ERDS Stat Profile 2010_P165-174

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ERDS Stat Profile 2010_P165-174 Powered By Docstoc
					     ECOSYSTEMS RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT SECTOR
                    DENR Region I

                   ENR STATISTICAL PROFILES CY 2010


       The Ecosystems Research and Development Services takes pride in its
worthy accomplishment being the research arm of the Department task to conduct
relevant research and development activities in line with its mandates on ENR
management as provided for in EO 192. Research cuts across all concerns of the
environment bringing about a balance between integrity of life support systems and
socio-economic development.

       The ERDS implemented priority programs in relation to climate change.
Under the Climate Change Adaptation RDE Program, there are three (3) programs
implemented, the first program is the “Vulnerability Assessment of priority
watersheds in the Philippines (BP1)”, the watershed targeted for Vulnerability
Assessment (VA) for this year is the Amburayan River Watershed. However, the
Service managed also to conduct VA and offered technical assistance in
coordination with FMS and CENRO La Union for other two (2) watersheds, namely:
Baroro River Watershed (covering Bacnotan, San Juan and San Gabriel, La Union)
and Quaioit River Watershed (covering Batac and Paoay, Ilocos Norte. The second
program is the “Determination of Carrying Capacity (CARCAP) of Various
Areas/Sites for Resources Conservation, Ecotourism and Sustainable Development
(BP2) with one (1) component project entitled “Carrying Capacity of Paoay Lake
National Park for Ecotourism and Sustainable Development; and the third program is
the “Development Strategies for the Production of Quality Planting Materials (BP4)”.
The Technology Transfer Division implemented the “Determination of appropriate
extension strategies to facilitate the adoption of ENR technologies” (BP5). Under
Climate Change Mitigation RDE Program, there are three (3) projects: (1) Biomass
and carbon sequestration of selected mangrove forests (component 2 of BP7), (2)
Establishment of Bio-Intensive Demo Farms within Upland Areas in Region I (under
BP7) and (3) Survey, inventory and documentation of selected biofuel species
(BP8).

        Considering the limited funds of the Research Sector the strong linkages and
networking of the DENR-1 through the service with other agencies, funding support
were realized to augment the implementation of other programs and projects. From
these funds, there are special projects that are being implemented, one (1) was
funded under KR2-PEP of NEDA-Region 1 entitled “Bio-intensive Gardening (BIG)
Project and one (1) program funded by PCARRD which under the Techno-Gabay
Program (TGP) / Enhancing Farmers’ Information Technology Service (FITS) for
Rural Development with two (2) component projects namely: (1) Farmer’s
Information Technology Service (FITS) Center – One Stop Shop                 of ENR
Techno/Information; and (2) S&T-based on bamboo-agroforestry production in the
City of San Fernando, La Union.

       Under the “Vulnerability Assessment of the Amburayan River Watershed”
study, there are about three (3) priority watersheds that were assessed by the
ERDS. These are the Lower Amburayan River Watershed (LARW) the Baroro River
Watershed and the Quiaoit River Watershed which are still continuing and being
conducted in coordination with the Forest Management Services (FMS) and
PENROs La Union and Ilocos Sur.

      Similarly, the area covered by the LARW, encompasses ten (10)
municipalities i.e., Sigay, Alilem, Sugpon, Cervantes, Tagudin, Suyo, (Ilocos Sur)
and Sudipen, Bangar, San Gabriel, and Santol (La Union) The terminal report for
the Vulnerability Assessment of this watershed had been completed as of December
2010 and due for submission. The objectives of the program as well as the project
are as follows: a. to identify and analyze hazard/disasters occurring within the
watershed; b. prepare digitized hazard maps; c. assess the impact of hazards and
coping mechanisms; recommend mitigating measure and come up with policy
recommendation.

       In order to come up with these objectives, the characterization report done by
the FMS was thoroughly analyzed. The generation of thematic maps was done so
that bio-physical and spatial analyzes can be done.

        The hazards that were assessed include flood, erosion, landslide, fire and
bio-diversity loss as caused by man’s intervention and natural disasters. The final
output of the project includes policy recommendations and various mitigating
measures to include SWC technologies, vegetative and installation of protective
structures.

        Various activities that were undertaken on the “Carrying Capacity of Paoay
Lake National Park for Ecotourism and Sustainable Development” are as follows: 1)
conducted leveling-off with ERDB staff and assisted them in visiting the Paoay Lake
National Park. Coordination with CENRO Laoag, BFAR, Ilocos Norte and LGU,
Paoay was also done regarding the implementation of the project; (2) the Project /
Study Proposal was presented to the Protected             Area Management Bureau
(PAMB) of Paoay Lake National Park for approval and possible financial support and
other types of technical assistance; (3 Identified sampling sites for water quality
monitoring and distribution of zooplankton in Paoay Lake. Sampling areas were
assigned in the following sites : Site 1- Nagbacalan side; Site 2 - Suba side; Site 3 -
Nangguyudan side; and Site 4 – Sungadan side. Additional sampling sites were
established to represent the true picture of the lake in terms of water quality as
affected by the different factors foremost of which is the presence of fish cages.
Secondary data on the zooplankton diversity in Paoay lake from a 2006 study were
used as a basis for the determination of any changes in observation during the
course of the study; (3) Water sampling and in-situ analysis in 14 sampling stations
in the lake were conducted four months after the initial sampling in May. The
parameters measured were pH, temperature, Dissolved Oxygen (DO), Total
Suspended Solids (TSS), Total Dissolved Solids (TDS), Salinity (NaCl) and
conductants. Nutrient loading and pollution measures were determined in terms of
the nitrates, sulfate and phosphate contents of the lake and conductivity level at the
different sites respectively.

       The results of analysis showed that the average pH (7.61) is still within the
standard value (6.5-9) for lakes and rivers. During the second assessment, the
average DO from the different sampling sites is 6.0, indicating a slight increase (5.6
in May) during the wet season. The same average temperature readings were noted
from the different portions of the water depth (21.3 0C). There is a slight decrease
from the previous sampling (23.5 to 21.30C) but still within the standard which is
<33oC. The minimum and maximum temperatures recorded were at 20.8 0C and
22.20C respectively. The Total Suspended Solids recorded is 1.46 ppm which is far
below the standard (50ppm). The lake is clean with no suspended solids and no
waste materials present on the surface. Likewise, there is a decrease in the
recorded TDS (from an average of 120.83 in May to 85.89 in September). All
recorded TDS from the different stations are still below the standard (250) indicating
a low pollution level in the lake. Higher TDS readings were noted in areas within
the fish cages. However, lower TDS were noted from the fish cages and dwellings
and at the center of the lake. Salinity has tremendously dropped during the rainy
months (from 94 in May to 20.8 ppm in September). Conductants on the other
hand, has increased after the rainy months (255 uS in May to 950.16 uS in
September) but still within the acceptable range (1000 uS). It was noted that
pollutants are non-point sources. The lake was quite turbid during assessment since
heavy rains wwere recorded earlier.

       Aside from the sediments deposited including the feeds at the fish cage area,
there were entries of pollutants since the lake is a catchment basin. Agricultural
drainage water received by the lake during heavy rains could have contributed to the
increase of conductants in the lake. Nitrate and phosphate in the lake is nil in
September (0.106 and 0.063 respectively) and there is also a very minimal value for
sulfates which indicates that the lake is free from toxic pollutants.

       Generally, the present status of the lake is still safe but some parameters
need to be monitored in order to maintain water quality and its capability to provide a
sustained fish production. Likewise, there is a need to assess the existing activities
within the perimeter of the lake to determine other contributory factors that affects
water quality.

        Regulation of the number of fish cages be considered as a sustainable option
in maintaining the good health of the lake ecosystem. Moreover, proposed projects
relative to the introduction of exotic fish species with intensive feeding and cultural
management be seriously studied prior to implementation to prevent further damage
to the lake.

       Designation of area for development can be considered to ensure long-term
survival of the lake.

       On the third program being implemented, the “Development Strategies for the
Production of Quality Planting Materials” (BP4), activities accomplished are as
follows: (1) pricked/sown 1,500 palosapis seeds with 33.33 % germination rate; (2)
collected and potted wildlings of the various species such as yakal (2000), palosapis
(1,600), yemane (2,000), mahogany (1,000), narig (355) , guijo (220) and white
lauan (125);        (3) sent about 1,536 seeds of narra to ERDB for progeny testing;
(4) monitored and maintained the SS/SPA areas including identified plus trees; and
(5) maintained the potted seedlings in the nursery at Pagdalagan Sur, Bauang, La
Union.

       Under Climate Change Mitigation RDE Program, the first project, the
“Biomass and carbon sequestration of selected mangrove forests” (component 2 of
BP7), the activities undertaken were: (1) initial site identification and assessment of
the proposed project location at Brgy. Pagdalagan, Bauang, La Union; (2) marking
and delineation of proposed experimental plots; (3) established 5 samples plots
(main plots) with a size of 10 m x 10 m within the established mangrove plantation
(4) within the 5 sample plots, 100% inventory of trees of at least 5 cm and above at
DBH was accomplished. The diameter and the total height of the trees were
recorded and marked for yearly re-measurement; (5) branch sample (6-8 cm
diameter, 10-20cm long) of the major species found in the sample plots were also
taken for carbon content analysis; (6) Of the total 5 main plots, regenerants samples
were collected only from the three plots (Plots 2, 4 & 5) which includes <3cm dbh-
seedlings, saplings and herbaceous plants.

       A total of 9 subplots with a size of 1m x 1m were established; 3 subplots were
randomly located at any corner of the main plot representing seaward, middleward
and landward areas. All the regenerations found within the subplots were harvested
for fresh and oven-dry weight determination; (7) collected litterfall of 100 gm per
sample/main plots for carbon content analysis; (8) Collected sediments from the
undisturbed portion of the sample plots for bulk density and organic matter content
analysis; (9) Analysis of bio-mass samples - within the 5 plots, there were four (4)
species found which includes bakauan, pototan, kulasi and api-api. It is dominated
by pototan species. However, the bakauan species had the biggest average
diameter (11.79 cm) and the tallest (9.81 m) average height. The kulasi species had
the lowest average diameter (5.5 cm) and one bakauan tree had the smallest (3.0
m) average height. Fresh weight and oven-dry weight of biomass samples like
litterfall, roots, branch samples and regenerants were taken.

        For the litterfall, all the samples had an initial weight of 100 gm. However after
oven drying, samples from plot 2 gave the highest oven dry weight (47.7 gm) and
the lowest was the samples gathered from plot 5. This is due to the type/kind of
forest litters present in the plots. For the branch sample, plot 5 had the highest fresh
and oven dry weight (979.0 gm and 669.3 gm) while the lowest was from plot
1(351.5 gm and 233.7 gm) respectively. This maybe due to the sizes of the major
species existing within the sample plot. As to the regenerants, samples collected
from plot 4 in the landward area had the highest fresh and oven dry weight in terms
of leaves, branches and stem while the lowest were samples from plot 2 seaward
area.      Results of the soil analysis submitted to Department of Agriculture, Soil
Laboratory, Regional Office 1, San Fernando City shows that the soil texture is
generally light while the soil pH is within the standard allowable values (6.6-7.0). As
to the nutrient content, Plot 5 gave the highest percentage of organic matter and the
least is Plot 1 (0.5) however, it is characterized from medium to very high (Landon,
1991). The phosphorous content is very low to low (4-20) ppm) while the potassium
is very high (380-729 ppm).

       Under the study, “Establishment of Bio-Intensive Demo Farms within Upland
Areas in Region I (under BP7), activities undertaken from the three (3) study sites
located at Sarrat, Ilocos Norte, Sta. Cruz, Ilocos Sur and San Manuel, Pangasinan
includes monitoring the planting of agricrop species, getting their yield / produce (kilo
of various vegetables) and the preparation of organic fertilizer. In Sarrat, Ilocos
Norte, crops produced are: 20 k string beans; 25 k ampalaya, 50 k tomato; in Sta.
Cruz, Ilocos Sur, 35 k eggplant, 65 k tomato, 25 k string beans and 30 k okra; in San
Manuel, Pangasinan, 20 k bush sitao, 25 bundles ampalaya, 15 k green pepper and
20 k squash. The organic fertilizer prepared for each site were: 3 liters fermented
plant juice (Sarrat, Ilocos Norte), 5 kilos bokashi (Sta. Cruz, Ilocos Sur) and 4 liters
fermented plant juice (San Manuel, Pangasinan.

       With regards to “Survey, inventory and documentation of selected biofuel
species” (BP8), activities undertaken are as follows:

       1) Conducted survey / inventory of Baguilumbang stand at Caniaw
          Reforestation Project in Piddig, Ilocos Norte. Identified and charted 481
          trees with 30 cm and up dbH;

       2) Conducted phenological observation and documentation of the species in
          the site.

          On March 24-26, 2010, it was observed that majority of the trees are in
          bloom and some (80%) have shed-off their leaves and started flowering
          while ninety-five percent (95%) of the Baguilumbang trees are at their
          fruiting stage and new leaves are emerging;

       3) Continued survey, mapping and inventory of the identified location of
          biofuel species in Region 1. Bitaog stand has been assessed at Sitio
          Bungro in Brgy. Pragata, Pasuquin, Ilocos Norte. The activity was
          conducted in coordination with CENRO, Bangui. There were 92 bitaog
          trees in the islet mostly located along its shoreline and densely growing in
          clusters (group of 37, 25 and 17 trees/cluster). The trees have an average
          dbH of 14.7 cm and an average total height of 12 m. Thirteen (13) sample
          trees were charted and mapped. During the assessment conducted on
          July 1-2, 2010, it was observed that the trees are already in their fruiting
          stage;

      4) Conducted survey, mapping and inventory of three (3) more biofuel
         species such as Baguilumbang, Bani and Botong. Baguilumbang trees
         are found in cluster of irregular spacing at Sitio Paraiso in Brgy.
         Tanggaoan, Piddig, Ilocos Norte. There were 480 trees assessed but only
         20 trees were charted and mapped for the study. Baguilumbang trees
         flowers and bloom in early May this year and progressively shed-off their
         leaves after a week or two to give way to young fruits. Mature fruits are
         ready for harvest when they fall towards the end of July and early part of
         August. Bani were found naturally growing on the coastal area in Brgy.
         Salugan, Currimao, Ilocos Norte. Of the 13 trees documented, 11 trees
         were already bearing fruits.

          With respect to Botong trees, these are found sporadically in the
          northernmost town of Ilocos Norte along the coastal area of Brgy. Saud,
          Municipality of Pagudpud, Ilocos Norte. Almost 50% of the trees
          inventoried are about a century old according to the residents in the area.
          These trees however, are still prolific seeders and flowers continually
          every year;

      5) Conducted survey and mapping of Bitaog in a seven-year old plantation
         found in a 0.113 ha area in the river bank at Brgy. Pugo, Bauang, La
         Union. There are 15 trees with an average height of 6.62 m and an
         average dbH of 13.62 cm. For this year, fruiting started in October. For
         two years now, the trees serve as seed source of the LGU of Bauang for
         their seedling production in the municipal nursery. The trees are also
         growing well in sandy-loam soil along the Pugo river bank;

      6) Conducted survey and mapping of Kapok trees in Brgy. Talogtog, San
         Juan, La Union. Kapok trees as observed are becoming sparser in Region
         1. Of the one hectare area covered, there are only 7 old trees ranging
         from 35 to 60 – year-old trees according to residents and owners of lots
         where the trees are located. Trees were observed to have an average
         height of 13.52 m with an average dbH of 88.78 cm. The trees are
         bearing fruits every year where owners gather the matured fruits and sell
         them for P80 per 100 pieces and collect the fluffs for stuffing pillows.
          Terminal Report of the study was already prepared and submitted to
          ERDB, College, Laguna on December 2010.

      For the Technology Transfer Division, the banner program being implemented
is BP5 on “Determination of appropriate extension strategies to facilitate the
adoption of ENR technologies”. The program was able to assess the Dragon Fruit
Farming Technology using the Technology Assessment Guidelines (TAG).

        Known as the new money crop, the Dragon Fruit (Hylocereus undatus) with
local name, Pitaya/saniata is the fruit of several cacti species native to Mexico,
Central and South America. It contains lycopene which is natural anti-oxidant known
to fight cancer, heart diseases and lowers blood pressure. Dragon fruit production is
a very promising potential source of income for lowland and upland communities. It
can be raised in a backyard level or grown into a micro/macro enterprise. One can
start in a backyard level with a minimum capital and with the use of indigenous
materials. A 10-post with 4 cuttings yields 20-30 kilos on the 1st year and increases
yearly by 50-75%. A kilo of dragon fruit costs P90-150/kilo. On a macro level a 1-
ha plantation with 2,000 concrete post requires an input of P300,000 at the start of
the project. For a 3-year period the benefit expected is 2.58 for every peso invested.
This indicates a high economic viability.
         Activities conducted under the special project, on the “Bio-intensive
Gardening (BIG) Project” funded by KR2-PEP of NEDA-1 are as follows: (1)
Delivered additional inputs (brown sugar, pails for use in the preparation of organic
fertilizer and seeds for planting) to the different demo sites. (2) Monitored and
conducted documentation on the preparation of organic fertilizer using Indigenous
Microorganism (IMO) and Fermented Plant Juice (FPJ) by the PO participants in the
different sites based on Natural Farming Method. As a result of the training, the POs
produced a total of 30 liters of liquid organic fertilizer in the BIG demo sites; (3)
Monitored the different BIG demo sites especially the production data. During the
2nd quarter, which is usually a fallow period for the demo sites because of the
extreme dry season and the onslaught of the El Nino phenomenon, the latter part of
the period was devoted to site preparation activities and planting of different
vegetable species and rootcrops.

       For Sto. Tomas sites, the following species were planted: okra, string beans,
bush beans, squash, eggplant, green pepper and tomato. No production data was
noted for Santol site. For Liquicia, Caba, the site was temporarily relocated within
the backyard of the PO cooperator to maximize production since availability of water
resources is quite a problem in the previous site. The yield of production for the site
totaled to 50 k and 60 bundles production for ampalaya, stringbeans and sweet
potato valued at P2,000. Majority of the crop produced were sold and only a small
portion were used for home consumption and given away to neighbors and relatives.
Likewise, for Tubao site, the total recorded production was 30 kilos from okra,
stringbeans, squash and eggplant valued at P570. For Talogtog, San Juan – Gawad
Kalinga site, backyard gardening participants were able to produced 28 kilos for upo,
okra and sweet potato which were used for home consumption only.

       Another special project / program funded under PCARRD is Techno-Gabay
Program (TGP) / Enhancing Farmers’ Information Technology Service (FITS) for
Rural Development which has two (2) component projects namely: (1) Farmer’s
Information Technology Service (FITS) Center – One Stop Shop             of ENR
Techno/Information; and (2) S&T-based on bamboo-agroforestry production in the
City of San Fernando, La Union. Under FITS Project, various IEC materials were
prepared for the database content development both on print and electronics-the
web page as a modality of service delivery using the ICT technology of
disseminating ENR technologies/information generated by research centers for use
by target end-user: The Center provides IEC materials and technical assistance to
various clientele.

        The Sector had formulated and prepared three (3) project proposals which
are still on the pipeline. These proposals are entitled: (1) Integrated Regreening of
Upland Areas within the Province of La Union for Ecotourism, Biodiversity
Conservation and Livelihood Development; (2) Plantation establishment of potential
fiber and palm species for gifts and house wares production in Region 1; and (3)
Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability Adaptation Strategies for severely affected
AFNR Sector within the Lower Agno River Basin (LARB)

       The Seed Production Areas being established and maintained were located
at Tadao, Pasuquin, Ilocos Norte (23 ha); Poblacion, Nueva Era, Ilocos Norte (20
ha); and at Manleluag, Mangatarem, Pangasinan (2 ha). Additional SPA are private
plantations located at San Mateo, Batac, Ilocos Norte (private plantation- 60 ha) and
San Agustin, San Nicolas, Ilocos Norte (private plantation – 5.9 ha and 0.7 ha)
respectively.

      The propagation or production of quality seedlings is being done at ERDS-
Nursery at Brgy. Pagdalagan Sur, Bauang, La Union.
       For the Technology Transfer, the ERDS-DENR-1 has already a number of
ENR technologies already transferred. These technologies aim to improve the
quality of life of resource dependent communities as it addresses poverty reduction
and wealth creation.

      Demonstration Areas considered are from various projects such as S & t-
Based farm on the production of bamboo cum agroforestry in the City of San
Fernando, La Union at Barangay Cabarsican; and Bio-intensive Gardening (BIG) in
the Uplands.

        One (1) Regular Publication (ENR Technology Bulletin) has been published
and circulated on a quarterly basis. This features the highlight of accomplishments
of the Service particularly on R & D and E program and project implementation.
There are media releases thru prints (published in the Amianan Tribune local
newspaper, City of San Fernando, La Union). Production of brochures on 101 ways
to greener lifestyles; Preparation and Production of Organic Fertilizer (Panagaramid
iti organiko nga abono) (BIG Technology); and Technology on Carrying Capacity of
Manleluag Spring Protected Landscape-recreational area for ecotourism and
sustainable development.        Reproduced flyers on: Climate Change; Bamboo
Harvesting (POPEYE) technology; Panagsalaknib iti bakir-baybay; and Charcoal
briquettes production from forest wastes and agricultural wastes. Also reproduced
Leaflet, back to back which depicts Wastes Segregation and the Greenhouse
Effects.

       Various posters (tarpaulin) produced such as: Technology on Bio-intensive
gardening (BIG) in the uplands of La Union; and Technology on Carrying Capacity of
Manleluag Spring Protected Landscape- recreational area for ecotourism and
sustainable development.


1.    ENR Research and Development Activities:

      1.1    List of Ongoing Research and Development Programs/Projects/
             Studies (see separate sheet for detailed information)

                A. Banner R & D Programs

                1.     Vulnerability Assessment of priority watersheds in the
                       Philippines (BP1)
                       Project Title 1: Vulnerability Assessment of the Amburayan
                       River Watershed
                 2.    Determination of Carrying Capacity (CARCAP) of Various
                       Areas/Sites for Resources Conservation, Ecotourism and
                       Sustainable Development (BP2)
                       Project Title : Carrying Capacity of Paoay Lake National
                       Park for Ecotourism and Sustainable Development
                3.     Development of strategies for the production of quality
                       planting materials (BP4)
                4.     Determination of Appropriate Extension Strategies          to
                       facilitate the Adoption of ENR Technologies (BP5)
                5.     Biomass and carbon sequestration of selected mangrove
                       forests (component 2 of BP7)
                6.     Establishment of Bio-Intensive Demo Farms within Upland
                       Areas in Region I
                 7.    Survey, inventory and documentation of selected biofuel
                       species (BP8)
                 B.      Special Projects
                 1.      Bio-Intensive Gardening Project (KR2-PEP Project)
                 2.      Techno-Gabay Program (TGP)/Enhancing           Farmers’
                          Information Technology Service (FITS) for Rural
                          Development Program

                          Component 1: Farmer’s Information Technology Service
                          (FITS)   Center    –   One     Stop   Shop    of   ENR
                          Techno/Information
                          Component 2: S & T-based Farm on Agroforestry-
                          Bamboo Production in the City of San Fernando, La Union
                          Project


     1.2    List of Research and Development Proposals (see separate sheet
              for detailed information)

            1. Integrated Regreening of Upland Areas within the Province of La
               Union for Ecotourism, Biodiversity Conservation and Livelihood
               Development;

            2. Plantation establishment of potential fiber and palm species for gifts
               and house wares production in Region 1;

            3. Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability Adaptation Strategies for
               severely affected AFNR Sector within the Lower Agno River Basin
               (LARB)

     1.3    List of Completed Programs/Projects/Studies (see separate sheet
            for detailed information)

            1.    Survey, inventory and documentation of selected biofuel species
                   (BP8)

2.    Experimental Forest Maintained – Payao, Batac, Ilocos Norte (777 ha)

3.    Seed Production Areas Established and Maintained

      1.    Tadao, Pasuquin, Ilocos Norte (23 ha)
      2.     Poblacion, Nueva Era, Ilocos Norte (20 ha)
      3.     Manleluag, Mangatarem, Pangasinan (2 ha)
      4.    San Mateo, Batac, Ilocos Norte (private plantation- 60 ha)
      5.    San Agustin, San Nicolas, Ilocos Norte (private plantation – 5.9 ha and
            0.7 ha)

4.    Clonal Facilities (none) – only seedling nursery

      1.    Production of High Quality Seedlings – ERDS Nursery, Brgy.
            Pagdalagan Sur, Bauang, La Union

5.    Technology Transfer

      5.1   List of Technologies Transferred

            1.        Panagsalaknib iti Bakir-Baybay
            2.        Establishment of Mangrove Plantation
            3.        Bio-intensive Gardening (BIG) in the Uplands
            4.        Panagaramid iti Organiko nga Abono
      5.        Tiger Grass Farming and Broom Making
      6.        Labtang Handicraft Making
      7.        Carrying Capacity of Manleluag Spring Protected Landscape-
                Recreational Area for Ecotourism and Sustainable Development
      8.        Solid Waste Management
      9.        Climate Change (mitigation and adaptation measures)
      10.       Agroforestry
                - Alley cropping
                - Sloping Agroforestry Land Technology
                - Contour Hedgerow Planting
                - How to use the “A” Frame
      11.       How to Conserve Water (Domestic use)
      12.       101 Ways to Greener Lifestyle

5.2   List of Demonstration Areas

      1. S&T-based farm on the production of bamboo-agroforestry in the
         City of San Fernando, La Union at Barangay Cabarsican.

      2. Bio-intensive Gardening (BIG) in the Uplands
            - Poblacion East, Santol, La Union
            - Talogtog, San Juan, La Union
            - Liquicia, Caba, La Union
            - Rizal, Tubao, La union
            - Bail, Sto. Tomas, La Union
            - Fernando, Sto. Tomas, La Union
            - San Isidro, Sarrat, Ilocos Norte
            - Sevilla, Sta. Cruz, Ilocos Sur
            - Sto. Domingo, San Manuel, Pangasinan

5.3   Regular Publications

      1. ENR Techno Bulletin

                -   January-March 2010 (5)1
                -   April-June 2010 (5)2
                -   July-September 2010 (5)3
                -   October-December 2010 (5)4

      2. Media Releases (Published in the Amianan Tribune local
         newspaper, City of San Fernando, La Union

            -   Region 1 welcomes new DENR executive director January 23-
                29, 2010 issue p. 7
            -   DENR new Executive Director holds dialogue with ERDS staff
                January 30- February 5, 2010 p. 2
            -   DENR 1 responds to climate change February 6-12, 2010 issue
                p. 3
            -   AREX embarks Health and Wellness Program, February 6-12,
                2010 p. 2
            -   Serious water shortage, February 20-26, 2010 issue p. 2
            -   DA bares measures to mitigate El Niño , February 20-26, 2010
                issue pp.1 & 6
            -   DENR urges industries to conserve, reuse water , February 27-
                March 5, 2010 issue p. 8
            -   DENR dalaw turo held at City of Pines, Sept. 25-Oct. 1, 2010, p.
                8
   -   ENR-Secom holds 1st regular meeting, October 23-29, 2010, p.
       3
   -   DENR to launch “Green Multipliers” program, October 2-8,
       2010, pp. 1 & 2
   -   Forum on Climate Change for health conducted, October 2-8,
       2010, p.7
   -   International Coastal clean-up conducted, October 2-8, 2010, p.
       5

3. Brochures/Flyers/How to’s on:

          Produced
           - 101 ways to greener lifestyle
           - Panagaramid iti organiko nga abono (BIG technology)
           - Technology on Carrying capacity of Manleluag Spring
              Protected Landscape-recreational area for ecotourism
              and sustainable development

          Reproduced
           - Flyer on Climate Change
           - Flyer on Bamboo harvesting (POPEYE) technology
           - Flyer on Panagsalaknib iti bakir-baybay
           - Flyer on Charcoal briquettes production from forest
             wastes and agricultural wastes
           - Leaflet (back to back which depicts Wastes Segregation
             and the Greenhouse Effects)
           - Flyer on Natural/Organic farming (IMO, FPJ, FFJ)

4. Posters
     - Technology on Bio-intensive gardening (BIG) iti
         kabanbantayan ti La Union
     - Technology on Carrying capacity of Manleluag Spring
         Protected Landscape-recreational area for ecotourism and
         sustainable development

				
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posted:9/22/2011
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