Docstoc

CQS_INTRO_PACK__WEB

Document Sample
CQS_INTRO_PACK__WEB Powered By Docstoc
					C H A N Q U A N S H U
School of Daoist Arts

     An Introduction
CHANQUANSHU ...............................................................................................................4
Martial Arts Practices............................................................................................................................ 4

Health Preservation Practices ............................................................................................................... 4

Spiritual Practices .................................................................................................................................. 4

TAIJIQUAN ..........................................................................................................................5
1. Full Syllabus ....................................................................................................................................... 5

2. Health and Relaxation Syllabus ........................................................................................................ 5

Types of Taijiquan ................................................................................................................................. 5

Taijiquan Classes at Chanquanshu Wales........................................................................................... 6

TAIJIQUAN FULL SYLLABUS LEVELS 1-3 ..........................................................................7

Taijiquan Level 1 ................................................................................................................................... 7

Taijiquan Level 2 ................................................................................................................................... 7

Taijiquan Level 3 ................................................................................................................................... 8

Taijiquan for Older Adults ................................................................................................................... 9

QUANSHU ..............................................................................................................................9

DAOYI N ................................................................................................................................10

Daoyin Yangsheng Gong ..................................................................................................................... 11

Daoyin at Chanquanshu Wales ........................................................................................................... 12

MEDITATION ........................................................................................................................12

Concentrative Meditation .................................................................................................................... 12

Insight Meditation ................................................................................................................................ 12

CHINESE THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE .................................................................................12

Tuina Anmo .......................................................................................................................................... 12

Fuzang Anmo ........................................................................................................................................ 13

Meditation & Massage at Chanquanshu Wales ................................................................................ 14

CLASSROOM ETIQUETTE ..................................................................................................14


                                                                                                                                                        2
Dress Code ............................................................................................................................................ 14

INSTRUCTORS .....................................................................................................................14

Gordon Faulkner - Principal Instructor ............................................................................................ 14

Other Instructors ................................................................................................................................. 15

Mike Hart.............................................................................................................................................. 15

Apprentice Instructors......................................................................................................................... 16

PETER RALSTON & CHENG HSIN .....................................................................................16

What Is Cheng Hsin ............................................................................................................................. 17
 The No Way ....................................................................................................................................... 18
 Martial ................................................................................................................................................ 18
 Ontological ......................................................................................................................................... 19
 Why Cheng Hsin T’ui Shou ............................................................................................................... 19

Cheng Hsin at Chanquanshu Wales ................................................................................................... 20

TO CONTACT US .................................................................................................................20

Mike Hart                  Head Office .............................................................................................................. 20

CLASSES, CLASS FEES, MEMBERSHIP AND INSURANCE ............................................21

Class Times ........................................................................................................................................... 21
  Swansea .............................................................................................................................................. 21
  Llanelli ............................................................................................................................................... 21
  Membership Polo Shirt Offer ............................................................................................................. 21

TESTIMONIALS ....................................................................................................................22




                                                                                                                                                           3
Chanquanshu
C H A N Q U A N S H U is a school that teaches techniques based upon Daoist
principles of `Internal Energy'. The name Chanquanshu is composed of three elements.

                         禪       Chan = meditation
                         拳      Quan = boxing or fist
                         術      Shu = art

Therefore Chanquanshu can be translated as: THE ART OF THE MEDITATIVE
FIST.
Daoist Arts covers a range subjects such as:

Martial Arts Practices
     · Quanshu
     · Taijiquan

Health Preservation Practices
     · Daoyin Yangsheng Gong
     · Daoist Meditation
     · Taijiquan
     · Chinese Therapeutic Massage

Spiritual Practices
      · Daoist Meditation
      · Daoist Philosophy

As you can see from the diagram there is a great deal of overlap between the three
different branches of the school.
These three branches are divided into five separate aspects of the school and each of
those aspects has its own syllabus. The five parts are: taijiquan, quanshu, daoyin,
meditation and massage.
The purpose of the system is to train the whole person, both physically and
psychologically (psychophysical training) to arrive at a central equilibrium - a state of
total harmony and balance within oneself and with the world at large. This
understanding is achieved through a combination of the above subjects.

The Chanquanshu School is affiliated with the following organisations:

      British Council for Chinese Martial Arts
      Tai Chi Union for Great Britain
      Scotland & Wales Daoyin Yangsheng Gong Association
      European Daoyin Yangsheng Gong Federation
      Beijing University of Physical Education


                                                                                       4
TAIJIQUAN
The Chanquanshu schools of Taijiquan run two types of syllabus.

1. Full Syllabus
Which contains Modern & Traditional Yang Forms, T’ui shou, San shou, Da Lu,
Applications, Weapons and Qinna, Health and Relaxation, and History and Philosophy.

2. Health and Relaxation Syllabus
Includes the History and Philosophy from the Full Syllabus but expands the Qigong and
Meditation parts of the Health and Relaxation section.

Each Chanquanshu school of Taijiquan is slightly different from the others. For while
the Core Syllabus is standard each instructor is encouraged to bring his own skills and
experiences to the individual school syllabus.

The Core Syllabus is based on the modern routines of `24-Step Taijiquan' and `32-Step
Taiji Jian' along with the more traditional Yang solo and partner forms, applications,
etc.. The overall bias in Chanquanshu is toward Qinna techniques.

Types of Taijiquan
Today although there are many different types of Taijiquan there are only five major
styles.

The school with the longest history is the Chen. Retaining the old-styled practice which
was popular in Chenjiagou, this style contains vigorous as well as gentle movements.
With jumps, leaps and explosions of strength, the performance followed a circular path.
The Chen school is known as "Lao Jia" (Old Frame).

The most popular school is the Yang. Systematised by Yang Chengfu (1883-1936),
grandson of Yang Luchan, its main characteristic features were: extended and natural
postures, slow and even motions, light and steady movements, and curved, flowing
lines of performance. The Yang school was given the name "Da Jia" (Big Frame).

The Wu school, also referred to as the Hao style, was established by Wu Yuxiang
(1812-1880), a fellow villager of Yang Luchan. This branch of Taijiquan was
disseminated and popularised by Hao Weizhen (1849-1920), a follower of Wu
Yuxiang. The main characteristic feature of the Hao style is that it consists of a well-
knit series of forms, with simple, quick and short-range movements mostly involving
opening and closing of the arms - giving rise to the name "Xiao Jia" (Small Frame)

The Sun school of Taijiquan was developed by Sun Lutang (1861-1932). Originally a
pupil of Hao Weizhen, Sun created a style of his own with dextrous and nimble
movements performed at a quick tempo and with lively footwork - which gave rise to
name "Huobu Jia" (Lively Pace Frame).

                                                                                      5
Yet another style was created by Quan You who studied with Yang Luchan and his son
Yang Banhou. This style, also called Wu and known as "Zhong Jia" (Medium Frame),
was popularised by his son Wu Jianquan (1870-1942). With moderate postures and
well-knit lithe movements, its actions also followed a circular path.

After the founding of New China in 1949, Taijiquan underwent unprecedented
development. Physical culture workers and medical personnel in China collected and
studied various schools of Taijiquan and special hanging charts, books and musical
compositions were published. In 1956, a simplified set of Taijiquan based on the most
popular sequences of the Yang school was issued. This series consists of twenty-four
forms which progress logically from the easy to the difficult. This "Simplified
Taijiquan" has proved to be a great stimulus to the popularisation of the art.

Taijiquan Classes at Chanquanshu Wales
In addition to the standard forms taught throughout the Chanquanshu syllabus (see
later) we also teach the Cheng Hsin Mini Tai Chi Set, of 12 moves performed each side.
This form is taught purely to teach the student body structure and movement that can
then be applied to other Tai Chi forms. It has a different function to the 13 step Tai Chi
Chi Kung form covered in Level 2 of the full syllabus.

Once the student has gained competence in the physical mechanics of the postures, they
are trained more in depth on the correct principles of structure, movement and power
transfer through the system. These principles however, are introduced from the very
beginning, although obviously the student first has to learn the physical choreography.
We stress the use of the principles from the very start of your training with us as these
are what make your movements Taijiquan, not the choreography.

"Learning form and movement without understanding function and intent is like fruit
made of wax. Looks good on the outside but nothing inside. It is not real, only an
imitation."
Li, Long-dao.

Rather than teach you a set of movements incorrectly we guide you along the way,
letting you experience incorrect movement first and then teaching the ―feel‖ of how it
should be done, so you have a comparison and can feel how the principles of taijiquan
manifest in your body – or at least understand the concepts clearly so you may work
towards proficiency and accomplishment. Everyone has at least a little personal tuition
in the class to help with feeling your body structure and movement and also to point out
any major errors in your postures

You will also work in some exercises with a partner to help get feedback on many
aspects of your training, something that solo practice alone doesn’t give. We use fun
and challenging interactions with your fellow class mates to help you gauge your level
of relaxedness, structural defects (or lack of them!) and understanding of function and


                                                                                        6
intent in your postures. Together we will help you build a complete picture of
understanding, of the art you study, from a psychophysical angle.

Taijiquan Full Syllabus Levels 1-3
Taijiquan Level 1
Solo Practice
24-Step Taijiquan
Perform in a competent manner
Knowledge of applications for Lan Que Wei
Name each movement
Additional
Demonstrate stances
Demonstrate hand positions
Demonstrate linking moves
Daoyin Yangsheng Gong Practice
Daoyin Baojian Gong
Know purpose of the exercise
Perform in a competent manner
Name each movement
Know primary focus of each movement
Knowledge
Taijiquan
What is Taiji & how does it relate to Taijiquan
Basic history of Taijiquan
Daoyin
What is Daoyin
Basic history of Daoyin Yangsheng Gong

Taijiquan Level 2
Solo Practice
24-Step Taijiquan
Perform in a proficient manner
Knowledge of primary application for each movement
13-Step Taijiquan
Perform in a competent manner
Name each movement
Knowledge of primary application for each movement
Additional
Perform Basic strikes in a competent manner
Lan Que Wei at combat speed
Partner Practice
Joined-Hands
Perform in a competent manner
Tuishou: Basic Single- & Double-hand with Fixed- & Moving-step

                                                                             7
Sanshou: Parts 1 and 2 ¾ slow
Qinna: Lan Que Wei Routine & 3 Neutralisations
Applications
Lan Que Wei in a competent manner
Basic one-step routines in a competent manner
Daoyin Yangsheng Gong Practice
Daoyin Baojian Gong
Perform in a proficient manner
Shujin Zhuanggu Gong
Know purpose of the exercise
Perform in a competent manner
Name each movement
Know primary focus of each movement
Knowledge
Main points from Taijiquan classics

Taijiquan Level 3
Solo Practice
13-Step Taijiquan
Perform in a proficient manner
13-Step Fast Taijiquan
Perform in a competent manner
108-Step Taijiquan
Perform in a competent manner
Name each movement
32-Step Taiji Jian
Perform in a competent manner
Name each movement
Partner Practice
Joined-Hands
Perform in a competent manner
Tuishou: Fixed-step, Five-step and Free Style
Sanshou: Parts 3 and 4 — slow
Qinna: Breakouts, Takedowns & applications from 24-Step Form
Applications
All applications from 24-Step Form
Additional
Perform previous level techniques at improved standard
Iron Shirt Masterclass
Meditation Foundation I Course
Daoyin Yangsheng Gong Practice
Daoyin Baojian Gong
Know the therapeutic uses of the form
Shujin Zhuanggu Gong
Know purpose of the exercise
                                                               8
Perform in a proficient manner
Knowledge
Internal structure of Taijiquan
The Jingluo (Meridian) system of the body

Taijiquan for Older Adults
Taijiquan is particularly suited to older adults. It is a low impact and gentle form of
exercise, which has many benefits to the practitioner. Tai Chi has been shown in tests to
reduce the risk of falls in the elderly by up to 25%, has lowered blood pressure,
improved breathing patterns and posture, relaxed muscles and increased leg / knee
strength and overall flexibility in the body. Tai Chi is the perfect exercise for those
looking to return to exercise after a period of inactivity.

We have a lot of experience with older adults and welcome anyone who would like to
try Tai Chi as a gentle way to get back into physical exercise

QUANSHU
There are two parts to the Martial Arts training in the Chanquanshu schools.
Part 1.
Quanshu Core Syllabus covers the area that would roughly correspond to the training of
gongfu (kungfu). Training is `external' in the early stages but then gradually transforms
into `internal'.




Part 2.
Taijiquan was originally included in the Quanshu area but due to its popularity has now
become an entity in its own right.

The Martial Arts in China have many designations:

wushu - military arts (main name used in China today);
quanshu - boxing arts;
quanfa - boxing techniques;
gongfu (kungfu) - mis-interpretation for the word for skill.

We generally use the term quanshu.

Many people believe that the monks from the Shaolin Temple created wushu. This of
course is wrong, for although Shaolin Quan is one of China's most well-known styles of
wushu, the Shaolin Temple was only built in 495 CE and the Buddhist monk

                                                                                       9
Bodhidharma, the mythical father of Shaolin Quan, did not arrive until the early 6th
century.

Wushu itself has a much longer history and developed alongside Chinese society. The
following is a brief summary of developments in dynastic order.

During the Shang period (1600-1066 BCE) many bronze weapons were created. These
weapons required a level of training and skill to wield them.

According to the Zhuangzi (book of Zhuangzi 370-286 BCE) during the Spring &
Autumn and Warring States (700-221 BCE) weapons training and unarmed combat was
evolving and became highly developed by the end of these periods. Even Confucius
(551-479 BCE) used to practise regularly with a sword.

During the Qin (221-207 BCE) & Han dynasties (206 BCE- 220 CE ) martial arts
competitions became regulated with the use of referees, arenas and protective clothing.
many martial routines were created. It was during the Six Dynasties (420-581) period
that the Shaolin Monastery was built and by the end of the Sui dynasty (581-618) the
outstanding skills of the Shaolin monks was well-known.

Martial Arts associations organised by ordinary people appeared in the Song dynasty
(960-1279). It is during the reign of emperor Huizong (1101-1126) that Zhang Sanfeng,
the mythical founder of Taijiquan, was a Daoist priest on mount Wudang. Daoist
priests, like their Shaolin counterparts, were well versed in wushu.

By the Ming dynasty (1368-1644) quanshu became organised into many different
schools and many books on martial art theory were printed.

The Qing dynasty (1644-1911) saw the creation of secret wushu societies.
Since the end of the Qing dynasty wushu organisation and associations both
governmental and nongovernmental have popularised the martial arts throughout China.
Wushu is now on the physical education curriculum of most schools and colleges.

DAOYI N
There have been many types of exercise throughout Chinese history. However, the
oldest and most diverse forms are Daoyin. The exercises known as Daoyin are used as
preventatives against old age and sickness, but are also used to cure certain diseases,
both chronic and acute. Daoyin is often classified as either part of traditional medical
knowledge or among the various practices of Yangsheng (also known as Zhisheng), the
art of "nourishing the vital principle" which consists of adopting a way of life according
to psycho-physical hygienic principles.

Dao refers to the fact that physical movements are guided by the strength of the mind
and in turn stimulate the internal flow of Qi within the body. Yin means that with the
aid of physical movements, Qi can reach the bodily extremities. In this way the flow of
                                                                                        10
Qi links the zang (yin) organs and fu (yang) organs, before returning to its starting
point. There are many postures and movements in Daoyin exercises, but the emphasis is
on achieving a state of harmony between body and mind.

Daoyin Yangsheng Gong
The name describes the principle of the system - Guiding and Conducting (daoyin)
Exercises (gong) for Nourishing the Vital Principle (yangsheng). Combining traditional
knowledge with modern medical theory, Daoyin Yangsheng Gong is a comprehensive
system of gentle exercises involving breath control, the stimulation of key acupoints in
the body, self massage and mental development. The system consists of sets of
exercises that are designed to promote health in all the major organs.

Some sets are specifically composed to be practised by the disabled. The exercises are
suitable for people of all ages and physical conditions.
The modern system Daoyin Yangsheng Gong was created by Zhang Guangde who was
born in Tangshan, Hebei Province, in 1931. Coming from a medical family
background, he was encouraged to develop an interest in Wushu, the Chinese system of
health promotion through martial exercise.

In 1955 he was enrolled in the Wushu Dept of the Beijing University of Physical
Education where he has remained ever since, progressing from student to Senior
Professor of the Institute.

Professor Zhang devised this new system in order to combat his own illness, which
started in the early 1970's when he began to suffer from hypertension, coronary heart
disease and hepatitis. To add to this two years later he was diagnosed as having lung
cancer. The illness was further complicated by haematopathy. Worst of all, he was
deprived of medical treatment due to his hypersensitivity to chemical drugs. He was left
at death's door. This was the spur needed to bring all the elements together. From a
keen study of the classical theories of Daoyin, Yangsheng and Longevity schools and
using a family owned "Exercises For Chronic Diseases" he had inherited from his
maternal grandfather coupled with his modern knowledge of anatomy and physiology
he began to develop Daoyin Yangsheng Gong. It was through the use of this health
system that it is claimed that the Professor overcame his own illnesses.

Since that time, he has continued his studies as well as sharing his knowledge through
teaching visits to other countries. It is estimated that throughout the world in excess of
four million students are involved in its practice.

Daoyin Yangsheng Gong was awarded the National Prize for Sports Science in 1992
and in 1996 it became recommended by the All-Chinese Sports Federation as part of
the National Fitness Program. The Chinese (Japanese and Korean) Olympic Committee
also recommends it for its athletes and the Chinese Wushu Association considers it to
be a premier healthcare system.


                                                                                       11
In 1997 the European Daoyin Yangsheng Gong Federation was formed with the
backing of the Beijing University of Physical Education and with Professor Zhang as
the Honorary President.

Daoyin at Chanquanshu Wales
At present, we don’t have any formal Daoyin classes in Swansea. Daoyin is generally
taught in the advanced taijiquan class, through private tuition or we organise weekends
where the forms and theory are taught over one or two days.

MEDITATION
Shouyi is a general term for meditation in Daoism. Since Daoism itself consists of
many traditions, each based on a different revelation of the Dao, there are many forms
of Daoist meditation, different sects practising different styles. For example:

Concentrative Meditation
Concentrative Meditation is a state in which the conscious awareness of the adept is
fixated on one single object to the exclusion of all others. Training in concentration is
usually a prerequisite to entering higher or altered states of consciousness. Guarding the
One (shouyi) and focusing on the lower Dantian are examples of this type.

Insight Meditation
Insight Meditation is an advanced type of meditation practice in which the adept applies
the power of concentration indiscriminately to all sensual stimuli. Inner Vision
(neiguan) is an example in which the adept's own body becomes the centre of focus.

Daoists use meditation to cultivate health and longevity and attain the highest level of
spiritual development, the union with the Dao. In the early stages of spiritual
development, meditation is used to clear the mind, minimise desire, balance the
emotions and circulate internal energy. In the later stages, it is used to help the
practitioner to be united with the Dao, the undifferentiated origin of all things.

Chanquanshu uses a range of traditional Daoist meditation routines that allow the
student to progress slowly using beginner to intermediate to advanced techniques.
    Beginner techniques are for improving the Body.
    Intermediate techniques are for improving the Mind.
    Advanced techniques are for improving the Spirit.

CHINESE THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE
Chinese Therapeutic Massage is a term that covers many types of massage (anmo). The
most commonly known in the West is probably Tuina Anmo, while less known is
Fuzang Anmo.

Tuina Anmo
Tuina is a method of Chinese Massage that utilizes soft tissue manipulation, acupoints,
and structural re-alignment methods to treat a wide variety of musculo-skeletal and
                                                                                       12
internal organ disorders. It uses traditional Chinese medical theory of the flow of Qi
through the channels as its basic therapeutic principle. Through various techniques
Tuina seeks to increase the circulation of Qi and Blood in order to promote healing and
relieve pain. Passive joint movements are also used to restore complete function to
muscles and joints.

As with all types of massage, most of the effects of Tuina occur through its function of
stimulating the flow of Qi, Blood, and body fluids. Many health problems are caused by
blockages of these vital fluids. Tuina can re-establish the proper flow of these fluids and
the function of the body and promote the recovery of damaged tissues.

Tuina Anmo is commonly used to treat the following conditions: Musculo-skeletal
problems, nervous systems disorders, chronic stress-related disorders of the digestive
and respiratory systems, and reproductive systems.

Fuzang Anmo
Fuzang Anmo (Internal Organ Massage) is a method of Chinese massage (pioneered in
the West by Master Mantak Chia under the name Chi Nei Tsang) which is focused
primarily, but not only, on the abdomen works through all the body systems: digestive,
cardiovascular, respiratory, lymphatic, nervous, muscle/tendon and acupuncture
channels.

Early Chinese doctors observed that humans often develop blockages in their internal
organs that result in knots and tangles in their abdomens. These obstructions occur at
the centre of the body's vital functions and constrict the flow of Qi and Blood. Negative
emotions affect the organs, while stress, accidents, drugs, toxins, bad posture, etc., can
also cause congestion. When congested, the internal organs accumulate unhealthy
energies and toxins that can overflow into other bodily systems and make us feel
unwell.

The lower abdomen is considered to be the centre of the body. Qi, Blood and other
fluids concentrate and cross paths there. It is a generator and storage place for energy as
well as the area that balances all forces and is the physical centre of gravity.
Disturbances can cause physical tangling and knotting of the nerves, blood and lymph
vessels. Fuzang Anmo can help eliminate these blockages.

Fuzang Anmo is commonly used to treat the following conditions: Intestinal blockages,
menstrual cramps, sciatica, knots and lumps, scar tissue, sports injuries, headaches,
poor blood circulation, lower back pain, infertility and impotence, Myalgic
Encephalomyelitis (ME, Chronic Fatigue), stress, abdominal masses, swellings and
fibroids.

The Chanquanshu Chinese Therapeutic Massage course includes both types, Tuina
Anmo and Fuzang Anmo.


                                                                                        13
Meditation & Massage at Chanquanshu Wales
Currently learning basic Daoist meditation can be learned at the school on the same
basis as the Daoyin Yangsheng Gong system. More advanced meditation is available in
weekend workshops from Gordon Faulkner.

Massage is only available in block courses for levels 1, 2 & 3 from Gordon Faulkner,
please ask if you are interested

CLASSROOM ETIQUETTE
Chanquanshu is a disciplined art.
   Self discipline is preferable to enforced discipline. But discipline will be
     enforced.
   When a class is split into small groups each group is assigned a teacher/leader
     and that person is then responsible for that group.
   When a teacher or group leader speaks everyone should become silent and listen.
     The teacher should not have to raise his voice.
   In the absence of the teacher, the senior student is in charge and should be
     accorded the respect due to the teacher.
   One of the main features of Chanquanshu is the strengthening of the legs,
     therefore, people should not sit down during class unless told to do so by the
     teacher/leader.
   When the class is called to order and told to line-up all discussions should cease
     and the students should form straight ordered lines.
   Working with a partner is sometimes required therefore, for safety reasons, all
     items of jewellery and watches etc. should be removed before the start of the
     class.
   The chewing of gum is forbidden in class.
   Be punctual.
   When entering the classroom get ready to start training straight away. Do not
     wait until the class is told to line-up.

Dress Code
In the absence of a wushu uniform the following is permissible:
Footwear: Comfortable trainers. No bare feet.
Tops: Black or white plain T-shirts.
Bottoms: Dark loose fitting trousers.

INSTRUCTORS
Gordon Faulkner - Principal Instructor
Gordon's interest in Chinese culture started in the early 1960's but he did not begin
training in the martial arts until 1968 and in 1972 aligned himself with the Daoist based
school known as Chanquanshu which incorporates theories of Traditional Chinese
Medicine and philosophy, as well as the combat features.

                                                                                       14
Continuous research and study lead him deeper into the Daoist Arts. This research
included his first trip to China in 1990, and studying with the creator of the
International Healing Dao Association, Master Mantak Chia, in New York. The latter
resulted in qualifying him as a teacher of the Healing Dao.

Along the way he also became accepted as a Fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society and a
member of the Society for Anglo-Chinese Understanding. And, during his career in the
Royal Air Force, was one of the founders and General Secretary of the RAF Martial
Arts Federation, a post he held until his retirement from military service in 1993 when
he became a full time Daoist Arts teacher.

In early 1994 he began to study the Daoyin Yangsheng Gong system of Medical
Qigong with Professor Zhang Guangde from the Beijing University of Physical
Education. This involved several more visits to China culminating with becoming one
of the first Westerners to be qualified as a Senior Judge certified by the China Daoyin
Yangsheng Gong Association and the China Wushu Society. Later, in 1999, he became
Ru Shi Di Zi (usually called a closed-door disciple).
On the medical side Gordon is a practitioner and teacher of Qigong Therapy and
Chinese Therapeutic Massage.

At present Gordon is Co-Director of the European Instructors Association for the
Healing Dao, President of Scotland & Wales Daoyin Yangsheng Gong Association and
Principal Instructor of the Chanquanshu School of Daoist Arts.

Other Instructors
MARIA FAULKNER                   Chief Administrator
ARCHIE MCALLAN                   Senior Instructor Morayshire
ALISTAIR BRUMFITT                Senior Instructor Morayshire
DOUGLAS HARDIE                   Highlands
DONNIE SMITH                     Head of Highland Junior Division
GARY BICKET                      Royal Air Force
MIKE HART                        Head of Chanquanshu Wales
PETER OOSTERVEER                 Switzerland

CHANQUANSHU WALES

Mike Hart
Mike currently teaches at the Dojo in Swansea. The classes are taught informally, but
self-discipline and respect where due is required to study. There is still a large element
of traditional methods and teaching at the school and students are expected to practice,
study and research in their own time to advance their skills, abilities and understanding
of the arts practised.



                                                                                         15
Mike started training in 1979 at the age of 12 in Wado Ryu karate, progressing to the Li
(Lee) family system under the late Prof. Chee Soo. At 16 became the youngest teacher
in Chee Soo's association throughout it's international branches. After some 10 years
learning and teaching Li family arts including Feng Shou Kung Fu, Li Style T’ai Chi,
Chinese Yoga, massage and weapons, work forced a break of 4 years and in 1993 met
an old student, Tony Court who was teaching Erle Montaigue's taiji system. He
qualified as a teacher of this system in 1996 and set up a school in Swansea.

After a few months he felt there was something missing in his teaching and practice and
set about researching different styles and methods of internal arts, at the same time
exposing him material on Daoist meditative disciplines. Further research revealed the
Healing Dao system of Master Mantak Chia, but where to find a teacher?

A visit to Tony Court's shop was to bring to light Gordon & Maria Faulkner of the
Chanquanshu School of Daoist Arts in Scotland. After much planning and talking over
the phone, Gordon kindly agreed to come to Swansea for the first Healing Dao
workshop and has been a visitor ever since to pass his knowledge on to students in the
South Wales area.

Mike has now found, through Chanquanshu, the "missing link" in his training and
teaching of Daoist arts and is very proud to represent Chanquanshu in Wales. He
continues his studies with Gordon Faulkner realising there is still much work to be done.

Mike has also studied Aikido, Wing Chun and has researched into many other
combative arts. He is Vice President (Wales) of the Scotland & Wales Daoyin
Yangsheng Gong Association and is a member of the Society for Anglo-Chinese
Understanding (SACU)

Mike has recently become an official Cheng Hsin Trainer with Peter Ralston. This is
not official teacher status as this takes many years. We have a Cheng Hsin group in
Swansea on Tuesday nights from 8.30 – 10pm for anyone who is interested in
experiencing this unique art.

Apprentice Instructors
Chanquanshu Wales currently has two apprentice instructors
Name                   Authorised to Teach (to level)
Russell Evans          24 step Taijiquan Form & Zhan Zhuang (Standing Qigong)
                       (Level 1)
Preston James          24 Step Taijiquan Form (Level 1)

PETER RALSTON & CHENG HSIN
Peter Ralston was raised in Asia and began studying martial arts at the age of 9. By the
age of 19 he was a black belt in Judo and Jujitsu (Nidan), black belt in Karate (Shodan),
had been Sumo champion at his high school in Japan, Judo and fencing champion at
UC Berkeley, and had demonstrated proficiency in Kempo, Ch'uan Fa and Northern Sil
                                                                                      16
Lum Kung Fu. At age 19, a growing interest in the "internal" martial arts lead him to
study T'ai Chi Ch'uan, Hsing I Ch'uan, and Pa Kua Chang.

Ralston has pursued this endeavor with a passionate determination for more than 35
years. He sought out and studied with the world's most demonstrably skilled teachers,
broadening his study with such arts as Aikido, Japanese and Chinese fencing, western
boxing, Muay Thai (Thai boxing), and new levels of his own investigations into all of
these arts. His exceptional commitment (often practicing for more than eight hours a
day) and depth of study, his intense meditation and open inquiry have led Ralston to
profound levels of skill and understanding. Consistent with Zen studies, his
investigation into martial arts also came to include a questioning of reality. Long
periods of intense contemplation resulted in many enlightenment experiences regarding
the nature of self and reality, which greatly influenced his study.

To communicate his understanding, in 1975 Ralston founded the Cheng Hsin School. In
1977 he opened a center called "The Cheng Hsin School of Internal Martial Arts and
Center for Ontological Research" in Oakland, California. Intent on revealing the depth
and power of this work, in 1978 he became the first non-Asian ever to win the World
Championship full-contact martial arts tournament held in the Republic of China.

Ralston's main focus in his teaching has been to uncover and communicate the
principles behind any subject matter; frequently it is about being effortlessly effective.
His main focus in his facilitation work is to uncover the truth of things, to break through
assumptions and beliefs, and to assist others in having a direct, authentic, and
experiential increase in Consciousness.

He has trained staff or done workshops for numerous groups, including various t'ai chi,
aikido, and other martial arts associations, as well as human transformation
organizations such as Lifesprings, Institute of Self Actualization (ISA), Robbins
Research Institute (NLP), Actualizations, and the Institute for Empowerment. He is a
highly trained and insightful facilitator, freely and openly teaching what he has learned
from years of insight and direct experience.

What Is Cheng Hsin
The Chinese words cheng hsin (pronounced "cheng shin") loosely translate as "truth"
and "being" -- an appropriate title for a body of work that involves increasing
consciousness on all levels of "being." Founded by Peter Ralston in 1975, Cheng Hsin
is grounded in a school of internal martial arts and contemplative disciplines; however,
any pursuit or course of study can be a Cheng Hsin endeavor if the objective is a real
understanding of the principles and true nature of the matter at hand.

Zen studies direct our focus beyond the reality that we take for granted, and martial
disciplines offer new possibilities for power and skill in a diverse range of activities.
World-class martial artist Peter Ralston has unified these studies of consciousness and
ability in a unique body of work known as Cheng Hsin.

                                                                                        17
Some of the forms we have used so far to pursue this work:

      Martial arts
      Contemplation
      Personal growth or transformative workshops (ontological studies)
      Intense trainings regarding personal integrity, clarity, and accountability
      Courses on the principles behind effective movement, effortless power, and
       interaction
      Development in the art of teaching or facilitation.

The overall goal of the Cheng Hsin work is to discover and experience the principles
and dynamics that construct the activity or event in question. For example, we may set
out to discover what is responsible for creating skill (whether it's being effective as an
athlete, a writer, a painter, a banker, a chef, or a contemplator), or to directly experience
the nature of being -- anything could be the subject for investigation.

The No Way
Initial encounters with the Cheng Hsin communication often create a sense of
frustration, for its fundamental nature is ungraspable by the mind. Cheng Hsin does not
lay out a path of moral righteousness nor does it define a set of concrete beliefs. It
doesn't lay out precise dogma or a set of rules to follow, and so demands patience and
commitment to comprehend. It is not immediately intelligible.

       "You can't fix Cheng Hsin on the wall with a pin because, as you try, you
       realize that Cheng Hsin is the wall, and the pin, and the action, and the
       intent."

       Frank LaManna, T'ai Chi Journal

Paradoxically however, there are definite guidelines and principles to which we adhere
-- for example, honesty, openness, questioning, and being authentic. Although we have
already established many useful methods for investigation or training, we are open to
whatever is effective or true, whether it is known by us at this moment or not.

Martial

       "Giving way, yielding, is not a meek activity, it is a positive one. Although
       passive in nature, it is effective in reality. By learning to yield and follow,
       sticking to activity without resisting, one forms a real union with that
       activity." Peter Ralston

Within the Cheng Hsin martial work, we train to obtain an effortless power and a
gracefully effective interaction. The steady background objective is to learn about
ourselves and life; to observe how our minds, emotions, and bodies currently operate;
and to discover new, more effective and freeing possibilities in how to think, feel,


                                                                                          18
move, and interact. The Cheng Hsin arts are designed in relation to the principles of an
effortlessly effective body-being and the principles of effective interaction.

      "When I began putting together Cheng Hsin T'ui Shou, I wanted to create
      an art based on fundamental observations of physics, perception, intent,
      impulse, and energy -- an art that gears itself to meet any situation because
      it is founded on understanding the principles in which interaction takes
      place. I wanted an art that is adaptable and well-designed, forged through
      training and techniques but designed to teach something beyond the form.
      Cheng Hsin T'ui Shou is such an art." Peter Ralston

Ontological
Ontology is the study of being. Zen is the most well-known example of an ontological
school. Within Cheng Hsin, although we openly consider what has been handed down
from the past, we do not want to simply follow any presuppositions or dogmas. Instead,
we reach for an authentic encounter, a direct experience of the truth.

Cheng Hsin is pursued in ontological work such as contemplation intensives and other
powerful workshops designed to penetrate and awaken "mind." We investigate the
nature of emotion, thought, perception, interaction, communication -- anything that we
are involved in as human beings. Our purpose is to have direct insights that provide us
with a more conscious experience of the truth. The methods of inquiry are many,
ranging from dialogue, exercises and experimentation, to pure contemplation.

Four of the fundamental principles on which Cheng Hsin stands as an investigation are:
Honesty, Questioning, Direct Experience, and Grounded Openness. It is an alive and
evolving endeavor, committed to an experience of what's true rather than a set of
beliefs.

      "The essence of Cheng Hsin is found in questioning our own event. We're
      striving to honestly investigate our actions, emotions, beliefs, relationships,
      and experience. It seems that in grasping the truth of any matter, the
      possibility arises of becoming more powerful, effective, and balanced in
      relation to that matter."

      "Cheng Hsin is non-moral, non-political and non-religious. The intent is
      not to embrace a new belief system, but rather to question and challenge
      openly and honestly the nature of our event -- any aspect of being alive.
      This often means challenging our existing beliefs." Peter Ralston

Why Cheng Hsin T’ui Shou
Unfortunately, most Martial Arts are practised with little understanding of the
principles on which they are founded, and the practices have become limited to single
realms of study and dogma. Peter Ralston has endeavoured to expand and deepen this
study ~ yet worked hard to avoid this art becoming just another eclectic gathering.

                                                                                        19
Cheng Hsin T'ui Shou is an Art - a direct expression of the principles of movement and
interaction. It is a study of effective and sensitive participation in spontaneously
unfolded interactions. It develops relaxation, groundedness, awareness and a subtlety
of interaction rarely found or understood. This practice endeavours to change our state
of being from one of reactive habit to one in which all techniques are done effortlessly.
The goal is to bring forth effortless power, a power that, by design, directs our
development towards mastery.

Cheng Hsin at Chanquanshu Wales
In our Cheng Hsin classes the focus is on developing skill and consciousness. There is
no room for anyone’s ego. We work to develop ours and our partners skills to become
effective in the principles of interaction. We learn ritualised techniques and do a lot of
exercises and games to help our awareness. We also frequently engage our partners in
freeplay, everyone’s favourite, where we learn much more about interaction than we
can in the ritualised techniques. Rather than ―inflict‖ a technique on our partner we try
to learn where to apply the technique when it is appropriate.

       Until one is committed, there is hesitancy, the chance to draw back, always
ineffectiveness. Concerning all acts of initiative (and creation), there is one
elementary truth, the ignorance of which kills countless ideas and splendid plans:
that the moment one definitely commits oneself, then Providence moves, too.
       All sorts of things occur to help one that would never otherwise have occurred.
A whole stream of events issues from the decision, raising in ones favour all manner
of unforeseen incidents & meetings and material assistance, which no one could have
dreamed would have come his way.

Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power and
magic in it. Begin it now
Goethe

To Contact Us
Mike Hart                                    Head Office
Tel:         01792 415310                    Maria Faulkner, School Administrator
Mob:         07812 076440                    Tel: 01463 231869
Email:       mike.hart@ntlworld.com          Fax: 01463 239139
Web:         www.taichiwales.com             Email: quanshu@quanshu.co.uk
                                             Websites: www.quanshu.co.uk &
                                             www.daoyin.co.uk.




                                                                                       20
CLASSES, CLASS FEES, MEMBERSHIP AND INSURANCE
On the following pages you will find all the information you need on the above,
including testimonials from existing students. If you have any questions please don’t
hesitate to ask.

We look forward to receiving you membership application. If you decide to join us
please tear out and complete all three forms in full and return them to us with your
membership fee.

If for some reason you decide not to join the Chanquanshu family, please would you be
kind enough to return this information pack to us to help save on our costs. We design,
print and produce these packs ourselves as we cannot afford to employ the services of a
printer.

Class Times
Our regular class times are as follows:
Swansea
       Day               Class             Time                        Place
Taijiquan Classes
      Tuesday       Modern Taijiquan    7 –8:30pm              The Dojo, Manselton
     Thursday      Beginners Taijiquan 6:30 –8pm               The Dojo, Manselton
     Thursday      Advanced Taijiquan 8 – 9:30pm               The Dojo, Manselton
Cheng Hsin Classes
      Tuesday         Cheng Hsin       8:30 – 10pm             The Dojo, Manselton
Llanelli
    Day                 Class                   Time                  Place
Taijiquan
 Wednesday Taijiquan for the Over 50s 6:30-7:30pm            Calsonic Kansei Llanelli
 Wednesday         Modern Taijiquan           6 – 7pm        Trallwm Community Hall
  Saturday         Modern Taijiquan        11am – 12pm Trallwm Community Hall
Calsonic Classes are FREE to over 50s living in certain catchment areas of Llanelli
Membership Polo Shirt Offer
Please note that as standard, everyone who joins the Chanquanshu Association receives
a free embroidered polo shirt, in black, with the Fist & Butterfly logo in Gold and Red.

We look forward to welcoming you as a member of the Chanquanshu Family.

Best regards

Mike Hart
Head of Chanquanshu Wales

                                                                                     21
TESTIMONIALS
The following testimonials come from our students at both the Swansea and Llanelli
classes.

   “Since starting tai chi, I find my coordination, concentration and mobility has
improved considerably. Also I am enjoying the classes immensely, the movements are
explained in detail which makes it easier to learn, I am always sorry when the class
ends”
                                                                   J Collard, Llanelli

   “A feeling of well being, relaxed, subtlety, mobility and inner calm. I really do enjoy
the hour of tai chi. If for any reason I miss a session or two, I notice the stiffness and
tension creeping in and can’t wait to get back to class”
                                                                           V. Ives, Pembrey

    “In the few months I have been learning how to practice Tai Chi I have noticed
many subtle and more pronounced improvements in almost every area of my life. My
general attitude is more relaxed which has led me to cut down on my previous “props”
of cigarettes and alcohol
    I’m more in tune with my body and surroundings, which, considering the simple
techniques that Tai Chi (and Daoism in general) teaches, produces an incredible
feeling of well-being – something I’m keen to pursue further.”
                                                                 Russ Crosby, Swansea

   “An enjoyable and interesting class. I feel healthier and more relaxed. I’m certainly
feeling the benefit and look forward to each class. Hopefully I’m improving and
learning the basics of Tai Chi. Thanks for your patience!!”
                                                                 Sandra Piggott, Llanelli

   “The classes are run in a pleasant and relaxed manner, new material taught in a
well structured manner. As the form develops, the air of achievement increases the
pleasure in the form. The benefits to health and mobility are very noticeable over the
months.”
                                                                Mary Williams, Swansea

   “When I began the classes last year I had a painful knee injury and suffered from a
painful neck and shoulder> Since attending the classes I have found that the knee &
neck/shoulder pain, from which I have suffered for many years has gone. I believe the
correction of my knee positioning to my toes and the strengthening of my leg muscles
while practising the Tai Chi form has helped alleviate the pain and strengthen my knee.
   From learning the relaxation techniques used within Tai Chi I am able to recognise
tension within my muscles, particularly within my neck and shoulder and this has given
me the ability to release the tension. (cont’d over)


                                                                                        22
   I enjoy attending the classes, I find Mike and Preston make the classes interesting
and fun. They are very patient when teaching a new part of the form and with new
students, encouraging comments and questions.
   I personally obtain a lot of pleasure when practising the Tai Chi form and
occasionally experiencing energy flow when a movement is practised correctly,
something that I look forward to happening more frequently as I become more
experienced”
                                                                    Jill Davies, Swansea




                                                                                     23

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:6
posted:9/22/2011
language:English
pages:23