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					PROJECT TITLE:


Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Site 200000900


A. Abstract and statement of innovation

The Burns Paiute Tribe acquired the Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Site in April 2000. This
project is ongoing and allows the Tribe to manage 1760 acres of wet meadow, wetland, forest
and sagebrush steppe habitats at the headwaters of the Malheur River while addressing multiple
goals for fish, wildlife and Tribal members. The deeded property includes approximately seven
miles of McCoy, Lake, and Big Creeks which combine to form the Malheur River. The project
benefits a diverse population of fish, wildlife, and plant species but focal species include bull
trout (Salvelinus confluentus), redband trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Rocky Mountain elk
(Cervus elaphus), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), and pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra
americana). Objectives include reviving and improving critical habitat for fish and wildlife
populations, controlling/eradicating weed populations, improving water quality, forest fuels
reduction management and preserving cultural resources for Tribal members. Our biological
objectives will be completed by planting native vegetation, removing and improving fence,
restoring wetlands, irrigating, controlling noxious weeds, cattle grazing, and providing hunting
opportunities for Tribal members. The objectives will be met by seasonal and permanent staff of
the Burns Paiute Fish and Wildlife Department.

B. Problem statement: technical and/or scientific background

The Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Site (Mitigation Site) is located south of the Strawberry
Wilderness in Grant County, Oregon. The Mitigation Site consists of 1,760 deeded acres in
which Lake Creek, Big Creek, and McCoy Creek combine to form the Malheur River (Figure 1).

In 1998, the Burns Paiute Tribe submitted a land acquisition proposal to Bonneville Power
Administration (BPA) to acquire the Mitigation Site. In February 2000, the Tribe and BPA
entered into a Memorandum of Agreement to fund the acquisition and management of the
Mitigation Site. The MOA requires the Tribe to dedicate the Mitigation Site to wildlife habitat
protection.

The 1986 Oregon Natural Heritage Program assessed Logan Valley as one of the best examples
of mountain meadows in the Blue Mountain Ecoregion. The Project’s unique assemblage of
habitat types includes upland forest, wet meadow, aspen stands, bottomland forest, wetlands and
sagebrush steppe. Table 1 outlines species in the ecoregion designated as sensitive, threatened,
endangered, or of special concern by state and federal listings. A number of the species listed
are known to occur on Project lands.




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                                                                                            Study Area
                                      Wilderness
                                      Boundary
                                                                  OREGON




                      McCoy Creek
                                                     Lake Creek
                                                                                    Big Creek




                                                      16rd




                  0 0.5 1                2
                                          Miles              Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Site



                              Figure 1: Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Site.

Bird surveys have detected the state and federally listed Lewis’ woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis)
for the last three consecutive years. Two species state listed as sensitive in other ecoregions, the
greater sandhill crane (Grus Canadensis tabida) and the willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii
adastus), have likewise been documented annually since 2006. Upland sandpipers (Bartramia
longicauda) breed on the Project. One of only four known areas in Oregon. The Project also
doubles as both a waterfowl nesting area and as important summer habitat for the state and
federally designated greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus).

The threatened bull trout resides on the Project and spawns a short distance upstream (Schwabe
et al. 2008). The redband trout, designated as sensitive and as a species of concern, inhabits the
same Project streams (Schwabe et al. 2008). The Columbia spotted frog (Rana luteiventis) has
been spotted by tribal biologists on more than one occasion.



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  The Project is a known birthing area for pronghorn (Antilocapra americana), Rocky Mountain
  elk (Cervus elaphus) and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus).


Table 1: Special Status Wildlife Species of the Blue Mountain Ecoregion
 Scientific Name                  Common Name                       Federal Status           State Status
 Amphibians and Reptiles
 Ascaphus montanus                Inland Tailed Frog              species of concern             sensitive
 Bufo boreas                      Western Toad                                                   sensitive
 Chrysemys picta belli            Western Painted Turtle                                   critically sensitive
 Rana luteiventris                Columbia Spotted Frog           candidate for listing          sensitive
 Rana pipiens                     Northern Leopard Frog                                   ecoregion extirpation
 Birds
 Bartramia longicauda             Upland Sandpiper                species of concern       critically sensitive
 Buteo regalis                    Ferruginous Hawk                species of concern       critically sensitive
 Centrocercus urophasianus Greater Sage-grouse                    species of concern             sensitive
 Dolichonyx oryzivorus            Bobolink                                                       sensitive
 Dryocopus pileatus               Pileated Woodpecker                                            sensitive
 Lanius ludovicianus              Loggerhead Shrike                                              sensitive
 Melanerpes lewis                 Lewis' Woodpecker               species of concern       critically sensitive
 Otus flammeolus                  Flammulated owl                 species of concern
 Picoides albolarvatus            White-headed Woodpecker         species of concern       critically sensitive
 Picoides arcticus                Black-backed Woodpecker                                  critically sensitive
 Picoides dorsalis                Three-toed Woodpecker                                    critically sensitive
 Strix nebulosa                   Great Gray Owl                                                 sensitive
 Fish
 Cottus bendirei                  Malheur mottled Sculpin         species of concern           sensitive
 Cottus marginatus                Margined Sculpin                species of concern           sensitive
 Oncorhynchus kisutch             Coho Salmon                     species of concern        local extirpation
 Oncorhynchus mykiss              Redband Trout                   species of concern           sensitive
 Onocorhynchus mykiss             Steelhead                           threatened            local extirpation
 Salvelinus confluentus           Bull Trout                          threatened               sensitive
 Mammals
 Antrozous pallidus               Pallid Bat                      species of concern             sensitive
 Corynorhinus townsendii          Townsend's Big-eared Bat        species of concern       critically sensitive
 Euderma maculatum                Spotted Bat                     species of concern
 Lasionycteris noctivagans        Silver-haired Bat               species of concern           sensitive
 Martes pennanti                  Fisher                          candidate for listing   ecoregion extirpation
 Myotis californicus              California Myotis                                            sensitive
 Myotis thysanodes                Fringed Myotis                  species of concern           sensitive
 Myotis volans                    Long-legged Myotis              species of concern           sensitive
  Adapted from the Oregon Conservation Strategy (ODFW 2006).



  The Mitigation Site was historically used for summer and fall grazing, hay cropping, and timber
  management. These land uses have affected water quality and quantity, bank and channel
  stability, and upland, forest, aquatic and riparian habitats. Activities have also impacted soils,



  FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form                                                 3
indirectly reducing water quality and quantity. The removal of effective ground cover, soil
compaction, and soil displacement has also occurred with the long-term over-utilization.

Livestock use in and around riparian areas is often associated with impacted water quality, poor
bank and channel stability, and a degradation of aquatic and riparian habitats (Platts 1990,
Cooperrider et al. 1986, USFS 2000). Historic grazing pressure has resulted in the loss of aspen
stands throughout the Logan Valley (USFS 2000). The Malheur River Subbasin Assessment and
Management Plan (Plan) recognizes livestock grazing as a key disturbance and limiting factor
for wildlife populations within the Subbasin (NPCC 2004). Specifically, the Plan states grazing
has contributed to loss of riparian and wetland habitats, has resulted in a loss of spring and
summer forage for pronghorn, resulted in a decline in populations and distribution of sage
grouse, and have been linked to continued losses of biological soil crusts (NPCC Appendix A,
Page 58).

Forest habitat structure and function has been altered by fire suppression and management
practices resulting in Douglass fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta)
encroachment and high density seedling establishment (NPCC 2004, p.57). Encroachment may
lead to disease susceptibility, insect infestations, and the likelihood of stand replacing wildfires
(BLM 2003). In addition, a reduction has occurred in fire resistant species, e.g. ponderosa pine
(Pinus ponderosa) and western larch (Larix occidentalis), and stand age. Tall shrubs have been
reduced in forest communities. Forest understory currently provides hiding cover where
historically, understory provided both hiding cover and forage (USFS 2000).

Sagebrush steppe habitat has been severely altered by over 150 years of livestock grazing, fire
suppression and invasion of numerous exotic plant species (Ashley 2005). Limiting factors for
shrub-steppe habitats are 1) livestock and ungulate grazing resulting in a reduction of habitat
effectiveness, 2) grazing and changes in fire patterns have been linked to loss of soil and
biological soil crusts and 3) the absence of wildfire has encouraged invasion of cheatgrass and
other non-native species (NPCC 2004, pg. 57). Under the habitat level objectives in the Plan, it
is a priority to restore and protect the native grasses, forbs, and shrub composition, within the
sagebrush-steppe community (NPCC Appendix A. Part 3 p.64). Out of the fifteen terrestrial
focal species described in the Plan, eleven would be directly affected by protection and
restoration of native shrub-steppe and riparian habitat (NPCC 2004 Appendix A Part 3 p.61).

Riparian conditions on some stream reaches within the Logan Valley are currently rated at 0-
25% of optimum (NPCC 2004). Key limiting factors for riparian and wetland habitats addressed
in the Plan are 1) loss of beaver (Castor canadensis) and beaver dam complexes, 2) conversion
of valley floors to pasture and 3) livestock grazing in and around riparian areas (NPCC 2004, pg.
58). Willow habitat has been lost in the low elevation meadows. Aspen stands are in poor
condition throughout the valley, regeneration is very limited and the dominant age class is
decadent (USFS 2000). In the 1800’s, beavers were trapped intensively by the Hudson’s Bay
Company and were largely extirpated by the mid-1850’s (Ogden 1950, 1961, 1971; USFS 2000).
The loss of beaver and beaver dam complexes from the river and meadows has eliminated
productive riparian and floodplain habitat important to many native wildlife species (NPCC
2004).




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A Qualitative Habitat Assessment (QHA) was conducted on stream reaches throughout the
Malheur Subbasin. A QHA determines habitat attributes of a stream and their importance to the
corresponding life cycle of a particular focal species and ranks them by importance of
restoration. In the Plan, the Mitigation Site is located in the reach referred to as Logan Valley
West (NPCC 2004). The Plan ranks Logan Valley West #1 for bull trout restoration, #7(upper
13 percentile) for redband trout, and # 7 (upper 54 percentile) for spring chinook salmon. Top
limiting factors in the QHA for redband and bull trout include: 1) riparian condition, 2) low flow,
and 3) channel complexity. Limiting factors for spring chinook salmon are: 1) low flow, 2)
riparian condition, and 3) oxygen levels. The QHA protection values for the reach “Logan
Valley West” are ranked: #5 (upper 63 percentile) for bull trout, #23(upper 44 percentile) for
redband trout, and not ranked for spring chinook salmon. Top protection attributes in the QHA
for redband and bull trout include: 1) channel stability and 2) habitat diversity. These numbers
reassert the need to continue responsible management and restoration needs in the Logan Valley.
Some current management that may address some of the above needs are riparian plantings,
cattle exclusion from riparian areas, shortened irrigation season to leave water in-stream and
encouraging beaver activity to increase channel complexity.

Cultural Relationship

The Burns Paiute Tribe has significant cultural ties to Logan Valley and the surrounding
environs. Prior to contact by white explorers in the mid-nineteenth century, the Northern Paiute
people occupied a vast area as far west as the Cascades and as far east as Montana. The tribe
ventured as far south as inter-mountain Nevada and as far north as the areas surrounding the
Strawberry Mountains. The Wadatika people, the ancestors of the Burns Paiute, utilized this
extended area, but maintained a primary traditional use area around the Strawberry Mountains,
the main stem and tributaries of the Malheur River, Malheur and Harney Lakes, Steens
Mountain, and all areas in-between. Within this traditional aboriginal area of primary and
extended use, numerous areas were of great importance to the tribe. Logan Valley was one such
area of importance.

Post-white contact, a “Snake Indian” or Paiute tribal reservation was created by Presidential
Executive Order. The President signed the Executive Order on September 12, 1872 for the 1.8
million acre reservation. Central within this described reservation area was Logan Valley, a key
area of traditional use.

The Logan Valley area is known through oral histories and traditions as a seasonally utilized area
for such activities as hunting of terrestrial and avian species, fishing primarily for salmon,
gathering of food, medicinal, and daily use/craft fiber, and other secular and sacred activities
(Peck 2008, pers. comm.). Some histories describe pre-white contact Logan Valley as a common
meeting place between the Paiutes and non-Paiute Indians for trade, gaming, and other activities
(Peck 2008, pers. comm.).

The loss of the Logan Valley area at the time the Reservation was removed from Paiute control
and use has precluded much of the traditional activities within the valley for decades, although
numerous Paiute descendants continue to return to the Logan Valley area (Peck 2008, pers.
comm.). The purchase and continued operation of the Project offers the Tribal members a



FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form                                        5
unique opportunity to resume traditional practices and to utilize the unique resources found
within the area.

C. Rationale and significance to regional programs

In less than 100 years, anadromous fish were extirpated from the Malheur River Subbasin that
included chinook salmon, steelhead trout, pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata), and possible
coho salmon (Thompson and Haas 1960). The contemporary society of the 1900’s had the need
to manipulate and control the environment. The construction and operation of large in-stream
dams provided the water, electrical power and control over the environment for the greatly
expanding population. As each in-stream dam was constructed, the range and distribution of
anadromous fish declined. The anadromous resource that was the center of economics, religion
and survival for many Native Americans was decreased, and for some tribes, was completely
eliminated. This project is providing off-site mitigation to the Burns Paiute Tribe for the
destroyed wildlife resources in the Malheur Subbasin due to hydropower construction and
inundation.

The Northwest Power Act (1980) identifies measures to “protect, mitigate, and enhance” fish and
wildlife resources impacted from the development of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River
Basin. The Northwest Power and Conservation Council’s (NPCC) Basinwide Provisions (2000)
stated vision for the fish and wildlife program is to sustain an abundant, productive, and diverse
community of fish and wildlife valued by the people of the region. Amendments to the program
provided by the Council in 2000 (NPCC 2000) also recognize that anadromous fish losses have
occurred in the blocked area and a corresponding part of the mitigation for these losses must
occur in these areas. The specific objectives for biological performance as found in the NPCC’s
(2000) Fish and wildlife Program include: quantify losses caused by the construction, inundation,
and operation of the hydropower projects, the coordination of mitigation-related activities
throughout the basin, specifically those that promote connectivity between the management of
terrestrial and aquatic areas, maintaining existing and created habitat values, and determining the
species response to mitigation action through monitoring and evaluation.

The NPCC’s 2000 Basinwide Fish and Wildlife strategies relevant to this project include: 1)
identify the current condition and biological potential of the habitat, 2) assure that Subbasin
plans are consistent with harvest management practices and increase opportunities for harvest
wherever feasible 3) complete the current mitigation program for construction and inundation
losses and include wildlife mitigation for all operational losses as an integrated part of habitat
protection and restoration (allocation of habitat units and habitat enhancement credits).

The Malheur River Subbasin Assessment and Management Plan (Plan) was adopted into the
NPCC fish and wildlife Program in 2004. The overarching goal of the Mitigation Site is to
“Mitigate Tribes and Communities for the loss of the wildlife resource in the Malheur Subbasin”
which is directly related to the Plan. Mitigation Site specific objectives and associated Strategies
consistent with the MRSAMP (NPCC, 2004) are:
Malheur Subbasin Plan Objective – Restore Stream Channel Processes and Conditions.
      Strategy- Reduce mechanical stream bank damage associated with grazing.
      Strategy- Beaver management.


FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form                                           6
Malheur Subbasin Plan Objective – Restore Riparian Conditions.
      Strategy- Riparian buffer restoration- cropland areas.
      Strategy- Riparian buffer restoration- rangeland areas.
      Strategy- Exotic vegetation and noxious weeds in riparian areas.
      Strategy- Wetland protection and restoration.

Malheur Subbasin Plan Objective – Increase Harvest Opportunities.
      Strategy- Property acquisition for culturally significant terrestrial resource
               harvest.

Malheur Subbasin Plan Objective – Restore Shrub-steppe Habitat Processes and Functions.
      Strategy- Overstory vegetation, increase native shrub cover.
      Strategy- Understory vegetation, increase native grass cover and forage.
      Strategy- Restore/manage weed and juniper encroachment.
      Strategy- Road closures.
      Strategy- Management through the measurement and evaluation of indicators.
      Strategy- Protection.

Malheur Subbasin Plan Objective – Restore Herbaceous Wetlands Habitat Processes and
Function.
       Strategy- Restoration.
       Strategy- Protection.

Malheur Subbasin Plan Objective – Restore Riparian Habitat Processes and Function.
      Strategy- Restoration.
      Strategy- Beaver management.
      Strategy- Upland erosion management.
      Strategy- Protection.

Malheur Subbasin Plan Objective – Address Habitat Losses Resulting from Development and
Operation of Hydrosystem Projects.
       Strategy- Acquisition and Enhancement .
       Strategy- Coordinate and implement wildlife mitigation projects.
       Strategy- Protect and maintain habitat.
       Strategy- Management planning.
       Strategy- Monitor.

Malheur Subbasin Plan Objective – Restore, Enhance and Protect Critical Wildlife Habitat.
      Strategy- Mitigate or enhance Neo-tropical migrant bird populations.
      Strategy- Mitigate or enhance reptile and amphibian populations.
      Strategy- Mitigate or enhance big game population for cultural and subsistence uses.
      Strategy- Mitigate small game populations.

Malheur Subbasin Plan Objective – Assess and Map Habitat Extent and Condition Information.
      Strategy- Habitat mapping.
      Strategy- Habitat monitoring.



FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form                                     7
Malheur Subbasin Plan Objective – Identify Noxious Weed Communities, Prevent Their
Introduction, Reproduction, and Spread, and Reduce Their Density Where Already Established.
       Strategy- Evaluate noxious weed problems in the subbasin.
       Strategy- Develop and implement noxious weed control.

In 2006, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) released the Oregon
Conservation Strategy. Fire suppression and historic overgrazing were cited as two factors
having had the most detriment to the Blue Mountain Ecoregion (ODFW 2006, p. 16).
Recommended actions for the Blue Mountain Ecoregion was to initiate riparian shrubland
restoration and wet meadow restoration, improve fish passage (with fish passage on Lake Creek
being cited specifically), and improve ponderosa pine habitat (ODFW 2006, p. 118). The Burns
Paiute Tribe is carrying forward these conservation objectives by:
        · Performing a controlled burn in a mixed ponderosa pine habitat.
        · Restoring 346 acres of riparian habitat through Conservation Reserve Enhancement
        Program (CREP) planting and off-site watering.
        · Restoring wet meadows through irrigation, beaver activity and less frequent grazing
        regimes.
        · Improving fish passage on Lake Creek and Big Creek by installing fish screens at
        diversion canals.
On page 127 of the Oregon Conservation Strategy, ODFW recognizes BPT as a conservation
partner promoting wildlife diversity in Blue Mountain sub-region 14.

D. Relationships to other projects

The management of the project is being coordinated with the Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation
Project (BPA Project #200002700) which is 38 miles downstream of the Mitigation Site. Both
projects are managed cooperatively by the Tribe to minimize duplicate equipment purchases and
to share staff and other resources as needed.

BPA Project #199701900: Evaluate the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River
Sub-Basin is also related to the Mitigation Site. Research is actively being conducted on parts of
the Mitigation Site. Management and use of data will be coordinated with this proposal and
future activities of this project.

In addition to annual reports, other means of information transfer are occurring. BPA has
recently produced “Pisces” which we see as an information sharing opportunity allowing other
entities to see proposed work and successes. CBFWA’s Wildlife Advisory Committee is
actively visiting multiple mitigation sites to discuss problems, successes and concerns. The
Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Site was visited by CBFWA on June 1st, 2006. Also,
presentations are often given to multiple state/federal agencies, Tribal managers and general
members of the Tribe and other public members.

Research findings are often published and distributed to the public. As a result of our
coordination with Eastern Oregon Agricultural Research Center (EOARC), 1 paper has been
published and another is under peer review. Development of a method to monitor willows on the


FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form                                       8
Mitigation Site resulted in a paper entitled A Visual Obstruction Technique for Photo Monitoring
of Willow Clumps (Boyd and Svejcar 2005). This same study is also being reviewed for
inclusion in the Wildlife Society Bulletin.

Our fisheries department has been conducting a study entitled Evaluate the Life History of Native
Salmonids in the Malheur Subbasin. Some of this work has occurred on the Mitigation Site, has
contributed to the local subbasin planning effort and annual progress reports are distributed to
several agencies including: Bureau of Reclamation, BPA, Oregon Department of Fish and
Wildlife, BLM, U.S. Forest Service and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

E. Project history

The Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Project was purchased in April 2000. Over the past 8
years, major accomplishments have been achieved to reverse the trend of land and stream
degradation. Habitat improvements have been conducted to help habitat functions and
sustainability. Studies have also been conducted and continue to provide management direction
on the Mitigation Site.

2000: Budget information unknown.

Coordination with several entities began both prior and after acquisition which occurred in April
2000. In 2000, a willow monitoring study was initiated with EOARC. The study’s objective
was “to develop a photo-based technique that could be used to monitor changes in willow (Salix
sp.) biomass over time and estimate changes in biomass associated with herbivory” (Boyd and
Svejcar, 2005). The technique proved useful and will be used in future analysis of willow
regeneration on the Mitigation Site. A baseline habitat evaluation procedure (HEP) was
conducted and included individuals from the Burns Paiute Tribe, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service,
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the
Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation. The HEP was conducted to provide
vegetation data for all habitat types on the Mitigation Site, provide initial management direction,
and provide BPA with a crediting amount to apply to their wildlife mitigation responsibilities.
The Tribe subcontracted with The Nature Conservancy (TNC) to complete a fencing project that
ultimately built a perimeter fence and removed several miles of interior fence. The exterior
fence was built to prevent cattle trespass and the interior fences were removed to allow freedom
of movement for all wildlife species.

2001: Expended Amount $174,758

2001 was the first full year of operation on the Mitigation Site. A baseline plant species
inventory was conducted. Six 125 meter transects were established to measure frequency, cover,
density, and biomass. In addition, the Mitigation Site was surveyed for noxious weeds. No
infestations were found however they do occur on neighboring lands and will continue to be
monitored. Passive restoration was the dominant activity throughout the year. Significant willow
regeneration has occurred since TNC acquired the Mitigation Site on behalf of the Tribe.
The first draft of the Mitigation Site’s management plan was completed. The plan was
completed with Advisory Board input consisting of Tribal, federal, state and public entities.


FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form                                         9
With the assistance of EOARC, an irrigation study was initiated. 2001 was the first year of a 2
year “non-irrigation” treatment. In-stream flow, in-stream water temperatures and depth to
ground water were monitored (Boyd and Zamora, 2004). Irrigation commenced in 2003 and data
was acquired through 2005.The willow monitoring study initiated in 2000 was concluded.

2002: Expended Amount $208,672

The final draft of the management plan was completed and accepted by the Columbia Basin Fish
and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) and BPA. The irrigation study initiated in 2001 was
continued. Vegetation treatments on the Mitigation Site began. Cattle grazing and thinning of
timber stands occurred. Cattle were utilized to reduce residual vegetation and spur growth.
Timber stands were thinned to reduce lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) encroachment into the
meadows and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) stands. In addition, monitoring for noxious
weeds continued. Coordination occurred with Oregon State University and Oregon Department
of Agriculture to introduce Oregon semaphore grass (Pleuropogon oregonus), a state endangered
and federal species of concern onto the Mitigation Site. A 2005 review indicated a successful
transplant. To determine stream conditions on the Mitigation Site, a Rosgen Level III assessment
was conducted on Lake and Big Creeks.

2003: Expended Amount $125,717

Vegetation treatments continued and included timber thinning and monitoring for noxious
weeds. Thirty acres of upland were seeded with Idaho Fescue (Festuca idahoensis).The
irrigation study initiated in 2001 was continued. Coordination with Ducks Unlimited occurred to
improve the efficiency of the flood irrigation system. Two miles of new irrigation ditch was dug
to better distribute water. Aerial photos of the Mitigation Site were taken. When input into GIS,
these photos should allow us to monitor vegetation trends on the Mitigation Site.

2004: Expended Amount $133,881

Vegetation treatments continued. They included timber thinning, grazing, irrigation, and
monitoring for noxious weeds and willow plantings. Approximately 10 acres of timber were
thinned. Grazing occurred treating approximately 150 acres. Irrigation commenced.
Monitoring for noxious weeds continued. Willows were planted along 1 linear mile of stream
bank. The irrigation study initiated in 2001 was continued. Coordination with USFS occurred to
build a bridge across Lake Creek. The bridge allows vehicle travel to and from the Mitigation
Site headquarters without loading the Creek with sedimentation and reducing bank stability.

2005: Budgeted Amount $146,840 Expended Amount $131,689.40

In 2005, additional vegetation treatments and irrigation control were the main objectives.
Grazing continued with the treatment of approximately 150 acres. About 10 acres of forest were
thinned, reducing lodgepole pine encroachment. Slash piles from previous thinning projects
were burned. Noxious weeds began to appear where the new irrigation ditches were dug. Weeds
were removed by hand pulling. Two head-gate structures and 2 flashboard risers were installed.
A repaired head-gate was re-installed on Big Creek and a new head-gate was installed on the



FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form                                      10
Lake Creek irrigation diversion. In addition, 2 flashboard risers were installed on the new
irrigation ditch. All structures were installed to better regulate water flows. The irrigation study
initiated in 2001 was concluded.

2006: Budgeted Amount $146,840 Expended Amount $138,487.36

Grazing of 165 acres in the meadows occurred from July 11th – September 4th. One mile of fence
located by the 16 road was converted to a let-down fence. The entire 14.5 miles of perimeter
fence was checked and repaired as needed. Three new species of noxious weeds were discovered
and recorded into Weed Information Management System (WIMS). About 2,000 willows were
planted on McCoy Creek and Lake Creek. Three sites were planted into aspen consisting of ten
to fifteen trees and protected with a deer proof fence. Ten acres of forest was thinned and ten
more acres were surveyed, but it was determined no treatment was necessary. Irrigation took
place on 620 acres. A study entitled Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the
Malheur River Subbasin was evaluating the seasonal distribution of bull trout localized salmonid
population status, and trend and genetic integrity of redband trout and bull trout populations.
BPT collected photos on 9 willow monitoring stations to determine change in both individual
willow clumps and willow community changes. The continuation of monitoring these 9 sites was
not recommended due to the difficulty in repeating the protocol (missing stacks, insufficient
detail about how analysis was done, etc.). A small mammal presence/absence survey was
conducted on the forest and meadow habitat resulting in 3 species: montane vole (Microtus
montanus), deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) and least chipmunk (Tamias minimus).
Amphibian presence/absence survey was conducted using electroshock methods but proved to be
unsuccessful. Later that summer a Columbia spotted frog (Rana pretiosa), a candidate for federal
listing, was captured incidentally by a field biologist. Base line data was collected on 4 transects
for point count bird surveys. The cabin was maintained (plumbing system was repaired and
updated, painted interior walls and general cleanup around structure). Two grants were received
from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
(ODFW) to construct a fish screen on the McCoy Creek irrigation diversion. A Memorandum of
Understanding (MOU) was created with Oregon State University (OSU) to “facilitate
collaboration on science and engineering education and research efforts which will mutually
benefit the sighting parties”. Three access permits were issued to the Project site. All project
generated funds were recorded and summarized (Table 2).

           Date                       Description                  Amount           Balance
             1/1/2006              Beginning Balance                                       $0.00
            7/21/2006                 Grazing Fees                     $272.09           $272.09
            10/1/2006               Property Taxes                    $2,242.93        $1,970.84
           10/31/2006                 Grazing Fees                    $1,133.07          $837.77
            11/6/2006          Reclassification of funds               $719.45           $118.32
           12/29/2006         Sale of old fencing materials            $350.00           $231.68
           12/31/2006               Ending Balance                                       $231.68
        Table 2: Project Income Expenditures

2007: Budgeted Amount $151,245 Expended Amount $121,177.79

The entire 14.5 miles of perimeter fence was checked and repaired as needed. Four new weed
species were located and hand pulled to prevent seed production. A total of 7 known species of


FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form                                         11
weeds exist on the Project site with all occurrences mapped with WIMS. Three hundred and
forty five acres were enrolled into Conservation Reserve and Enhancement Program (CREP)
protecting a 180 foot buffer around all streams within the project site. ODFW completed the
McCoy Creek irrigation fish screen. An assessment of avian relative abundance (percent species
per habitat type) comparing 2006 and 2007 was graphed (Graph 1-4). Steam photos were taken
at 14 points on the project to monitor vegetative components and changes in stream structure to
be used for a visual historic reference. Two small mammal trapping sites were established using
a 100 meter by 100 meter trapping grid that placed 100 traps 10m apart. Trapping occurred for
two consecutive nights (Table 3). BPT fisheries staff performed stream temperature monitoring,
bull trout redd monitoring and analyzing redband trout population. A review of Oregon
semaphore grass (Pleuropogon oregonus) planted in 2002 revealed that 1 of the 3 sites had a
growing population. Two grants were received from USFWS and ODFW to build a fish screen
on the “cabin ditch” of Lake Creek. Five access permits were issued by BPT staff. All project
generated funds were recorded and summarized (Table 4).


                                                                                                                                              Meadow

             40.0
             35.0
             30.0
   Percent




             25.0                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     2006
             20.0
             15.0                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     2007
             10.0
              5.0
              0.0
                                                                                                               Common Raven

                                                                                                                              Common Snipe




                                                                                                                                                                                                          Northern Flicker
                                                                             Canada Goose




                                                                                                                                                                                                                             Red-Winged Blackbird
                                                                                                                                             Hooded Merganser




                                                                                                                                                                                                Mallard




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Sandhill Crane
                                       American Robin
                    American Kestrel




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Unkown
                                                                                                                                                                Killdeer




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Western Meadowlark
                                                        Brewer's Blackbird



                                                                                            Chipping Sparrow




                                                                                                                                                                           Long-Billed Curlew




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Song Sparrow

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Tree Swallow




Graph 1: Avian Relative Abundance




FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               12
                                                                                                                 Percent                                                                              Percent                                                                            Percent




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        10.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        15.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        20.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        25.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        30.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        35.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        40.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        45.0




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         0.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         5.0




                                                                                                              10.0
                                                                                                              15.0
                                                                                                              20.0
                                                                                                              25.0
                                                                                                              30.0
                                                                                                              35.0
                                                                                                              40.0




                                                                                                               0.0
                                                                                                               5.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                  10.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                  15.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                  20.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                  25.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                  30.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                  35.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                  40.0




                                                                                                                                                                                                   0.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                   5.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  American Goldfinch
                                                                                             American Kestrel                                                                      American Robin
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      American Robin
                                                                                              American Robin
                                                                                                                                                                            Black-Capped Chickadee                                                                Brewer's Blackbird
                                                                                           Brewer's Blackbird                                                                                                                                                          Cinnamon Teal
                                                                                                                                                                                    Cassin's Finch                                                                    Common Raven
                                                                                           Brewer's Sparrow
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Common Snipe
                                                                                            Chipping Sparrow                                                                     Chipping Sparrow




                                                                                                                                        Graph 3: Avian Relative Abundance
                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Graph 2: Avian Relative Abundance




                                                     Graph 4: Avian Relative Abundance
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Dusky Flycatcher
                                                                                          Common Merganser                                                                                                                                                          European Starling
                                                                                                                                                                                 Clark's Nutcracker
                                                                                              Common Raven                                                                                                                                                               Gray Catbird
                                                                                                                                                                                    Common Raven                                                                  Green-Winged Teal
                                                                                               Common Snipe
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Long-Billed Curlew
                                                                                                                                                                                  Dusky Flycatcher




FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form
                                                                                            European Starling                                                                                                                                                     Lewis' Woodpecker

                                                                                                      Killdeer                                                                     Eastern Kingbird                                                                           Mallard
                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Trees

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Macgillivray's Warbler




                                                                                                                               Upland
                                                                                                      Mallard
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Riparian




                                                                                                                                                                                   Northern Flicker
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Northern Flicker
                                                                                               Mourning Dove
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Red-Tailed Hawk
                                                                                                                                                                             Red-Breasted Nuthatch
                                                                                              Northern Flicker                                                                                                                                                  Red-Winged Blackbird
                                                                                                                                                                             Ruby-Crowned Kinglet                                                                      Song Sparrow
                                                                                             Red-Tailed Hawk
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Spotted Sandpiper
                                                                                         Red-Winged Blackbird                                                                     Red-Tailed Hawk
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Tree Swallow
                                                                                               Sandhill Crane                                                                                                                                                                Unkown
                                                                                                                                                                                          Unkown
                                                                                               Song Sparrow                                                                                                                                                      Western Meadowlark
                                                                                                                                                                               Western Meadowlark                                                               Western Wood-Pewee
                                                                                                     Unkown
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Willow Flycatcher
                                                                                         Western Meadowlark
                                                                                                                                                                             Western Wood-Pewee
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Yellow Warbler




13
                                                                                                                                                                                                      2007
                                                                                                                                                                                                             2006




                                                                                                                 2007
                                                                                                                        2006
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         2007
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                2006
                      Logan Valley Small Mammal Captures
    Date      Location  Least Chipmunk          Deer Mouse        Montane Vole    Traps
 7/18/2007     Forest          1                                                   100
 7/18/2007 Riparian                                    1                           100
 7/19/2007     Forest          2                       1                           100
 7/19/2007 Riparian                                                      1         100
   Total:                      3                       2                 1         400
Table 3: Small Mammal Data

                      Accounting of Project Generated Income
             Description                             Amount                  Balance
            Beginning Balance                                                        $231.68
                   CREP                                     $97,308.00             $97,539.68
       Sale of old fencing materials                           $883.05             $98,422.73
                   Travel                                     -$884.05             $97,538.68
                 Supplies                                   -$4,714.56             $92,824.12
                  Indirect                                  -$2,828.14             $89,995.98
                 Fire Debt                                 -$49,374.33             $40,621.65
           Salaries and Fringe                              -$1,610.52             $39,011.13
             Property Taxes                                 -$2,363.59             $36,647.54
           State Fire Protection                            -$2,048.34             $34,599.20
             Ending Balance                                                        $34,599.20
Table 4: Project Income Expenditures

2008: Budgeted Amount $146,840

The entire 14.5 miles of perimeter fence was checked and repaired as needed. One new weed
species was identified making 8 known species of noxious weed species on the project site. All
known plants were hand pulled to prevent seed dispersal. Cattle grazing took place from July 1-
September 21. A controlled burn on 55 acres of forest lands was conducted by a contractor. A
well for the cabin was drilled to provide enough water for staff staying in the cabin during the
summer months. The CREP planting portion was completed that included 97,000 willow (salix
sp.), 10,000 dogwood (Cornus sericea), 10,000 woods’rose (Rosa woodsii), 10,000 golden
currant (Ribes aureum), and 1,000 aspen (Populus tremuloides). Meadow irrigation continued
throughout the spring. An assessment of avian relative abundance comparing 2006, 2007 and
2008 was graphed (Graph 5-8). A report produced by Riparian Resources entitled 2008 Channel
Cross Section and Assessment Reach Monitoring (Miles, 2008) was provided to BPT. An
assessment of small mammal populations was conducted for the second consecutive year to
estimate small mammal trend data based on 1000 trap nights (Table 5). The Burns Paiute Tribe
Natural Resource Department continued bull trout and redband trout life history studies in the
upper Malheur River drainage in 2008. Objectives for 2008 were: 1) Determine population trend
for bull trout and redband trout, and 2) Describe the genetic makeup of redband trout. Sampling
of forest composition was completed prior to the burn at fifteen survey sites within the 55 acre
controlled burn boundary (Graph 9). A HEP (Habitat Evaluation Procedure) Survey was
conducted as a follow up to the original survey conducted in 2000. Paul Ashley, the HEP
Coordinator for CBFWA (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority), conducted the week


FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form                                         14
                                                                                                                    Percent                                                                                      Percent




                                                                                                                  10.0
                                                                                                                  15.0
                                                                                                                  20.0
                                                                                                                  25.0
                                                                                                                  30.0
                                                                                                                  35.0
                                                                                                                  40.0
                                                                                                                  45.0




                                                                                                                   0.0
                                                                                                                   5.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                               10.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                               15.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                               20.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                               25.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                               30.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                               35.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                               40.0




                                                                                                                                                                                                                0.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                5.0
                                                                                             American Goldfinch

                                                                                                American Robin                                                                             American Kestrel

                                                                                             Brewer's Blackbird                                                                              American Robin
                                                                                                 Cinnamon Teal                                                                                Barn Swallow
                                                                                                Common Raven                                                                              Brewer's Blackbird
                                                                                                 Common Snipe
                                                                                                                                                                                          Brewer's Sparrow
                                                                                           Common Yellowthroat
                                                                                                                                                                                             Canada Goose




                                                     Graph 6: Avian Relative Abundance
                                                                                                                                                   Graph 5: Avian Relative Abundance
                                                                                               Dusky Flycatcher
                                                                                                                                                                                           Chipping Sparrow
                                                                                              European Starling
                                                                                                                                                                                         Common Goldeneye
                                                                                                   Gray Catbird

                                                                                             Green-Winged Teal
                                                                                                                                                                                             Common Raven
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              were recorded and summarized (Table 6).




                                                                                             Long-Billed Curlew                                                                               Common Snipe




FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form
                                                                                            Lewis' Woodpecker                                                                             Hooded Merganser
                                                                                                        Mallard                                                                                      Killdeer
                                                                                          MacGillivray's Warbler                                                                          Long-Billed Curlew




                                                                                                                                        Riparian
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Meadow




                                                                                                Northern Flicker
                                                                                                                                                                                                     Mallard
                                                                                               Red-Tailed Hawk
                                                                                                                                                                                             Northern Flicker
                                                                                           Red-Winged Blackbird
                                                                                                                                                                                       Ruby-Crowned Kinglet
                                                                                                 Song Sparrow
                                                                                                                                                                                       Red-Winged Blackbird
                                                                                              Spotted Sandpiper

                                                                                                  Tree Swallow                                                                                Sandhill Crane

                                                                                                      Unknown                                                                                 Song Sparrow
                                                                                           Western Meadowlark                                                                                 Tree Swallow
                                                                                          Western Wood-Pewee                                                                                       Unknown
                                                                                              Willow Flycatcher
                                                                                                                                                                                           Western Kingbird
                                                                                                Yellow Warbler
                                                                                                                                                                                        Western Meadowlark
                                                                                         Yellow-Rumped Warbler




15
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              (HU’s) from 653 to 1,375 HU’s. No access permits were issued. All project generated funds
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              long evaluation on the Property. Preliminary data analysis suggests an increase in habitat units




                                                                                                                                                                                                                2008
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       2007
                                                                                                                                                                                                                              2006




                                                                                                                   2008
                                                                                                                          2007
                                                                                                                                 2006
                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Percent                                                                                     Percent




                                                         Forest
                                                                                                                                                                                                                 10.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                 15.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                 20.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                 25.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                 30.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                 35.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                 40.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                 45.0




                                                                                                                                                                                                                  0.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                  5.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              10.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              15.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              20.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              25.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              30.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              35.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              40.0




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               0.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               5.0




                                                        Riparian
                                                       Location
                                                                                                                                                                                                American Kestrel
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             American Robin




                                                                        -
                                                                       15
                                                                                                                                                                                                 American Robin




                                                                      2007
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Black-Capped Chickadee
                                                                                                                                                                                              Brewer's Blackbird
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Brewer's Blackbird




                                                                                                       Least
                                                                                                                                                                                              Brewer's Sparrow




                                                                                                     Chipmunk


                                                                                10
                                                                               2008
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Cassin's Finch
                                                                                                                                                                                               Chipping Sparrow




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Graph 7: Avian Relative Abundance




                                                                                                                                                        Graph 8: Avian Relative Abundance
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Chipping Sparrow
                                                                                                                                                                                             Common Merganser




                                                                                         10
                                                                                         10
                                                                                        2007
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Clark's Nutcracker
                                                                                                                                                                                                 Common Raven




                                                     Table 5: Estimated Catch for Small Mammals
                                                                                                                                                                                                  Common Snipe                                                                                Common Raven




                                                                                                 -
                                                                                                10
                                                                                                        Deer Mouse

                                                                                              2008




FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form
                                                                                                                                                                                               European Starling                                                                            Dusky Flycatcher

                                                                                                                                                                                                         Killdeer                                                                            Eastern Kingbird




                                                                   -
                                                                  10
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Trees




                                                                 2007
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Upland
                                                                                                                                                                                                         Mallard                                                                             Northern Flicker

                                                                                                                                                                                                  Mourning Dove
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Red-Breasted Nuthatch




                                                                   -
                                                                  10
                                                                 2008
                                                                                                        Montane Vole
                                                                                                                                                                                                 Northern Flicker
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Ruby-Crowned Kinglet
                                                                                                                                                                                                Red-Tailed Hawk
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Red-Tailed Hawk




                                                                   -
                                                                   -
                                                                 2007
                                                                                                                                                                                            Red-Winged Blackbird
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Ruffed Grouse
                                                                                                                                                                                                  Sandhill Crane




                                                                                                                       Estimated Catch Per 1000 Traps


                                                                   -
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Unknown




                                                                  10
                                                                                                                                                                                                  Song Sparrow




                                                                                                        Water Shrew

                                                                 2008
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Western Meadowlark
                                                                                                                                                                                                       Unknown




                                                                   -
                                                                   -
                                                                                                                                                                                            Western Meadowlark                                                                         Western Wood-Pewee




                                                                 2007




16
                                                                   -
                                                                  10
                                                                                                      Great Basin

                                                                 2008
                                                                                                     Pocket Mouse
                                                                                                                                                                                                                    2008
                                                                                                                                                                                                                           2007
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  2006
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                2008
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       2007
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              2006
                          Forest Composition Across All Size Classes


                                         1%     13%
                               25%                     3%
                                                                               Douglas Fir
                                                                               Grand Fir
                                                                               Lodgepole Pine
                                                                               Ponderosa Pine
                                                                               Western Larch


                                               58%



                               Graph 9: Relative Abundance of Trees Preburn.


                      Accounting of Project Generated Income
             Description                             Amount                     Balance
            Beginning Balance                                                                $231.68
                   CREP                                      $97,308.00                    $97,539.68
       Sale of old fencing materials                            $883.05                    $98,422.73
                   Travel                                      -$884.05                    $97,538.68
                 Supplies                                    -$4,714.56                    $92,824.12
                  Indirect                                   -$2,828.14                    $89,995.98
                 Fire Debt                                  -$49,374.33                    $40,621.65
           Salaries and Fringe                               -$1,610.52                    $39,011.13
             Property Taxes                                  -$2,363.59                    $36,647.54
           State Fire Protection                             -$2,048.34                    $34,599.20
             Ending Balance                                                                $34,599.20
Table 6: Project Income Expenditures


F. Proposal biological/physical objectives, work elements, methods, and metrics

Biological Objective #1 – Improve riparian condition and complexity on approximately 7
                          miles of stream (MRSAMP p. 69-75,80-82,86-88).

Protect, restore, and maintain riparian conditions and functions along McCoy, Lake, and Big
Creeks by managing livestock use, planting vegetation, noxious weed control and protecting
riparian vegetation from wild ungulates.

Work Element Name: Maintain Vegetation
Work Element Title: Livestock Management
Methodology: Livestock use in and around riparian areas is often associated with impacted
water quality, poor bank and channel stability, and a degradation of aquatic and riparian habitats
(Platts 1990, Cooperrider et al. 1986, U.S. Forest Service 2000). We can reduce and often
eliminate these problems through proper livestock management. A fulltime range technician will


FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form                                                 17
monitor cattle status and maintain fencing to exclude cattle from riparian areas. Water will be
provided to livestock through alternative water sources established outside of riparian areas. We
expect riparian conditions will improve with willow re-establishment, reduced erosion and
compaction in and around riparian sites.

Work Element Name: Plant Vegetation
Work Element Title: Plant Riparian Vegetation
Metric: 14.5 miles of riparian assessed for planting
Methodology: Riparian conditions on some stream reaches within the Logan Valley are
currently rated at 0-25% of optimum. Within the Mitigation Site, this can be contributed to
historic haying practices, grazing by livestock and wildlife, and loss of beaver and beaver dam
complexes (NPCC 2004, pp 33-34). Between 2010 and 2018, we intend to plant riparian plants
within the CREP boundary along McCoy Creek, Big Creek and Lake Creeks. Willows will be
harvested from local sites in January of each year and kept in a cold and dark environment until
mid April when access to the valley becomes available and planting begins. Planting will occur
by pounding a stake into the ground and sticking the willow stalks into the ground surface to a
depth that would reach water levels in late summer. All above ground branches will be removed
and stalks will be cut so no more than 6 – 12 inches of stalk is visible above ground. All work
will be conducted by BPT staff. We will continue to exclude livestock from riparian zones and
encourage the expansion of beaver activity which exists on a small portion of the Mitigation Site.
These activities should provide habitat for multiple wildlife species and help restore McCoy,
Lake, and Big Creeks from active erosion, return historic channel morphology, provide instream
cover for aquatic species and assist in reducing stream temperatures.

Biological Objective #2 – Improve 1760 acres of upland, forest and wet meadow habitats
                          (MRSAMP p. 82-91).

The uplands, forests and wet meadow habitats of the Mitigation Site are highly important for
many wildlife species. Logan Valley is a known birthing area for pronghorn, elk and deer; is a
waterfowl nesting area; is sage grouse summer habitat; is nesting area for upland sandpipers, and
serves other wildlife species in a variety of ways. The maintenance, restoration, and protection
of these habitat types are crucial in maintaining the local ecosystem as well as wildlife
populations throughout the subbasin.

Work Element Name: Maintain Vegetation
Work Element Title: Maintain wet meadow habitat through irrigation.
Methodology: Wet meadows will be irrigated from April through June during high water flows.
Flood irrigation will be utilized. Multiple head gates and irrigation ditches allow movement of
water across the property. A range technician will monitor irrigation needs daily and move water
as deemed necessary. Historically this would have occurred naturally but due to past land uses
stream channels have begun to incise, the water table has lowered, and consequently flood events
occur less often (U.S. Forest Service 2000). When flows begin to decrease, water is left in-
stream for fish habitat. We are working cooperatively with the BPA project named Evaluate the
Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Sub-Basin. Research resulting from that
project and research by EOARC will determine the future irrigation efforts on the Mitigation
Site. We anticipate irrigation efforts will continue in some capacity through 2018.


FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form                                      18
Results from the irrigation study conducted by EOARC were presented to the BPT on March 1,
2006. The study concluded that flood irrigation increased water storage, decreased depth to
groundwater in 2004 – 2005 more than the strategy employed in 2003, increased mesic plant
communities, and resulted in dramatic declines in dry-land plant communities. Flow data
suggests that the date at which the creek begins losing flow to the surrounding meadow is
advanced with flood irrigation (Boyd and Zamora, 2005). Based on this information, we will
continue to employ the strategies utilized during this study to improve habitat conditions on the
Mitigation Site.

Work Element Name: Remove Vegetation
Work Element Title: Noxious Weed Control
Metric: 345 acres of riparian and 1415 acres of upland
Methodology: Noxious weed control is crucial for maintaining a healthy ecosystem (NPCC
2004). Noxious weed control requires the identification of sites that need treatment, the
development of a method in which to control the particular weed species (chemical, mechanical,
etc.), and the insurance of environmental compliance with the control itself. In addition,
documentation of the control is crucial for future success and overall control efforts. We will
monitor noxious weed control using Weed Information Management System (WIMS) developed
by the University of California, Davis for use by The Nature Conservancy (TNC). “WIMS
keeps track of three types of data records: weed occurrences (GPS point locations), assessments
(size and status of the weed infestation to facilitate monitoring over time), and management
treatments applied to those weed infestations. Data can be easily exchanged between multiple
users and written to shapefiles for mapping in any standard GIS program” (The Nature
Conservancy 2006). Control will continue through 2018.

Work Element Name: Install Fence
Work Element Title: Install Fencing around Willow and Aspen Plantings
Metric: 1.14 miles of riparian fence
Methodology: Historic grazing pressure has resulted in the loss of aspen stands throughout
Logan Valley (U.S. Forest Service 2000). We will work to reestablish aspen stands. Wildlife
fences will be installed to prevent herbivory. Enclosures will be approximately 400 square feet.
We anticipate developing 20 enclosures per year. Fencing will be removed once vegetation
grows beyond the herbivory line. The intent is to reestablish aspen and willow stands which are
beneficial to an array of wildlife species.

Work Element Name: Remove Vegetation
Work Element Title: Tree Thinning
Metric: 60 acres treated
Methodology: The Subbasin Plan recognizes ponderosa pine stands as an asset and lodgepole
pine and Douglass fir encroachment as a threat to those stands (NPCC 2004 pg. 57). Past work
on the Mitigation Site has included tree thinning as a management tool and we will continue that
work to prevent encroachment which may lead to susceptibility to disease, insect infestations,
and the likelihood of stand replacing wildfires (BLM 2003). Approximately 60 acres will be
thinned. Cull species are prioritized as 1) lodgepole pine, 2) Douglas fir and 3) ponderosa pine.
Ponderosa pine will be cut when distribution levels of all other species are met and additional



FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form                                       19
thinning is still needed. The resulting tree stand should include a variety of age classes. Project
staff will perform all work with chainsaws. Within the thinning process, not all trees will be
felled but some will be cut to create snags for the benefit of many avian species including the
Pileated Woodpecker, a terrestrial focal species identified in the Malheur River Subbasin
Assessment and Management Plan (pg. 48). Approximately 10 snags per acre will be created.
Work Element Name: Conduct Controlled Burn
Work Element Title: Conduct a Controlled Burn in Forest Understory and in Wet Meadows.
Metric: 100 upland acres treated
Methodology: Two factors that historically and currently contribute to the degradation of
habitat within the subbasin are overgrazing by cattle and fire suppression (NPCC 2004 p. 51).
We intend to use fire in forest habitats to restore forest structure and function. In wet meadow
systems, we would like to conduct a test burn to determine if reintroducing fire as a management
tool is a better alternative to grazing when vegetation treatment is needed. One forest understory
was burned in the fall of 2008 treating approximately 55 acres. A test burn in the wet meadows
will likely occur prior to full scale implementation. The BPT will be responsible for all pre-burn
activities including thinning, low limb removal and moving debris from sites we don’t want
burned. Burning activities will be contracted.

Biological Objective #3 – Maintain, Restore and Protect Fish Habitat and Fish Passage
                          Connectivity (MRSAMP p.69-76,78-82,86-88).

Maintain, restore and protect fish habitat and fish passage connectivity by managing irrigation
diversion fish screens, planting riparian vegetation and livestock management.
Work Element Name: Install Fish Screen
Work Element Title: Install Fish Screen on Lake Creek
Methodology: An unscreened irrigation diversion exists on Lake Creek, east of the cabin on the
Mitigation Site. To reinitiate the use of water, the irrigation ditch must be screened. The Tribe
will coordinate with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Forest Service and Oregon
Department of Fish and Wildlife to design and construct an appropriate fish screen eliminating
fish loss. Coordination began in 2007 with construction in either 2009 or 2010.
Work Element Name: Operate and Maintain Habitat/Passage/Structure
Work Element Title: Maintain Fish Screen on McCoy Creek and Big Creek Diversion Ditch
Methodology: A fish screen was built in 2007 by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Oregon
Department of Fish and Wildlife to eliminate fish loss due to irrigation practices. The project
staff will perform minor maintenance for the life of the fish screen. Minor maintenance includes:
winterizing fish screens, grease wheels, making sure the screens are working properly and free of
debris. Minor maintenance activities will continue through 2018.
Biological Objective #4 – Conduct M&E Activities to Evaluate and Adapt Management
                          Strategies (MRSAMP p.88,89).

Conduct M&E Activities to Evaluate and Adapt Management Strategies. Activities involve: bat,
small mammals, amphibian, HEP, point-counts surveys, Cross section analysis, forest inventory,
monitor water quantity/quality and coordinate/ implement native fish management
recommendations developed through on going research efforts in project 199701900 Evaluate
Life History.


FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form                                        20
Work Element Name: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data
Work Element Title: Amphibian Surveys
Metric: Population Status, Action Effectiveness Research and Status and Trend Monitoring
Methodology: Information on amphibian abundance and diversity helps determine the relative
health of ecosystems and the success of wetland habitat improvements. Amphibian studies will
be conducted annually to yield species occurrences. Both active and passive sampling methods
will be utilized. The active method will be a pitfall and drift fence trap design on the immediate
edge of water bodies for data on relative abundance and estimations of species catch based on
one thousand trap nights. Passive methods will include searching for egg masses and listening
for spawning calls to document species presence. Egg mass counts and call surveys will be
conducted when pitfall traps are checked. More detailed methods are included in section G
Monitoring and Evaluation.
Work Element Name: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data
Work Element Title: Forest Inventory
Metric: Population Status, Action Effectiveness Research and Status and Trend Monitoring
Methodology: Fifteen permanent plots were established along two parallel transect lines prior
to the prescribed burn to 55 forested acres. Plots 1-10 ran through the section of forest
previously thinned (transect 1). Plots 11-15 ran through the section of forest where no known
forest management activities have taken place in recent history (transect 2). Our management
objectives for the controlled burn were to reduce the mean total fuel load by 50-80% one year
postburn; open woodland stand and improve native grass, shrub and forb populations for wildlife
by reducing the density of live pole-size trees one year postburn; and reduce understory sapling
density by at least 25%. The forest inventory was conducted preburn to help us quantify if
management objectives were met. A second inventory will be conducted one year postburn
(2009) and three years postburn.
Work Element Name: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data
Work Element Title: Bird Point Counts
Metric: Population Status, Action Effectiveness Research and Status and Trend Monitoring
Methodology: When performing a HEP on the Mitigation Site, 5 avian indicator species are
used to assess habitat quality: Western Meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta) representative of dry
grassland habitat, Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), representative of wetland/riparian nesting
habitat, sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), representative of upland nesting habitat,
yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), representative of deciduous habitat, and black-capped
chickadee (Poecile atricapillus), representative of conifer forest habitat. Performing population
estimates will provide us with the ability to analyze population response to habitat
manipulations. Population estimates will be determined utilizing methods outlined in Research
and Management Techniques for Wildlife and Habitats (Lancia et al. 1996). More detailed
methods are included in section G Monitoring and Evaluation.
Work Element Name: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data
Work Element Title: Small Mammal Surveys
Metric: Population Status, Action Effectiveness Research and Status and Trend Monitoring
Methodology: Rodents are prey base food for predators such as birds of prey, coyotes, bobcats,
badgers and others. In addition, they may be used as an indicator of habitat change (Cooperrider
et al. 1986). For these reasons, our goal is to determine trends in species and numbers. Small
mammal surveys will be performed annually using Sherman live traps. A population analysis


FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form                                       21
will be conducted utilizing trapping and analysis methods outlined in Research and Management
Techniques for Wildlife and Habitats (Lancia et al. 1996). More detailed methods are included
in section G Monitoring and Evaluation.

Work Element Name: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data
Work Element Title: Bat Surveys
Metric: Population Status, Action Effectiveness Research and Status and Trend Monitoring
Methodology: BPT staff, US Forest Service and BLM will perform different methods to
inventory the presence of bat species using a standardized survey effort and sample unit
developed by U.S. Forest Service, (Ormsbee 2008). Methods include: mist netting, harp trapping,
acoustic sampling and roost surveys. Project staff involved in capturing bats must have a current
rabies vaccination and attend bat survey training. Coordination will be done through 2010-2018.
More detailed methods are included in section G Monitoring and Evaluation.

Work Element Name: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data
Work Element Title: Conduct Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP)
Metric: Population Status, Action Effectiveness Research and Status and Trend Monitoring
Methodology: To attain credits for wildlife land purchases, BPA chose to utilize HEP which
provides an index to the quality of land for a particular target species. The Mitigation Site
received a HEP to determine baseline conditions in 2000. An additional HEP will be conducted
in 2014 to determine vegetation trends and evaluate whether the habitat needs of each target
species are improving. More detailed methods are included in section G Monitoring and
Evaluation.

Work Element Name: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data
Work Element Title: Aquatic habitat and population assessments.
Metric: Population Status, Action Effectiveness Research and Status and Trend Monitoring
Methodology: Conduct periodic aquatic habitat and population assessments on drainages
associated with the management of the Logan Valley Mitigation Site. Aquatic assessments
include: 1) Aquatic Habitat Assessments on critical drainages every 5 years; 2) Annual Stream
Temperature Monitoring; 3) scheduled multiple-pass removal (depletion) estimates for redband
trout; 4) stream discharge monitoring; 5) stream channel cross section monitoring; and 6) annual
bull trout spawning surveys.

Biological Objective #5 – Protect cultural resources on Project (Burns Paiute Tribe
                          Cultural Resources Protection and Management Code).

Work with Tribal and BPA Cultural Resources department to ensure that an Environment
Compliance Documentation is produced. Staff will have to provide detailed descriptions of work
performed to ensure proper protection is achieved.

Work Element Name: Produce Environmental Compliance Documentation
Work Element Title: Cultural Resources
Metric: Herbicide will be used




FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form                                     22
Methodology: Work with Tribal and BPA Cultural Resources department to ensure that
Environment Compliance Documentation is produced. Staff will have to provide detailed
descriptions of work performed to ensure proper protection is achieved.

G. Monitoring and evaluation

Several monitoring efforts are being conducted to evaluate management effectiveness on
vegetation communities, streams and terrestrial wildlife populations, including focal species.

Vegetation

We expect our management efforts will result in a reduction of noxious weeds and increase in
native bunchgrass communities, increase biomass availability to terrestrial wildlife species,
increase frequency and density of riparian vegetation, and protect upland and forest sites from
degradation. Vegetation is currently being monitored through four different methods: photo
monitoring, noxious weed monitoring, HEP and forest inventory monitoring.

1) Photo Monitoring

Stream photos are taken at 14 points on the Project to monitor vegetative components and
changes in stream structure due to the enrollment of CREP. An upstream and downstream
azimuth was obtained to make it repeatable on subsequent visits. Stream photos were not taken
to quantify changes; rather the photos will be used as a qualitative analysis tool for visual historic
reference. It is recommended to take photos every 5 years to determine visual change.

2) Noxious Weeds

Noxious weeds will be monitored annually using Weed Information Management System
(WIMS) developed by the University of California, Davis for use by The Nature Conservancy
(TNC). “WIMS keeps track of three types of data records: weed occurrences (GPS point
locations), assessments (size and status of the weed infestation to facilitate monitoring over
time), and management treatments applied to those weed infestations. Data can be easily
exchanged between multiple users and written to shapefiles for mapping in any standard GIS
program” (The Nature Conservancy 2006). Weed documentation should be utilized throughout
the funding period.

3) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP)

The BPT realizes the ISRP does not recommend HEP as a vegetation monitoring tool. However,
we see it as additional information that can be used to assess vegetative conditions throughout
the Site. A HEP should identify vegetation changes specifically for the focal species used in the
baseline HEP conducted in 2000. A HEP should be conducted by the regional HEP team on a 5
– 10 year cycle, determined by Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) staff and
BPA. In the Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Site the 2008 HEP analysis results were “follow-
up HEP yielded 1,375 habitat units (0.78 HUs per acre) which was an increase of 722 HUs over
2000 baseline HEP assessment results (653 HUs). Under current management the habitat units


FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form                                          23
have increased, proving passive and active vegetation management has increased wildlife value
on the Project.

4) Forest Inventory Monitoring

Fifteen permanent monitoring plots were established along two transect lines in the burn site for
pre- and postburn sampling of the forest vegetation. Monitoring plots extended 20m to the west
and east and 10m to the north and south from the plot origin. The DBH of all standing trees
attaining breast height was measured within the monitoring plot. Fine woody debris (FWD) and
coarse woody debris (CWD) crossing tape lines at predetermined points were separated into size
classes and counted. Estimated cover of herbaceous and shrub vegetation within .5m x 1m
Daubenmire plots was recorded (Daubenmire 1959). Photos from the plot origin were taken in
the four cardinal directions. We will repeat the monitoring protocol at year 1 and year 3
postburn. We want to be 80% confident of detecting a 50% decrease in the mean total fuel load,
a 20% reduction of pole-size trees, and a 25% increase in the mean percent cover of native
understory species by year three postburn.

Streams

Conduct periodic aquatic habitat and population assessments on drainages associated with the
management of the Logan Valley Mitigation Site. Aquatic assessments include: 1) Aquatic
Habitat Assessments on critical drainages every 5 years; 2) Annual Stream Temperature
Monitoring; 3) scheduled multiple-pass removal (depletion) estimates for redband trout; 4)
stream discharge monitoring; 5) stream channel cross section monitoring; and 6) annual bull
trout spawning surveys.

1) Aquatic Habitat Assessments

Conduct habitat assessments on critical streams associated with the management of the property
utilizing Oregon Department Fish and Wildlife Intermediate Level Methods for Stream habitat
Surveys (ODFW 1999). Habitats can be assessed down to the individual unit type. Detailed unit
information will be collected and include: 1) characteristics, 2) slope of channel, 3) percent shade
4) substrate composition, 5) boulder count, 6) percent active erosion, and 7) woody debris count
and class. Critical stream reaches will need to be assessed every 5 years while secondary priority
streams only need to be re-assessed every 10 years. Critical streams include fish bearing
drainages and/or drainages with active management. Secondary priority streams include
drainages where passive land management actions are being implemented.

2) Annual Stream Temperature Monitoring

A commonly used technique for gathering stream temperature data is through the use of
continuous data recorders. Methods to collect stream temperature data will be conducted
utilizing the protocol outlined in the Oregon Plan Water Quality Monitoring Guide Book
(OWEB 1999). StowAway data loggers manufactured by Onset Computer, Inc. are used at
stream temperature monitoring sites. Loggers are checked for accuracy using methods
recommended by Oregon’s Water Quality Monitoring Guide Book (OWEB 1999). Stream



FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form                                        24
temperature recording units will be calibrated in the office prior to deployment. The stream
temperature unit will be deployed in the month of May on an annual basis. At a minimum,
stream temperature data loggers will be programmed to take stream temperature at least every
hour. Monthly site visits will be conducted to assure temperature recording unit is situated
properly in the channel. The stream temperature unit will be retrieved in late October annually.
The Burns Paiute Tribe Fish and Wildlife Department has identified stream temperature
monitoring sites.

3) Scheduled multiple-pass removal (depletion) estimates for redband trout

The Burns Paiute Tribe is currently developing a subbasin wide monitoring plan for native
salmonids, particularly redband trout and mountain whitefish. A final monitoring plan is
expected to be completed by March 2010. Population monitoring sites associated with the
wildlife mitigation properties will be sampled by the Tribe according to the final schedule. The
lower end of the monitoring site has been documented by a GPS point. Block nets are to be
placed at the beginning and the end of each site to eliminate recruitment and escapement of fish.
Crews will electrofish upstream starting at the downstream block net. Fish are to be collected
using a Smith-Root backpack electrofisher. Shocking a stream will require a minimum of two
individuals. One person will operate the shocker, and the other will use a dip net to collect fish.
Fish that are collected will be held in a 5 gallon bucket with an aerator until electroshocking of
each pass is completed. The initial pass will consist of shocking from the lower block net to the
upper block net and back. A second will be completed requiring a 50 percent reduction in the
collection of age 1 + salmonids (fork length > 70 mm) for the site to be complete. If reduction
criteria are not achieved, two more passes will be required using the same methodology.
Processed fish will be released into the closest pool downstream of the site. All salmonids will be
measured (mm at fork length) and all other species will be counted.

4) Stream discharge monitoring

Stream discharge monitoring will be utilized to document changes in water quantity. It is
anticipated that summer base flows will be affected by irrigation management and riparian
restoration efforts that mature over time. Stream inflows and outflows will be measured twice a
week from June through mid October.

5) Stream Channel Cross Section Monitoring

Stream channel cross section monitoring will be conducted according to the protocol outlined in
the Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Project 2008 Annual Report (Kesling et al. 2009). Cross
section locations have been documented by a GPS point and both ends of each cross section are
marked with approximately 3 foot rebar pins, with only about 6 inches of the rebar pin above
ground. A reference point (usually a post) is present nearby the location and a known distance
and azimuth marks the location of the 0.0 rebar pin that aid in relocation. Relative elevations are
to be collected using a rotating beam laser level, receiver and rod. A total of 14 sites have been
identified and are scheduled to be resurveyed every 5 years.




FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form                                       25
6) Annual bull trout spawning surveys

Due to the migratory life history of bull trout, redd count surveys are the most cost effective
approach for monitoring population trends for bull trout. The Tribe shall conduct annual bull
trout spawning surveys on Lake Creek, Big Creek, Meadow Fork Creek, Snowshoe Creek and
Summit Creek. These streams contain all known bull trout spawning habitat for the upper
Malheur River local population which is approximately 12 miles of habitat. Total known
spawning habitat will be surveyed twice in the fall for a total of up to 24 miles of stream
completed annually. In 1992, ODFW initiated spawning surveys for bull trout. Since 1999,
Tribal staff has played an important role in assisting ODFW in conducting these surveys. These
surveys are only possible with the cooperation of all of the local agencies and the many
volunteers that participate. Bull trout spawning ground surveys will be conducted from mid-
August through mid-October. All surveys will be conducted walking upstream, generally in the
center of the channel, or when two surveyors are required, each surveyor on opposite side of the
stream. All surveyors will be equipped with polarized sunglasses. All redds in the survey
reaches will be marked with survey flagging so they are not double-counted. In addition, a GPS
reading will be taken at each redd identified. The GPS unit will be set to record the coordinates
in decimal degrees or decimal minutes and the datum to NAD 1983. A chronological record will
be kept of each redd and the visibility of each classified every survey.

Terrestrial Wildlife

Most of the focal species will be monitored through 4 wildlife population surveys: point-counts,
amphibian, small mammals and bat surveys.

1.) Point-Counts

Point counts will be utilized on an annual basis to monitor all bird species on the Mitigation Site.
Protocols are derived from A Habitat-Based Point-Count Protocol for Terrestrial Birds,
Emphasizing Washington and Oregon (Huff et al. 2000), developed for the U.S. Forest Service
and developed through collaboration with Washington-Oregon Partners in Flight, and are
minimally different than those proposed in the Albeni Falls plan.

We recommend three visits to each location in each breeding season to make the most of varying
detectability over time and among species. The visits should be spread across the breeding
season, at least 7 to 10 days apart, and occur at about the same dates each year. Each visit to a
location should consist of point-count observations at all stations at that location. Observations
should begin around sunrise and be completed about 10:00 a.m., 5 hours after the “dawn
chorus.” Weather conditions should be calm and warm enough for birds to be active and for
detection by sight and sound to be likely. Avoid counting on days with high wind, heavy rain, or
other conditions of poor bird detectability. Field observers should be tested and highly qualified
to detect birds by sight and sound. Even qualified observers differ from each other, so try to use
observers who have consistent bird detection abilities.

At each station the counts themselves are conducted in a 5-minute span. Tally every bird
detected over 5 minutes and record it in one of five categories:



FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form                                        26
        Typical detection 0 to 50 m: birds up to top of vegetation/canopy, ≤50 m from the
         station center point.
        Typical detection >50m: birds up to top of vegetation or canopy, >50 m from the
         station center point.
        Fly-over associated: birds above top of vegetation or canopy, but in your judgment are
         associated with the local habitat.
        Fly-over independent: birds above top of vegetation or canopy, and in your judgment
         are unassociated with the local habitat.
        Record juveniles in a separate count of immature birds

Record the data on the standard paper data form provided or similar electronic format. After
returning to the office, you can enter it into a computer using Flight Attendant 4, a specialized
data entry program, and analyze what you have entered through a database, spreadsheet, or
statistical program.

2) Amphibian surveys

Information on species presence, population trend data (catch estimations based on 1000 trap
nights) and relative abundance will be obtained through active and passive survey methods. We
will use the pitfall trap design described by Jones (1981) (Figure 3). The circles in Figure 3 are
the pitfall traps, and the connecting lines are 5m long drift fences. Detailed construction design
is outlined in Figure 4.




               Figure 3: Pitfall trap design.        Figure 4: Pitfall trap and drift fence construction.

We will open the traps for two consecutive nights every other week for a six week period. A
dispersed timeframe for trapping will help encompass movements of adults to water bodies in
different species spawning periods. Population trend data and relative abundance will be
ascertained through trapping efforts. Basic information on species presence will be documented
through identifying observed egg masses to species and identifying calls of breeding amphibians.
Egg mass searches and call surveys will be conducted while checking traps.


FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form                                                 27
3) Small Mammals

Protocols for small mammal trapping are found in the Monitoring and Evaluation Plan for the
Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project (2002) with minor adjustments: Small mammal
populations will be sampled by Sherman live traps. Traps will be baited with a mixture of
peanut butter and rolled oats. An array of traps will be laid out as follows. One hundred-meter
baselines transect centered at the sample point and running along a random compass bearing and
its back azimuth will be established. From the baseline transect, 100 Sherman live traps will be
spaced 10m apart in a 100m x 100m area. Trapping will be conducted for two consecutive nights
yielding a total of 200 trap nights per sample point. Sample point, cover type, date of capture,
and species will be recorded for each small mammal capture and marked by shaving a small
patch on the rump of the small mammal. A scientific taking permit will be acquired from ODFW
prior to the trapping effort, and a trap report is submitted upon conclusion to complete the
reporting requirements of the permit.

4) Bat Surveys

Bat Grid survey protocol was developed by Pat Ormsbee, Bat Specialist for the U.S. Forest
Service.
The objectives of the Bat Grid sampling are:
      To inventory the presence of bat species using a standardized survey effort and sample
         unit across the region.
      To collect baseline data on acoustic, morphologic, and genetic characteristics that serve
         as references for identifying all bat species in the region.
      For select sample units monitor changes in:
             o Occupancy
             o Detection Probabilities
             o Species distribution and relative rarity
Bats are sampled while in flight, typically in association with drinking at a water body, or while
they are roosting. A site is sampled using several methods:
    In flight:
            o Acoustic
            o Visual
            o Capture (mist net or harp trap)
     Roosting:
            o Visual
            o Capture (hand net, mist net, or harp trap)
            o Guano analysis

Mist net surveys are conducted within the period of June 1 – September 1. Repeat visits to the
same site will occur, allowing 1 week between repeat visits to the same site to prevent depression
of capture success and to take advantage of potential shifts in bat activity that may occur across
the summer.




FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form                                       28
Mist net surveys will be selected on features in the following order of priority:
    Small water features (e.g. creek, spring, pond, exposed guzzler or tank), especially where
       water may be a limiting factor.
    Larger water features (e.g. small river or lake) where mist netting is an effective method
       of capture.
    Arroyo, roadway, or other potential flight corridors.

One to three nets will be placed on each survey. Documenting net sets by photos, drawings, and
maps, so that the configuration can be repeated in the future. Surveys are conducted by at least 2
people who are qualified and trained to do all aspects of the mist net survey, and if there is an
additional acoustic component. Mist net is only done in dry weather or in situations where nets
will stay dry. Windy conditions will be avoided. Mist net will be done for 3.5 hr. after civil
sunset or until 1 hr. has passed without visual or acoustic detection of bats in the vicinity.

5) Ungulate Use

Ungulate use is difficult to determine on this Mitigation Site. The Site is less than a mile wide at
any one point and is only ½ mile wide at most points. Due to the large home range of most
ungulates it is difficult to assess actual use of the Site vs. travel through the Site. In addition,
vegetation is often 2-3 feet tall making pellet counts an inappropriate method to assess ungulate
use. Therefore, the Tribe will continue to work with CBFWA, Wildlife Committee in
establishing standardized M&E strategies for wild ungulates.

Terrestrial focal species identified in the Malheur River Subbasin Assessment and Management
Plan (NPCC 2004) are: elk, pileated woodpecker, blue grouse, mule deer, sage grouse, horned
lark, California bighorn sheep, pronghorn, California quail, bald eagle, river otter, spotted frog,
leopard frog, yellow warbler and yellow-breasted chat. With the exception of elk, deer, bighorn
and pronghorn, the remaining focal species that exist on the Mitigation Site will be monitored on
an annual basis through the methods described. All previous data gathering is stored at the
Burns Paiute Fish and Wildlife Department in both paper and electronic format.

H. Facilities and equipment

This project has adequate facilities, equipment, and staff levels. All major equipment items are
stored at the Malheur Wildlife Mitigation Site, where a full time employee resides, to prevent
theft and vandalism. A cabin exists at the Mitigation Site to house seasonal employees and may
serve as a base of operation during the summer months. Currently 4 trucks are available and are
adequate to both carry personnel and haul trailers and equipment. Office space has been
provided by the Tribe and high quality communication equipment is funded through BPA to
administer the project. Three full time employees and 4 seasonal employees are utilized to
accomplish project goals.




FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form                                        29
I. References

Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group. 2002. Monitoring and evaluation plan for the Albeni
       Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project.

Ashley, Paul R. 2005. Malheur River Wildlife Management Plan. Lone Pine Butte Consulting,
      Spokane, WA.

Boyd, C.S., and J. Zamora. 2004. Interim Report on Research Activities in Logan Valley. 2004
      Field Season. Eastern Oregon Agricultural Research Center. Burns, OR 23pp.

Boyd, C. S., and T. J. Svejcar. 2005. A visual obstruction technique for photo monitoring of
      willow clumps. Rangeland Ecology and Management 58:434 – 438.

Bureau of Land Management (BLM). 2003. Southeast Oregon resource management plan, final
      environmental impact statement, and record of decision. Vale District, BLM, Vale, OR.

Cooperrider, A.Y., R. J. Boyd, and H. R. Stuart, eds. 1986. Inventory and monitoring of
      wildlife habitat. U.S. Dept. Inter., Bur. Land Manage. Service Center. Denver, CO.
      xviii, 858 pp.

Daubenmire, R. 1959. A canopy-coverage method of vegetational analysis. Northwest
      Science 33:43-64.

Huff, M.H., K.A. Bettinger, H.L. Ferguson, M.J. Brown, and B. Altman. 2000. A
       habitat-based point-count protocol for terrestrial birds, emphasizing Washington and
       Oregon. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-501. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of
       Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 39pp.

Kesling, J., L. Schwabe, C. Abel. 2009. Logan Valley Mitigation Site Annual Report. Burns
       Paiute Tribe Natural Resources Division.

Jones, K.B. 1981. Effects of grazing on lizard abundance and diversity in western Arizona.
       Southwest Nat. 26: 107-115.

Lancia, R.A., J.D. Nichols, and K.H. Pollock. 1996. Estimating the number of animals in
       wildlife populations. Pages 215-253 in T.A. Bookhout, ed. Research and management
       techniques for wildlife and habitats. Fifth ed., rev. The Wildlife Society, Bethesda, MD.

Miles S.L. 2008 2008 Channel Cross Section and Assessment Reach Monitoring Logan Valley
       Wildlife Mitigation Property of the Burns Paiute Tribe. Riparian Resources.

Nature Conservancy. 2006. http://tncweeds.ucdavis.edu/wims.html. July 13, 2006.

Northwest Power Act. 1980. 16 United States Code Chapter 12H (1994 & Supp. I 1995). Act of
      Dec. 5, 1980, 94 Stat. 2697. Public Law No. 96-501, S. 885.



FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form                                     30
Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC). 2000. Columbia River Basin Fish and
      Wildlife Program. Council Document No. 2000-19. NPCC, Portland, OR.

Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC). 2004. Malheur River Subbasin
      Assessment and Management Plan. NPCC, Portland, OR.

Ogden, P.S. 1950. Peter Skene Ogden’s Snake Country Journal 1824-25 and 1825-1826. E.E.
      Rich (ed). Hudson’s Bay Record Society, London.

Ogden, P.S. 1961. Peter Skene Ogden’s Snake Country Journal 1823-27 K.G. Davies (ed).
      Hudson’s Bay Record Society, London.

Ogden, P.S. 1971. Peter Skene Ogden’s Snake Country Journal 1827-28 and 1826-1829. G.
      Williams (ed). Hudson’s Bay Record Society, London.

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. 2006 Oregon Conservation Strategy. Salem, OR.

ODFW 1999. Aquatic Inventory Project: Intermediate Level Methods for Stream Habitat
    Surveys. Salem, OR.

OWEB 1999. Water Quality Monitoring Handbook: Oregon Salmon Plan. Salem, OR.

Ormsbee, P. 2008. Bat Grid Protocol. Unpublished.

Peck, Theresa. 2008. Burns Paiute Tribe Cultural Specialist. Communicated from tribal
       records.

Platts, W.S. 1990. Managing fisheries and wildlife on rangelands grazed by livestock. White
        Horse Assoc., Smithfield, Ut. 445pp.

Schwabe, L., D. Brown, R. Perkins, B. Bangs, S. Gunkel, S. Jacobs, and D. Hawkins. 2008.
      Evaluate the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur Subbasin. FY 2007
      Annual Report. Burns Paiute Tribe. Burns, OR. 167p.

Thompson, R.N. and J.B. Haas. 1960. Environmental survey report pertaining to salmon and
     steelhead in certain rivers of eastern Oregon and the Willamette River and its tributaries.
     Part I. Survey reports of eastern Oregon rivers. Fish Commission of Oregon, Contract 14-
     17-001-178, Clackamas, OR.

U.S. Forest Service. 2000. Malheur Headwaters Watershed analysis. Prepared by David Evans
       and Associates, Inc. in association with Integrated Resource Management, Inc. and
       Shapiro and Associates, Inc. for Prairie City Ranger District, Prairie City, OR.




FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form                                    31
J. Key personnel

Lawrence Tangog Schwabe
Current Position: 8% of time dedicated to this project.
Job Title: Fisheries and Wildlife Director, Burns Paiute Tribe
       Develop and Implement Fisheries Programs
       Collaborate with Federal and State Agencies
       Obtain Fish and Wildlife Take Permits
       Write Quarterly and Annual Reports
       Supervise Data Collection
       Supervise Data Analysis
       Submit Annual Statements of Work to Sponsors and Tribal Council
       Over See Budgets, and Spending
       Hire Staff
       Conduct Performance Evaluations
       Write and Submit Research and Restoration Grants
       Serve as Tribal Representative on State and Regional Technical Panels
Work Experience:

Burns Paiute Tribe
        Natural Resource Director 10/2004 to Present (1.0 FTE)
        Fisheries Program Manager- 02/2002 to 10/2004 (1.0 FTE)
        Fisheries Biologist- Burns Paiute Tribe 07/98-02/2002 (1.0 FTE)
USFS Ochoco National Forest
        Fisheries Biologist (Project Inspector) 5/98-6/98 (1.0 FTE)
        Fisheries Biologist (Data Entry, Data Collection, Data Analysis, Report Writing) 6/96-
        5/98 (1.0 FTE)
        Fisheries Technician (Data Entry, Data Collection, Data Analysis, Report Writing) 6/95-
        6/96 (1.0 FTE)
        Fisheries Technician (Data Collection, Fish Identification, and data entry)
        [1.0 FTE = (40+ HRS/Week)]
Oregon State University
        Biological Aide (Data Collection) 6/94-10/94
Job Related Training
Electrofishing Operation and Fish Handling Techniques 2003, Principles of Rosgen Channel
Classification 2002, FERC Re-Licensing Information Course 2001, ATV, Boat Certification
2000, ODFW Stream Survey Habitat 1998;2000, Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) analysis
1998
USFWS Certifications
ODFW Stream Surveys 1998;2000, Grant Writing Seminar 1998, USFS Region 6 Stream Survey
Habitat 1995,96,97,99, CORT/Inspector Certification 1997, Data Interpretation Course1997,
Water Pump and Engine Fire Course 1997, Fire Fighting Training/Refresher Course
1995,96,97,98
Education:
B. S. in Fisheries Science 1995, Oregon State University. Corvallis, OR



FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form                                   32
Jason Kesling
Current Position: 50% of time dedicated to this project.
Job Title: Wildlife Program Manager, Burns Paiute Tribe
       Develop and Implement Wildlife Programs
       Collaborate with Federal and State Agencies
       Obtain Fish and Wildlife Take Permits
       Write Quarterly and Annual Reports
       Supervise Data Collection
       Supervise Data Analysis
       Submit Annual Statements of Work to Sponsors and Tribal Council
       Over See Budgets, and Spending
       Hire Staff
       Conduct Performance Evaluations
       Write and Submit Research and Restoration Grants
       Serve as Tribal Representative on State and Regional Technical Panels
Work Experience:
Burns Paiute Tribe
       Wildlife Program Director- Burns, OR. 8/2008-Present (1.0 FTE)
Burns Paiute Tribe
       Wildlife Assistant Manager-Burns, OR. 5/2005-8/2008 (1.0 FTE)
Louisiana State University
       Research Assistant- Baton Rouge, LA. Research Assistant Waterfowl Surveys 10/2004-
       3/2005 (1.0 FTE)
Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
       Habitat Technician- Hines OR. Habitat Improvement 6/2004-9/2004 (1.0 FTE)
California Waterfowl Association
       Crew Leader-San Joaquin Valley, CA. Waterfowl Study 6/2003-8/2003 (1.0 FTE)
Tulelake National Wildlife Refuge (TNWR)
       Paid Internship- Klamath Falls OR. Avian Surveys 8/2003-9/2004 (200 HRS)
       Research Assistant- Klamath Falls, OR. Waterfowl Surveys 6/2002-9-2002
       (1.0 FTE)
Oregon State University
       Paid Internship- Habitat Improvement at TNWR 10/2002-3/2003 (300 HRS)
Miller Island Wildlife Area (Refuge)
       Wildlife Technician- Upland Game Management August 2001
Work Relate Training
Avian Identification Sight and Sound, Operate Heavy Equipment, Operation of Airboats, Grant
Writing Seminar, Plant Identification, Equipment Maintenance, First Aid, CPR Oregon Boater
Education Card
Scholarships and Awards
        E. R. Jackman Internship Scholarship
        Native American in Marine and Space Sciences Internship (NAMSS)
Education
B. S. Fish and Wildlife Science 2004, Specialty Option: Avian Ecology.



FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form                                 33
Chad Eric Abel
Current Position 50% of time dedicated to this project.
Job Title: Wildlife Assistant Manager, Burns Paiute Tribe
       Develop and Implement Wildlife Programs
       Collaborate with Federal and State Agencies
       Obtain Fish and Wildlife Take Permits
       Write Quarterly and Annual Reports
       Data Collection
       Data Analysis
       Submit Annual Statements of Work to Sponsors and Tribal Council
       Conduct Performance Evaluations
       Write and Submit Research and Restoration Grants
       Serve as Tribal Representative on State and Regional Technical Panels

Work Experience

Burns Paiute Tribe
      Wildlife Assistant Manager – Burns, OR 9/2008-present (1.0 FTE)
ODFW
      Mountain Quail Technician – Burns, OR 3/2008-9/2008 (1.0 FTE)
      Tracking, data collection and research on radio-collared mtn. quail translocations to the
      Trout Creek Mountains
BLM
      Wildlife Technician – Eugene, OR 4/2007-10/2007 (1.0 FTE)
      Wildlife surveys and habitat mapping in the Siuslaw Coastal Range
Simon Frasier University
      Field Research Assistant – Baja, Mexico 11/2006-12/2006 (1.0 FTE)
      Decoy mist net and net gun trapping effort to radio collar wintering surf scoters
Bighorn Institute
      Field Biologist – Coachella Valley, CA 3/2006-9/2006 (1.0 FTE)
      Tracked radio collared bighorn sheep in the San Jacinto and Santa Rosa Mountains
University of Montana
      Wildlife Technician – Buffalo, WY 3/2005-9/2005 (1.0 FTE)
      Trapped then tracked nesting sage grouse near methane drilling projects
University of Wisconsin Institute of Environmental Studies
      Student Researcher – Madison, WI 5/2003-12/2003 (20hr/wk)
      Research on exotic shrub invasion across two distinct habitat types
University of Wisconsin Botany Department
      Research Assistant – Madison, WI 5/2002-10/2002 (25hr/wk)
      Vegetative survey to quantify historical changes to WI River floodplain
UW Herbarium
      Data Entry Specialist – Madison, WI 9/2001-11/2002 (15hr/wk)
      Catalogued information from dry specimens into database




FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form                                      34
University of Wisconsin Wildlife Department
        Field Assistant – Spring Green, WI 5/2001-8/2001 (1.0 FTE)
        Nest searching and monitoring of tall grass prairie passerines
Scholarships and Awards
Vicky Lee Hirsch Conservation Scholarship 2001-2002
Education
BS Conservation Biology, University of Wisconsin 12/2003
Certificate, Environmental Studies




Neil Lunt
Current Position: 5% of time dedicated to this project.
Job Title: Ranch Manager/ Wildlife Technician
       Maintain Irrigation
       Haying Operations
       Weed Control
       Cattle Management
       Perform Reseeding Operations
       Fence Removal and Modifications
       Maintain Farm Equipment
       Oversee Seasonal Technicians
       Heavy Equipment Operator
       On-site Personnel

Work Experience

Burns Paiute Tribe
      Ranch Manager/ Wildlife Technician- Burns, OR. (1.0 FTE)
Double C Ranch
      Cattle Forman-Vale, Oregon Cattle Management (1.0 FTE)
Lamar Roche
      Cattle Forman-Parma, Idaho Cattle Management (1.0 FTE)
Topo Ranch
      Cattle Forman- King City, California Cattle Management (1.0 FTE)

Education

High School Graduate 1964, Fort Ann Central High School NY




FY 2010+ Wildlife Category Review - Narrative Form                       35

				
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