas


To develop specific      Provide opportunities    April – July   Head Teacher    £1,200            Precise information        Skills audit         Co-ordinators’
skills of curriculum     to learn and develop     2003           and Link                          available identifying       (co-ordinators)       subject files
co-ordinators            skills in:                              Adviser                           strengths and
                              observation                                                         weaknesses in              Paired Lesson
                              work analysis                                                       planning, teaching          Observations
                              making                                                              and learning
                               judgements
                              giving feedback




                                                            Seeing the difference in our schools!
                                            POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN

Key Issue / Priority:


Objectives          Activities   Timeline    Key         Resources and      Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                             Personnel   Costing            Criteria   Systems      Evidence




                                    Seeing the difference in our schools!
                                                       POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN

Objectives              Activities          Timeline    Key         Resources and   Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                        Personnel   Costing         Criteria   Systems      Evidence




Parents / carers and community links


Governors‟ involvement and responsibility


Other implications




                                                 Seeing the difference in our schools!
                POST-OFSTED ACTION PLANNING

What is improvement?

In the context of action plans improvement is the school‟s progress in
addressing the key issues identified in the inspection report of the school.
If the key issues have been addressed appropriately, the pupils‟ standards
of achievement and the quality of education for them should improve.

Monitoring

The purpose of monitoring is to assess the progress that the school is
making towards addressing key issues.

Monitoring should:

          check objectives are being implemented;
          ensure staff are fulfilling their responsibilities;
          ensure funds are efficiently managed and applied to meet the
           objectives; ensure progress is matched to the identified timeline;
          check progress is moving towards the success criteria and as a
           result will:

            inform the staff continuing development programme;
            refine and improve future objectives.

Who is responsible for monitoring?

Overall responsibility for monitoring lies with the appropriate authority of
the school, usually the governing body. In practice the monitoring is
carried out by the head teacher and staff and where appropriate by
individual governors and committees.

How can progress to address the key issues be monitored?

Objectives and success criteria should be set in the action plan. These
will form the basis for judging progress within the action plan. If the
objectives are clear and precise it will be easier to judge if they are being
met. An objective that states “a scheme of work will be written by 2003” is
less helpful that one which states “the scheme of work will be completed
by the end of July 2003”.




                                                                          SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!            School Context
                                                                and Priorities
               POST-OFSTED ACTION PLANNING

Who should monitor progress?

The appropriate authority, usually the governing body, should decide with
the head teacher who should monitor the implementation of the action
plan. Careful consideration should be given to who is most appropriate to
monitor progress. The person with responsibility for implementation of
action is unlikely to be objective if required to monitor as well. This can
pose a dilemma for small schools where the division of responsibilities is
not easy. Curriculum co-ordinators may have a significant monitoring role.


How should progress be monitored?

The progress of monitoring will depend to a large extent upon the nature
of the objective and the success criteria. Monitoring involves the collection
of evidence at first hand, checking data collected by the school and
reviewing pupils‟ work. It may also include:

                        classroom observation;

                        discussion with staff;

                        staff meetings;

                        governors‟ committee meetings;

                        feedback from parents.


The monitoring process is essential if the head teacher and governors are
to know if the action plan is being implemented appropriately.

Staff involved in monitoring should be offered appropriate training.


Who needs to know about the results of monitoring?

The results of monitoring should be communicated to the governing body
and to all staff. In the case of a school subject to special measures the
Secretary of State and the LEA and / or Diocese also need to be informed.
In the annual report to parents the governing body must inform parents of
the progress being made.




                                                                        SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!           School Context
                                                              and Priorities
               POST-OFSTED ACTION PLANNING

Evaluating

The purpose of evaluating is to judge the effect of the action taken on
pupils‟ attainment and progress and the quality of education.

Three important elements are:

Success criteria: what is the intended outcome for success?

Monitoring:         what systems are in place to measure progress?

Evaluation:         what evidence of effectiveness will be presented?

Effective evaluation relies upon having clear evidence set against
measurable success criteria. “Measurable” could mean targets set using:

                    test results;

                    teacher assessment outcomes;

                    attendance figures;

                    figures for incidents of serious misbehaviour;

                    exclusions, etc.



Outcomes of evaluation

Outcomes of evaluation evidence will inform the appropriate authority
whether a key issue has been successfully completed.

As a result of the evaluation, new objectives may need to be set or
existing objectives amended. Evaluation over a period of time will indicate
if an objective has been effectively implemented and is helping to raise
standards of achievement.


Who has responsibility for evaluation?

Governors should work closely with the head teacher to ensure that there
is a coherent process.




                                                                          SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!          School Context
                                                              and Priorities
                       BUDGET, BEST VALUE

New advice to help schools manage their annual budgets was published in
October 2000 by the Office for Standards in Education and the Audit
Commission.


The guidance package has four elements:

   a revised version of Keeping Your Balance, which sets out standards
    for financial management in schools;

   Controlling School Finances: a self-evaluation tool, which is an
    interactive web site for schools containing a checklist and good
    practice guide based on the standards in Keeping Your Balance;

   Getting the Best from your Budget, which draws together for the first
    time a set of principles to guide schools in managing their resources;

   Managing School Resources: self-evaluation tool, which is another
    web site enabling schools to assess their resource management
    against the principles set out in Getting the Best from your Budget.


Both web sites can be accessed through:

                   www.schools.audit-commission.gov.uk

The four tools will help governors, head teachers and staff with financial
responsibilities to assess their schools‟ finance and resource management
arrangements. Familiarity with these tools should prove helpful to the
development of the next generation of head teachers.

Launching the two web sites Andrew Foster, Controller of the Audit
Commission, said: “We are keen to recognise the growing emphasis on
self-evaluation by schools, and we hope that these tools will be valuable
aids in helping head teachers, bursars and governors do a „stock take‟ of
their financial systems.”

“Each individual school has the option to allow their LEA privileged access
to their results. This would support local authority audit, education,
finance and the advisory sections in deciding where to focus their
attention.”




                                                                       SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!         School Context
                                                             and Priorities
                     BUDGET, BEST VALUE

Please refer to the updated Keeping Your Balance document (see
appendix 5).


Press enquiries:        020 7421 6617 / 6574 / 6773

General enquiries:      020 7421 6744

Press Office Fax:       020 7421 6522

Audit Commission press enquiries:

                        Tel. 020 7838 4848

                        Fax. 020 7838 4871


Audit commission web site www.audit-commission.gov.uk


Audit Commission address:

                        The Audit Commission
                        1 Vincent Square
                        London
                        SW1P 2PN


The above extract has been taken from:

www.ofsted.gov.uk/about/press00/nr2000-56.htm




                                                                  SIP
            Seeing the difference in our schools!       School Context
                                                         and Priorities
                  LITERACY KEY ELEMENTS


   Effective cycle of assessment, target setting, teaching/focused
    support, monitoring and review.

   Effective integration of NLS Framework and Programmes of Study
    in English into the planning, teaching and learning for literacy.

   Teachers‟ knowledge and understanding of the NLS Framework for
    Teaching and Programmes of Study in English.

   Effective and consistent use of key NLS publications to inform
    teaching and learning.

   Professional development of staff and regular access to training.

   Lessons which incorporate a variety of teaching and learning styles.

   Use of ICT to enhance teaching and learning.

   Close links across the key stages.

   Cross-curricular links.




                                                            Annual SIP
           Seeing the difference in our schools!            Priority 1.1
          LITERACY SELF-REVIEW STATEMENTS


PRIMARY                                                   Fully   Partly   Not
                                                          met     met      met
 The school has a whole school strategy for
 Literacy, including an action plan.

 The SMT provides active leadership in, and
 support for, Literacy in school.

 Literacy lessons are:       enjoyable
                             interactive
                             challenging
                             relevant

 The school carries out an assessment(s) of pupil
 performance in Literacy.

 Targets for the improvement of performance in
 Literacy are set.

 A regular review of the progress made by each
 pupil who under-attains in Literacy is carried out.

 The school has a commitment, supported by a
 training plan, to improving the skills of staff in the
 school to teach and extend Literacy.

 A range of teaching styles are used to improve
 Literacy.

 Appropriate teaching and learning materials to
 improve Literacy are used.

 Parental involvement in developing their
 children‟s Literacy is secured.

 An effective procedure for monitoring the Action
 Plan (i.e. a monitoring timeline) and assessing
 improved performance in Literacy is in place.

 Teachers are encouraged to observe Leading
 Literacy Teachers in other schools as examples.

 The school organisation for Literacy enables
 teachers and teaching assistants to share good
 practice with each other.




                                                                    Annual SIP
            Seeing the difference in our schools!                   Priority 1.1
           LITERACY SELF-REVIEW STATEMENTS

                                                   Fully   Partly   Not
                                                   met     met      met
Resources produced by the National Literacy
Strategy are used systematically and effectively
i.e.:
      Progression in Phonics

      Developing Early Writing

      Spelling Bank

      Grammar for Writing

      ELS, ALS and FLS materials




                                                             Annual SIP
            Seeing the difference in our schools!            Priority 1.1
        LITERACY SELF-REVIEW STATEMENTS


SECONDARY                                       Fully   Partly   Not
                                                met     met      met
 Annual audit of standards leading to
 development of action plan/improvement
 plan.
 Teaching staff confident with the content of
 the programmes of study and level
 descriptions.
 Resources available for SEN and G&T.
 Development of literacy in skills in all
 subjects.
 Use of appropriate ICT evident.
 Range of teaching styles used to engage
 pupils.
 Objectives of each lesson made clear to all
 pupils.
 Progression evident in schemes of work.
 Programme of study covered by end of a key
 stage.
 Acknowledgement of prior knowledge
 evident in lessons.
  Tracking system used to monitor progress of
 pupils.
 Range of assessment methods used i.e.:
  oral;
  written;
  practical based and
  recorded.

 Each pupil has a target.
 Each pupil is aware of their target.
 Catch up programme available e.g. use of
 KS3 Progress Units.
 Expected standards of behaviour clear to all
 staff and pupils.
 Procedures for behaviour management.
 Reward system used effectively.
 Staff attend external training for Literacy.
 Links with primary schools evident.



                                                          Annual SIP
          Seeing the difference in our schools!           Priority 1.1
           LITERACY MONITORING AND EVALUATION

Success criteria might include:


      % of pupils achieving level 2 or above at the end of Key Stage 1;
      % of pupils achieving level 4 or above at the end of Key Stage 2;
      % of pupils achieving level 5 or above at the end of Key Stage 3;
      an average score in literacy at the end of a Key Stage;
      % of pupils achieving lower than their chronological age;
      number of pupils failing to achieve a specific level;
      number of books read by individual pupils.



Monitoring systems might include:


          review of schemes of work;
          review of lesson plans;
          lesson observation;
          tracking individual progress;
          collecting and analysis of assessment results;
          discussions with pupils and teachers;
          scrutiny of pupils‟ work.



Evaluation evidence might include:


      assessment and test results showing trends,
       patterns and progress;
      feedback and reports on lesson observations;
      outcomes from work analysis.




                                                               Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!            Priority 1.1
                                   LITERACY
Publication and training materials:

Management of Literacy
National Literacy Strategy Review of Research and Other Related Evidence
Ref: DFEE NLSRR 1997

Target Setting and Assessment in the National Literacy Strategy
Ref: QCA 99 363 1998

The National Literacy Strategy:
An evaluation of the first year of the National Literacy Strategy
Ref: HMI 216 1999

Watching and Learning: Evaluation of the implementation of the
National Literacy and Numeracy strategies
Ref: 0108/2000 0109/2000 (summary)

Core Materials
The Implementation of the National Literacy Strategy
- full report Ref: DFEE NLS 97 1997
The National Literacy Framework for Teaching Ref: DFEE NLFT 1997
Literacy Training Pack (lunch box) Ref: NLS 54 1997
LEA Training Materials Ref: NLS 506 1998
Progression in Phonics Ref: NLS 503 1998
Spelling Bank Ref: NLS 504 1998
Revised Glossary of Terms to Accompany NLS Framework
(NLS website)1999
Progression in Phonics (with CD Rom) Ref: DFEE 0033/2000 1999
Grammar for Writing Ref: DFEE 0107/2000 2000


Targeted Support
Revision Guidance for Year 6 pupils Ref: DFEE RGY6
Activity Resource Sheets Ref: DFEE RGY6ARS
Suggested Lesson Plans Ref: DFEE RGY6SLP 1997
Additional Literacy Support – modules 1-4 Ref: NLS ALS 100 1998
Guidance on Teaching Able Children Ref: DFEE LNGT 1999
Supporting Pupils with Special Educational Needs in the Literacy Hour
Ref: DFEE 0101/2000 2000
Guidance on the Organisation of the National Literacy Strategy in
Reception Classes Ref: 0153/2000 2000


                                                                    Annual SIP
               Seeing the difference in our schools!                Priority 1.1
                            SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN

Key Issue / Priority: Literacy


Objectives          Activities     Timeline   Key         Resources and    Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                              Personnel   Costing          Criteria   Systems      Evidence




                                         Seeing the difference in our schools!
                                  SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN
Objectives               Activities         Timeline   Key         Resources and    Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                       Personnel   Costing          Criteria   Systems      Evidence




Parents / carers and community links


Governors‟ involvement and responsibility


Other implications




                                                  Seeing the difference in our schools!
                     NUMERACY KEY ELEMENTS

All pupils should:

      Have a sense of the size of a number and where it fits into the
       number system.

      Know by heart number facts such as number bonds, multiplication
       tables, doubles and halves.

      Use what they know to figure out answers mentally.

      Calculate accurately and efficiently, both mentally and with pencil
       and paper, drawing on a range of calculation strategies.

      Recognise when it is appropriate to use a calculator, and be able to
       do so effectively.

      Make sense of number problems, including non-routine problems
       and recognise the operations needed to solve them.

      Explain their methods and reasoning using correct mathematical
       terms.

      Judge whether their answers are reasonable and have strategies
       for checking them where necessary.

      Suggest suitable units for measuring, and make sensible estimates
       of measurements; and

      Explain and make predictions from the numbers in graphs,
       diagrams, charts and tables.




                                                                Annual SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!              Priority 1.2
           NUMERACY SELF-REVIEW STATEMENTS

                                                          Fully   Partly   Not
                                                          met     met      met
Children in school normally enjoy their mathematics
lessons.

The school has a whole school strategy and action
plan to improve performance in Numeracy.

The SMT is well informed, provides active leadership
and sets high expectations for what can be achieved
by staff and pupils in mathematics.

There is a daily-dedicated mathematics lesson in
every class.

All Numeracy lessons have a clear structure and
focused objectives.

The school uses a varied diet of teaching and
learning material to improve Numeracy.

All classrooms have a designated Numeracy area.

The school carries out, at least, an annual
assessment of pupil performance in Numeracy.

The school has set, and all staff are aware of, targets
for the improvement of performance in Numeracy.

The school is aware of pupils that are under-attaining
and have focused plans to address this and monitor
their progress.

The school is committed to improving the skills of
staff to teach, extend and support the development
of Numeracy in its pupils.

Parents are involved in supporting the school
develop Numeracy with their children.

The outcomes of monitoring and assessment always
trigger changes and amendments to planning and
provision for Numeracy.




                                                                    Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!                 Priority 1.2
           NUMERACY SELF-REVIEW STATEMENTS

                                                        Fully   Partly   Not
                                                        met     met      met
All teachers are aware of individual pupil and group
strengths and weaknesses in mathematics.

Opportunities to attend National Numeracy Strategy
(NNS) training are always taken up.

All staff have been given opportunities to observe
colleagues or Leading Maths Teachers (LMTs) and
reflect on the qualities of teaching mathematics.

Pupils understand and can use a wide range of
related mental calculation strategies before they are
taught vertical algorithms.

ANSAT 1-2-3, or in-school procedures, are used to:

           identify areas of weakness
           set targets and
           understand common errors in key
           assessments

Continuing teacher assessment is focused on the
key objectives from the National Numeracy Strategy.

The mathematics co-ordinator is supported by the
Senior Management Team to enable him/her to
carry out their role.

Focused Springboard programmes are implemented
for targeted pupils rather than a final year revision
culture.

There is a dedicated Numeracy governor and the
governing body are regularly and systematically
updated on developments taking place in Numeracy.




                                                                  Annual SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!                Priority 1.2
         NUMERACY MONITORING AND EVALUATION

Success criteria might include:
      % of pupils achieving level 2 or above at the end of Key Stage 1;
      % of pupils achieving level 4 or above at the end of Key Stage 2;
      % of pupils achieving level 5 at the end of Key Stage 2;
      % of pupils achieving level 5 or above at the end of Key Stage 3;
      % of pupils achieving level 6+ at end of Key Stage 3;
      an average score in numeracy at the end of a Key Stage;
      % of pupils achieving lower than their chronological age;
      number of pupils failing to achieve a specific level;



Monitoring systems might include:

      review of schemes of work;
      review of lesson plans;
      lesson observation;
      tracking individual progress;
      collecting and analysis of assessment results;
      discussions with pupils and teachers;
      scrutiny of pupils‟ work.



Evaluation evidence might include:

      assessment and test results showing trends, patterns and progress;
      feedback and reports on lesson observations and outcomes from
       work analysis.




                                                               Annual SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!             Priority 1.2
                             NUMERACY

References:


NNS Mathematical Vocabulary
NNS The National Numeracy Strategy: Framework for teaching
mathematics
NNS Teaching mental calculation strategies
NNS Teaching written calculation strategies
NNS Mathematical challenges for able pupils at KS1 and KS2
NNS Guidance to support pupils with specific needs in the Daily
Mathematics Lesson
NNS Using assess and review lessons
NNS Sample numeracy lessons
NNS More numeracy lessons
Springboard 3 and 4 catch up programme for children in Years 3 and 4
Springboard 5 - catch up lessons for children in Year 5
Springboard 6 - Lessons for use in booster classes
NNS School training materials including videos
NNS Transition from Year 6 to Year 7 - Mathematics units of work
The National Numeracy Strategy: The Second Year OFSTED
Effective Practice - Numeracy, Nottingham City

Quality Counts 1
Quality Counts 2
Quality Counts 3
P level assessment material
Individual pupil target booklets
Mental Maths tapes for Years 3, 4, 5 and 6
The Practitioner- 'Week-end Supplement' of mathematical resources
Nottingham City assessment papers - YR to Y6




                                                            Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!         Priority 1.2
                           SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN

Key Issue / Priority: Numeracy


Objectives         Activities     Timeline   Key         Resources and    Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                             Personnel   Costing          Criteria   Systems      Evidence




                                        Seeing the difference in our schools!
                                  SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN
Objectives               Activities         Timeline   Key         Resources and    Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                       Personnel   Costing          Criteria   Systems      Evidence




Parents / carers and community links


Governors‟ involvement and responsibility


Other implications




                                                  Seeing the difference in our schools!
                  SCIENCE KEY ELEMENTS


   Effective organisation of programmes of study in Science
    to allow all pupils access to the curriculum.

   Teachers‟ knowledge and understanding of level descriptions.

   Integration of scientific enquiry into most lessons.

   Audit of standards.

   Involvement in whole school initiatives i.e. Literacy and Numeracy.

   Use of ICT to enhance teaching and learning.

   Professional development of staff.

   Tracking of pupil progress.

   Assessment and use of target setting.

   Effective behaviour management.

   Reward system.

   Ongoing staff professional development.

   Cross-phase communication.




                                                            Annual SIP
           Seeing the difference in our schools!            Priority 1.3
          SCIENCE SELF-REVIEW STATEMENTS


PRIMARY                                               Fully   Partly   Not
                                                      met     met      met
 Annual audit of standards leading to
 development of action plan/improvement plan.
 Teaching staff confident with the content of the
 programmes of study.
 Teaching staff fully understand the level
 descriptions.
 Resources available for SEN and G&T.
 Development of scientific enquiry evident in most
 lessons.
 Development of literacy in science lessons
 evident.
 Development of Numeracy skills in science
 lessons evident.
 Use of appropriate ICT evident.
 Range of teaching styles used to engage pupils.
 Objectives of each lesson made clear to all
 pupils.
 Progression evident in schemes of work.
 Programme of study covered by end of a key
 stage.
 Tracking system used to monitor progress of
 pupils.
 Range of assessment methods used i.e.:
  Oral;
  Written;
  practical based and
  recorded.

 Each pupil has a target.
 Each pupil is aware of their target.
 Catch up programme available.
 Expected standards of behaviour clear to all staff
 and pupils.
 Procedures for behaviour management.
 Reward system used effectively.
 Staff attend external training in science.
 Links with secondary schools evident.


                                                                Annual SIP
           Seeing the difference in our schools!                Priority 1.3
          SCIENCE SELF-REVIEW STATEMENTS

SECONDARY                                             Fully   Partly   Not
                                                      met     met      met
 Annual audit of standards leading to
 development of action plan/improvement plan.
 Teaching staff confident with the content of the
 programmes of study and level descriptions.
 Resources available for SEN and G&T.
 Development of scientific enquiry evident in most
 lessons.
 Development of literacy in science lessons
 evident.
 Development of Numeracy skills in science
 lessons evident.
 Use of appropriate ICT evident especially data
 logging.
 Range of teaching styles used to engage pupils.
 Objectives of each lesson made clear to all
 pupils.
 Progression evident in schemes of work.
 Programme of study covered by end of a key
 stage.
 Acknowledgement of prior knowledge evident in
 lessons.
 Tracking system used to monitor progress of
 pupils.
 Range of assessment methods used i.e.:
  oral;
  written;
  practical based and
  recorded.

 Each pupil has a target.
 Each pupil is aware of their target.
 Catch up programme available.
 Expected standards of behaviour clear to all staff
 and pupils.
 Procedures for behaviour management.
 Reward system used effectively.
 Staff attend external training in science.
 Links with primary schools evident.


                                                                Annual SIP
           Seeing the difference in our schools!                Priority 1.3
          SCIENCE MONITORING AND EVALUATION

Success criteria might include:

      % of pupils achieving level 2 or above at the end of Key Stage 1
      % of pupils achieving level 4 or above at the end of Key Stage 2
      % of pupils achieving level 5 or above at the end of Key Stage 3
      % of pupils achieving an A* - C grade at the end of Key Stage 4
      pupils achieving or improving upon their own personal target
       (value-added)
      % of pupils who remained engaged throughout the key stage


Monitoring systems might include:

      review of schemes of work;
      review of lesson plans;
      lesson observation;
      tracking individual progress;
      analysis of assessment results;
      discussions with pupils and teachers;
      work sampling.


Evaluation evidence might include:

      assessment and test results showing trends, patterns and progress;
      outcomes of work analysis;
      feedback and reports on lesson observations.




                                                               Annual SIP
       Seeing the difference in our schools!                   Priority 1.3
                               SCIENCE

References:

QCA scheme of work (KS1 and KS2)          QCA/98/211


QCA scheme of work (KS3)                  QCA/00/445


National Curriculum (science) (1999)


Framework for teaching science            (National KS3 strategy)
                                          DfES 0136/2002


OFSTED Primary subject report 2000-01 (science) HMI 357


OFSTED Secondary subject report 2000-01 (science) HMI 371


OFSTED Inspecting Science 11-16
with guidance on self-evaluation (2001)




                                                               Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!            Priority 1.3
                            SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN

Key Issue / Priority: Science


Objectives          Activities     Timeline   Key         Resources and    Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                              Personnel   Costing          Criteria   Systems      Evidence




                                        Seeing the difference in our schools!
                                  SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN
Objectives               Activities         Timeline   Key         Resources and    Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                       Personnel   Costing          Criteria   Systems      Evidence




Parents / carers and community links


Governors‟ involvement and responsibility


Other implications




                                                  Seeing the difference in our schools!
        RELIGIOUS EDUCATION KEY ELEMENTS



   Policy Statement for Religious Education.

   Planning to include Learning Aims/Objectives, Desirable Learning
    Outcomes.

   Identified provision for a differentiated curriculum and/or activities.

   Contributing curriculum areas e.g. Citizenship, PSHE, ICT, EMAG,
    Literacy.

   Staff knowledge and training needs.

   High expectations and appropriate challenge.

   A variety of teaching strategies.

   Classroom management and organisation.

   Children‟s responses.

   Marking, assessment and record keeping.

   Employment of appropriate resources – visits, visitors, personnel,
    materials.




                                                                Annual SIP
           Seeing the difference in our schools!                Priority 1.4
  RELIGIOUS EDUCATION SELF-REVIEW STATEMENTS

                                                   Fully   Partly   Not
                                                   met     met      met
There is a shared understanding of the stated
aims of RE.

There is an RE policy, which relates to the
school/college‟s mission statement and the
syllabus adopted.

The RE syllabus has been translated into
planning which makes clear the contribution of
RE to curriculum areas.

Schemes of work clearly identify expectations
for learning.

The RE curriculum content which shows „at a
glance‟ the religions and topics covered for all
years taught.

The curriculum overview makes clear the links to
the Agreed Syllabus, the QCA schemes of work
and/or Exam Syllabus.

Medium-term planning shows key ideas, words,
concepts, assessment strategies, resources and
an overview of learning outcomes.

Short-term planning supports all staff who teach
RE.

A range of teaching styles and strategies are
planned for in the schemes of work.

Staff who teach RE have opportunities to update
their knowledge and skills.

Lessons have a purposeful, yet varied working
atmosphere.

Children/young people are enthusiastic,
questioning and responsive.




                                                             Annual SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!           Priority 1.4
RELIGIOUS EDUCATION MONITORING AND EVALUATION


Success criteria might include:

      Stated aims of RE are understood by all;
      systematic review and feedback to the co-coordinator/head of
       department, informs ongoing planning.



Monitoring systems might include:

      review of teachers‟ planning;
      lesson observation;
      review meetings;
      moderation of assessment activities;
      sampling of children‟s work;
      audit of resource provision;
      exam performance against national guidelines.



Evaluation evidence might include:

      feedback from lesson observations;
      outcomes from work analysis;
      written documents and reports;
      staff reports;
      analysis of data.




                                                             Annual SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!           Priority 1.4
                           SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN

Key Issue / Priority: Religious Education


Objectives         Activities         Timeline   Key         Resources and      Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                 Personnel   Costing            Criteria   Systems      Evidence




                                        Seeing the difference in our schools!
                                  SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN
Objectives               Activities         Timeline   Key         Resources and    Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                       Personnel   Costing          Criteria   Systems      Evidence




Parents / carers and community links


Governors‟ involvement and responsibility


Other implications




                                                  Seeing the difference in our schools!
                         ICT

The following ICT self-review guidance has been
presented in a format already familiar to schools to
assist them in accessing NGfL funding.




                                                       Annual SIP
  Seeing the difference in our schools!                Priority 1.5
                                   ICT SELF-REVIEW
SCHOOL ……………………………… HEAD TEACHER ……………………….

ICT CO-ORDINATOR ………………………………………

In each of the boxes below highlight those indicators which you consider describe
your current stage of development.

This should give you an accurate perspective of the current level of development
and indicate areas which need to be incorporated in your ICT Development Plan
for the next academic year.

When you have completed this and your development plan, please fax back or
post them back to Sandfield to receive clearance for your NGfL funding.
(Fax Number 0115 9150949)

                      1                   2                   3                    4
 1 Curriculum
 a. Scheme of         Well planned        Satisfactory        No SoW or            Use QCA
    work of ICT       and fully           SoW, largely        partially            guidelines, but
                      implemented         implemented         implemented          no clear SoW
 b.   Planning –      Good medium         Moderate            ICT is not           There is no clear
      medium          term planning for   medium term         planned              evidence of
      term            teaching ICT        plans for ICT       consistently in      Medium term
                                          with a few gaps     the medium term      planning for ICT
                                          in NC coverage
 c.   Planning –      Good short term     Most learning       Lack of clarity of   No evidence of
      short term      plans with clear    objectives are      the learning         staff short term
                      learning            well defined in     objectives in        plans
                      objectives          the short term      short term plans
                                          plans
 d.   Maths           ICT is used         ICT is used         Little of no use
                      frequently and      occasionally with   of ICT made to
                      successfully to     moderate            enhance the
                      enhance the         success             subject
                      teaching and
                      learning
 e.   English         ICT is used         ICT is used         Little of no use
                      frequently and      occasionally with   of ICT made to
                      successfully to     moderate            enhance the
                      enhance the         success             subject
                      teaching and
                      learning
 f.   Science         ICT is used         ICT is used         Little of no use
                      frequently and      occasionally with   of ICT made to
                      successfully to     moderate            enhance the
                      enhance the         success             subject
                      teaching and
                      learning
 g.   Foundation      ICT is used         ICT is used         Little of no use
      subjects        frequently and      occasionally with   of ICT made to
                      successfully to     moderate            enhance the
                      enhance the         success             subject
                      teaching and
                      learning
 h.   Pupils‟ ICT     Above national      In line with        Below national
      Capability      average             national average    average
      (Best fit)




                                                                                       Annual SIP
                    Seeing the difference in our schools!                              Priority 1.5
                                   ICT SELF-REVIEW
                     1                    2                   3                    4
i.   E-Learning      Staff and            Staff and           Staff and            Staff and
     in the          children             children            children rarely      children very
     curriculum      regularly use the    occasionally use    use the www for      rarely use the
                     www for              the www for         teaching and         www for
                     teaching and         teaching and        learning             teaching and
                     learning             learning            purposes             learning
                     purposes             purposes                                 purposes
j.   Use of          Digitalbrain used    Some staff use      Occasional use       No use of
     Digitalbrain    widely in and out    Digitalbrain in     of Digitalbrain in   Digitalbrain in
     for teaching    of school            their classrooms    classroom            school
     and learning

2 ASSESSMENT
a. Recording         Assessment of        End of KS NC        No assessment
    and              all pupils is used   levels are          of individual
    Assessment       effectively to       assessed and        pupil‟s
                     inform planning.     recorded for all    achievement.
                     End of KS NC         pupils
                     levels are
                     assessed and
                     recorded
b.   Computer        School               Some use of         No computer
     based           assessment and       computer-based      based
     assess-         analysis             assessment          assessment
     ments           completed on                             undertaken
     (e.g. ILS,      computer
     etc)
c.   (KS2 only)      Regularly            Have assessed       Assessed             School does not
     Do you          assess at the        for school use      children but not     assess ICT at
     assess ICT      end of KS2 and       only                on a regular         the end of KS2
     at the end of   report to                                basis
     KS2? (a         Secondary
     requirement     schools
     from 2004)

3 MONITORING & EVALUATION
a. Teaching    ICT is a regular           ICT is monitored    ICT teaching is
               part of the                infrequently        not monitored
               monitoring
               schedule
b. Planning    Short and                  Medium term         Monitoring of        No monitoring
               medium term                plans are           planning only        takes place
               plans are                  regularly           occasionally
               regularly                  monitored by:
               monitored by:

4 STAFF DEVELOPMENT
a. Competency    All staff are            Most staff are      Some staff lack      Most staff lack
                 confident and            confident and       confidence           confidence
                 competent to             competent to        and/or               and/or
                 teach ICT to the         teach ICT to the    competence to        competence to
                 appropriate level        appropriate level   teach ICT            teach ICT
b. CPD –         Teachers‟ skills         CPD is available    CPD is               NO regular ICT
    Continuing   are audited and          at least once a     infrequent           CPD is available
    professional matched CPD is           term                                     for staff
    develop-     on-going
    ment
c. NOF           All staff have           Most staff have     Few or no staff
    Funded       progressed as a          progressed as a     have progressed
    CPD          result of the            result of the       as a result of the
                 training                 training            training

                                                                                      Annual SIP
                  Seeing the difference in our schools!                               Priority 1.5
                                       ICT SELF-REVIEW
                     1                    2                   3                   4
d.   NOF             On completing        On completing       On completing       On completing
     Funded          the training all     the training most   the training        the training no
     CPD             staff have drawn     staff have drawn    some staff have     staff have drawn
                     up a personal        up a personal       drawn up a          up a personal
                     Action Plan          Action Plan         personal Action     Action Plan
                                                              Plan
e.   E-Learning      All staff have       Some staff have     A few staff have    No staff have
     & CPD           received training    received training   received training   received training
                     on Digitalbrain      on Digitalbrain     on Digitalbrain     on Digitalbrain
f.   Pupils use      All pupils have      The majority of     Some pupils         Few or no pupils
     of              structured           pupils have         have structured     have structured
      E-learning     e-learning           structured          e-learning          e-learning
     during a        lessons each         e-learning          lessons each        lessons each
     school week     week                 lessons each        week                week
                                          week
G&H–
Secondary only
g. How many          All pupils are       More than 50%       Less than 50%       No pupils are
   KS3 pupils        studying an          pupils are          pupils are          studying an
   are studying      accredited           studying an         studying an         accredited
   any               qualification        accredited          accredited          qualification
   accredited                             qualification       qualification
   qualify-
   cations in
   ICT

h.   How many        All pupils will      More than 50%       Less than 50%       No pupils will
     KS4 pupils      leave with a         pupils will leave   pupils will leave   leave with a
     who leave in    qualification        with a              with a              qualification
     2002/3 will                          qualification       qualification
     have a key
     skill or
     vocational
     qualification
     in ICT?

5 NGfL
a. Internet          Regular use by       Regular use by      Occasional use      Rarely used by
   access for        all staff            most staff          by some staff       the staff
   teachers for
   planning,
   communicat
   ion and
   research
b. Email             All staff have       All staff have      Only some staff     Email access is
   access for        email access         email access but    have email          rarely used by
   staff             and use              not used            access              staff
                     regularly            regularly
c.   Internet and    Regular use of       Some pupils         Occasional use      Very rarely or
     email           email and www        have regular        of email and        never used
     access for      by all pupils        used of email       www by pupils
     pupils for                           and www.
     learning
d.   Does your       From a qualified     From a qualified    From an             Would your
     school have     technician on a      technician when     unqualified         technical support
     regular         regular contract     required            technician          be interested in
     technical                                                                    further training?
     support?




                                                                                    Annual SIP
                  Seeing the difference in our schools!                             Priority 1.5
                                 ICT SELF-REVIEW
                    1                   2                    3                   4
6 RESOURCES
a. Access to        Pupil: computer     School will have     School will not
   hardware         ratio exceeds       achieved the         achieve target
   (1:8 prim/       NGfL targets for    NGfl targets by      by 2004
   1:4 sec)         2004                2004
b. Hardware         The school has      The school has       The school is       The school has
                    a mixture of        a mixture of         aiming to           only desktop
                    laptops and         laptops and          purchase            machines
                    desktop             desktops used        laptops in the
                    machines being      on an occasional     near future
                    used regularly      basis
c.   Network        The school has      The school has       The school has      School has only
     capability     a fully             a network facility   a networked         standalone
                    operational         for some             suite               machines
                    wireless network    computers
                    for all computers
d.   Internet       Internet access     Internet access      Internet access
     access on      available on all    available on         only available on
     machines       machines            some machines        some machines
                                                             intermittently
e.   Staff          All staff have      Some staff have      Staff only use      Only some staff
     computer       computer access     access at home       computers at        regularly use
     access         for preparation     or use a school      school              computers for
                    and teaching        computer at                              their
                                        home                                     professional use
f.   As a school    Most classrooms     Some                 We have data        We have no data
     do you have    have access to      classrooms have      projectors in       projectors or
     rooms with     projectors and      access to            school              interactive
     data           whiteboards         projectors and                           whiteboards
     projection                         whiteboards
     and/or
     interactive
     white-
     boards?

7 HOME & COMMUNITY ACCESS
a. Home         A majority of           Some children        Very few pupils     There is little
   access to    pupils have             have access to       have access to      computer
   computers    access to               computers            computers           availability for
                computers               outside school       outside school      pupils outside
                outside school                                                   school
                on a regular
                basis
b. Access to    A majority of           Some children        Very few pupils     There is little
   the Internet pupils have             have access to       have access to      Internet
   at home      access to the           the Internet         the Internet        availability for
                Internet outside        outside school       outside school      pupils outside
                school on a                                                      school
                regular basis
c. Parent       Regular                 Parent               School is           School has no
   access       parent/computer         workshops helps      considering         parent
                workshops held          occasionally         commencing          workshops
                                                             parent              available
                                                             workshops




                                                                                     Annual SIP
                  Seeing the difference in our schools!                              Priority 1.5
                          ICT SELF-REVIEW
EXAMPLE

NGfL REQUIREMENTS FOR 2002/3

School Name: ………………………………………….……………………

The following table covers the information that NGfL request from the LEA
each year to assess the developments in ICT across England.

This information is required annually.

         A. The number of
            computer/pupil ratio in your
            school

         B. The total number of pupils
            in your school

         C. Is the school internet
            connection ISDN or
            Broadband?

         D. The average number of
            computers per school with
            Internet for curriculum
            purposes

         E. The average number of
            computers for curriculum
            purposes which are
            networked

         F. The average number of
            computers per school with
            Internet for administration
            purposes

         G. The average number of
            computers for
            administration purposes
            which are networked

         H. Have you achieved all the
            above?



                                                                     SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!               Example
                          SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN

Key Issue / Priority: Information Communication Technology


Objectives        Activities       Timeline   Key         Resources and    Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                              Personnel   Costing          Criteria   Systems      Evidence




                                         Seeing the difference in our schools!
                                  SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN
Objectives               Activities         Timeline   Key         Resources and    Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                       Personnel   Costing          Criteria   Systems      Evidence




Parents / carers and community links


Governors‟ involvement and responsibility


Other implications




                                                  Seeing the difference in our schools!
          FOUNDATION SUBJECTS KEY ELEMENTS

The content and organisation of the curriculum should provide access to
the full range of learning experiences and promote high achievement and
personal development of all pupils.

The curriculum comprises all the planned activities within and beyond the
school day.

Foundation subjects comprise of two sets of requirements:

              -      knowledge, skills and understanding
              -      breadth of study

and should encourage children to become successful and independent
learners.

Key Elements

      To provide a broad range of opportunities which meet the interests,
       aptitudes and particular needs of pupils, including those with SEN.

      To promote the skills of Literacy and Numeracy through foundation
       subjects.

      To teach pupils to appreciate their own cultural traditions and the
       diversity and richness of other cultures.

      To enable pupils to reflect on their experiences in a way which
       develops their spiritual awareness and self knowledge.

      To promote principles which distinguish right from wrong.

      To encourage pupils to take responsibility, show initiative and
       develop an understanding of living in a community.

      To be socially inclusive by ensuring equality of opportunity for all
       pupils.

      To provide effectively for personal and social education (e.g. health
       education, sex and relationship education, attention to drug
       misuse).

      To provide enrichment including extra-curricular opportunities.

      To promote constructive relationships with partner institutions such
       as link schools.



                                                                  Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!               Priority 1.6
 FOUNDATION SUBJECTS SELF-REVIEW STATEMENTS
                                                        Fully   Partly   Not
                                                        met     met      met
School has own curriculum statement which
determines the emphasis and time allocation for
subjects.

Governors discharge their responsibilities with
regard to the curriculum.

Long, medium and short-term planning is in place.
Planning maximises opportunities for cross-curricular
links and dual learning objectives and development
of key skills.

Planning identifies opportunities for e-Learning.

Assessment procedures are in place to ensure that
teaching builds on prior learning and promotes high
standards.

Co-ordinators have good subject knowledge and fulfil
their leadership and management roles.

The curriculum promotes and fosters pupils‟
appreciation of their own cultural traditions and the
diversity and richness of other cultures.

The school actively seeks opportunities to help
pupils explore their own beliefs and values and those
of others.
The curriculum promotes and fosters values such as
honesty, fairness and respect for truth and justice.

Opportunities are made to develop pupils‟ attitudes,
good social behaviour and self-discipline, including
accepting responsibility.

The curriculum is accessible to all groups and
individuals.

PSHE and Citizenship is taught through subject
and/or as a broader programme.

Opportunities are planned for visits/visitors/out-of-
school-hours learning.

Opportunities are sought for cross key stage and
cross-phase curriculum development.

Information regarding pupils‟ attainment and
progress is shared with receiving schools.

                                                                  Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!               Priority 1.6
FOUNDATION SUBJECTS MONITORING AND EVALUATION

Success criteria might include:

             school curriculum statement in place and guiding practice;
             e-Learning opportunities identified appropriately in planning;
             all subject co-ordinators have good subject knowledge;
             clear policy exists to teach PSHE.



Monitoring systems might include:

       regular review of planning;
       annual review and discussion of curriculum statement;
       lesson observations;
       feedback from staff to each subject co-ordinator;
       work analysis.



Evaluation evidence might include:

       heads of departments monitoring evidence;
       subject co-ordinators action plans;
       samples of work;
       displays of work round school.
+




                                                                 Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!              Priority 1.6
                     FOUNDATION SUBJECTS

References:


City of Nottingham Curriculum Statement 2000


Inspecting Subjects 3 – 11 and 11 - 16, guidance for inspectors and
schools Revised 2000 OFSTED
can be downloaded from www.ofsted.gov.uk


Handbook for Inspecting Primary and Nursery Schools, OFSTED 2000


Handbook for Inspecting Secondary Schools, OFSTED 2000


National Healthy Schools Standard




                                                              Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!           Priority 1.6
                         SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN

Key Issue / Priority: Foundation Subjects / (Subect ………………………)


Objectives       Activities      Timeline   Key         Resources and    Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                            Personnel   Costing          Criteria   Systems      Evidence




                                      Seeing the difference in our schools!
                                  SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN
Objectives               Activities         Timeline   Key         Resources and    Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                       Personnel   Costing          Criteria   Systems      Evidence




Parents / carers and community links


Governors‟ involvement and responsibility


Other implications




                                                  Seeing the difference in our schools!
      TEACHING AND LEARNING KEY ELEMENTS

   Teaching and learning is the first priority for schools.

   Successful recruitment, retention and development of high quality
    teaching staff is essential.

   Teaching is judged to be at least „good‟ across City schools.

   Teaching staff are committed to working together in a culture of
    continuous improvement.

   Schools are committed to considering innovative teaching/learning
    styles e.g. e-learning, brain compatible learning.

   Pupils develop a positive attitude and disposition to their learning.

   Pupils achieve their targets.

   Parents/carers are involved in their children‟s learning.

   Teaching staff, pupils, parents/carers have high expectations of
    themselves and their schools.




                                                                Annual SIP
           Seeing the difference in our schools!                Priority 1.7
 TEACHING AND LEARNING SELF-REVIEW STATEMENTS


                                                           Fully   Partly   Not
                                                           met      met     met
The school‟s ethos/vision/aims relate to teaching and
learning.
The school‟s documentation reflects this commitment
to teaching and learning as a priority.
The school has an effective Teaching and Learning
Policy which is regularly reviewed.
The school‟s commitment to teaching and learning is
visible throughout the school.
The school is proactive in recruiting and retaining high
quality teaching staff.
The school has an effective monitoring, evaluation
and review programme including regular reviews of
planning, pupil work analysis and lesson observations
with evaluative feedback.
The school has effective assessment procedures
which include data analysis and tracking pupil
progress.
The school has an effective Continuing Professional
Development programme that complements the
statutory Performance Management Policy.
Teaching staff look for opportunities to share good
practice internally and externally.
The school has an awareness of innovative
developments e.g. e-learning, brain compatible
learning.
Pupils are positive about attending school because
their learning is enjoyable and challenging.
Pupils‟ behaviour is good.
The school meets its statutory targets.
Pupils make quantifiable progress.
The school has a positive strategy to encourage
parents/carers to be involved in raising achievement.
The school‟s ethos encourages the school‟s staff,
pupils, parents/carers to have high expectations of
themselves and the school community.
The school promotes life-long learning.




                                                                     Annual SIP
               Seeing the difference in our schools!                 Priority 1.7
        TEACHING AND LEARNING MONITORING AND
                     EVALUATION

Success criteria:

      effective Teaching and Learning policies are in place;
      monitoring indicates all lessons to be at least good;
      pupils achieve targets;
      all teaching positions filled.


Monitoring systems might include:

      lesson observations and feedback;
      pupils‟ work analysis;
      planning review;
      data analysis - attainment, attendance, exclusion;
      governors' visits;
      LEA monitoring;
      Performance Management;
      pupil/parent questionnaires.


Evaluation evidence might include:

      pupil data;
      outcomes from lesson observations;
      outcomes from work analysis;
      reports to governors;
      pupils‟ reports.




                                                                Annual SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!              Priority 1.7
                    TEACHING AND LEARNING

References:

Education Strategic Planning Framework 2002-2004

City of Nottingham Curriculum Statement 2000

The National Curriculum

Curriculum Guidance for the Foundation Stage

National Literacy and Numeracy Frameworks

Key Stage 3 Strategy Framework

14-19 Strategy Framework

OFSTED Framework for the Inspection of Schools

Inspecting Subjects (OFSTED)




                                                      Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!   Priority 1.7
                           SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN

Key Issue / Priority: Teaching and Learning


Objectives         Activities         Timeline     Key          Resources and    Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                   Personnel    Costing          Criteria   Systems      Evidence




                                              Seeing the difference in our schools!
                                  SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN
Objectives               Activities         Timeline   Key         Resources and    Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                       Personnel   Costing          Criteria   Systems      Evidence




Parents / carers and community links


Governors‟ involvement and responsibility


Other implications




                                                  Seeing the difference in our schools!
              FOUNDATION STAGE KEY ELEMENTS


Key elements:

   Planning for the six areas of learning.


   Clear learning objectives for activities to promote the Early Learning
    Goals.


   Variety of teaching methods to challenge and inspire children.


   Accessible and appropriate indoor and outdoor learning environment.


   A strategy for the deployment of staff across the Foundation Stage.


   Opportunities to widen and deepen practitioners‟ knowledge and
    understanding.


   Inclusive provision for all children‟s needs.


   Monitoring of children‟s progress towards achieving the Early Learning
    Goals.


   Arrangements to work in partnership with parents and carers.


   Effective links with Key Stage 1.




                                                                 Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!              Priority 1.8
    FOUNDATION STAGE SELF-REVIEW STATEMENTS

                                                      Fully   Partly   Not
                                                      met     met      met
Practitioners have the skills, knowledge and
experience to deliver a broad and balanced
curriculum for the Foundation Stage.
Policies reflect the needs of the Foundation Stage
and staff are involved in their formulation.
Six areas of learning are covered in the planning.
Planning takes into account the different needs of
children.
Practitioners plan and work collaboratively.
Standards are commensurate with the age and
capability of all the children.
The staff development programme reflects the needs
of all staff working in the Foundation Stage.
Children are active and independent learners.
A wide range of appropriate and effective resources
enhance teaching and learning.
A well-organised environment enables children to
have access to materials, equipment and resources
both indoors and outdoors.
Provision is made for children‟s progress to be
monitored as part of a whole school self-review.
There are clear strategies and systems in place for
ongoing assessment.
Assessment informs future planning, teaching and
learning.
Parents/carers are well informed about the
curriculum.
The school engages the support and help of parents,
carers and volunteers.
Planning ensures effective continuity between the
Foundation Stage and Year One.




                                                                Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!             Priority 1.8
  FOUNDATION STAGE MONITORING AND EVALUATION



Success criteria might include:

      a clear, strategic direction for development in the Foundation Stage;
      planning and assessment directly inform teaching and learning;
      x % of children achieve the Early Learning Goals by the end of the
       Foundation Stage;




Monitoring systems might include:

      analysis of planning;
      observations of teaching and learning;
      feedback and discussion with staff;




Evaluation evidence might include:

      children‟s work;
      displays;
      policy statements;
      reports to governors;
      children‟s records.




                                                                Annual SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!              Priority 1.8
                       FOUNDATION STAGE

References:

Curriculum Guidance for the Foundation Stage
QCA (2000)

Planning for Learning in the Foundation Stage
QCA (2001)

LEA Policy Statement for the Foundation Stage (2002)

Mathematical activities for the Foundation Stage
(National Numeracy Strategy 2002)

Understanding how young children learn
(Additional guidance for the Foundation Stage)
LEA (2000)

Looking at the Foundation Stage
(Margaret Glen-Bott Family of Schools 2002)




                                                       Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!    Priority 1.8
                           SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN

Key Issue / Priority: Foundation Stage


Objectives         Activities            Timeline   Key         Resources and    Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                    Personnel   Costing          Criteria   Systems      Evidence




                                              Seeing the difference in our schools!
                                  SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN
Objectives               Activities         Timeline   Key         Resources and    Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                       Personnel   Costing          Criteria   Systems      Evidence




Parents / carers and community links


Governors‟ involvement and responsibility


Other implications




                                                  Seeing the difference in our schools!
  SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS KEY ELEMENTS

Leadership within the school demonstrates that provision for children
with special educational needs is seen as integral to school
development and not as an „add on‟.

A shared vision of inclusion throughout the school.

Staff understand their roles and accept responsibility for the learning of
students with special educational needs.

Pupils have a „voice‟ in relation to their own learning and in setting
their own targets.

Students have access to all appropriate learning opportunities and to
extra-curricular activities.

Parents are actively involved in their child‟s education.

Support strategies are varied and creative; utilise a range of
resources, both human and material; and aim to increase children‟s
independence.

Continuing professional development opportunities are provided for all
staff in relation to working with children with special educational needs.

SEN resources are targeted openly and equitably.

Governors fulfil their roles in relation to children with SEN.




                                                                 Annual SIP
          Seeing the difference in our schools!                  Priority 1.9
                  SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS
                   SELF-REVIEW STATEMENTS


                                                          Fully   Partly   Not
                                                          met     met      met
There is a shared responsibility and accountability
for SEN throughout the school.
There is a clear, shared vision of inclusion within the
school.
All staff take responsibility for making the school
more inclusive.
Curriculum content is flexibly planned within the
framework of the National Curriculum to enable ALL
pupils to succeed, including those with SEN.
A variety of teaching styles are employed and
matched to individual learning styles.
Lessons extend the learning of all students.
The school uses p-levels to assess students‟
achievements below level 1.
Students are involved in assessing, commenting on
and setting targets for their own learning.
IEP targets are systematically reviewed at least twice
per year.
The school addresses the needs of students with
special educational needs at unstructured times, for
example, lunchtimes and break times.
Pupils with SEN have access to a range of extra-
curricular activities.
The co-ordination of teaching assistant support is
given high status within the school and planning time
is prioritised.
The SENCO receives an appropriate amount of non-
contact time.
All school staff understand the roles of the SENCO
and teaching assistants.
Parents/carers are involved in their children‟s
education through invitations to IEP review meetings
and other strategies.




                                                                    Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!                 Priority 1.9
                   SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS
                    SELF-REVIEW STATEMENTS

                                                            Fully   Partly   Not
                                                            met     met      met
School Action and School Action Plus (MSG) funds
are accounted for within school systems for meeting
the needs of identified students.
There are systematic procedures for appropriately
sharing information with all staff, including supply
staff, about pupils with special educational needs.
The progress of pupils with SEN is systematically
monitored, reviewed and recorded.
The school‟s inclusion policy is reviewed regularly.
Governors report annually to parents on the school‟s
policy for children with special educational needs.
There are systems in school for sharing the SEN
policy with all staff, particularly new members of staff.
Admission and transition arrangements for students
with special educational needs are individualised
according to each student‟s needs.
School provision for children with special educational
needs is monitored and evaluated and informs the
school improvement plan.
There is an identified SEN governor who meets
regularly with the SENCO.




                                                                      Annual SIP
               Seeing the difference in our schools!                  Priority 1.9
                SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS
                MONITORING AND EVALUATION

Success criteria might include:

      % of pupils with SEN achieving above cohort average p-level
       targets at end of Key Stage 1
      % of pupils with SEN achieving above cohort average p-level
       targets at end of Key Stage 2
      % of pupils with SEN achieving above cohort average p-level
       targets at end of Key Stage 3
      % of pupils with SEN achieving agreed IEP target
      Audit results in comparison to previous years. An excellent audit
       tool is the „Index for inclusion‟ which provides a range of
       questionnaires to involve all members of the school community.
       Another audit tool is available from the LEA.


Monitoring systems might include:

      review of schemes of work;
      review of lesson plans;
      review of the School Improvement Plan;
      lesson observations;
      tracking individual progress;
      analysis of assessment results;
      discussion with pupils and teachers;
      work sampling.


Evaluation evidence might include:

      assessment results showing trends, patterns and progress;
      feedback to staff and pupils about work sampling and predicted
       progress;
      discussions with staff (and written feedback) after lesson
       observations.




                                                               Annual SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!             Priority 1.9
            SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS

References:

SEN Handbook
Index for inclusion
LEA Inclusion audit




                                                 Annual SIP
         Seeing the difference in our schools!   Priority 1.9
                           SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN

Key Issue / Priority: Improve the standards achieved by pupils with SEN


Objectives         Activities         Timeline   Key         Resources and    Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                 Personnel   Costing          Criteria   Systems      Evidence




                                           Seeing the difference in our schools!
                                  SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN
Objectives               Activities         Timeline   Key         Resources and    Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                       Personnel   Costing          Criteria   Systems      Evidence




Parents / carers and community links


Governors‟ involvement and responsibility


Other implications




                                                  Seeing the difference in our schools!
GIFTED AND TALENTED PUPILS KEY ELEMENTS


   School has clear procedures to identify gifted and talented.

   The school encourages the involvement of the community to
    enhance the education of their gifted and talented pupils.

   Pupils are enabled to progress beyond their peer group
    contemporaries if their progress warrants such development.

   The school cooperates with other schools in sharing expertise
    and the provision of activities at an appropriate level for their
    gifted and talented pupils.

   There are appropriate resources available for gifted and talented
    pupils.




                                                           Annual SIP
       Seeing the difference in our schools!              Priority 1.10
                   GIFTED AND TALENTED PUPILS
                    SELF-REVIEW STATEMENTS

The following statements offer a guideline to establish and monitor good
practice in educating the gifted and talented minority of pupils in our
schools.

                                                           Fully   Partly   Not
                                                           met     met      met
 A governor has been delegated for the education
 of the gifted and talented pupils in school.

 The interests of the gifted and talented pupils are
 encapsulated in the stated aims of the school.

 The School Policy document refers to meeting the
 needs of the gifted and talented pupils in the
 school.

 A policy re. parental notification of identified gifted
 and talented pupils exists.

 There is a designated teacher in the school with
 responsibility for the co-ordination/oversight of the
 education of gifted and talented pupils.

 The school has a working definition for giftedness
 and talent.

 The government criteria for giftedness and talent
 are encapsulated in the school‟s working
 definition.

 There is an agreed procedure for the identification
 of gifted and talented pupils in the school.

 There is a regular review of the identified gifted
 and talented pupil cohorts.

 All staff know which pupils have been identified as
 gifted or talented.

 Subject/departmental/pastoral policy documents
 specifically address the issues of educating gifted
 and talented pupils.

 Programmes of study/schemes of work specifically
 address the needs of the gifted and talented pupils
 in the school.


                                                                     Annual SIP
               Seeing the difference in our schools!                Priority 1.10
                 GIFTED AND TALENTED PUPILS
                  SELF-REVIEW STATEMENTS

                                                        Fully   Partly   Not
                                                        met     met      met
Targets are set and regularly reviewed for gifted
and talented pupils.

There is a culture in the school that encourages,
supports and celebrates the aspiration and
achievement of high expectations and outstanding
standards.

The school addresses the issue of identifying and
remedying underperformance for its gifted and
talented pupils.

Staff training requirements are regularly assessed
and reviewed.

All staff have been encouraged, and given an
opportunity, to participate in training opportunities
to develop their skills in working with gifted and
talented pupils.

Every lesson is designed to accommodate the
needs of gifted and talented pupils.

The classroom provision for gifted and talented
pupils is monitored on a regular basis.




                                                                  Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!              Priority 1.10
                 GIFTED AND TALENTED PUPILS

Success criteria might include:


      pupils achieve targets;
      teaching and learning reflects pupils‟ learning styles and is
       challenging;
      staff identify and support gifted and talented pupils;
      gifted and talented cohorts reflect whole school population.



Monitoring systems might include:


      collection and analysis of data (including cognitive ability test data);
      classroom observation (using the file „Monitoring the Gifted and
       Talented Curriculum‟);
      moderation with other schools;
      dialogue with pupils, parents, staff, governors.



Evaluation evidence might include:


      records;
      pupil self reports evaluation;
      test and assessment data.




                                                                   Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!               Priority 1.10
                            SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN

Key Issue / Priority: Gifted and Talented


Objectives          Activities         Timeline     Key          Resources and      Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                    Personnel    Costing            Criteria   Systems      Evidence




                                            Seeing the difference in our schools!
                                  SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN
Objectives               Activities         Timeline    Key         Resources and     Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                        Personnel   Costing           Criteria   Systems      Evidence




Parents / carers and community links


Governors‟ involvement and responsibility


Other implications




                                                       Seeing the difference in our schools!
OUT-OF-SCHOOL HOURS LEARNING KEY ELEMENTS


   Whole school strategy for out-of-school-hours learning.

   Action Plan for delivery and extension.

   Awareness of cross-City initiatives.

   Encouragement of pupils to access opportunities beyond school
    boundaries.

   Training for providers.

   Family of Schools perspective/development plan for key activities.

   Pupils involvement in planning and monitoring.

   Models of good practice.

   Recognition/promotions of achievement.

   Recognition of out-of-school-hours learning within the whole school
    achievement strategy.




                                                               Annual SIP
           Seeing the difference in our schools!              Priority 1.11
              OUT-OF-SCHOOL HOURS LEARNING
                 SELF-REVIEW STATEMENTS


                                                   Fully   Partly   Not
                                                   met     met      met
The school has a whole school strategy on Out-
of-School-Hours Learning.

Teachers/staff/governors/parents involved in the
strategy.

The school has an action plan for delivery and
extension.

The school identifies and develops initiatives
targeting inclusion and equality.

The school integrates Out-of-School Hours
Learning within its School Improvement Plan

There are systems to monitor and evaluate the
quality of provision.

The school promotes LEA and City-wide Out-of-
School-Hours opportunities.

The school exploits partnership opportunities.

Family of Schools strategy to ensure continuity
and progression.

The school celebrates and recognises
achievement.

Providers have access to training opportunities.

The school has set a target to expand provision.




                                                             Annual SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!          Priority 1.11
              OUT-OF-SCHOOL-HOURS LEARNING
               MONITORING AND EVALUATION

Success criteria might include:

      % of pupils accessing opportunities out of school;
      % of pupils accessing opportunities beyond school;
      measurable achievement or accreditation;
      planning reflects outcomes;
      increased opportunity.



Monitoring systems might include:

      review of planning;
      analysis of attendance data;
      observations of activities;
      audit samples of work.



Evaluation evidence might include:

      curriculum policy framework;
      curriculum activity review;
      reports to governors;
      feedback from parents and partners;
      pupil self-evaluation and staff reports.




                                                             Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!         Priority 1.11
              OUT-OF-SCHOOL-HOURS LEARNING

References:

Excellence in Cities Strategic Plan

Inclusive Education Development Plan

Out-of-School-Hours Learning Strategy




                                                       Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!   Priority 1.11
                          SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN

Key Issue / Priority: Out-of-School-Hours Learning


Objectives        Activities        Timeline   Key         Resources and    Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                               Personnel   Costing          Criteria   Systems      Evidence




                                          Seeing the difference in our schools!
                                  SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN
Objectives               Activities         Timeline   Key         Resources and    Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                       Personnel   Costing          Criteria   Systems      Evidence




Parents / carers and community links


Governors‟ involvement and responsibility


Other implications




                                                  Seeing the difference in our schools!
           WORK RELATED LEARNING KEY ELEMENTS


The City 14-19 Strategy offers a vision for 14-19 provision:


          to meet the needs and aspirations of all young people;

          to raise the achievement of all young people;

          to increase participation in post-16 education and training,
           including higher education;

          to broaden the skills acquired by all young people to improve
           their employability;

          to be delivered through flexible, integrated and innovative
           networks of providers.

Essential to the delivery of this strategy is the inclusion of an entitlement to
high quality and appropriate Work Related Learning for all young people.




                                                                   Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!               Priority 1.12
WORK RELATED LEARNING SELF-REVIEW STATEMENTS

                                                       Fully   Partly   Not
                                                       met     met      met
Clearly defined policy exists for:
    work related education;
    key skills;
    careers education and guidance.

Work related provision is monitored and evaluated
annually.

A wide range of work related education, key skills
and career education and guidance is offered and
accredited.

A co-ordinator is a member of the senior
management team.

Funding for work related education is sustainable.

Staff are specialists with good subject knowledge
and relevant experience.

High quality curriculum resources are available for
staff and pupils.

An integrated team exists with clearly defined roles
and responsibilities.

Staff are trained for delivery, assessment and
internal moderation.

Planned provision for external partners to support
the programme.

Work related education is an entitlement for all
pupils.

Work related provision is fully integrated into the
timetable at Key Stages 4 and 5.

Off-site experiences link directly with Key Stage 4
provision.

Students make an informed choice in Year 9
supported by careers advisers and / or learning
mentors.




                                                                 Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!             Priority 1.12
                 WORK RELATED LEARNING
                MONITORING AND EVALUATION


Success criteria might include:

         the curriculum prepares pupils for the next stage of education;
         external partnerships contribute vocational education, training or
          employment;
         school curriculum and extra-curricular contribute to programme;
         specific resources support work related learning;
         key skills to high standard.


Monitoring might include:

         analysis assessment data;
         lesson observations;
         questionnaires - students, parents, staff, external partners;
         audit samples of students‟ work;
         audit curriculum provision;
         audit school policies and plans.


Evaluation evidence might include:

             assessment data;
             review and reports;
             feedback from questionnaires and observations;
             staff performance management targets.




                                                                 Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!             Priority 1.12
                   WORK RELATED LEARNING

References:

     Work Related Learning - Guidance for Nottingham City Schools

     Policy on Work Related Learning

     Key Skills - Guidance for Nottingham City Schools

     Education Strategic Planning Framework




                                                           Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!       Priority 1.12
                           SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN

Key Issue / Priority: Work Related Learning


Objectives         Activities         Timeline     Key          Resources and    Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                   Personnel    Costing          Criteria   Systems      Evidence




                                                 Seeing the difference in our schools!
                                  SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN
Objectives               Activities         Timeline   Key         Resources and    Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                       Personnel   Costing          Criteria   Systems      Evidence




Parents / carers and community links


Governors‟ involvement and responsibility


Other implications




                                                  Seeing the difference in our schools!
IMPROVE TRANSITION ESPECIALLY AT KEY STAGE 2 – 3
                 KEY ELEMENTS


    Effective communication/liaison between schools either side of
     transition.

    Efficient sharing of information for all pupils, including those with
     special educational needs.

    Curriculum provision between key stages and phases.

    Continuity in aspects of strategy for embedding key skills, teaching
     and learning between key stages.

    Provision of cross-phase out-of-school-hours learning, including
     summer schools.

    Promotion of pupils‟ personal and social development across key
     stages.




                                                                 Annual SIP
            Seeing the difference in our schools!                  Priority 2
 IMPROVE TRANSITION ESPECIALLY AT KEY STAGE 2 - 3
            SELF-REVIEW STATEMENTS

       Ideally self-review should be carried out in consultation with
       the Family of Schools.

                                                Fully   Partly      Not
                                                met     met         met
Meetings take place between members of
staff from representative key stages.

Parents are involved.

Teachers meet pupils prior to admission.

All relevant information is shared.

Opportunities for cross-phase curriculum
planning including, transition units, subject
networks.

A plan is in place to develop cross-phase
Key Skills teaching.

Vulnerable pupils are identified and
appropriate induction systems are in place.

Gifted and talented pupils are identified.

Out of hours opportunities take place.

Programmes for PSHE build on prior
achievements.




                                                                 Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!                Priority 2
                    IMPROVE TRANSITION
                ESPECIALLY AT KEY STAGE 2 - 3



Success criteria might include:

      schools achieve end of Key Stage Targets;
      increase % of pupils from feeder schools attending designated City
       schools.


Monitoring systems might include:

      analysis of data;
      feedback from staff;
      feedback from parents;
      lesson observation;
      tracking individual progress;
      moderation of cross-phase work.


Evaluation methods might include:

      assessment data;
      admissions data;
      pupils‟ records;
      reports to parents.




                                                              Annual SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!              Priority 2
                    IMPROVE TRANSITION
                ESPECIALLY AT KEY STAGE 2 - 3

References:

     Education Strategic Planning Framework

     Behaviour Support Plan

     Literacy and Numeracy Transition Units Plan

     Key Stage 3 Strategy Framework

     Inclusive Education Development Plan




                                                      Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!     Priority 2
                            SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN

Key Issue / Priority: Improve Transition


Objectives          Activities         Timeline   Key         Resources and    Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                  Personnel   Costing          Criteria   Systems      Evidence




                                            Seeing the difference in our schools!
                                  SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN
Objectives               Activities         Timeline   Key         Resources and    Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                       Personnel   Costing          Criteria   Systems      Evidence




Parents / carers and community links


Governors‟ involvement and responsibility


Other implications




                                                  Seeing the difference in our schools!
 IMPROVE THE ACHIEVEMENT OF UNDERACHIEVING PUPILS
                   KEY ELEMENTS


Addressing the needs of underachieving pupils is a strategic priority in the
education development plan. The LEA and schools are expected to have
specific plans related to this priority.

In addressing this priority, in addition to whole school data, schools will
need to look at achievement in some or all of the following areas as
appropriate:

      Ethnic minority groups
      Children with EAL
      Asylum seekers
      Travellers
      Gender issues
      Pupils with high mobility
      Children in public care
      Children with SEN
      Higher attaining pupils
      Under-attaining pupils
      Children with a disability


This priority links with other strategic priorities and with a range of City
Council plans including;

      Behaviour Support Plan
      Early Years Development and Childcare Plan
      Adult Learning Plan
      Children‟s Services Plan
      Youth Justice Plan
      Community Strategy
      Excellence in Cities Strategic Plan
      Excellence Challenge Strategic Plan
      Inclusive Education Development Plan

and with the City Council‟s Race Equality and Equal Opportunities Policies




                                                                   Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!                  Priority 3
 IMPROVE THE ACHIEVEMENT OF UNDERACHIEVING PUPILS
              SELF-REVIEW STATEMENTS

                                                             Fully   Partly    Not
                                                             met      met      met
Underachievement of individual pupils and groups of
pupils is identified.

Use is made of school data.

Use is made of comparative school data.

Use is made of national comparative data.

Comparative data is disseminated to staff.

Comparative data is disseminated to governors.

Parents and carers have some understanding of
comparative data.

Use is made of teacher assessment.

Assessment data is translated into individual and
group targets.

Whole school targets are set which directly address
identified areas of underachievement.

Pupils are aware of their targets.

Parents and carers are aware of their child's targets.

Parents are encouraged to be actively involved in
their child's work to achieve targets.

A structured programme is in place to monitor and
evaluate the individual, groups and whole school
targets for areas of underachievement.

Targets are updated regularly as a result of TA.

Assessment data is used to inform planning.

Teachers have high expectations for underachieving pupils.

Teaching and learning styles are varied and adapted
as appropriate.




                                                                         Annual SIP
                Seeing the difference in our schools!                      Priority 3
 IMPROVE THE ACHIEVEMENT OF UNDERACHIEVING PUPILS
              SELF-REVIEW STATEMENTS

                                                        Fully   Partly    Not
                                                        met      met      met
A Teaching and Learning policy is in place which is
understood and used to impact positively on
teaching for underachieving pupils and groups.

Teaching and learning is identified as a key area for
observations and monitoring.

Parents and carers are supported to understand
how their children learn.

Differentiation is used effectively to support
underachieving pupils.

Resources for differentiation are adequate.

All children have full access to all areas of the
curriculum.

The curriculum is reviewed regularly to ensure it
meets the needs of underachieving pupils.

The homework policy is used effectively to support
underachieving pupils and groups.

Parents and carers are encouraged to support
children with their homework.

The special needs policy includes information with
regard to the support available to improve the
performance of underachieving pupils.




                                                                    Annual SIP
               Seeing the difference in our schools!                  Priority 3
IMPROVE THE ACHIEVEMENT OF UNDERACHIEVING PUPILS
           MONITORING AND EVALUATION



 Success criteria might include:

       pupils and groups of pupils achieve their targets;
       % of identified pupils or groups achieve targets;
       underachieving pupils and groups have been identified and
        targets impacting on performance;
       pupils are aware of their targets and are more involved in the
        progress towards them.


 Monitoring systems might include:

       analysis and use of data;
       classroom observations;
       personal and professional development dialogue;
       performance management;
       work analysis;
       feedback from pupils, staff and parents;
       analysis of planning.


 Evaluation evidence might include:

       assessment data;
       IEP information;
       outcomes from observations and dialogue;
       information from pupils‟ self-review.




                                                             Annual SIP
           Seeing the difference in our schools!               Priority 3
 IMPROVE THE ACHIEVEMENT OF UNDERACHIEVING PUPILS


References:

Educating the Very Able: Current International Research,
(OFSTED 1998)


Recent Research on Gender and Educational Performance,
(OFSTED 1998)


Recent Research on the Achievements of Ethnic Minority Pupils,
(OFSTED 1996)


Can Do Better: Raising Boys‟ Achievement in English,
(QCA 1998)


Educational Inequality: Mapping Race, Class and Gender
(OFSTED 2000)


Raising Achievement of Children in Public Care
(OFSTED 2001)


Managing Support for the Attainment of Pupils from Minority Ethnic
Groups (OFSTED 2001)


Providing for Gifted and Talented Pupils: An Evaluation of Excellence in
Cities and other Grant Funded Programmes (OFSTED 2001)




                                                              Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!             Priority 3
                           SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN

Key Issue / Priority: Improve the achievement of underachieving pupils


Objectives         Activities         Timeline   Key         Resources and      Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                 Personnel   Costing            Criteria   Systems      Evidence




                                        Seeing the difference in our schools!
                                  SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN
Objectives               Activities         Timeline   Key         Resources and    Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                       Personnel   Costing          Criteria   Systems      Evidence




Parents / carers and community links


Governors‟ involvement and responsibility


Other implications




                                                  Seeing the difference in our schools!
ETHNIC MINORITY ACHIEVEMENT GRANT KEY ELEMENTS


In order to qualify for this grant schools include within their development
plan objectives for:

      raising the achievement of minority ethnic pupils who are at risk of
       underachievement;

      making provision for pupils for whom English is an additional
       language;

      supporting the educational attainment of refugee pupils.

Schools need to monitor the achievement of minority ethnic groups and
set clear targets and outcome measures agreed with the LEA, against the
background of LEA wide targets.

The following guidance documents produced by the LEA will assist
schools to ensure DfES guidelines are followed and statutory
requirements are met:

                     EMAG Guidance document 1:
                     Overview of EMAG

                     EMAG Guidance document 2:
                     Setting targets – recording progress

                     EMAG Guidance document 3:
                     Strategies and issues

                     EMAG Guidance document 4:
                     Nottingham City data by ethnicity

                     EMAG Guidance document 5:
                     Policies and Plans




                                                                  Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!                 Priority 3
           ETHNIC MINORITY ACHIEVEMENT GRANT
                SELF-REVIEW STATEMENTS

                                                          Fully   Partly   Not
                                                          met     met      met
The school has a policy for raising achievement of
minority ethnic pupils.

The policy clearly outlines the role of EMAG staff.

All staff are aware of and implementing the policy.

Other policies have been reviewed that include
reference to EAL, anti racist/multi cultural education,
asylum seekers/refugees, equal opportunities.

Specific reference is made to the achievement of
minority ethnic pupils in school aims.

An annual EMAG action plan is developed and
included within the school improvement plan.

The line management of EMAG funded staff is clear
and effective.

The time of EMAG staff is effectively prioritised and
managed.

EMAG staff work in partnership with mainstream staff
to develop the curriculum.

Adequate planning and liaison time is available.

Successful curriculum development initiatives are
disseminated and embedded into mainstream
practice.

Professional development for all staff in relation to
minority ethnic pupils is identified.

Professional development opportunities for EMAG
staff are identified.

Achievement data is analysed by ethnic group.

Any groups at risk of underachievement are
identified.




                                                                   Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!                  Priority 3
          ETHNIC MINORITY ACHIEVEMENT GRANT
               SELF-REVIEW STATEMENTS

                                                          Fully   Partly   Not
                                                          met     met      met
Achievement targets are set for each minority group
in line with LEA targets.

EMAG funded staff work together with mainstream
staff to identify targeted pupils and to agree
appropriate individual targets for each targeted pupil.

Data maintained on pupils is broken down by
minority ethnic group.

LEA is informed of the number of pupils targeted.

LEA is informed of the number of pupils who meet
their targets.

EAL needs are monitored and broken down by
language level.

LEA are informed of numbers and levels.

Financial records are kept which record use of
EMAG funds and would be acceptable for audit
purposes.

The school makes effective links with the parents,
carers and communities of minority ethnic pupils.

The role of EMAG funded staff in relation to parental
involvement work is clear and effective.




                                                                    Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!                   Priority 3
          ETHNIC MINORITY ACHIEVEMENT GRANT
             MONITORING AND EVALUATION

Success criteria might include:

      EMAG policy positively impacts on effectiveness of EMAG funds;
      data analysed and targets set for each minority group;
      all staff benefit from in-service training;
      all pupils with English as a second language achieve set targets.



Monitoring systems might include:

      analysis of planning;
      lesson observations;
      feedback from staff, pupils, parents;
      professional/personal development dialogue;
      performance management;
      work analysis;
      data analysis;
      progress between language levels.


Evaluation might include:

      assessment data;
      outcomes from work analysis;
      outcomes from lesson observations.




                                                               Annual SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!               Priority 3
           ETHNIC MINORITY ACHIEVEMENT GRANT

References:

Removing the Barriers, (DfEE 2000)

Recent Research on Achievements of Ethnic Minority Pupils, (OFSTED
1997)

Raising the Attainment of Minority Ethnic Pupils, (OFSTED 1999)

Learning for All - Standards for Racial Equality in School, (CRE/Belmont
Press 2000)

New Start, Ethnic Minority Pupils, (DfEE 1999)

Making the Difference - Teaching and Learning Strategies in Successful
Multi-Ethnic Schools, (DfEE/Blair and Bourne 1998)

Recent Research on Achievement of Ethnic Minority Pupils, (Gilborn,
David and Gipps, Caroline 1996)

Improving Practice – A Whole School Approach to Raising Achievement of
African Caribbean Youths, (Cecile Wright 1998)

City of Nottingham EMAG „Guidance Documents‟ 1- 5

There is a further comprehensive list of reference materials in City of
Nottingham „Guidance Document‟ 3.




                                                                 Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!                Priority 3
                           SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN

Key Issue / Priority: Ethnic Minority Achievement Grant


Objectives         Activities         Timeline   Key         Resources and      Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                 Personnel   Costing            Criteria   Systems      Evidence




                                        Seeing the difference in our schools!
                                  SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN
Objectives               Activities         Timeline   Key         Resources and    Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                       Personnel   Costing          Criteria   Systems      Evidence




Parents / carers and community links


Governors‟ involvement and responsibility


Other implications




                                                  Seeing the difference in our schools!
IMPROVE BEHAVIOUR, MOTIVATION AND SELF-ESTEEM,
     INCLUDING ATTENDANCE KEY ELEMENTS

The City Council has published a Behaviour Support Plan linked to the
priority entitled Raising Motivation and Self-Esteem which is regularly
reviewed and monitored.

Schools are expected to reflect this priority in their school improvement
plans.

The LEA has published a guide for Head Teachers and Governors entitled
„Managing Pupil Behaviour‟ which was sent to all schools in 2001. This
gives specific guidance on managing exclusions, developing the School
Behaviour Policy and the use of physical intervention.

Guidance on Attendance issues can be found in the LEA document
„Working in Partnership to Improve Attendance in the City of Nottingham‟.


      Behaviour Policy.
      Behaviour targets (in-school incidents, fixed term and permanent
       exclusions).
      Monitoring, reviewing and evaluating behaviour
       (e.g. analysis of exclusions, incidents, progress).
      Rewards and sanctions in relation to behaviour.
      Physical Intervention Policy.
      Training needs identified and met.
      Partnership – LEA/other agencies/community.
      Pupils‟ involvement in decision/policy making.
      Curriculum enrichment
       (e.g. out-of-school-hours learning/e-Learning).
      Curriculum appropriateness/accessibility.
      Mentoring.
      Equality Strategy.
      Parental, community and pupil involvement:       - Attendance;
                                                        - Behaviour;
                                                        - Learning.

      Attendance Policy (e.g. system/roles EWO and use of support).
      Attendance targets – unauthorised absence and total absence.
      Monitoring, reviewing and evaluating attendance, (e.g. analysis of
       attendance patterns/poor attenders).




                                                                 Annual SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!                Priority 4
IMPROVE BEHAVIOUR, MOTIVATION AND SELF-ESTEEM,
 INCLUDING ATTENDANCE SELF-REVIEW STATEMENTS

                                                        Fully   Partly   Not
                                                        met     met      met
The school has an Attendance Policy which is
consistent and understood.
Attendance targets are set.
Procedures for monitoring, reviewing and evaluating
are in place.
Systems for rewards and sanctions are consistent
across the whole school.
The school has systems in place to aid successful
reintegration.
Staff and parents are aware of attendance levels.
Protocols and procedures for working with EWS are
in place and consistent across the school.
There is a Behavioural Management Policy which is
consistent and understood.
There is a Physical Intervention Policy which is
consistent and understood.
Behaviour targets are set.
Staff roles outlined, defined and clearly understood.
There are procedures for monitoring, reviewing and
evaluating behaviour.
Systems for rewards and sanctions are clear and
well-managed.
The school has:         an SEN Inclusion Policy
                        a Mentoring Policy
                        an Equality Policy
Strategies to maximise pupils‟ voice (e.g. School
Council).
Teaching and learning are rigorously reviewed and
evaluated.
Curriculum Enrichment includes:
                         out-of-school-hours
                            learning
                         e-learning
There are clear and well-defined procedures for
identifying training needs.
Partnerships with LEA/Business/Governors/Support
Agencies are well-established.
There are procedures for monitoring parental
involvement in terms of:
                         attendance
                         behaviour
                         learning


                                                                  Annual SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!                 Priority 4
IMPROVE BEHAVIOUR, MOTIVATION AND SELF-ESTEEM,
     INCLUDING ATTENDANCE MONITORING AND
                  EVALUATION

Success criteria might include:

      attendance targets set;
      rewards and sanctions are identified and included in the behaviour
       policy;
      targets set for number of parents involved in supporting pupils‟
       learning;
      targets set for number of children involved in out-of-school hours
       learning;
      targets met towards eradication of racist and bullying incidents;
      staff, pupils and parents are aware of school mentoring strategy.



Monitoring systems might include:

      analysis of data;
      professional development dialogue;
      surveys of governors/staff/parents/pupils;
      observations of lessons and activities.



Evaluation evidence might include:

      assessment data;
      school policy statements;
      written feedback from discussions;
      reports in relation to priorities;
      outcomes from observations;
      reports to governors.




                                                               Annual SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!              Priority 4
IMPROVE BEHAVIOUR, MOTIVATION AND SELF-ESTEEM,
            INCLUDING ATTENDANCE

References:

Pupils with Problems (DfEE 1994)

Excellence for All Children : Meeting Special Educational Needs –
DfEE 1997)

Social Exclusion Unit Report : Truancy and Exclusion – (DfEE 1998)

Circular 10 / 99 Social Inclusion – Pupil Support

Managing Pupil Behaviour – Nottingham City LEA

Working in Partnership to Improve Attendance – Nottingham City LEA




                                                              Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!            Priority 4
                          SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN

Key Issue / Priority: Improve Behaviour, Motivation and Self-Esteem including Attendance


Objectives Activities Timeline       Key                    Resources and    Success       Monitoring   Evaluation
                                     Personnel              Costing          Criteria      Systems      Evidence




                                    Seeing the difference in our schools!
                                  SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN
Objectives               Activities         Timeline   Key         Resources and    Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                       Personnel   Costing          Criteria   Systems      Evidence




Parents / carers and community links


Governors‟ involvement and responsibility


Other implications




                                                  Seeing the difference in our schools!
            STRENGTHEN SCHOOL CAPACITY
                   KEY ELEMENTS

    (including improving teacher recruitment and retention)

Strategic direction and development of the school
 vision
 ethos
 strategic planning
 staff involvement
 administration/organisation/finance
 data collection – analysis and review
 monitor/evaluate/review school policies and practice

Teaching and learning
 high standards of achievement and behaviour
 curriculum/assessment
 target setting
 learning support
 monitoring
 equal opportunities
 community links
 parent partnership

Leading and managing staff
 constructive working relationships
 delegation
 performance management
 continuing professional development
 providing support
 motivation
 fulfil professional duties in the „Terms and Conditions of Service‟
 whole school quality assurance initiatives e.g. IIP (Investors in People)
   BSQM (Basic Skills Quality Mark)
 using examples of best practice including specialist and Beacon
   schools

Efficient and effective development of staff and resources
 governor recruitment and training
 staff recruitment and retention
 involvement of senior management
 financial priorities
 health and safety
 use of resources

Accountability
 governing body
 staff accountability/success
 school performance – achieving targets
 home/school partnership

                                                               Annual SIP
          Seeing the difference in our schools!                 Priority 5
               STRENGTHEN SCHOOL CAPACITY
                 SELF-REVIEW STATEMENTS

      (including improving teacher recruitment and retention)

                                                 Fully   Partly   Not
                                                 met     met      met
Senior staff encourage all those involved
in the school to be committed to its
vision and aims and provide effective
motivation for continuing achievement.

The school uses a range of data to help inform
decisions about target setting and raising
achievement.

The school uses a range of learning
support activities, which are effectively
deployed.

The school has a professional
development plan, which ensures that
all staff have appropriate training
opportunities to match both the needs of
the individual and the needs of the
school.

Effective systems are in place for
teacher recruitment and retention.

Staff are deployed effectively to improve
the quality of education.

Strategies are in place for making all
staff and governors aware of their
accountability in promoting a successful
school.

Effective systems are in place for
informing pupils and parents about
progress in meeting curriculum targets.

These systems are regularly monitored
and evaluated.

The school makes effective links with
business and the community in order to
extend the curriculum and enhance
teaching and learning.


                                                           Annual SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!          Priority 5
               STRENGTHEN SCHOOL CAPACITY
                MONITORING AND EVALUATION

Success Criteria might include:

      school has effective strategic planning based on a shared vision;
      teaching promotes high standards;
      target setting procedures are ambitious in promoting achievement;
      school rigorously reviews its own performance.


Monitoring systems might include:

      regular professional dialogue with staff and governors;
      Performance Management Reviews;
      Annual Performance Review;
      planned cycle for monitoring teaching and learning.


Evaluation evidence might include:

      Annual Performance Review documentation;
      reports to governors and the LEA;
      outcomes from lesson observations and work analysis;
      pupils‟ records and reports.




                                                                 Annual SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!                Priority 5
              STRENGTHEN SCHOOL CAPACITY

References:


     National Standards booklet, (TTA 1998)

     Setting Targets for Pupil Achievement, (DfEE 1997)

     National Professional Qualification for Headship,
     (National College for School Leadership, Tel. 0845 716 5136)

     Leadership Programme for Serving Head Teachers,
     (National College for School Leadership Tel. 0845 716 5136)

     The OFSTED Framework for Inspection of Schools (2000)

     School Evaluation Matters, (OFSTED 1998)

     Basic Skills, (BSA 1996)

     Getting the Best from your Budget (2002)

     Managing School Resources: a self-evaluation tool
     (www.schools.audit-commission.gov.uk)

     Controlling School Finances: a self-evaluation tool
     (www.schools.audit-commission.gov.uk)



     References to other LEA plans:

     Excellence in Cities Strategic Plan
     Raising Achievement Plan




                                                           Annual SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!         Priority 5
                           SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN

Key Issue / Priority: Strengthen school capacity including improving teacher recruitment and retention


Objectives         Activities         Timeline   Key         Resources and      Success       Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                 Personnel   Costing            Criteria      Systems      Evidence




                                        Seeing the difference in our schools!
                                  SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN
Objectives               Activities         Timeline   Key         Resources and    Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                       Personnel   Costing          Criteria   Systems      Evidence




Parents / carers and community links


Governors‟ involvement and responsibility


Other implications




                                                  Seeing the difference in our schools!
                 SCHOOL DETERMINED PRIORITIES


Schools may wish to include their own priorities, for example:


                 Improving school buildings, site and grounds.


                 Developing links with Community Partners.


                 Developing Adult Education.




                                                                  Annual SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!                 Priority 6
                            SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN

Key Issue / Priority: School Determined Priorities


Objectives          Activities         Timeline      Key         Resources and   Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                     Personnel   Costing         Criteria   Systems      Evidence




                                            Seeing the difference in our schools!
                                  SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN / POST-OFSTED ACTION PLAN
Objectives               Activities         Timeline   Key         Resources and    Success    Monitoring   Evaluation
                                                       Personnel   Costing          Criteria   Systems      Evidence




Parents / carers and community links


Governors‟ involvement and responsibility


Other implications




                                                  Seeing the difference in our schools!
               STAFF DEVELOPMENT PRIORITIES

In this section, schools can extract from the School Improvement Action
Plans the overall implications for staff training focused on the school‟s
development priorities. There will be strong links with Performance
Management arrangements. This guidance is written with reference to the
GTC‟s “Draft Professional Learning Framework” (Sept 2001 copy for
reference in every school). Schools should also consider encouraging
staff to produce a “Professional Development Record”. (DfES Guidance
September 2001).

Schools are working within or towards a culture in which teachers and
school leaders are enabled to learn and grow professionally throughout
their careers. Teaching involves skills, knowledge, values and creativity
which must be enriched and sustained. Schools plan for staff
development in order to promote collaborative inquiry and active
professional learning.


Individual Action

Teachers taking responsibility for their own professional development
may:

   Analyse and interpret pupil data in order to evaluate and review
    teaching strategies.
   Evaluate own practice including feedback from pupils.
   Engage with research.
   Use internet.
   Participating in courses, e-Learning and distance learning opportunities
    and undertake formal study.


Networks within the School

Teachers learning with and from each other may:

   Work within a study team.
   Team teach and plan paired observation.
   Observe lessons.
   Be coached by a peer or experienced colleague.
   Develop policies together.




                                                                        SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!                Training
                                                                   Priorities
               STAFF DEVELOPMENT PRIORITIES

Networks beyond the School

Teachers as members of a broader education community may:

   Work with teachers across key stages.
   Share practice in cluster/partnership networks.
   Work with identified groups – EiCs, Action Zones.
   Link with schools with identified specialism e.g. Beacon Schools,
    Specialist Schools.
   Use identified professionals with particular strengths e.g. Leading
    Teachers, Advanced Skills Teachers.
   Share lesson plans and materials on the internet and digital brain.
   Take part in teacher exchanges locally, nationally and internationally.
   Contribute to conferences and seminars.


Assisting in the development of colleagues‟ practice

In supporting others, teachers developing as professionals may:

   Observe colleagues and provide feedback.
   Mentor, coach, model and team teach.
   Help colleagues identify development needs.
   Manage Networks.
   Lead staff meetings, workshops etc.


Informing professional understanding beyond the School

Teachers and schools benefiting from a wider perspective may:

   Set up and devise links with other schools.
   Present at conferences, seminars, group discussions and workshops.
   Be a member of LEA steering groups and working parties.
   Moderate exams.
   Respond to national policy enquiries.
   Participate in community, multi-agency and business forums.
   Develop and publish materials and resources, including web sites.
   Pilot projects nationally.




                                                                         SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!                 Training
                                                                    Priorities
               STAFF DEVELOPMENT PRIORITIES

Organisations linked to the Professional Development website as
sources of further information.

          www.dfes.gov.uk/teachers/professional_development

Association of Teachers and Lecturers – www.askatl.org.uk
Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music – www.abrsm.ac.uk
Association for Science Education – www.ase.org.uk
Association of Teachers of Mathematics – www.atm.org.uk
Association of Teachers of Social Services –
www.le.ac.uk/education/centres/ATSS/atss.htm/
British Educational Communications Technology Agency –
www.becta.org.uk
British Association for Early Childhood Education – www.early-
education.org.uk
British Association of Lecturers in Physical Education – www.nof.org.uk/
Catholic Teachers Gazette – www.cartrefc.demon.co.uk/
Design and Technology Association – www.data.org.uk
Department for Education and Skills – www.dfes.gov.uk
Economics and Business Education Association – www.ebea.org.uk
Education Action Zones –
www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/eaz/servlet/Display?page+displaySearch
Excellence in Cities – www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/excellence
Film Education – www.filmeducation.org/
Geographical Association – www.geography.co.uk
General Teaching Council – www.gtce.org.uk/gtcinfo/profdevelopment.asp
Historical Association – www.history.co.uk
Institute of Biology – www.iob.org
Institute of Physics – www.iop.org.uk
Investors in People in Schools –
www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/schoolimprovement/iip/




                                                                       SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!                Training
                                                                  Priorities
     SUMMARY OF STAFF DEVELOPMENT PRIORITIES

Joint Association of Classics Teachers – www.jact.org/
Joint Mathematical Council of the UK –
www.mis.coventry.ac.uk/~nhunt/jmc/index.html
Learn Direct – www.learndirect.co.uk/
Learning and Skills Council – www.lsc.gov.uk
London Mathematical Society – www.lms.ac.uk
Music Education Council – www.mec.org.uk
National Association of Head Teachers – www.naht.org.uk
National Association of Music Educators – www.name2.org.uk
National Association of School Masters and Union of Women Teachers –
www.nasuwt.org.uk
National Association of Teachers in Home Economics –
www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~nathe/
National Association for the Teaching of English –
www.nate.org.uk/top.html
National Curriculum online – www.nc.uk.net/home.html
National College for School Leadership – www.ncsl.gov.uk
National Federation for Educational Research – www.nfer.org.uk
National Foundation for Educational Research – www.nfer.ac.uk/
National Society for Education in Art and Design – www.nsead.org/
National Union of Teachers – www.data.teachers.org.uk/nut/index.html
Office for Standards in Education – www.ofsted.gov.uk
Physical Education Association of the UK – www.pea.uk.com/
Professional Council for Religious Education – www.pcfre.org.uk
Professional Association of Teachers – www.pat.org.uk
Qualifications and Curriculum Authority – www.qca.org.uk
Secondary Heads Association – www.sha.org.uk
Special Educational Needs – www.dfee.gov.uk/sen/p_r_stat.htm
Teacher Training Agency – www.canteach.gov.uk
The Mathematical Association – www.m-a.org.uk
Unicef – Teachers Talking About Learning – www.unicef.org/teachers

                                                                       SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!                Training
                                                                  Priorities
             SUMMARY OF STAFF DEVELOPMENT NEEDS
    Key Issue         Training    Personnel    Time      Cost   Activity/
                       Needs                                    Method




Priority 1

School
Improvement




Priority 2

School
Improvement at
Transition Key
Stage 2 - 3




Priority 3

Improve the
achievement of
underachieving
pupils




                                                                     SIP
                 Seeing the difference in our schools!          Training
                                                                Priorities
             SUMMARY OF STAFF DEVELOPMENT NEEDS
    Key Issue         Training    Personnel    Time      Cost   Activity/
                       Needs                                    Method




Priority 4

Improve
behaviour,
motivation and
self-esteem,
including
attendance




Priority 5

School capacity
and self-
improvement,
including ICT and
teacher
recruitment and
retention




Priority 6
School
determined
priorities




School …………………………………                     Date/Year …………………………..

                                                                     SIP
                 Seeing the difference in our schools!          Training
                                                                Priorities
      REVIEWING GOVERNING BODY EFFECTIVENESS

Reviewing Governing Body Effectiveness

Questionnaire (1) -

Focuses on the key areas of:

                     Standards
                     Teaching and Learning
                     Leadership, Management and Governance

It aims to draw out how much governors know about their schools in these
key areas and the questions relate to governors‟ statutory responsibilities
in these areas.


Questionnaire (2) -

Aims to assess the effectiveness of governing body of the school.


Questionnaire (3) -

How well do you know your School Questionnaire –

This questionnaire is more wide-ranging and helps support governors to
understand the school more generally.




                                                                         SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!                  Training
                                                                    Priorities
      REVIEWING GOVERNING BODY EFFECTIVENESS
Reviewing Governing Body Effectiveness – Questionnaire 1

This questionnaire is designed to assist head teachers and governors in
identifying what the governing body knows about the school‟s performance.
Governors should draw on their learning from Head Teachers‟ Reports,
governing body meeting minutes, focussed school visit records and presentations
at governors meetings. Please consider your response and tick the box which
most closely reflects your judgement.

School: …………………………….. Date: …………………………………

                                           Yes   Partially/    Not       No
                                                 Sometimes     Sure
      Standards and progress
 1    Does the governing body or
      Strategic Development
      Committee understand the
      school‟s performance data and
      how the school‟s performance
      compares nationally and with
      similar schools?
 2    Was the governing body actively
      involved in agreeing the pupil
      achievement targets? Were
      targets for the academic year
      formally agreed at a full
      governing body meeting?
 3    Does the governing body or
      Strategic Development
      Committee regularly review
      progress towards targets?
 4    Do governors know whether the
      school met the targets set for the
      last academic year?
 5    Are governors aware of whether
      the school is on track to reach
      agreed targets in literacy and
      mathematics?
 6    Are governors aware of the rates
      of progress and attainment of
      different groups of children e.g.
      children with special needs,
      boys, ethnic minority children,
      children in public care, traveller
      children?
 7    Is there a programme of
      governor visits to monitor
      implementation of the School
      Improvement Plan?



                                                                           SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!                   Training
                                                                      Priorities
    REVIEWING GOVERNING BODY EFFECTIVENESS
                                         Yes   Partially/   Not       No
                                               Sometimes    Sure
    Standards and progress -
    continued
8   Do governors discuss the
    contents of the Head Teacher‟s
    Report?
                                         Yes   Partially/   Not       No
                                               Sometimes    Sure
    Teaching and Learning
1   Have governors monitored the
    quality of teaching via discussion
    at Personnel and Pupils‟
    Committee or governing body
    meetings?
2   Does the governing body know if
    any member of staff is being
    formally monitored?
3   Has the governing body
    received a report from the head
    teacher on the quality of
    teaching?
4   Does the governing body know
    how the quality of teaching is
    monitored and which members
    of staff are responsible?
5   Does the Strategic Development
    Committee or governing body
    understand the curriculum
    taught to pupils and do they
    review the school‟s curriculum
    policy?
6   Does the governing body ensure
    that any changes to the
    curriculum and ways in which
    children are taught has been
    communicated to parents and
    included in the school‟s
    prospectus?
                                         Yes   Partially/   Not       No
                                               Sometimes    Sure
    Leadership, Management and
    Governance
1   Are governors involved in
    looking at how the school is
    doing and comparing it with
    other schools, deciding what
    needs to be improved and
    reviewing progress?




                                                                        SIP
            Seeing the difference in our schools!                  Training
                                                                   Priorities
     REVIEWING GOVERNING BODY EFFECTIVENESS
                                          Yes   Partially/   Not       No
                                                Sometimes    Sure
     Leadership, Management and
     Governance – continued
2    Were governors involved in
     generating the School
     Improvement Plan?
3    Has the budget been set /
     approved by the governing body
     and is it related to development
     priorities?
4    Does the governing body /
     Finance and General Purposes
     Committee regularly monitor the
     budget?
5    Do governors know how
     additional support for children is
     managed and targeted?
6    Has good progress been made
     with the School Improvement
     Plan and (where appropriate)
     Post-OFSTED Action Plan?
7    Has the school developed
     subject leader roles?
8    Have governors attended
     training?
9    Is the impact of governor training
     on the work of the governing
     body evaluated?
10   Does the governing body work
     effectively as a team?
11   Does each governor make an
     active contribution (either in
     meetings, undertaking specific
     roles or tasks, or links with
     subject areas)?
12   Are governing body meetings
     well attended?
13   Do governing body committees
     meet regularly?
14   Are governing body meetings
     well chaired?
15   Do you have a problem
     recruiting governors?

Comments:




                                                                         SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!                  Training
                                                                    Priorities
        REVIEWING GOVERNING BODY EFFECTIVENESS

Reviewing Governing Body Effectiveness – Questionnaire 2

School: ………………………………. Date: ……………………………..

Name:       ………………………………

This questionnaire is designed to assess the effectiveness of the governing body
of this school. Please place a tick in the box which most closely reflects your
judgement.


                                                            Fully   Partially/ Not     Don‟t
                                                                    Sometimes Sure     Know
1.   POLICY AND PRIORITIES

     Governors are sufficiently involved in setting the
     school‟s improvement targets and priorities.

     Individual governors play an active part in specific
     areas of school life.

     Governors are fully informed about the school‟s
     performance.


2.   RELATIONSHIPS INSIDE AND OUTSIDE THE SCHOOL

     Governors meet staff and pupils formally.

     Governors know who to approach at the LEA for
     information and advice.

     Governors know the community the school serves.


3.   ROLES AND RELATIONSHIPS WITHIN THE GOVERNING BODY



     All governors know each other.

     New governors are made to feel welcome.

     Governors are encouraged to take responsibility
     within the group and in sub-committees.

     The governing body freely shares ideas, skills,
     knowledge.

     The training needs for the governing body are
     identified and met.



4.   MEMBERSHIP

     Are there vacancies on the governing body?

     Yes                    No



                                                                                          SIP
                   Seeing the difference in our schools!                             Training
                                                                                     Priorities
      REVIEWING GOVERNING BODY EFFECTIVENESS

How Well Do You Know Your School? – Questionnaire 3

Few governors, even after long service, will know the answers to every
one of the questions listed below, but the list may help you to identify
those aspects of the school‟s work with which you have still to become
conversant.

Size of the School:
 How many registered pupils are there
 at present?
 Are the numbers rising or falling?

 What is the school‟s „standard
 number‟ and „admission number‟?

Admissions
 What is the school‟s admission
 policy?
 Is the school over or under
 subscribed?
 Are most pupils from within the
 catchment area?
 What is the ethnic composition of the
 pupils?
 What are the arrangements for liaison
 with receiving/feeder/schools?
 How are new parents informed about
 the school?


Staffing
 Are there sufficient teaching and non-
 teaching staff, and what are their
 responsibilities?
 How high is staff turnover and
 absence? Are there any recruitment
 issues?

 How is supply cover managed?

 What is the school‟s Pay Policy?

 What is the school‟s management
 structure?
 What are the performance
 management arrangements?
 How are professional development
 needs determined?


                                                                        SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!                Training
                                                                   Priorities
      REVIEWING GOVERNING BODY EFFECTIVENESS
Curriculum
 Is the Foundation Stage
 implemented?
 Is the National Curriculum
 implemented? What proportion of
 time is spent on each subject?
 Are pupils making sufficient progress
 in relation to the school‟s targets?
 How does the curriculum extend
 beyond the National Curriculum?
 What is the Governing Body‟s policy
 on Sex Education?
 How does the school provide for
 pupils with special educational needs?
 What is the school‟s approach
 towards teaching pupils of different
 abilities and aptitudes?
 What are the arrangements for
 Religious Education?
 What are the arrangements for
 assemblies?
 What educational visits take place
 during school hours?
 How does the school secure equal
 opportunities?
 What is the school‟s homework
 policy? Can homework be done at
 school?


Extra-Curricular Activities
 How is lunch time organised? How
 are pupils supervised?
 What clubs and similar voluntary
 activities are there at mid-day and
 before or after school? How are they
 organised?
 What voluntary sports activities are
 there after school hours?
 Are pupils involved in plays, concerts
 etc.?




                                                           SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!   Training
                                                      Priorities
     REVIEWING GOVERNING BODY EFFECTIVENESS

Pupil Welfare and Behaviour
What is the pupil attendance
record? What are the
arrangements for encouraging
good pupil attendance?
How does the school care for its
pupils?
Has the school excluded any
pupils and for what periods?
How many pupils are entitled to,
and how many receive, free
school meals?
What is the governing body‟s
understanding of the school
behaviour policy?
How effectively are good
standards of behaviour secured,
e.g. in relation to disruption,
bullying and racial or sexual
harassment?
How does the school ensure
health and safety of staff and
pupils?


Resources
How does the governing body
determine the allocation of the school
budget?
How does the governing body monitor
the school‟s resources and ensure
best value?
What is the governing body‟s charging
policy?
What is the governing body‟s policy
on supplementing the resources
available from the LEA, e.g. by
obtaining funding from lettings or
fundraising?


Parents and Carers
How does the school communicate
with parents?
What are the arrangements for
reporting on pupils‟ progress?
Is there a parent/teacher association?




                                                          SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!   Training
                                                     Priorities
     REVIEWING GOVERNING BODY EFFECTIVENESS

Parents and Carers (continued)

Are parents welcomed to see the
Head Teacher or class teacher?
Do the parents take part in school
activities?
What are the arrangements for access
to pupil records?
What is the complaints procedure?


Links with the Community
How does the school link with
the local community?
Does the school liaise with the
local police?
Are there appropriate links with
the media?


Premises
Are the premises adequate for the
functioning of the school?
Is the condition of buildings and
grounds acceptable? Has the
governing body carried out a risk
assessment?
Are security arrangements in place
and is the building welcoming to
visitors?
Are the cleaning arrangements
satisfactory?
Does the school have, and carry out,
an energy efficiency policy?
Are the premises accessible to those
with specific needs?


Improvement Plan
How is the plan prepared,
approved and revised?
How does the plan focus the
work of the governing body?
Are governors‟ training needs
included?
How do governors monitor the
progress of the plan?



                                                          SIP
             Seeing the difference in our schools!   Training
                                                     Priorities
      REVIEWING GOVERNING BODY EFFECTIVENESS
The School‟s Performance
When was the school last inspected?
What were the inspection‟s main
findings, and what action was taken in
response?
When is the school next likely to be
reinspected?
What arrangements does the school
have for self-evaluation?




                                                           SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!   Training
                                                      Priorities
                SUMMARY OF GOVERNOR TRAINING
    Key Issue         Training    Personnel    Time      Cost   Activity/
                       Needs                                    Method




Priority 1

School
Improvement




Priority 2

School
Improvement at
Transition Key
Stage 2 - 3




Priority 3

Improve the
achievement of
underachieving
pupils




                                                                     SIP
                 Seeing the difference in our schools!          Training
                                                                Priorities
             SUMMARY OF GOVERNOR TRAINING NEEDS
    Key Issue         Training    Personnel    Time      Cost   Activity/
                       Needs                                    Method




Priority 4

Improve
behaviour,
motivation and
self-esteem,
including
attendance




Priority 5

School capacity
and self-
improvement,
including ICT and
teacher
recruitment and
retention




Priority 6
School
determined
priorities




School …………………………………                     Date/Year …………………………..

                                                                     SIP
                 Seeing the difference in our schools!          Training
                                                                Priorities
           RESOURCES AND COSTING SUMMARIES

This section enables schools to relate their current improvement priorities
to sources of funding. These sources include the school‟s own budget and
external funding.

The Standards Fund will be a key source of funding in relation to the
School Improvement Plan.

The School Improvement grant (Standards Fund Activity 1b) will be
allocated by the school to priorities in the School Improvement Plan. Other
Standards Fund grants will be tied to specific activities determined by the
Standards Fund programme.

Other sources of external funding will support priority activities in the
School Improvement Plan.

This section enables schools to make explicit links between priority
activities and funding sources. In relation to the Standards Fund this will
reduce the bureaucracy associated with LEA grant allocations.

To make these links schools will be able to refer to other aspects of the
framework:


             the school‟s Summary of Current Priorities;

             the school‟s Summary of Staff and
              Governor Development Priorities;

             the school‟s priority Improvement Plans.




                                                                            SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!                    Training
                                                                       Priorities
           RESOURCES AND COSTING SUMMARIES

EXAMPLE                                     Standards Fund Priorities

                        Details of Staffing
Development                                                   Standards Fund
                        Event / Materials /
Priorities                                          Cost      Activity
                        Equipment
Literacy                Development of literacy               Standards Fund
                        training for FLS                      (Literacy)
                        Materials                   £100
                        Additional staffing         0.3 FTE

ICT                     Purchase of 3 PCs to        £2100     Standards Fund
                        improve the information               (NGFL)
                        resource centre of the
                        school

Teaching and            Development of Key          £1851     Standards Fund
Curriculum              Skills course in                      (1b) School
                        Years 6/7 – training of               Improvement
                        teachers

                        Training and support        £1500     Standards Fund
                        materials for Year 10                 (14-19)
                        and Year 11 teachers in
                        support of pupil
                        achievements, RoA and
                        career action planning
Special Educational     Training for TAs in         £250      Standards Fund
Needs                   counselling skills                    (SEN)

                        Purchase of PC for          £850      Standards Fund
                        management of SEN                     (NGFL)
                        administration

Underachieving pupils   Non-contact for             £400      Standards Fund
                        Numeracy co-ordinator                 (1b) School
                        to interpret ANSAT data               Improvement
Leadership and          Monitoring of middle        £2547     Standards Fund
Management              managers by senior                    (1b) School
                        managers – supply                     Improvement
                        cover for developmental
                        interviews

                        Provider fees for INSET     £400
                        day implementing „Race
                        Equality Policy‟

                        Governor training in new    £200      Standards Fund
                        Code of Practice in SEN               (1b) School
                                                              Improvement



Name of School: Nottingham Primary                 Date/Year: 2002 - 2003

                                                                            SIP
               Seeing the difference in our schools!                    Example
           RESOURCES AND COSTING SUMMARIES
FORM

External Funding Sources (other than Standards Fund)

Name of funding source:



Development priority addressed by funding source:



What outcomes          How does this fit    How is the school   How does the
are expected in        with existing        expected to         school claim the
exchange for this      school priorities?   account for the     money?
money?                                      money?




Details of activity:                        Costs:




Name of School:                                Date/Year:


                                                                              SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!                          Form
DRAFT                                                                    Appendix (1)

 NOTTINGHAM CITY COUNCIL – LOCAL EDUCATION AUTHORITY
               XXXXXXXXXXXXXX SCHOOL
        ASSET MANAGEMENT PLAN (AMP) 2002 - 2006
             AND STATEMENT OF PRIORITIES

Purpose

This Asset Management Plan has been produced to detail school strategy to effectively and
efficiently manage its site and buildings in accordance with the LEA‟s Asset Management
Policy Statement. This plan will prioritise programmes of work to improve the condition and
suitability of buildings and site, and sufficiency in terms of overall accommodation and
specialist facilities.

School Policy and Practice
Local policy is set by school representatives to ensure the effective and efficient
management of buildings and to provide a prioritised programme of financial investment into
the future maintenance and improvement of school buildings. School representatives listed
below will jointly determine and implement the local asset management plan (see note 1
below):


                   Representative                                    Name(s)

 Head Teacher
 Caretaker and/or Site Manager
 Curriculum Manager or Staff Representative
 (If applicable)
 Chair - Finance and General Purposes Committee
 Chair of Governors
 Diocesan Officer (If appropriate)



Key contacts may include:

            Partner                                 Representative(s)

    Local Education            Link Advisor, Standards and Effectiveness Division.
    Authority
                               Service Manager, Asset Management Team.
    Environmental Services     Service Manager, Health and Safety Division
    Design and Property        Service Manager, Building Maintenance Team
    Services                   Service Manager, Property
    Diocese                    Diocesan Officer
    (if applicable).


Note 1: Linkages need to be made with Part C Priority 6 – School determined
priorities – of the School Improvement Plan.
Prioritising Maintenance and Improvement Works
Within The School Asset Management Plan
This will be achieved through:-

1. School Representatives understanding the aims and principles of the LEA‟s Asset
   Management Plan.

2. An understanding of school issues and need through consultation at all school forums,
   including Staff, Governing Body and Committee meetings.

3. Recording all issues/needs that can be partly or fully resolved through maintenance
   and/or improvement of the school building/site.

4. Utilising available information to assist in determining short and long term maintenance or
   improvement priorities. Information can be taken from:

5.

            Condition survey report                        Equal opportunities statements
            School premises data                           Special Educational Needs Policy
            Suitability data                               Information relating to specific pupil(s) needs
            Sufficiency data                               Crime prevention reports
            Health and Safety reports                      Zurich risk assessment
            OFSTED report                                  Fire Officer reports
            Monitoring reports portraying curriculum       School records of vandalism, building repairs,
             delivery and standards                          insurance claims etc
            Forecast of financial resources (year-on-
             year).



         Other information that can be referenced:
              Statutory School Premises Regulations 1999
              DfES Building Bulletins
              National curriculum guidance
              DfES publications relating to Asset Management

6. Consider and prioritise all issues/needs with consideration to the School‟s Improvement
   and other plans.

7. Identify all benefits achieved through any future maintenance or improvement of the
   school‟s site/buildings.

8. Estimate the cost of individual elements of the plan.
9. Forecast expenditure over the life of the plan.

10. Compare forecast expenditure against predicted accessible financial resources to
    determine any „funding‟ gap or surplus.

11. Obtain approval to the School‟s Asset Management Strategy from the relevant school
    body (e.g. Finance and General Purposes Committee).

12. Consult with Key Partners in relation to the agreed strategy and financial implications.
Reviewing and Change Mechanism
The Head Teacher will produce and monitor the plan through the Finance and General
Purposes Committee and consult with other school committees as appropriate. The
Committee will actively support the development of the school‟s Asset Management Plan.

The Head Teacher will ensure Key Partners are invited to comment on the plan annually and
will communicate feedback to identified school representatives to achieve:

   Compliance with the key aims and principles of the LEA‟s Asset Management Plan.
   Linkage with LEA policy and strategy across the broad Education Agenda for
    improvement.
   Harmony with LEA managed maintenance and improvement programmes.
   Joined-up approach to prioritising „need‟ and targeting funding accordingly.

Best Practice Considerations

The Head Teacher will ensure the efficient, effective and safe implementation of Asset
Management Plan actions, and which include consideration of the following:-

   day-to-day control and management of the building, including the health, safety and
    security of pupils, staff and visitors at all times (including when maintenance/improvement
    work is underway).

   obtaining relevant professional advice and where appropriate requesting an option
    appraisal to support the most economic and viable method of implementing maintenance
    and/or improvement work identified within the local Asset Management Plan.

   ensure sufficient financial resources are available to finance any proposed works within
    the agreed local plan.

   ensure the prior approval of the LEA is obtained for any demolition works, reconfiguration
    and/or new build proposal.

   ensure reconfigured buildings or new buildings are fully accessible for persons with a
    mobility difficulty and facilities with curriculum areas are partly designed for children with
    specialised mobility needs.

   where appropriate, work is conducted in accordance with Statutory Building Standards &
    Regulations, and School Premises Regulations 1999.

   ensure compliance to DfES building bulletin guidelines, as appropriate.

   ensure all actions conform with the City Council‟s financial regulations.

   ensure works are undertaken through contractors listed on the City Council‟s Select
    Tender List.

   authorise high risk health and safety work (whether statutory or otherwise), if necessary,
    at the loss of another proposal from the plan.

   ensure building repairs are commissioned as and when necessary to avoid unnecessary
    deterioration of premises and reduction in the „life‟ of building fabric.

   ensure the introduction of a planned maintenance programme to replace items beyond
    their „life expectancy‟.
THE PRIORITISED ASSET MANAGEMENT PLAN
Priority   Works   Estimated cost   Condition   Suitability   Sufficiency   Health and      Funding
order              and year of      rating      rating        rating        Safety/         Source
                   implementation                                           security/
                                                                            accessibility

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20




Signed by Head Teacher ………………………                    Date ……………………………….
                                                                       Appendix (2)

Guidance on Completion of Pre-OFSTED S4
(based on pilot alternative version which is likely to be
adopted)



Considerations

   This is a major piece of pre-inspection information for the inspection team. First
    impressions count!

   It should convey important positive messages about the way the Head Teacher
    and key staff and governors view the school.

   Concentrate on evaluating what the schools does saying why it is effective rather
    than merely describing what happens.

   Focus on pupil outcomes (standards and response).

   Be brief (consider bullet points). Try to keep to the size of the given format by
    being succinct.

   Mention evidence which can be found in other places by the team.

   In the “How do you know?” sections, give a thorough account of the depth of the
    school‟s monitoring and evaluation systems as there is no longer a section for
    this.
1a      What is distinctive about your school and its ethos?



Evaluation

    The main characteristics that make it different from other schools. Write for
     somebody who doesn‟t know it.

    School size, type, intake. Consider feeder schools and pre-school provision,
     staffing, relationship with community.

    Catchment, socio-economic information which is not clear from the PICSI/PANDA
     information. Write this in a positive way.

    Attainment on entry and across the school – picture of strengths and
     weaknesses. Any significant information on SEN, gender, ethnicity, turnover,
     variations etc in entry profile year on year.

    Any changes in the school‟s context/catchment since the last inspection.

    What do you believe in? Give an overview of your aims and values and the areas
     you are proud of e.g. SMSC, relationships, PSHE.

    Any distinctive curriculum areas or activities the school provides.


Evidence

-       School Prospectus.
-       Local information on socio-economic context, e.g. FSM, employment, health,
        crime.
-       Attainment and assessment data.
-       Governors‟ reports.
-       School policies/aims/mission statement.
1b      In what ways has the school improved since the last
        inspection?



Evaluation

    Take into account the key issues and other headline judgements from your
     school‟s last report and internal and external evaluations you have undertaken
     since. Consider the main improvements and what has contributed to them?
     What remains to be done?

    Improvement in standards (core subjects and at all key stages).

    Comment on key issues from last report
     - how each one has been addressed
     - how you have monitored the effectiveness and the outcomes of the action
       taken
     - consider provision including teaching and standards in pupils‟ learning and
       progress.

    Comment on improvements in the quality of teaching. Refer to the impact of the
     school‟s self-evaluation policy and that of other initiatives e.g. NLS, NNS.

    Comment on other areas of improvement which may not have been key issues
     e.g. curriculum, environment, resources and buildings.


What has helped or hindered progress?

    Consider all areas mentioned above.

    Comment on any aspects which have not improved as much as expected or
     where problems have re-emerged. Show that you are aware, the causes and the
     action taken.

    Make sure there are more positives than negatives.

    Focus on what the school has strategically planned to do to improve and how
     this has been monitored and evaluated. Stress a whole-school approach.
     Possible topics -      focus on raising standards (targets)
                     -      data analysis and comparison
                     -      monitoring teaching/learning
                     -      curriculum content and organisation
                     -      national strategies
                     -      staffing, resources, pupil numbers
                     -      pupil response
                     -      parental involvement
Evidence

-    SIP
-    subject plans
-    Head Teacher reports to governors and parents
-    analysis of data
-    Post-OFSTED Action Plan and progress reports
-    school monitoring and evaluation evidence
-    subject audits
2a      How well do pupils achieve? Comment on standards and
        other achievements.


Evaluation

    The school‟s results and other performance data at the end of each stage of
     education particularly in En, Ma and Sc.

    Is the school maintaining high standards or improving as expected?

    Highlight any variations in achievement of different groups of pupils (e.g. EAL,
     SEN, G&T, gender, ethnicity) and between different subjects. Consider
     underachievement you have identified.

    Trends in results over time.

    Progress towards targets (comment on the level of challenge).

    Strengths and weaknesses of what pupils know, understand and can do.

    Consider value-added information in relation to previous achievement and the
     National and Benchmark levels.

    The reasons why standards are as they are eg cohort variance/size.

    Other achievements across the curriculum and beyond.


How do you know?

-       SATs results.
-       TA and school assessments.
-       Monitoring of teaching and learning.
-       observation, work analysis, pupil questioning, work of coordinators.


Evidence

-       PANDA, PICSI
-       school assessment information
-       lesson observation records
-       pupils‟ work and records
-       levelled portfolios
-       Head Teacher‟s reports
2b      How good are pupils‟ behaviour and attitudes to learning?



Evaluation

    Pupils‟ eagerness to come to school (include attendance issues and trends).

    Pupils‟ interest and involvement in all aspects of school life. Quality of curriculum
     and teaching and learning.

    Pupils‟ behaviour in lessons and around school (consider if they are courteous,
     trustworthy, show respect).

    Relationships within the school.

    Comment on bullying, racism, sexism.

    Pupils‟ reflection on what they do and its impact on others.

    Respect for other people‟s feelings, values and beliefs.

    Sharing initiative and taking responsibility.

    Involvement with outside agencies and parents.

    Focus on what the school has done to ensure these areas are positive ones.


How do you know?

-       Talking to parents and children.
-       Lesson observation programme.
-       Focused observation.
-       Feedback from outside agencies.
-       Shared, monitored whole-school policies.
-       Teacher consultation.


Evidence

Incident books – eg behaviour, lunchtime, racism, letters to parents, lesson
observation records, IEPs, staff and governor meeting minutes.
3      How good are teaching and learning?



Evaluation -          whole school focus on teaching and learning.
Consider   -          how you go about improving teaching and learning in
                      your school.
              -       which areas give you most pride?
              -       in which areas does work still need to be done?

   Indicate the profile of the quality of teaching in the last inspection and point out
    significant areas of improvement.

   Outline strengths and areas for development in quality of teaching – refer to key
    stages/year groups/subjects and identify the links to pupil achievement.

   Mention variety of teaching strategies and how this relates to learning styles and
    pupil progress. Refer to Teaching and Learning policy if you have one.

   Refer to school self-evaluation and links to Performance
    Management/threshold/teaching profile. Concentrate on how you analyse
    standards and link this to the impact made by the quality of teaching.

   Outline support/INSET programme and comment on impact.


How do you know?

-      School monitoring programme.
-      External evaluations.
-      Performance Management feedback.
-      Evaluation of INSET and support.
-      Data analysis and making links with teaching.


Evidence

-      Records of classroom observations.
-      Performance Management records.
-      INSET records.
-      Data analysis records.
4      How good is the school‟s curricular and extra-curricular
       provision?




Evaluation

Consider      -      match to interest, aptitudes and special needs of pupils
              -      particular provision for identified groups

   Statement of aims/values/curriculum statement.

   Concentrate on core, especially Literacy and Numeracy but refer to breadth and
    balance, enrichment and foundation subjects.

   Consider extra-curricular activities including links to wider community.

   Refer to study support eg homework clubs and summer schools.

   Outline range of provision available to meet the needs of particular groups of
    pupils e.g. ALS, ELS, SEN, booster groups, setting arrangements, external
    agencies.


How do you know?

-      Feedback from teachers, pupils and parents.
-      Work sampling outcomes.
-      SoW – monitoring implementation.
-      Registers of extra-curricular activities.
-      Analysis of data.


Evidence

-      Pupil records.
-      Work sample/school portfolios.
-      Timetables.
-      Photographs.
-      SoW. Whole school curriculum plan.
-      Outcomes of data analysis.
5      How well does the school care for, support and guide its
       pupils?



Consider      -      Support is directed to where pupils need it most.
              -      How do you know that pupils are progressing
                     academically?
              -      How do you keep track of personal development?
              -      Links with school aims/values/ethos.
              -      Links with behaviour, attendance, bullying etc.

   Outline monitoring and recording of pupils‟ personal development by class
    teacher and whole-school level eg certificates of achievement.

   Refer to health, safety, care and protection of pupils.

   Refer to relevant aspects of PSHE curriculum, SMSC and the Healthy Schools
    Initiative.

   Development of social responsibility e.g. School Council.

   Range and take up of extra-curricular activities.

   Pastoral support for pupils/child protection procedure.

   Support mechanisms for parents.


How do you know?

-      Survey of pupil and parental views and how they have been acted upon.
-      Monitoring of pupils‟ academic progress, personal development, behaviour
       and attendance.
-      Monitoring of Health and Safety incidents.


Evidence

-      Outcomes of survey.
-      Pupils‟ academic and pastoral records.
-      Health and Safety Book.
-      Analysis of attendance, bullying records, behaviour records.
-      Assessment records.
-      SoW.
6      How well does the school work in partnership with parents?




Evaluation

Consider      -      The effectiveness of the school‟s links with parents
                     and carers.
              -      Impact of parents‟ and carers‟ involvement with the
                     work of the school and on their children‟s learning.

   Parental satisfaction.

   Information for parents on school procedures, pupils‟ work and how they can help
    pupils with their learning.

   Feedback on pupil progress eg reports, parents‟ evening, SEN reviews.

   Home/school agreements.

   Learning at home/homework guidance.

   Parents working/helping in school.


How do you know?

-      Parental consultation.
-      Number of involved parents.
-      Pupil progress.


Evidence

-      Homework policy.
-      Photography.
-      Shared pupil records.
-      Parental surveys.
-      Documentation for parents.
7      How effective are the leadership and management of the
       school?



By its governors

Consider      -       The governors‟ role as critical friend, providing
                      strategic direction and holding the school to account
                      for standards and quality of education.

   Makeup of governing body – teamwork

   Experience, skills of individuals.

   Reference to statutory requirements/duties.

   Relationship between Head Teacher and Chair (performance targets).

   Involvement in policy writing, SIP.

   Knowledge of school strengths and weaknesses and issues. Priorities for
    development.

   How governors monitor the life and work of the school.

   Whether governors take responsibility.

By its Head Teacher


Consider      -       Promoting high standards of teaching and learning.
              -       Distinguish between leadership and management.

   Creating commitment to a clear vision.

   Managing change for improvement.
                                                               leading
   Building a high-performing team.

   Inspiration, motivation, communication.

   Managing people and resources.

   Monitoring and evaluating performance and
    using outcomes to identify priorities.                     managing

   Strategic planning cycle.
By other key staff

Considerations       -      As above – also shared commitment to
                            improvement and knowing what needs to be
                            done.


   Concentrate on DHT, SMT, key stage leaders, subject leaders and aspect
    leaders.

   Talk in general terms and highlight particular strengths and issues.

How do you know?

-      Effective self-review systems.
-      Effective appraisal and performance management.
-      Consultation eg spending decisions and changes to curriculum.
-      Application of best value principles.
-      Staffing context.
-      School‟s progress towards its targets.


Evidence

-      Team planning and other documentation.
-      Monitoring evidence eg planning, lesson observations, co-ordinator action
       plans.
-      Job descriptions.
-      Governors‟ and staff meeting minutes.
-      School aims.
-      Improved data.
-      Guidance to staff.
8       How inclusive is your school?



Evaluation

Consider       -      The extent to which all pupils are achieving as much
                      as they can and deriving maximum benefit according
                      to individual need from what the school provides.

   The action taken for pupils or groups who are underachieving or at risk of
    underachieving (curriculum management, classroom organisation, teaching
    groups etc).

   A well-founded explanation of any differences in achievement, experience and
    benefit between groups.

   Strategies to prevent racism and other discrimination.

   Consider significant issues concerned with:

    -   minority ethnic groups (including faith groups, travellers, asylum seekers and
        refugees)
    -   pupils with EAL                    -       pupils with SEN
    -   G&T pupils                         -       looked after pupils
    -   sick pupils                        -       young carers
    -   pupils from families under stress -        pregnant school girls and teenage
        mothers
    -   pupils at risk of disaffection and -       girls and boys
        exclusion


How do you know?

-       Monitoring of data of individuals and particular identified groups.
-       Work analysis.
-       Monitoring of policy and practice.
-       Records of incidents related to specific groups.


Evidence

-       LEA data, PANDA, PICSI, pupil records.
-       Work sample and outcomes.
-       School policies for subjects and aspects.
-       Inclusion policy.
-       Prospectus.
-       Lesson observation records.
-       Records e.g. racist incidents.
9      How good is your school?




Key Strengths

This should be a succinct summary of the information already compiled. Consider
cause and effect eg “Pupil behaviour in lessons is now good due to the improvement
in the quality of teaching throughout the school and an effective whole-school
strategy”.

   Make a clear statement about the school‟s current effectiveness and how pupil
    outcomes reflect this.

   Briefly refer to strong areas related to standards, teaching, curriculum, leadership
    and management, pupil care, parents.

   Refer to improvement and value-added measures.

Priorities for improvement

-      Where improvements are required, show that you know where they are,
       understand the reasons for this and what appropriate action you will take.

-      Limit the number to the significant few which will contribute significantly to
       raising standards of achievement.
10      Outline briefly your self-evaluation, school improvement and
        performance management process




Consider       -      The self-evaluation section at the back of the
                      OFSTED framework. Describe a cycle of monitoring,
                      do, review.

    Accept that there are always areas to improve.

    Raising standards should be at the heart of school improvement.

    Strategic planning cycle with whole-school involvement (priorities based on
     monitoring and reviewing findings).

    Using analysis, comparison, monitoring evidence, against agreed and rigorous
     criteria.

    Evaluation of the effect teaching has on learning and the subsequent links with
     performance management.

    Setting targets for improvement in all areas.

    Making sure action is supported, monitored and reviewed.
11      How good is your sixth form?


Evaluation

    Maintenance or improvement of standards including value-added information.
     Relationship to national standards and benchmarking information. Comment on
     achievements of different groups of pupils eg gender, ethnic groups, across the
     ability range.

    Mention key skills.

    Success rates in progressing into relevant and appropriate HE or employment.

    Range of activities outside academic courses.

    Comment on attendance and ability to work independently and study.

    Teachers in-depth subject knowledge.

    Curriculum ensures students acquire new knowledge and skills appropriate to the
     level of the course they are studying. They build on previous work allowing them
     to progress to further qualifications and employment. (Internal and external
     taught courses).

    Assessment and monitoring of students‟ progress.

    Provision of academic and personal support and induction arrangements.

    Parental involvement/satisfaction.

    Leadership providing direction and development.

    Rigorous monitoring, evaluation and development of teaching.

    School targets for retention, achievement and employment.

    Best Value principles used to ensure cost effectiveness.

    Extent to which accommodation and learning resources are adequate.


How do you know?

-       Use of value-added data in the autumn package or ALIS for example.
-       Analysis of retention rates on different courses.
-       Collect and analyse attendance data.
-       Analyse student destinations and following up their achievements in further or
        higher education.
-       Seek the views of students and parents.
-       Observe teaching and learning.
-       Analyse expenditure on the sixth form.
-    Regularly review the curriculum taking account of local and national priorities.


Evidence

-    Prospectus.
-    Data on achievement, destination of pupils.
-    Results of parental and pupil survey.
-    Budget information.
-    Policy documentation.
FORM                                                        Appendix (3)

                         HEALTH AND SAFETY


CHECKLIST                                Yes   No Comment

Is there a school safety policy?
(Which includes, first aid, medicines,
hazardous substances, protection
from the sun, dealing with bodily
fluids?)
Is the School Health and Safety
Policy displayed?
Is there a named Health and Safety
representative and designated First
Aider?
Is information about administration
of First Aid recorded?
Are staff using report forms for
personal accident and dangerous
occurrences appropriately and is
there a Safety Manual available?
Are general and specific risk
assessments carried out?
Has a COSHH assessment been
carried out?
Are appropriate safety signs
displayed?
Is the fire alarm tested weekly?
Are fire doors tested monthly?
Are systems in place regarding
security?
Are all maintenance issues
recorded?
Are portable electrical appliances
regularly inspected?
Are arrangements in place for the
collection of clinical waste?
Are handrails in place and are they
secure?
Are boilers serviced annually?
Is equipment used by the staff
regularly checked?
Are contractors informed about
asbestos?
Is there a designated person to „look
after‟ contractors on site?
Is Health and Safety covered in the
induction process: staff / pupils?

Name: …………………………..                       Date: ……………………………...

                                                                    SIP
              Seeing the difference in our schools!                Form
                                                                                                                                         APPENDIX 4
                                                      INITIATIVES IN SCHOOLS 2002-2003
                                                             Extract from Update 38

Listed below are national initiatives which inspectors may encounter during inspections. Inspectors should focus on their effectiveness and not on
detailed financial analysis. The list will be added to and amended in future issues of Update.

                                         FOUNDATION STAGE, FAMILY and COMMUNITY INITIATIVES
Initiative                     Who is it for?       What is the purpose?         Web site for further details                           Funding or Agencies
                                                                                                                                        involved
Sure Start                     Parents and carers of       To promote the physical, intellectual    www.surestart.gov.uk                Cross-Government
                               pre-school children.        and social development of pre-                                               initiative, led by DfES
                                                           school children – particularly those                                         and Department of
                                                           who are disadvantaged to ensure                                              Health
                                                           they are ready to flourish when they
                                                           get to school.

Early Excellence Centres       Parents/carers, pre-        To develop integrated services for       www.dfes.gov.uk/standardsfund       DfES
                               school children, families   families with pre-school children and
                               and the community.          upwards; and share good practice.

Family Literacy and Numeracy   Parents/carers and their    To raise standards of basic literacy     www.basic-skills.co.uk/programmes   Basic Skills Agency
                               children between 3 and 6    and numeracy skills among children                                           DfES
                               years.                      and parents, and extend parental
                                                           support for their children‟s
                                                           developing literacy and numeracy
                                                           skills.

Adult and Community            Community-based             To open access to learning for the       www.basic-skills.co.uk/programmes   Basic Skills Agency
Learning Fund (ACLF)           learning for adults.        most difficult to reach and to improve                                       National Institute of
                                                           the basic skills of adults.                                                  Adult Continuing
                                                                                                                                        Education (NIACE)
The National Support Project   Families and carers, e.g.   To support families reading together     www.basic-skills.co.uk/programmes   Basic Skills Agency
For Storysacks                 childminders, playgroup     at home.
                               leaders.
Initiative                      Who is it for?              What is the purpose?                      Web site for further details             Funding or Agencies
                                                                                                                                               involved
The Books for                   Parents and carers.         To encourage the introduction of          www.basic-skills.co.uk/programmes        Basic Skills Agency
babies/Bookstart                                            books to babies at an early age.



                                                                  PRIMARY SCHOOLS
Initiative               Who is it       What is the purpose?                                Web site for further details                      Funding or Agencies
                         for?                                                                                                                  involved
Booster Classes          Years 5 and 6   To provide extra help for pupils who need it to     www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/literacy                DfES Standards Fund
                                         reach Level 4 in literacy and numeracy at the
                                         end of Key Stage 2.

Additional Literacy      Key Stage 2     To support pupils who have already fallen           www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/literacy/publications   DfES
Scheme (ALS)             pupils          behind in literacy, but who would not
                                         otherwise receive any additional support.

Early Literacy Support   Year 1 pupils   To support pupils who are identified for            www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/literacy/publications   DfES Standards Fund
(ELS)                                    additional literacy support at the end of term
                                         1, Year 1.

Further Literacy         Year 5 pupils   To enable pupils who, with extra help, are          www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/literacy/publications   DfES Standards Fund
Support (FLS)                            likely to reach Level 4 in literacy at the end of
                                         Year 6.

Springboard 3, 4, 5      Year 3, 4, 5    To support pupils who may not otherwise             www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/numeracy/publicatio     DfES Standards Fund
                         pupils          achieve Level 4 in mathematics at the end of        ns
                                         Key Stage 2.

Infant Class Sizes       Years R,        To provide infant classes of no more than 30.       www.dfes.gov.uk/standardsfund                     DfES Standards Fund
                         1 and 2
                                                   SECONDARY AND SPECIAL SCHOOLS
Initiative             Who is it       What is the purpose?                              Web site for further details                    Funding or Agencies
                       for?                                                                                                              involved
Specialist Schools     Secondary       Selected schools to develop a particular          www.dfes.gov.uk/specschl                        DfES
                       schools:        specialist character and ethos and through
                       Target of       that to raise standards in their specialism and
                       1,000 by 2004   more generally across the school. Share
                                       expertise and resources with partner schools
                                       and the community.

Connexions             13-19 year      To provide a range of guidance and support to     www.connexions.gov.uk                           DfES
Partnerships           olds            help young people make a smooth transition
                                       to adult life.




                                                            SECONDARY SCHOOLS
Initiative             Who is it       What is the purpose?                              Web site for further details                    Funding or Agencies
                       for?                                                                                                              involved
Key Stage 3 National   Key Stage 3     To make education for 11-14 year olds             www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/keystage3             DfES Standards Fund
Strategy               pupils          challenging, demanding, vigorous and
                                       inspiring across the whole curriculum.

Year 7 catch-up and    Key Stage 3     To provide support for pupils who reached         www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/keystage3/publicat    DfES Standards Fund
Summer Schools         pupils          Level 3 at the end of Key Stage 2 in English      ions
programmes                             and mathematics.


                                                                  ALL SCHOOLS
Initiative             Who is it       What is the purpose?                              Web site for further details                   Funding or Agencies
                       for?                                                                                                             involved
School Achievement     Successful      To reward schools for high performance or         www.dfes.gov.uk/standardsfund                  DfES Standards Fund
Awards                 schools         rapid improvement.
Initiative             Who is it        What is the purpose?                         Web site for further details                    Funding or Agencies
                       for?                                                                                                          involved
Small Schools Fund     Small            To raise standards and reduce burdens in     www.dfes.gov.uk/standardsfund                   DfES Standards Fund
                       schools          small schools.
Beacon Schools         Schools          To raise standards in schools by improving   www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/beaconschools         DfES Standards Fund
                       awarded          communication and sharing and spreading
                       Beacon           good practice.
                       status
Learning Support       Pupils at risk   To provide separate short-term teaching      www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/excellence/policies   DfES (Standards Fund
Units                  of exclusion     and support programmes, tailored to                                                          for schools not in
                                        individual pupils‟ needs, in small self-                                                     Excellence in Cities
                                        contained units attached to main stream                                                      areas)
                                        schools.

National Grid for      All schools      To improve ICT provision in schools to       www.ngfl.gov.uk                                 NGfL
Learning                                baseline target for 2002 and beyond,                                                         BECTA
                                        encourage innovation and enable high-
                                        speed internet access through broadband
                                        provision.

Schools Standards      All schools      A direct grant paid to schools for them to   www.dfes.gov.uk/fairfunding                     DfES
Grant                                   spend on their own priorities.

New Deal for Schools   All schools      Devolved funds, allocated by formula for     www.teachernet.gov.uk/2001                      DfES
                                        schools to spend on capital needs.

Seed Challenge         All schools      To encourage innovative investment in        www.teachernet.gov.uk/ciseedfrontpage0702       DfES Standards Fund
                                        capital projects. Must be matched funding    02v4
                                        from private sector, donations or other
                                        sources.
Excellence in Cities   Primary and      Targeted support for schools to drive up     www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/excellence            DfES Standards Fund
(EiC). There are six   secondary        standards in urban areas where they have
key policy strands:    schools in       been too low by increasing diversity and
 learning mentors;    selected         encouraging cooperation between schools
 Learning Support     areas.           to raise standards and extend learning
Initiative              Who is it        What is the purpose?                          Web site for further details           Funding or Agencies
                        for?                                                                                                  involved
   Units;                                opportunities for pupils of all abilities.
 extended
   opportunities for
   gifted and
   talented pupils;
 City Learning
   Centres;
 small EiC action
   zones;
   and
 more Beacon and
   Specialist
   Schools.
Education Action        Local            To work together to develop new and           www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/eaz          DfES
Zones                   partnerships     innovative ways of raising standards of
                        of schools,      education.
                        LEAs,
                        represen-
                        tatatives from
                        business and
                        community
                        organisations
National Strategy for   Disadvantag      Cross-Government initiative to reduce         www.dfes.gov.uk/neighbourhoodrenewal   Key Government
Neighbourhood           ed               social exclusion and turn round the most                                             Departments
Renewal                 communities      deprived neighbourhoods by tackling
                                         underlying causes of poverty. Education
                                         strands aim to raise achievement in schools
                                         and encourage young people to continue in
                                         education and training.
Teaching Assistants     All schools      To support the recruitment and training of    www.dfes.gov.uk/standardsfund          DfES Standards Fund
                                         teaching assistants.
Initiative            Who is it         What is the purpose?                           Web site for further details              Funding or Agencies
                      for?                                                                                                       involved
The Children‟s Fund   5-13 year         To tackle child poverty and social exclusion   www.cypu.gov.uk/corporate/childrensfund   Children and Young
                      olds at risk of   by bridging the gap between Sure Start (for                                              People‟s Unit
                      social            pre-school children) and the Connexions
                      exclusion         Service for the over 13s.

New Opportunities     All schools       Grants are made to:                            www.nof.org.uk                            New Opportunities
Funds (NOF) – there                      support information and communication                                                  Funds is UK-wide
are three strands                          technology for teachers and school                                                    distributor of grants
 education                                librarians;                                                                           funded by the National
 health                                 out of school hours childcare and out of                                               Lottery grants.
 environment                              hours learning;
                                         improve sports facilities in schools,
                                           which must be available for community
                                           use.

Study Support         All schools       To raise achievement and tackle social         www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/studysupport    DfES Standards Fund
                                        exclusion by supporting a range of out of
                                        school hours learning opportunities.

Playing for Success   All schools       To raise achievement and tackle social         www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/studysupport    DfES Standards Fund
                                        exclusion by providing study support                                                     and partners
                                        centres in football club and other sports
                                        clubs‟ facilities.

Pupil Support         All schools       To promote social inclusion, reduce truancy    www.dfes.gov.uk/standardsfund             DfES Standards Fund
                                        and exclusion.

Drug Education        All schools       To promote drug education in schools as        www.wiredforhealth.gov.uk                 DfES Standards Fund
                                        part of cross-Government anti-drugs related
                                        strategy.

Ethnic Minority       All schools       To raise standards for ethnic minority and     www.dfes.gov.uk/standardsfund             DfES Standards Fund
Initiative           Who is it        What is the purpose?                            Web site for further details          Funding or Agencies
                     for?                                                                                                   involved
Achievement Grant                     pupils with EAL.

Traveller Children   All schools      To provide services and activities related to   www.dfes.gov.uk/standardsfund         DfES Standards Fund
                                      the identification, placement, assessment
                                      and progress of traveller pupils.

School security      All schools      To provide capital funding for school           www.dfes.gov.uk/standardsfund         DfES Standards Fund
                                      security projects in 2002-03.


                                                       STANDARDS AWARDS
                                 These are awards based on criteria established by the agencies involved.
Initiative           What is the purpose?                                             Web site for further details          Agencies involved
Artsmark             A national arts award for schools in England. It recognises      www.artscouncil.org.uk/artsmark       The Arts Council
                     schools for making a strong commitment to the full range of
                     the arts – art and design, music, dance and drama.

Activemark           A national award for schools in England. It recognises           www.sportengland.org/active_schools   The Sports Council
                     schools for showing a strong commitment to promoting the
                     benefits of physical activity and offering good provision.
                     Schemes such as Top Play and Top Sport support this
                     initiative.

Quality Mark         Quality marks are awarded to organisations working to            www.basic-skills.co.uk/programmes     Basic Skills Agency
                     improve the basic skills of children, young people and
                     adults.

Healthy Schools      A national standard award for schools to improve children‟s      www.wiredforhealth.gov.uk             DfES
                     health and achievement with the help of other agencies.                                                Department of Health

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:5
posted:9/24/2011
language:English
pages:215