Johnson Bible College by yaofenji

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									     Johnson University
Teacher Education Department




   Master’s Degree Catalog in
Educational Technology and Bible
           2011-2012
                                                Accreditation
Johnson University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and
Schools to award associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees. Inquiries to the Commission (1866 Southern Lane,
Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097, Telephone: 404-679-4500) should relate only to the accreditation status of the
institution.

Johnson University is accredited professionally by the Accrediting Association of Bible Colleges (5575 S.
Semoran Boulevard, Suite 26, Orlando, Florida 32822-1781, Telephone: 407-207-0808, www.abhe.org).

The Teacher Education Program is approved by the Tennessee State Board of Education (400 Deaderick Street,
Suite 200, Citizens Plaza, Nashville, Tennessee 37243-1050, Telephone 615-741-2966), and by the Association
of Christian Schools International (P.O. Box 65130, Colorado Springs, CO 80962-5130, Telephone: 719-528-
6906).


                                                    Catalog
The course offerings and requirements of Johnson University are continually under examination and revision.
This catalog presents the offerings and requirements in effect at the time of publication. It is the sole
responsibility of the student to be aware of the information in this catalog and to keep informed of additions
and/or corrections when they are deemed necessary by the University. Adequate and reasonable notice will be
given to students affected by any changes. This catalog is not intended to state contractual terms and does not
constitute a contract between the student and the University.

Students graduate under the requirements published in the catalog in effect at the time of initial enrollment if that
enrollment has been continuous. Students who drop out for two consecutive semesters or longer and return will
follow the catalog requirements in effect at the time of their return. (Note: Requirements in the teacher
education program are subject to changes without notice when imposed by the Tennessee Department of
Education.)

No student may graduate from Johnson University who does not complete at least 30 credits at Johnson.

                  Consumer Information: Title IX/Section 504 Statement
Johnson University does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, color, national origin, age, handicap, or
veteran status in provision of educational opportunities. Johnson University does not discriminate on the basis of
sex or handicap in the education programs and activities which it operates, pursuant to the requirements of Title
IX of The Education Amendments of 1972, Pub.L.92-318; and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973,
Pub.L.93-112. Charges of violations concerning Title IX and Section 504 should be directed to the chairman of
the grievance committee, Lee Richardson, at his office, Phillips-Welshimer, Office 221. His office phone
number is (865) 573-4517, Extension 2216.


                                Rates of Graduation and Placement
The graduation rate after six years for students on the MA in Educational Technology and Bible is 79.23%.
Based on alumni surveys, five years after graduation, 100% of these graduates are employed in the field for
which they prepared.      Ninety-five percent are actively involved in church ministry (unpaid). Since all
candidates for this degree are employed in an educational setting before they begin they mostly continue in the
same setting. Thus there is 100 percent employment in a related field for all graduates.
                                TABLE OF CONTENTS



Chapter 1
            General Information ................................................................................. 1
                  History .......................................................................................... 1
                  Vision ........................................................................................... 2
                  Core Values .................................................................................. 2
                  Purpose ......................................................................................... 2
                  Philosophy of Education .............................................................. 3
                  Statement of Faith ........................................................................ 4
                  Reputation and Accreditation....................................................... 4
                  Program Purpose .......................................................................... 5
                  Program Content .......................................................................... 5
                  Program Outcomes ....................................................................... 5
                  Program Structure ....................................................................... 6
                  Time Limits .................................................................................. 6
                  Campus Environments ................................................................. 6

Chapter 2
            Application and Admission ...................................................................... 7
                   Application for Admission ........................................................... 7
                   Admission Documents ................................................................. 7
                   Admissions Decisions .................................................................. 8
                   Enrollment .................................................................................... 8
                   Other Admission/Enrollment Considerations .............................. 8

Chapter 3
            Academic Policies and Procedures ........................................................ 10
                  Class Attendance ........................................................................ 10
                  Dropping, Adding or Withdrawing from Class ......................... 10
                  Grades and Quality Points.......................................................... 10
                  Grade Appeal Process ................................................................ 11
                  Grade Information ...................................................................... 11
                  Graduation Requirements........................................................... 11
                  Plagiarism and Related Practices ............................................... 11
                  Repeating a Course .................................................................... 12
                  Registration ................................................................................ 12
                  Satisfactory Academic Progress ................................................. 12
                  Transcripts of Credits ................................................................. 12
                  Withdraw from University ......................................................... 13
Chapter 4
            Program and Course Descriptions .......................................................... 14
                  Program Overview ..................................................................... 14
                  Sample Program Layouts ........................................................... 15
                  Resources ................................................................................... 15
                  Course Descriptions ................................................................... 15

Chapter 5
            Financial and Housing Information ...................................................... 18
                   Current Financial Information.................................................... 18
                   Student Accounts ....................................................................... 18
                   Tuition, Fees and Costs .............................................................. 18
                   Housing Costs and Assignments ................................................ 18
                   Refunds ...................................................................................... 18
                   Financial Aid .............................................................................. 20

Chapter 6
            Personnel ................................................................................................ 21
                   Trustees ...................................................................................... 21
                   Administrators ............................................................................ 21
                   Faculty ........................................................................................ 22

Appendix
            Application Forms and Lifestyle Perspectives ....................................... 23
                     GENERAL INFORMATION                                       1
                                           HISTORY

Johnson University was founded as the School of the Evangelists on May 12, 1893, by Ashley S.
Johnson, a native of East Tennessee and an evangelist, teacher, and author. The University, an
outgrowth of Mr. Johnson's Correspondence Bible College started in 1886, was designed to satisfy
what the founder considered the one great need of the cause of Christ, namely, the need for more
laborers for the fields which were white unto harvest but going to waste. A complementary objective
in the establishing of the school was to provide an education for worthy young men who were not able
to pay for it. From its founding until 1941, the University included an Academy for students who had
not completed their high school requirements.

In the founding of the institution that has borne his name since 1909, Ashley Johnson was greatly
influenced by Alexander Campbell, the founder of Bethany College. They both desired to combine the
family, preparatory school, college, and church in one system of education. Even the design of the Old
Main Building contributed to this idea of educating the total person for it housed the dormitory, dining
room, classrooms, chapel, and library.

Showing the mark of Campbell's influence, Johnson also made the Bible the central study in the
curriculum. At the same time the University offered a substantial number of courses in the arts and
sciences, such as English, zoology, literature (Livy, Horace, Dante, Milton), astronomy, sociology,
geology, economics, European history, and psychology. Johnson University has always required a
solid core of general education courses as necessary for an educated ministry.

Ashley Johnson and his wife, Emma Elizabeth, were essentially a team. Under their direction the
University and Academy grew and prospered from a combined enrollment of 42 students in 1894 to
132 in 1925. A high of 188 was reached in 1910. The students came from many states and a number of
foreign countries. The progress was briefly set back in 1905 when the main building burned and
during the 1918-19 period of World War I.

The reputation of the University was enhanced by the worldwide renown of Dr. Johnson as an author.
Between 1881 and 1903 at least twenty books came from his pen. One of them, The Great
Controversy, sold 100,000 copies.

Mrs. Johnson outlived her husband by two years and served as president during that time. The couple
dedicated their lives to the development of the University. Not having children, they gave and
bequeathed all their possessions to the school. The students, faculty, alumni, and supporters were their
family.

In 1927 Alva Ross Brown, a brilliant young graduate of Johnson and the University of Michigan,
succeeded to the presidency of the University. At 22, he was reputed to have been the youngest
College president in America at the time. His fourteen years of faithful service were greatly
complicated by the Great Depression. The growing debt of the University became a heavy burden on
his heart and probably contributed to his early death. At the same time, the enrollment held steady, the
academic standards were raised, the quality of the faculty was strengthened, and the number of
graduates increased.
Robert Monroe Bell, former Johnson teacher and established professor of economics at the University
of Tennessee, became the fourth president of the University in 1941. The Academy was dropped that
year, and Johnson became coeducational a few years later. The school was brought out of debt and
placed on a firm financial footing. During Dr. Bell's twenty-seven years of service, the enrollment
steadily increased, the academic program was improved, new buildings (Bell Hall, Myrtle Hall,
Alumni Memorial Chapel, and Glass Memorial Library) were constructed, and the reputation of the
University was expanded by his influential writings.

In 1969 David L. Eubanks, a native of Maryville, Tennessee, was called to the presidency. A graduate
of Johnson and the University of Tennessee, Dr. Eubanks had been a member of the Johnson faculty
for eleven years. Under his leadership the University has continued to develop within the context of its
historic mission and purpose. The enrollment has grown (over 500 for the first time in 1997, 850 in
2003 and 922 in 2005), the faculty and staff have been increased, regional and national accreditation
have been achieved, undergraduate program offerings have been expanded, and graduate, distance
learning, and degree completion programs have been added. The physical plant was greatly improved
by the construction of the Global Education Technology Building, Phillips-Welshimer Building, Alva
Ross Brown Hall for men, Emma Johnson Hall for women, Eubanks Activities Center, married
student housing, faculty housing, the enlargement of Glass Memorial Library, and other additions.
Computers have been provided for all faculty members and the infrastructure has been added allowing
for campus-wide computer accessibility. A new men’s residence hall and a new woman’s residence
hall, housing a total of 576 students, was completed in 2000-2001. A new Counseling Center was
completed and occupied Fall Semester, 2004.

Johnson University graduates have served, and are serving, faithfully as preachers, youth ministers,
missionaries, counselors, Bible college presidents and faculty members, ministers of music, church
secretaries, and in other areas of specialized Christian service all over the United States and
throughout the world. Many of them have also made important contributions to mankind as doctors,
lawyers, statesmen, public school teachers, and business executives. Wherever they have gone, for the
most part, they have shown the marks of personal commitment to Christ and faithfulness to the Word
of God.

                                               VISION

At Johnson University, our vision is to bring glory to God and hope to the world by preparing
promising students for excellence in Christian ministry through an affordable, community-oriented,
Christ-centered education.

                                          CORE VALUES
As a private, coeducational institution of higher learning, Johnson University holds to the following
core values:
                         The lordship of Christ and the authority of Scripture
                        The centrality of ministry and the priority of preaching
                  The necessity of faith, the efficacy of prayer, and the value of work
                The importance of affordability and the worth of a nurturing community
              The imperative of a Christian lifestyle and the virtue of academic discipline
           The validity of the Restoration Plea and the significance of the Johnson heritage
                                             PURPOSE
Johnson University is a private, coeducational institution of higher learning offering associate,
bachelor’s, and master’s degrees. The purpose of Johnson University is to educate students for
specialized Christian ministries with emphasis on the preaching ministry. A secondary purpose is to
provide programs in Christian leadership and community service.
Because Christian ministry requires that students have a Christian worldview, understanding
themselves as well as the Word of God and the world of people, the University stresses holistic
education including spiritual, intellectual, professional, social, and physical development.

Spiritual development includes (1) a Christian worldview; (2) a personal devotional life; (3) Christ-
like living; (4) a sense of worldwide New Testament evangelism; (5) a commitment to service in the
local church; (6) an appreciation for the Restoration Movement, especially the plea for Christian unity;
(7) a commitment to Biblical, moral, and ethical values; (8) an appreciation for the University's
historic commitment to faith, prayer, and work; and (9) a continuing commitment to spiritual growth.

Intellectual development includes (1) a thorough knowledge of the Bible; (2) an adequate general
education including the ability to think critically, and to write and speak effectively; (3) a working
knowledge of the fundamentals of a specialized ministry, or a thorough knowledge of a specialized
ministry when double majors are undertaken; (4) good study habits; and (5) a continuing commitment
to educational growth.

Professional development includes (1) competence in one or more specialized Christian ministries; (2)
good work habits; and (3) continuing commitment to professional development.

Social development includes (1) the cultivation of social graces and interpersonal skills; (2) a sense of
personal responsibility as a Christian in the community; (3) a commitment to healthy family
relationships; and (4) a continuing commitment to social growth.

Physical development includes (1) appreciation for personal health; (2) healthful living habits; and (3)
continuing commitment to physical health.


To Accomplish Its Purpose, the University:
 employs faculty of genuine loyalty to the Word of God, unquestioned character and consecration,
   and high academic standing;
 provides adequate administration, business management, financial resources, facilities, academic
   support services, and student development services;
 offers curriculums of appropriate scope and sequence;
 enrolls students with the potential to succeed in the University's educational program and in
   Christian service;
 makes every reasonable effort to aid those of limited financial means; and
 maintains graduation requirements which predict success in a ministry.


                                PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION

Johnson University offers a curriculum of Biblical, general, and professional studies as well as
supporting programs designed to educate students for specialized Christian ministries, Christian
service, and lifelong learning.

As the inspired record of God’s revelation of Himself culminating in Jesus Christ, the Bible provides
the core curriculum for a Bible college education. It offers a sufficient guide for right living and
reveals God’s plan for the ministry of the church and for the redemption of people. Scripture provides
the lens through which Christians view the world.

Johnson University presupposes that people can apprehended and learn the truths of the Scripture, that
the arts and sciences have enormous value, and that the tools for ministry come not only by way of
spiritual gifts but also by way of learning and refining personal skills.

Students need accessibility to education that comes from variety in teaching styles and flexibility in
delivery systems. Johnson University believes that both traditional programs and nontraditional
programs can equally benefit students. Johnson University offers a course of study to place students
on the path of Christian maturity and ongoing ministry.

                                    STATEMENT OF FAITH

The University is aware of the potentially controversial nature of creeds and has no intention of adding
to an already divided church. The essence of our belief is in the old saying, ―no creed but Christ.‖
Therefore, any person who holds to the Lordship of Jesus and meets the other admission requirements
is welcome at Johnson University. Yet, in order to understand the nature of the University, you should
know that every trustee, administrator, and teacher holds the following items to be true:

1.  There is one true God of the Old and New Testaments.
2.  All the scriptures of the Old and New Testaments are inspired, and if one believes and obeys
    Jesus Christ, such faith and obedience will bring the remission of sins and eternal redemption
    hereafter.
3. Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, born of the Virgin Mary, without the interposition of man,
    and He is in the all-inclusive and all-exclusive sense, our Savior, Prophet, Priest and King.
4. Jesus died on the cross for the whole human race and for all ages, and His blood cleanses from all
    sins, on the conditions laid down in the New Testament.
5. Jesus was buried in the grave, and He came from the grave alive in the body in which He was
    buried, triumphant over death and the grave.
6. Jesus gave the Great Commission to the Apostles (Matthew 28:18-20; Mark 16:14-16; Luke
    23:45-47; John 20:22-23; Acts 1:8) to embrace all nations and all ages to the end of time.
7. Jesus Christ sent the Holy Spirit down from Heaven to the Apostles through whom the Gospel
    was unfolded, and men and women are saved according to the conditions laid down and on
    record in the book of Acts.
8. Faith, repentance, confession of faith in Jesus and baptism (immersion) and prayer are for the
    remission of past sins, and faith, repentance and confession of sins and prayer are for the
    remission of the erring Christian’s sins (Acts 8:22).
9. The basis of the Restoration Plea handed down to us by the fathers and the basis of the union of
    Christendom are found in the New Testament.
10. Jesus Christ will come at the end of the world and will judge all men and all ages according to
    that which is written in the Sacred Scriptures.


                           REPUTATION AND ACCREDITATION

Johnson University is the second oldest continuing Bible University in the United States. It is the
oldest Bible University of the Christian Churches/ Churches of Christ, among whom most of the
graduates serve, and from whom most of the students and financial support come.
The University is legally authorized and chartered by the State of Tennessee and approved by the
Tennessee Higher Education Commission to operate as a degree-granting educational institution.
Graduates are accepted in the leading seminaries of the nation and are sought by several of them.

Johnson University is accredited professionally by the Commission on Accreditation of the
Association for Biblical Higher Education (ABHE) (formerly the Accrediting Association of Bible
Colleges) and by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to
award associate, bachelor's and master's level degrees. Both are recognized by the United States
Office of Education and the Council of Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). The Teacher
Education Program is approved by the Tennessee State Board of Education.

Johnson is also a member of the Tennessee College Association, the Tennessee Independent Colleges
and Universities Association, and the Tennessee Conference of Graduate Schools. The curriculum is
approved by the Tennessee Higher Education Commission (the State Approving Agency) for the
training of veterans.

                                     PROGRAM PURPOSE

The purpose of the M.A. in Bible and Educational Technology is to provide graduate education in
these two areas to professionals such as the following:

 Teachers interested in using technology in their classrooms
 Christian school teachers who need Bible and technology credits for certification renewal
 Supervisors or computer coordinators

The writer in Ecclesiastes says, ―If the axe is dull and its edge unsharpened, more strength is needed
but skill will bring success‖ Ecclesiastes 10:10. This program aims to give the student more skills in
Bible and technology in order to help him/her to sharpen the axe.

                                     PROGRAM CONTENT

This program offers an understanding of the roles of hardware and software and their integration
within the various curricular areas. It also explores ethical and Biblical issues involved in the use of
technology in education.

                                    PROGRAM OUTCOMES

Successful completion of the M.A. in Bible and Educational Technology should enable students to:

 Reflect the person and work of Jesus Christ, the Master Teacher.
 Visualize teaching as a Christian profession through which they minister to children and their
  families
 Integrate Biblical and technological knowledge into their current knowledge base
 Effectively communicate from a Christian worldview
 Appreciate and integrate global and multicultural perspectives
 Facilitate the management and maintenance of technology resources in their school or work
  setting including hardware maintenance and network development.
 Understand and apply principles of human development within their technological instructional
  setting
 Demonstrate the technical skills required for competent instruction of learners using technology.
 Understand the factors that influence the school’s or system’s curriculum and philosophy as it
    relates to the implementation of school-wide or system-wide technology and training.
 Demonstrate a professional concern for the ethical use of technology
 Develop and implement a plan for staying current in educational technology.
 Meet the NET-S standards



                                   PROGRAM STRUCTURE

Several two-week sessions are offered during the summer semester. During the school year
technology and Bible classes are offered by distance and online learning. To graduate the candidate
must successfully complete nine educational technology courses (four online), three Bible courses
(two can be by distance learning). All courses carry three semester hours of credit. The nine Bible
credits required in this program reflect the purpose of the University and contribute to the integration
of ethical principles and educational technology. They also offer ACSI certified teachers the
opportunity to get needed Bible credits.

                                           TIME LIMITS

The minimum time required to complete this 36-credit hour program is two years and the maximum is
six years of part-time study.

                                   CAMPUS ENVIRONMENT

Johnson University is a smoke-free, alcohol-free and illicit drug-free campus. Candidates must abide
by these standards during their time on campus as well as the standards in the lifestyle perspectives
which each candidate signs.
                  APPLICATION AND ADMISSION                                        2
Johnson University seeks to enroll students who are committed to specialized Christian service or who
have a serious purpose to profit from a Bible University education. Admission to the University is
based on evidence that an applicant has Christian character and motivation, maturity, breadth of
interests, seriousness of purpose and intellectual capacity to participate successfully in the program of
the University.

While Johnson remains firmly committed to its historic purpose of educating students for Christian
ministry, the University recognizes that some people who desire the benefits of a Bible University
education for personal enrichment and Christian leadership training may have other career goals in
mind

Prospective students desiring to enroll or seeking further information about University programs may
communicate with the Graduate Teacher Education Office as follows:
    Mail: Graduate Teacher Education Office, Johnson University, 7900 Johnson Drive, Knoxville,
    TN 37998
    Telephone: 1-865-251-2348
    Email: khunt@JohnsonU.edu

                                  APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION

Students who desire to apply to this program must meet the following requirements

 A bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution with a GPA of 3.0 or higher during the
    last two years of full-time work.
 A current State or Christian school teaching license or employed as a teacher in a school.
 Access to a multimedia computer with high-speed modem or broadband access and an
    account with a full Internet access provider (AOL is not adequate).

Applications will be considered in the order in which they are received.




                                  ADMISSIONS DOCUMENTS

The following admissions documents constitute the admissions file. Candidates must submit all
documents before their applications will be considered

 Acceptable application form with fee

 Official College transcripts from all colleges attended

 Letters of reference
   From the applicant's minister
   From the applicant's principal or supervisor
   From the applicant's colleague or other selected individual
 Lifestyle statement

 A written statement describing why the applicant wants to enter this program and how
    he/she hopes to use this training upon graduation

 A phone or on-campus interview with the Graduate Program Coordinator.



                                      ADMISSIONS DECISIONS

Applicants may expect a response from the graduate teacher education committee to be mailed within
two weeks after their application file is completed. The decision of the committee may be to admit, to
admit conditionally, or to deny admission.

Deadlines. Application files must be complete by May 1 to begin in the summer, by July 1 for fall
entry and November 1 for spring semester.

Special admission category. Applicants who graduated more then ten years ago and who did not
have a 3.0 CGPA in the last two years of their undergraduate degree may petition the graduate
committee for admission on probation. Applicants so admitted must have at least a 3.0 CGPA at the
end of nine credit hours to continue on the program.

Transfer Credit. Relevant credit earned at an institution recognized by an approved accrediting
agency may be applied toward the requirements of a degree program at Johnson University providing
the grade earned is "C'' or better and the course is applicable to the Johnson degree. No student may
transfer in more than nine hours of relevant credits.



                                          ENROLLMENT

Applying for Financial Aid. Because the paperwork for Federal Financial Aid requires adequate
lead-time, students may apply for Financial Aid concurrent with their application for admission to the
University. See pages 23 for more details.

Applying for Housing. Campus housing is assigned on a first-come, first-serve basis. Students who
have housing preferences should get their housing applications in as early as possible. Applications for
campus housing may be made concurrent with application for admission to the University. See
campus housing section for more information, page 21.


                OTHER ADMISSION/ENROLLMENT CONSIDERATIONS

Veterans and War Orphans. Johnson University courses are approved for veterans' training. Credit
will be given for previous college work and for schooling completed in the service through the College
Level Examination Program (CLEP) sponsored by the Educational Testing Service (ETS). If veterans
fail to complete the course, the amount charged for a portion of the course will not exceed the
approximate pro rata portion of the total charges for tuition, fees, etc. Veteran students do not have a
leave policy while enrolled for classes. The Registrar is the Coordinator with the Department of
Veterans Affairs at Johnson University.

Eligible VA students must have completed formal University admission requirements and must be
fully admitted into a degree program before they request certification for VA payment. Students
should contact the Office of the Registrar for specific information about requesting VA payments for
their course enrollment. The Department of Veterans Affairs will make the final decision regarding
approval of payments for students in special admissions categories. Students are required to inform
the Financial Aid Office of the type and amount of any VA benefits.

To ensure receipt of benefits, eligible VA students must inform the Veterans Affairs Coordinator of
their intention to register for classes and supply the number of credit hours for which they will enroll
each semester. After the appropriate paperwork has been submitted to the Veterans Affairs
Coordinator, it is then submitted to the Department of Veterans Affairs Regional Office for processing
and, generally, payment.

Specific procedures and forms for application and enrollment certification may be obtained from the
Registrar. Each student's request will be handled individually according to the type of VA Education
Assistance Program for which the student is eligible and the student's enrollment status at the
University.

All students receiving VA Educational Assistance payments from the Department of Veterans Affairs
are responsible for immediately notifying the Registrar of any changes in their degree program and/or
their credit hour load during a semester, to include changing degree program or major, dropping or
adding a course, withdrawing from school, or auditing a course. Generally, the VA will not allow
payment for courses not computed in a student's GPA or not counted toward graduation requirements
for a student's degree program.
          ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES                                                  3
                                       CLASS ATTENDANCE

Johnson University attendance regulations are guided by the principle that in a traditional classroom
setting students receive a benefit from the discussion, interaction, and emphasis of a class session
which they can get no other way, even with the assignment of make-up work. To miss class is to
experience a loss that may not show up on a final examination but is nevertheless real. Accordingly,
the following regulations encourage faithful class attendance with allowances provided for necessary
absences. Class attendance policies only apply to summer sessions due to the nature of distance
learning courses. Because of the compact layout of the two week summer sessions there are no
personnal absences. Students are expected to be at all classes and to participate actively within the
class.

                DROPPING, ADDING OR WITHDRAWING FROM CLASS
Dropping a Class.
 Summer Session. Students may drop a class during the first week of each session and receive a
    full tuition refund. After the first week there will be no refunds – full payment is due. Students
    who do not begin a class will not be charged for that class.
 Distance Learning Bible Classes. Online Bible classes begin their semester on July 10 and
    December 10. In order not to receive a grade of F a student must drop these classes by August 31
    and January 31. No refund will be given after that time.
 Distance Learning educational technology classes. Fall and Spring semesters begin at the same
    time as the undergraduate calendar. (See the University calendar for these dates). Students who
    wish to drop a class and receive a refund must drop the class by the end of the fifth week of class.
    No refunds will be given after that date.
To drop a class the student must notify the registrar’s office or the teacher education graduate office in
writing (email is acceptable) by 5 p.m. by the appropriate deadline.

                                GRADES AND QUALITY POINTS

                              Grades and quality points are recorded as follows:
                     Letter     Quality
                                                           Description
                     Grade      Points
                        A         4.00
                                                              Excellent
                        A-        3.67
                        B+        3.33
                        B         3.00                          Good
                        B-        2.67
                        C+        2.33
                        C         2.00                        Average
                        C-        1.67
                        D+        1.33
                        D         1.00                         Passing
                        D-        0.67
                        P         0.00                       Passing
                        F         0.00                       Failing
                        W                    Withdrew (before deadline)
                        I       **Incomplete (averaged as ―F‖ until removed)
                                 GRADE APPEAL PROCESS
A student may appeal a final course grade which he/she believes to be inaccurate. This appeal must be
submitted in writing within six weeks from the close of the semester to the office of the registrar.

                                    GRADE INFORMATION
Students may view their grades on Campus Connect at mid-term and following each semester. A
student may view his or her transcript at any time on Campus Connect. Request for printed copies of
grades must be submitted in writing in the Registrar’s Office

                           GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Academic Credits. The minimum academic requirement for graduation with a Master’s degree is
completion of 36 semester credits with a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.00.

Attendance. All students are expected to participate in commencement unless a prior request to
graduate in absentia has been approved by the academic dean. Letters should be submitted to the
Academic Dean’s Office. Even when special permission is granted, the graduation fee will still be
charged.

Graduation Fee. A non-refundable graduation fee is paid which will cover the cost of diploma, cap
and gown, and other graduation expenses.

Intent to Graduate. The declaration of Intent to Graduate form must be completed by the beginning
of the academic year in which the student plans to graduate. Information for ordering diploma, cap and
gown is determined from this form. These forms are available in the Registrar’s Office. Submission of
Intent after deadline will result in a student waiting until the next graduation ceremony.

                           PLAGIARISM AND RELATED PRACTICES
Students commit plagiarism when they deliberately submit the writing of someone else as their own
work. This offense may involve either submission of a paper written by someone else or directly
copying from a printed source without using quotation marks or appropriate documentation. For
demonstrable plagiarism in a paper, students will receive a minimum penalty of ―F‖ on that paper.
The penalty may include a failing grade for the course. The matter will also be reported to the dean of
students. Disciplinary action may lead to suspension or dismissal from Johnson University.

Excessive Collaboration. (1) To write more effectively, students (like most writers) may discuss
their ideas and plans for papers with others or may read a paper (or a section of a paper) to friends,
making revisions based on their responses. Normally such collaboration improves writing. (2)
Students may also seek help from a volunteer or hired typist. For instructors to gain an accurate
representation of a student’s work, the student must present the rough draft of any theme or research
paper typed by someone other than the student. The final copy must mention the typist’s name.

Either of the above practices carried to the extreme constitutes excessive collaboration and prevents
instructors from recognizing the real ability and progress of their students, thus inhibiting effective
teaching and learning. Students may receive the grade of ―F‖ on a paper which shows unmistakable
evidence of excessive collaboration. Since students often practice excessive collaboration without a
deliberate intention to deceive, a professor, after conferring with the student, may allow a rewrite of
the paper.
Insufficient Documentation. Honesty and courtesy require that writers acknowledge their debt for
information and opinions they draw from other sources. Documentation provides both an
acknowledgment of this debt and a kind of support for the ideas expressed in a paper. Appropriate
documentation may range from the mere mention of a name or title to the extensive footnotes and
bibliography required in a fully documented paper. Insufficient or inaccurate documentation
constitutes a serious weakness in a paper and normally results in a lowered grade. Students may
receive the grade of ―F‖ on a paper where insufficient documentation overwhelms the communication.

Inadequate Paraphrase. In paraphrasing, students should carefully change the words and sentence
structure of the original source while retaining the original sense of the source’s meaning. Students
must learn the ability to paraphrase.

Usually inadequate paraphrase represents a lack of knowledge and skill on the part of the student
rather than a deliberate attempt to deceive. Professors will treat inadequate paraphrase like any other
writing deficiency, provided it does not also involve insufficient documentation. Students may receive
the grade of ―F‖ on a paper where inadequate paraphrase makes up most of the communication. In
such instances, professors may require the student to rewrite the paper. Inadequate paraphrase without
documentation usually constitutes plagiarism.

                                    REPEATING A COURSE

Whenever a course is repeated, either because of failure or in order to improve a grade, the grade
earned the last time the student repeats a course will be used in any grade point computation. All
grades will be placed on the transcript with an indication that the course has been repeated. There is no
limit to the number of times a student may repeat a course. Veterans should consult with the registrar
or their V.A. representative regarding the latest regulation relative to repeating a course.

                                         REGISTRATION

Students are required to register for classes prior to the beginning of each semester. After admittance
to Johnson, necessary items to complete the registration process include financial arrangements,
directory information, and I.D. pictures.

Continuing students register about mid-term of each semester for the upcoming semester. Students
will be notified by email when it is time to register for the next course.


                         SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS

To remain on good standing on the program, candidates must maintain a 3.0 CGPA. A candidate
whose CGPA drops below a 3.0 will have one semester to raise this CGPA back to a 3.0. Candidates
who do not achieve this will not be able to continue on the program. In extenuating circumstances,
candidates who are dismissed from the program may appeal to the Graduate Teacher Education
Committee.

                                 TRANSCRIPTS OF CREDITS

The registrar will furnish transcripts of credits upon written request. One complimentary transcript is
available without charge. There is a charge of $5 for each additional transcript. The form may be
printed from the Johnson Website and mailed to the Registrar’s Office. No transcript will be furnished
until all financial accounts have been satisfactorily settled with the University.
                           WITHDRAWAL FROM UNIVERSITY

All official withdrawals from the program are made through the graduate teacher education office.
Should a student withdraw from school during a semester, he or she must complete a Returning
Student Application before enrolling in subsequent semesters.
            PROGRAM AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONS                                              4
                                      PROGRAM OVERVIEW

The following is an outline of the classes that form a part of this program. Topics considered in the
special issues classes will vary as new issues and technologies emerge that have relevance for
education.

BIBLE

BIBL 5305           Ministry of the Master               3 hours   Distance Learning

BIBL 5005           New Testament Survey                 3 hours   Summer Session

BIBL 5004           Old Testament Survey                 3 hours   Summer Session

BIBL 5160           Integrating Biblical Values and
                    Educational Technology               3 hours   Summer Session



EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY

CPED 5300           The Teacher, the Web and Online      3 hours   Summer Session
                    Education
OR
CPED 5111           Putting your School on the Web       3 hours   Online Course

CPED 5202           History of the Microcomputer         3 hours   Summer Session

CPED 5402           Special Issues: Digital Video        3 hours   Summer Session

CPED 5203           Hardware/Networking                  3 hours   Summer Session

CPED 5401           Special Issues: Integration of the   3 hours   Online Course
                    Computer Into the Classroom

CPED 5404           Computer Tools for the Teacher       3 hours   Summer Session
                    And the Student

CPED 5301           Special Issues: Multimedia           3 hours   Online Course

CPED 5205           Web 2.0                              3 hours   Online Course

CPED 5503           Introduction to Technology           3 hours   Summer Session
                    Worldwide
                       SAMPLE PROGRAM LAYOUT for two years

                           Year 1                                             Year 2
                      Summer 1                                        Summer 2
Session 1   CPED5404 Tools                        Session 1 CPED5404 Tools
Session 2   CPED5402 Digital Video                           CPED5203 Hardware/Networking
Session 3   CPED5300 Web                          Session 2 CPED5503 Intro to Technology WW
                                                             CPED5202 History of Microcomputer
                                                  Session 3 CPED5300 Web
                                                  Session 4 BIBL5160 Integrating Biblical Values
                          Fall I                                               Fall 2
1 Bible Course                                    1 Bible Course
CPED 5205 Web 2.0                                 CPED5301 Multimedia
                        Spring 1                                              Spring 2
CPED 5111 Putting your School on the Web          CPED5401 Integration



Individual modifications may need to be made.               Students will schedule their classes
individually in a conference with Dr. Templar.

                                           RESOURCES

The following special resources are available to candidates on this program:

 Teacher Education Computer Lab – This state of the art facility contains both Macintosh and
  Windows 7 computers. These computers are all linked to the University network and to the
  Internet. A section of this lab contains machines which are built by the students in the hardware
  class and then networked during the networking class. These machines are not attached to the
  campus network.
 A wireless (WI-FI) network runs throughout the teacher education area. Thirty laptop computers
  are available for use on this network. During the summer they can be checked out by graduate
  educational technology students.
 Multimedia classrooms – two of these classrooms are available for use by the program in the
  teacher education area.
 Resource center – an extensive resource center with over 25,000 books is provided in the teacher
  education area,. This provides necessary curriculum and other resources for student projects.

                                   COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

New Testament Survey (BIBL 5005)
This course introduces students to the main people, places, events and themes of the New Testament.
It is a graduate course that requires the student to master a large amount of material and to do some
thinking and writing at an abstract level. However, it is also an introductory course in that it
presupposes no prior academic study of the Bible. 3 credits

Old Testament Survey (BIBL 5004)
This course is designed to survey the Old Testament books with the intent of highlighting the major
personalities and events relevant to the story of God’s Old Testament people (3 credits).
Integrating Biblical Values and Educational Technology (BIBL 5160)
This course is designed to help students to be effective and ethical in utilizing educational technology.
You can expect to encounter and work with social, economic, and moral issues that involve the use of
computers in education. You will learn how controversies are developed and resolved and how those
controversies impact your personal activities and responsibilities. This course should help also to
develop your communication skills—written, verbal and electronic—so as to enhance your
effectiveness as a teacher. 3 credits

Ministry of the Master (BIBL 5305)
This course is a graduate level study of the ministry of Jesus as depicted in Matthew, Mark, Luke,
John and various other Biblical witnesses. The aim of the course is to acquire knowledge of Jesus in
His historical setting and to make contemporary applications of His ministry for the Christian. 3
credits

Hardware/Networking (CPED5203)
This course allows students to gain a basic familiarity with microcomputer networking.
Students will obtain a sense of the rate of change in networking and data communications
technology which will impact their educational computing support roles in the coming years.
Classroom activities will include lectures, equipment demonstrations, lab exercises, hardware
and software installations, LAN site visits and student projects. 3 credits

Special Issues: Integration of the Computer into the Classroom (CPED 5401)
This course focuses on an understanding of issues of curriculum development and the effective use of
commercially developed software as a teaching tool. Teachers will consider national and regional
standards, ways in which computers can enrich and help students to learn more effectively, and the
many ways in which computers can play a meaningful role in the classroom. Each student will
primarily focus on software that is relevant to his or her own teaching position. 3 credits

Special Issues: Digital Video (CPED 5402)
In this course students work with digital video cameras learning to edit on both platforms using
computer non-linear editing programs, and then produce a multimedia DVD. Students study ways to
use video with children within the classroom. As a result of this course they will be able to integrate
video technology in various areas of their classroom. 3 credits

Computer Tools for the Teacher and the Student (CPED 5404)
Digital cameras, digital photo editing, the use of PDA’s in the classroom and the development of clay
animation DVD’s are some of the new tools explored in this class. 3 credits

The Teacher, The Web, and Online Education (CPED 5300)
This course includes planning and development of web sites, construction of various types of web
pages, collection of web-based resources, student-developed graphics, and the development of a
personal or school web site. 3 credits

Special Issues: Multimedia (CPED 5301)
This course teaches students to recognize different multimedia file formats and use them
appropriately. It also includes the use of stock photos; building a collection of resources; strategies for
planning, reviewing and developing multimedia presentations and the use of multimedia with children
both as developers and consumers. 3 credits
History of Microcomputer (CPED 5202)
In this course students will study the history of the development of the microcomputer. They
will use basic hand tools to remove and replace internal system components. Activities will
include lectures, equipment demonstrations, videos on microcomputer history, lab exercises,
and student project reports. 3 credits

Introduction to Technology Worldwide (CPED 5503)


Web 2.0(CPED 5205)
        FINANCIAL AND HOUSING INFORMATION                                                  5
                           CURRENT FINANCIAL INFORMATION

This section of the catalog addresses costs, housing, refunds, and financial aid. The information here
is subject to change. Every possible cost is not listed here, but the most common ones are. The latest
information on Scholarships and Financial Aid is on the financial aid page of the Johnson web site to
be found at http://www.JohnsonU.edu.

                                     STUDENT ACCOUNTS

An account is established for each student who is enrolled at Johnson. The account statement shows
all charges and credits (monies paid). Students receive a monthly statement indicating the status of
their account as of the date of the statement. Questions about student accounts should be directed to
the Secretary of Student Accounts.

A deferred payment plan is available for those who are unable to make full payment at the time of
registration. This plan requires a minimum cash payment of one-third of the total bill by the time of
registration and the remainder in three monthly installments.

                                 TUITION, FEES, AND COSTS

Application Fee. When applying for admission to Johnson, remember to enclose the application fee.
This is a one-time, non-refundable charge.

Graduation Fee. A graduation fee is to be paid at the beginning of the semester preceding
graduation. It will be used to cover the cost of diploma, cap and gown, and other expenses associated
with graduation. This fee is non-refundable.

Tuition. Tuition is charged by the credit hour. Each credit hour costs $260, so a three credit course is
$780.

                          HOUSING COSTS AND ASSIGNMENTS

Summer Housing. Applications for housing during summer school are made through Student Affairs
office. Contact Jerilyn Weaver at jweaver.JohnsonU.edu. Different types of housing are available to
summer school students based on availability.


                                             REFUNDS

Textbook Refund Policy. If a student officially drops or withdraws from a class for which he/she
purchased books, the bookstore will offer a refund or exchange. A full refund cannot be made on a
book in which a student has written. To be considered for a full credit refund, textbooks must be
returned within five days from the beginning of each summer session. The Bookstore does not carry
the textbooks needed for fall and spring distance learning technology classes. These can be ordered on
line from sites such as www.amazon.com.
Withdrawal Refund; Repayment Policy:
Refund Policy. ―Refund‖ refers to money paid toward school charges that must be returned to the
financial aid sources and/or the student. In accordance with Title IV regulations (668.22), the Johnson
University Refund and Repayment Policy is as follows:

For non-Title IV recipients the institutional policy will be applied. Because there is not an established
policy from the State of Tennessee and/or from the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools,
Johnson University abides by the Federal Title IV Regulations for refunds and repayments for Title IV
recipients.

Repayment Policy. When a student who has been awarded Title IV funds (or on whose behalf a
parent has borrowed under the Title IV loan program) ceases to attend on or after the first day of class,
but before the end of the enrollment period for which the student was charged, the withdrawal date (as
defined by Federal Regulations) will be determined. The withdrawal date will be used to determine if
a refund is required.

When a student receives a cash disbursement based on a credit balance on the student account after
financial aid has been credited, and withdraws on or after the first day of class but before the end of
the period of enrollment for which the student received the financial aid, it will be determined if a
payment will be required from the student. A repayment may be due if the student has received a cash
disbursement to cover books and supplies, transportation, and other non-institutional expenses. After
the repayment calculation is completed, the student is informed if a repayment is due.

Allocation of Return of Title IV Aid.
Refunds will be made in the federally required order of:
    1. Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan;
    2. Subsidized Federal Stafford Loan;
    3. Federal PLUS loan received on behalf of the student;
    4. Federal Pell Grant;
    5. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant;
    6. Any other Title IV Federal Program;
    7. The student

    The refund is allocated up to the full amount the student received from a particular fund.
    If a refund is due to a lender, the office of student accounts will prepare a check to be returned to
    the lender for the full amount of the refund, indicating which loans should be credited.
    If a refund is due to the student, the office of student accounts will inform the student and prepare
    a check to be returned to the student for the full amount of the refund.
    If other charges and/or fines are applied to the student’s account after a refund is determined, the
    student will be responsible for those charges and/or fines.
    Once the appropriated refund amount has been determined, the refund will be allocated in the
    federally required order. Johnson University will distribute or return the funds within the 30-day
    requirement.

Examples of Refunds/Repayments.
Examples of refund and repayment worksheets are available in the Financial Aid Office.
Students who arrive at Johnson and leave prior to the beginning of classes will be refunded their
money
                                     FINANCIAL AID

Financial Aid is available to those who are enrolled at least half-time. Financial aid for
graduate students currently includes: Student Stafford Loans and V.A. benefits, each of
which are based upon eligibility and need of the student.

Federal Stafford Loan Information
Graduate students must carry at least one-half (6 hours) the normal academic load (9 hours for
   graduate study) at an eligible institution.
Up to $20,500 per academic year for graduate or professional students with a total aggregate
   limit of $138,500.
Subsidized: Need based - $8,500. Interest is paid by the government while at least part time.
Unsubsidized: Student is responsible for interest accrued on loans while in school.


                                      How to Apply
   1.   Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) www.FAFSA.ED.GOV
   2.   Federal Stafford Loan www.studentloans.gov (if loan needed)
   3.   Johnson University Financial Aid Confirmation Card
   4.   Johnson University Loan Request Form (if needed)



                                          Contact
                              Johnson University Financial Aid Office
                                    7900 Johnson Drive
                                    Knoxville, TN 37998
                                       1-800-827-2122
                                        (865)-251-2316
                                    lrector@JohnsonU.edu
                                        PERSONNEL                                               6
                                                              TRUSTEES

The Board of Trustees of Johnson University is comprised of ten to fifteen members (and the president of the
University as an ex-officio member) who are nominated by the Alumni Council of Seventy for three year terms
with approval by the board. Members come from the ranks of the ministry and various other professions
representing various supporting constituencies of the University. A majority of the members must be alumni of
the University. The major responsibility of the Board of Trustees is to give general direction and oversight to the
operation of the University. As the governing body of Johnson University, the trustees establish broad
institutional policies, aid in securing financial resources to support the work of the University, select the chief
administrative officer, and upon his recommendation, approve the other administrative officers and the faculty of
the University.


CHAIRMAN ................................................................................................................... L. D. Campbell
VICE CHAIRMAN ....................................................................................................... Ralph Carnathan
SECRETARY ..................................................................................................................... Jeff Whitlock
Term Expires 2011:
L. D. Campbell .......................................................................................... Pastor, Burlington, Kentucky
Jeff Case .............................................................. Business Owner and Educator, Knoxville, Tennessee
Sam Widener ......................................................................... Business Owner, Johnson City, Tennessee
Term Expires 2012:
W. Perry Bailey ............................................................... Retired Corporate Executive, Salem, Virginia
Carol Clifford ........................................................................... Travel Consultant, Louisville, Kentucky
Jeff Whitlock ................................................................................ Senior Minister, Memphis, Tennessee
Richard E. Woods ..................................... Engineering Consultant and Educator, Knoxville,
Tennessee
Term Expires 2011:
Martha Alligood ........................ Professor and Academic Administrator, Chocowinity, North Carolina
Ralph D. Carnathan ..................................... Economic Development Consultant, Knoxville, Tennessee
Gregory J. Grant ....................................................................... Senior Minister, Morristown, Tennessee
George W. Haley ............................... Attorney and Former U.S. Ambassador, Silver Spring, Maryland
Drew Mentzer ..................................................................................... Senior Minister, Danville, Illinois
Charles Wingfield ........................................................... Minister of Pastoral Care, Florissant, Missouri
Ex Officio:
Gary E. Weedman ............................................................................... President, Johnson University



                                                     ADMINISTRATORS
Under the direction of the chief administrative officer of the University, the administrators are
responsible for the implementation of the policies of the Board of Trustees. The administrative
personnel are:


GARY E. WEEDMAN, President (2007); A.B. 1964, Johnson University; M.A. 1967, Western
Illinois University; Ph.D. 1971, Indiana University.
RICHARD K. BEAM, Academic Dean and Vice President for Academics (1978); B.A. 1965,
Kentucky Christian College; M.A. 1975; Morehead State University; Ed.D. 1981, University of
Kentucky.
DAVID L. EUBANKS, President Emeritus (1958); B.A. 1957, M.Th. 1958, D.D. 1984, Johnson
University; B.S. 1960, Ph.D. 1965, University of Tennessee.
PHILIP EUBANKS, Vice President for Development (1996); B.A. 1981, Johnson University; B.S.
1988, University of Tennessee; M.S. 1992, University of Cincinnati.
DAVID LEGG, Dean of Students and Vice President for Student Services, Staff Instructor, Ministry
(1994); B.S. 1980, Purdue University; M.A. 1993, Johnson University; additional studies: University
of Tennessee, Knoxville.
MARK F. PIERCE, Director of Institutional Effectiveness, Staff Instructor, Psychology (2003); B.A.
1973, Atlanta Christian College; M.Div. 1978, Emmanuel School of Religion; M.A. 2003 and Ph.D.
2004, University of Tennessee.
CHRISTOPHER R. ROLPH, Vice President of Business and Finance (2007); B.S. 1987, Northern
Kentucky University; M.Min. 2003, Cincinnati Christian University; Certified Public Accountant
1990; member: American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and Tennessee Society of Certified
Public Accountants.
TIMOTHY W. WINGFIELD, Dean of Enrollment Services and Director of Admissions (1999);
B.A. 1987, Johnson University; M.Div. 1995, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; D.Min. 2006,
Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary.




                        EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY FACULTY



           CHRIS M. TEMPLAR, Teacher Education Graduate Program Coordinator and
Professor, Teacher Education (1978); A.L.B.C.—1967, London Bible College; B.D. (Hons.)—1967,
London University; M.A.—1976, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D.—1979, Southern Baptist
Theological Seminary; additional studies: Leeds University, College of St. Mark and St. John, Oregon
University, Regis University, Loyola Marymont.

           BOB G. CHAMBERS, Adjunct Instructor, Educational Technology (1996); B.S.—1957;
M.S.—1972, University of Tennessee; additional studies: Arizona State University, University of
Tennessee.

           JOHN C. TONY KRUG, Lecturer, Educational Technology (2007); B.A. 1972, Indiana
State University; M.L.S. 1973, Indiana State University; Ph.D. 1985, Southern Illinois University at
Carbondale.

           1JESS O. HALE, JR., Lecturer, Educational Technology (2009); B.A. 1980, Johnson
University; M.T.S. 1982, Harvard Divinity School; J.D. 1985, University of Tennessee; M.A. 1988,
Duke University.

           JODY OWENS, Associate Professor, Bible and Pastoral Ministries (1999); B.A. 1987,
Armstrong State College; M.A. 1995, Johnson University; M.Div. 1998, D.Min. 2003, Emmanuel
School of Religion.
                                                APPENDIX
                  APPLICATION FORMS AND LIFESTYLE PERSPECTIVES

                                      APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION
                                       MASTER OF ARTS DEGREE IN
                           BIBLE AND EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY
Please Print or Type                                 Application Fee -- $50.00
                                      ENROLLMENT INFORMATION

I plan to enroll in June              for the summer semester/I plan to enroll in September                      for
the winter semester


                                         PERSONAL INFORMATION

Last Name:                                      First Name:                         __ Middle Initial:

Maiden Name:                           Preferred Name:                               Gender (M/F): _

Address:

City:                                                    State:                      Zip:

SS Number:                                                         Date of Birth:

Email address:                                           Home Phone:

Work Phone

Marital Status:              Single                      Married            Plan to be Married
                                                                                                       Date
                             Separated                     Divorced                   Divorced & Remarried
                    (Enclose a letter of explanation (including dates) about any divorce(s) or annulments)

Citizenship: U.S.            Other (country)

Spouse's Name

Name(s) and Age(s) of children

  I was born in                                               I last attended college in
                             State                                                                       State

My home state when I enter Johnson University will be


Check Status:        Non-Veteran         Veteran (for VA information and benefit forms, contact your local VA
office.)
                                             Teaching License

Type:                                       Issued By:                                 Expires:


                                      SCHOOL INFORMATION

School:

Principal:

Address:

City:                                                  State:                  Zip:

School Phone:

                                        CHURCH INFORMATION

Religious Preference:

Church you attend regularly:

Church Address
                          Street                                City                  State            Zip

Church Phone                                Minister

Has it been your pattern since becoming a Christian to attend church regularly?        Yes        No
(If No, attach explanation)

Is your life dedicated to Christ?     Yes     No (If No, attach explanation)

                                    EDUCATIONAL INFORMATION

High School with graduation date:


                                      COLLEGE INFORMATION


List of Colleges attended with date

        COLLEGE                LOCATION           DATES ATTENDED               DEGREE OBTAINED
Check any that apply to the LAST college attended:

   Graduated                  Currently attending          Withdrew in good standing
   Withdrew on probation                 Academic suspension (date dismissed                                )
   Disciplinary suspension, attach an explanation of suspension (date dismissed                             )


                                              REFERENCE INFORMATION

I have requested letters of reference from the following:
     1.      Minister/     Church Leader
                     Phone
     2.      Principal/      School District Supervisor
                     Phone
     3.      Colleague/        Educator
                     Phone


                                         CERTIFICATION AND SIGNATURE

I have read and agree to abide by the Statement of Cooperation for graduate students at Johnson University. I give my word
that I will abstain from gambling, the possession and use of tobacco, illicit drugs, and liquor on or off the University grounds. I
also promise not to bring a firearm to the campus of Johnson University.

I certify that the information contained within this application is true and correct. I further certify that I know the moral and
educational standards of the University, and I pledge to abide by the University policies.

I understand that completing this application does not guarantee acceptance.

Signature:                                                                                         Date:



                        SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS TO SUBMIT WITH THIS FORM


Check or money order for $50.00 – non-returnable one time application fee, payable to
Johnson University

Statement of goals and objectives for wishing to enroll in this program and how you plan to use
this material upon graduation.

         MATERIALS TO HAVE SENT TO THE TEACHER EDUCATION OFFICE

Official Copies of all Transcripts

Three References

                                               OTHER REQUIREMENTS

Schedule Phone Interview

Accepted tuition and fees for the first class are due on or before the first summer session.
Contact Student accounts
                                  CONSUMER INFORMATION


Johnson University adheres to the principles of equal educational and employment opportunity
without regard to handicap, gender, race, color, or national ethnic origin. Information on
completion/graduation rates and campus crime is available upon request from the Admissions
Office. Grievance procedures are outlined in the University catalog.



PRINCIPLES
   Authority of the Word of God
   The Bible is God's inspired revelation for Christian belief and practice.
   Lordship of Christ
   A personal relationship with Jesus Christ will bring guidance for life and enablement for
   obedience.
   Civil Authority
   Through His word, Christ calls us to obey local, state, and federal laws.
   Responsibilities of Community Living
   The mission and goals of Johnson University are stated in the University catalog. To accomplish
   this mission, the University adopts policies to maintain an optimum level of order and certain
   standards congruent with carrying out the University mission. Students are asked to recognize
   their responsibilities as members of the community and to respond positively to the policies and
   standards in order to enhance the learning environment.



STRATEGIES FOR LIVING
   Substance Use and Abuse
   The Bible describes our body as a "temple of the Holy Spirit." Irrefutable evidence has been
   presented that tobacco, alcoholic beverages, non-medicinal narcotics, and hallucinogenic drugs
   will harm the body. Therefore, students who possess, use or distribute any of the above while a
   member of the Johnson University community can expect dismissal from the University.
   Additionally, all students found guilty of possession, use or distribution of illicit drugs lose all
   eligibility for Title IV financial aid according to section 5301 of the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988,
   as well as University financial aid. A Substance Use and Abuse Policy statement will be
   distributed annually to the student body and is available upon request in the Student Development
   Office.
   Racial and Ethnic Diversity
   Johnson University encourages a diverse community of believers and subscribes to the equal right
   of all to pursue excellence in their lives without inhibitions based on their race or ethnicity. The
   Bible underscores this approach in the many passages, which describe our ―oneness in Christ
Jesus.‖ Racial or ethnic discrimination in any form is not condoned in Scripture, is not tolerated
according to federal law, and is not acceptable at Johnson University.
Sexual Harassment
Johnson University views any form of sexual harassment, verbal and physical, as inconsistent with
Biblical teaching and the standards of the University. Harassment of employees or students is
considered illegal sex discrimination and in violation of Title IX of the 1972 Education Act for
Students. Violators are subject to disciplinary action, including suspension or dismissal.
Complaints should be reported immediately to the Dean of Students. In all cases, confidentiality
will be maintained to the extent possible as required by applicable law.
Sexual Conduct
Johnson University encourages the development of healthy relationships between men and
women. Johnson University also recognizes that sexual relationships are designed by God for
expression only in the context of a committed heterosexual marriage. We believe that sexually
immoral behavior, including premarital sex, adultery, cohabitation with the opposite sex, and
homosexual acts, nullifies a positive experience of faith and learning. Students involved in such
behavior should expect dismissal.
Honesty
Lying, cheating, and stealing will spoil the educational experience for the student and the
University. Students engaged in such behavior should expect disciplinary action.
Speech and Conversation
Learning from one another in the Teacher Education Program is built on the principles of trust and
affirmation. Trust and affirmation is communicated in verbal and nonverbal ways. The Scriptures
teach us to ―not let any unwholesome talk come out of our mouths, but only what is helpful for
building others up…‖ Therefore, slanderous, profane, sacrilegious, obscene, or suggestive
language is considered inappropriate for a Johnson University student.
Holistic Critical Thinking
Part of the educational experience at Johnson University is the development of critical thinking
with regard to the relationship of ―spiritual‖ life and ―secular‖ life. We believe that God wants us
to make choices in all ways of life that reflect His values. With that in mind, members of the
Johnson University community are called upon to critically evaluate the effect of certain aspects of
our culture on our spiritual life.
Entertainment profoundly affects culture. Radio, television, films, videos, literature, drama and
music all have the potential of negatively affecting our spiritual life, especially when they use
obscenity, pornography, degradation, lewdness, sensuality, violence, or glorify any value that is in
opposition to your Christian values. Gambling also negatively affects our spiritual life. The
Scripture offers us a criteria for evaluating what kind of entertainment will positively affect
spiritual life: ―whatever is true, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever
is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy—think about such things‖ (Phil. 4:8).
Johnson University wants to facilitate the development of holistic critical thinking. Johnson
University wants you to understand that a productive educational experience is one in which
critical thinking will extend beyond the classroom to all of life. Therefore, members of the
Johnson University teacher education graduate program are called upon to critically evaluate the
effect of entertainment choices on their spiritual life and to make decisions that are compatible
with God’s will. Students are encouraged to discuss questions about this policy with the Dean of
Students.

								
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