Docstoc

Virginia Beach Acts on Poverty

Document Sample
Virginia Beach Acts on Poverty Powered By Docstoc
					          September 19, 2009
               Hosted by the
Department of Human Services
       Robert Morin, Director




                                1
 Virginia Beach Acts on Poverty
              Goal

Develop strategies to reduce poverty
and enhance economic opportunity for
all citizens of Virginia Beach



                                       2
Virginia Beach Acts on Poverty
 Welcome and Introductions - Robert Morin
    Meeting Objectives/Long Term Outcomes
 VA Summit on Poverty – Christine Bishop
 Poverty in Virginia Beach: By the Numbers –Earl Ford
 Facilitated Discussion: Identifying Barriers and
  Defining Poverty in Virginia Beach led by Susan Steed
 Poverty Simulation Planning Exercise - Karen Munden
 Closing – Robert Morin



                                                          3
Department of Human Services (DHS)
Community Services Board (CSB)
Social Services Advisory Board (SSAB)
Family & Youth Opportunities Strategic Issues Team (FYO)
Governor’s Initiative: Rethinking Poverty
Virginia Beach Community (YOU)




                                                           4
Department of
Human Services
Community Services
Board (CSB)

Social Services Advisory
Board (SSAB)

Family and Youth
Opportunity Strategic
Issues Team (FYO)




                           5
   Community Services Board
 Provides a continuum of care for persons with
  mental health, substance use disorders and
  developmental disabilities
 15 citizens appointed by City Council
 Review and evaluate the community-based mental
  health, substance abuse and developmental
  services delivery system
 Mrs. Melva Martin, Vice-Chair



                                                   6
Social Services Advisory Board
 Monitor formulation and implementation of
  social welfare programs in the city
 Advisory
 5 citizens appointed by City Council
 Dr. Susan Moore, Chair




                                              7
   Family and Youth Opportunity
    Strategic Issues Team (FYO)
                     Mission:
To develop and recommend strategic options
which foster the health, economic vitality, safety
and well being of families, youth and at risk
individuals in our city.



                                                     8
Rethinking Poverty
    Christine Bishop




                       9
The Poverty Reduction Task Force
Key Areas:

  Asset Development
  Individual & Community Resilience
  Workforce Training & Education




                                       10
VA Summit on Poverty
  One of 21 states engaged in Poverty Reduction
   Efforts
  Nationally 10th lowest in Poverty Rate
  Poverty Rate averaged 10% for the last 20 years
  21.5% of those living below poverty < HS
   education
  76% of children in poverty live in single parent
   homes

                                                      11
VA Summit on Poverty
  Only 4 states extend fewer
   unemployment benefits
  Only 3 states spend less on Medicaid
  Only 7 states have more stringent
   Medicaid rules



                                          12
13
Strategies to Reduce Poverty on a
State Level
 Expand eligibility requirements for existing federal
    programs (Temporary Assistance to Needy Families-
    TANF)
   Increase access to health care for those at or below
    poverty
   Provide additional funding for economic development
   Lower taxes or provide greater incentives to businesses
   Expand existing unemployment benefits
   Revise VA tax structure to provide greater return to
    working
   Raise awareness of Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC)
                                                              15
Strategies to Reduce Poverty on a
Local Level
 Provide Job Training or Re-Training
 Improve K-12 Education
 Increase Awareness of Assistance Services
 Expand Access to Health and Human Services
 Improve High School Graduation Rates
 Expand Access to TANF
 Increase Wages
 Expand Access to Public Transportation


                                               17
 Important Community Strategies

 Risk Taking Behavior           Financial and Life Skills
 Teen Pregnancy Rate            Education and Graduation
                                    Rates
 Domestic Violence Abuse and
                                   New businesses and jobs
  Neglect Issues
                                   Job Training and Retraining
 Drug Use
                                   Affordable Health Insurance
 Crime
                                   Wages
                                   Technical and Science Skills
                                   Public Transportation
                                    Options

                                                                   18
By the Numbers
    Earl Ford




                 19
Living Wage Calculation
 Living Wage: Hourly rate an individual must earn to
  support their family, if they are the sole provider and
  are working full-time (2080 hours per year).
 State Minimum Wage: Same for all individuals,
  regardless of number of dependents.
 Poverty Rate: Typically quoted as gross annual income;
  converted it to an hourly wage for comparison. Wages
  less than the Living Wage are shown in red.



                                                        20
Living Wage Calculation for
Virginia Beach
  Insert the table
Hourly Wages  One Adult   One Adult,   Two Adults,
                          One Child    Two Children

Living Wage $9.30         $16.93       $27.45
            ($19,337)     ($35,218)    ($57,091)
Minimum     $7.25         $7.25        $7.25
Wage        ($15,080)     ($15,080)    ($15,080)

Poverty       $5.04       $6.68        $9.83
Wage          ($10,483)   ($13,894)    ($20,446)



                                                      21
Monthly Expenses           One Adult    One Adult ,   Two Adults, Two
                                        One Child     Children

Food                       $232.00      $378.00       $740.00
Child Care                 $0           $572.00       $1,012.00
Medical                    $76.00       $151.00       $302.00
Housing                    $787.00      $904.00       $904.00
Transportation             $232.00      $397.00       $794.00
Other                      $188.00      $369.00       $738.00
Monthly After Tax Income   $1,515.00    $2,771.00     $4,490.00
That’s Required

Annual after-Tax Income    $18,180.00   $33,252.00    $53,885
That’s Required

Annual Taxes               $1,157.00    $1,966.00     $3,205.00
Annual Before Tax Income   $19,337.00   $35,218.00    $57,091.00
That’s Required

                                                                   22
 Case Profile: 1 Adult
• Age: 55
• Working part-time: 30 – 35 hours/week
• Minimum Wage: $7.25 hour
• Monthly Income: $1,013.21
• No benefits from employer
• Rents a room: $500 mo./utilities incl.


                                           23
Possible Benefits
 Plan First: Very limited medical
  coverage
 EITC: Up to $438 per year
 TANF: None; not eligible
 SNAP (Food Stamps): $48 per month


                                      24
Case Profile: 1 Adult, 1 Child
   Adult: Age 25; Child: Infant
   Working part-time: 30 – 35 hours/week
   Minimum Wage: $7.25 hour
   Monthly Income: $1,013.21
   Annual: $12,158
   No benefits from employer
   Shelter: $750 month + utilities
   Child care: Family member – $50 week



                                            25
Possible Benefits
 Medicaid: Child only
 Plan First: For adult; very limited coverage
 EITC: Up to $2917 per year
 TANF: None; over income
 SNAP: $303 per month
 Child Care Subsidy: $165
Note: If infant in a licensed center, cost = $860 mo.;
  parent would pay $226. mo.


                                                         26
Case Profile: 1 Adult, 2 Children
• Adult: Age 25; Child: 1 infant, 1 school-age
• Working part-time: 10 – 15 hours/week
• Minimum Wage: $7.25 hour
• Monthly Income: $430.00 (annual: $5,160)
• Child Support: $500 month ($6,000)
• Shelter: Lives w/family member; $200
  mo/utilities included
• Child care: Provided by family member – $50
  week

                                                 27
Possible Benefits

 Medicaid: Children only
 Plan First: For adult; very limited coverage
 EITC: minimal
 TANF: None; over income
 SNAP: $315 per month



                                                 28
Poverty and Participation
Government Programs: 2005-2007
Percent below poverty level in Virginia Beach
  People in poverty - 7%
  Related children under 18 years of age – 10%
  All families - 5%
  Female householder with children – 25.5%
  People age 65 and over – 5%


                                                  29
Predicting Poverty
Two Leading Indicators of Poverty
  Unemployment
    3.8% (2008)
    6.6% (2009)
  Food Stamp Caseload


                                    30
FS/SNAP Caseload
 2005-2007      FS caseload averaged 7, 287
 Today          SNAP caseload        11,350

Remember that in 2005-2007, the poverty rate was 7%
The caseload has increased by 58% since 2007.
What impact will this have on the poverty rate?


                                                      32
Other Indicators –
Virginia Beach Numbers
 32% increase in requests to Food Bank of
  Southeastern VA since last fiscal year
 67 = average monthly Water Assistance requests
 585 = average monthly Cooling Assistance requests
 397 = number of dropouts 2007-2008
 29.1% = students receiving free or reduced lunches



                                                       33
       Other Assistance Requests
                    3 month average
 Utilities – 200
 Emergency Shelter – 27
 Permanent Housing Information – 18
 Rent/Eviction – 68
 Food, Clothing, Rx, Transportation – 27
             Total Requests Received = 387
               Assistance Provided = 99
                Unmet Needs = 288


                                             34
Susan Steed
 Sherri Lee




              35
Discussion
 What does poverty in
 Virginia Beach mean to
 you?
 Who is in need of
 services?
                          36
Discussion

What are the barriers to
offering services?


                           37
Karen Munden




               38
Baseline Poverty Literature Review
National:
 Annie E. Casey Foundation, Reduce Poverty and Promote Opportunity, January 09
 www.aecf.org/~/media/PublicationFiles/BriefPoverty_final.pdf
 About Annie E. Casey Foundation:
   www.aecf.org/Home/AboutUs/MissionAndHistory.aspx
 Blank, Rebecca and Mark H. Greenburg, Improving the Measurement of Poverty,
   December 2008
 www.brookings.edu/papers/2008/~/media/Files/rc/papers/2008/12_poverty_meas
   urement_blank/12_poverty_measurement_blank.pdf
 About Brookings Institute: www.brookings.edu/about.aspx
 Urban and Rural Children Experience Similar Rates of Low-Income and Poverty,
   Summer 2008
 www.carseyinstitute.unh.edu/publications/IB_UrbanRuralChildren08.pdf
 About Carsey Institute: www.carseyinstitute.unh.edu/about08.htm
Census Bureau: Poverty
 www.census.gov/hhes/www/poverty/poverty.html
 Health and Human Services: Poverty
 http://aspe.hhs.gov/poverty/index.shtml
Virginia:
Virginia Performs: Poverty
 http://vaperforms.virginia.gov/indicators/economy/poverty.php#data
                                                                                  39

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:5
posted:9/24/2011
language:English
pages:36