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Cybersmart Detectives feedback form - CEO

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					Cybersmart Detectives




    Instructions
Table of contents
Table of contents                                                          2

Section 1: Overview                                                        3
  1.1 What is Cybersmart Detectives?                                       3
  1.2 What do you need to run the Cybersmart Detectives program?           4
  1.3 Background information                                               5
  1.4 Additional resources                                                 5

Section 2: Playing the Cybersmart Detectives game                          6
  2.1 Teacher role                                                         6
  2.2 Cybersmart Guide role                                                6
  2.3 Student role                                                         7
  2.4 Teaching and delivery strategy                                       7
  2.5 Rules of the game                                                    8
  2.6 The scenario in brief                                                9

Glossary Internet Safety                                                   11

Appendix 1: Cybersmart Detectives Script                                   12

Appendix 2: Cybersmart Guides Instructions                                 23

Appendix 3: Student Instructions                                           28

Appendix 4: Cybersmart Lesson plans                                        32

Appendix 5: Teachers Check List                                            36

Appendix 6: Log On and Activity Sheet                                      37

Appendix 7: Feedback form                                                  39




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Section 1: Overview
1.1 What is Cybersmart Detectives?
The Cybersmart Detectives program is a NetAlert community education initiative promoting
internet safety. The program is based on prevention: students are encouraged to alert any
inappropriate online behaviour to a responsible adult and to avoid giving personal
information over the internet.

The program comprises:
Cybersmart Detectives online game
       Teacher instructions , student instructions and Cybersmart Guides instructions and lesson plans
       Cybersmart safety brochures which can be ordered online.

The Cybersmart Detectives online game teaches students key internet safety messages in a
safe school environment. The game is based on a real-world internet safety scenario
delivered as a series of emails. Students read the emails, vote on a series of options presented
to them and ask questions about the scenario that are answered by Cybersmart Guides.

The scenario focuses on a high school student called ‘Sarah’ who arranges to meet a 17 year
old online friend ‘Kel’. Unfortunately ‘Kel’ is not who he seems online. As the events unfold
there are a number of points where the students, assuming the role of Sarah’s Deputy
Principal, are encouraged to think about the issues raised and to propose solutions.

The Cybersmart Detectives program has been developed for upper primary school students
and aims to convey in a positive way the following Cybersmart messages about keeping safe
online.

BE CAREFUL!
Meeting and talking to people online can be fun, but remember they may not be who they say
they are!

CHECK FIRST!
Ask your parents/carer before you give out your real name, phone number or any other
personal details. The best idea is to keep personal information secret.

TAKE SOMEONE WITH YOU!
If you want to meet someone in person, take your parents or another adult with you. Always
meet in a public place, preferably during the day.

DON'T STAY!
If someone is rude in a chat room, or posts offensive or scary pictures, don't respond! Leave
the chat room straight away.

TELL!
If you see or hear something that upsets you tell your parents or another adult you trust.

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1.2 What do you need to run the Cybersmart Detectives program?
You don’t need to be an internet expert to run the Cybersmart Detectives program at your
school. The teaching resources and online game have been designed so that you can conduct
the program with basic computer skills and some knowledge of the Cybersmart messages.

To run the Cybersmart Detectives program at your school you will need:

      broadband internet access

      computers (Apple Mac or PC) with any Mozilla based browser or IE (v6+) based browser.
       Safari browser will work but you will only be able to access basic mode operation

      NetAlert resources including this Teacher instructions, Student instructions, Cybersmart Guide
       instructions, Cybersmart Detective game Log in sheet, Check list, Lesson plans and Cybersmart
       brochures (optional)

      Cybersmart Detectives online game session booking

      two Cybersmart Guides (they will need to be available for about 1½ hours and can be teachers, non
       teaching staff or administration). Please ensure that Guides have the requisite approval for working with
       children as required in your state/territory. Schools that have difficulty arranging Guides should contact
       their local contact (CEO - Margaret Maassen at CEO, 6380 5314, email:
       maassen.margaret@cathednet.wa.edu.au, or DET representative ) or email
       cybersmartdetectives@acma.gov.au.

The focus of the program is the Cybersmart Detectives online game. As the classroom
teacher your role will be to facilitate running the game with your students. The Cybersmart
Detectives game has been designed to run with a team of up to three students at each
computer terminal. Each school may have up to ten teams of students at one session,
although there is scope for additional classes to be included subject to availability. Schools
that don’t have access to computers for a whole class, the game can play the game using one
computer hooked up to a data projector with a teacher facilitating input from the whole class.

Two Cybersmart Guides need to be available online to Guide students through the program,
answering any questions that the students may have about the game scenario or internet
safety. See Section 2 for more detail on the Teacher and Cybersmart Guide roles.

The game has been designed to run for 60 minutes. The amount of time you spend with
students in preparing to play the game and debriefing them on the issues is flexible. To help
guide this activity sample lesson plans and suggested class room activities have been
included in this Guide for your use.

Important note:



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The Cybersmart Detectives game is a NetAlert supported activity. You will have access to
the NetAlert team to answer any questions in the lead up to the game. On the day we will be
monitoring schools via the Cybersmart Detectives server to ensure the game runs smoothly.


Please refer any questions to your local contact – Margaret Maassen, at CEO, 6380 5314,
email: maassen.margaret@cathednet.wa.edu.au, the NetAlert team at ACMA on
telephone 02 9334 7700 or email your request to netalert@acma.gov.au.

1.3 Background information
Teachers interested in seeing how the game works can access an online promotional video.
Although the video has been designed for the equivalent UK program it gives a good
overview into what happens in the game and how it works. It also provides comments from
teachers and students who have used the game.

To view the video, go to:
http://www.e-ngage.net/video/low.aspx

1.4 Additional resources
There are a number of web sites that you might find helpful in learning about Cybersafety.

http://www.cybersmartkids.com.au

http://www.netalert.gov.au

http://www.chatdanger.com

http://www.fkbko.org




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Section 2: Playing the Cybersmart Detectives game
2.1 Teacher role
Your role is to facilitate the Cybersmart Detectives program in your classroom. Students will
need some introduction to the topic of online safety before playing the game. Please refer to
the sample lesson plans (Appendix 4) for further ideas.

The game has been designed to be played by 11 to 13 year old students (Years 6 /7/8
depending on your state) in a 60 minute session. You will need to log teams into the game 30
minutes prior to the session. This will allow you to check that the log ins are successful and
to spend some time explaining to the students how the game will work.

For some students the topic may be quite confronting for a number of reasons. It is important
for you to monitor individual student reactions during the game and to have a full debrief
after the game. Section 2.7 offers some advice about student welfare.

You will need to be familiar with the script (Appendix 1) and the students' role and
instructions (Appendix 2). A log in sheet has been included to assist you on the day of the
activity (Appendix 5). You will also need to use the teachers check list to ensure you are
ready to play the game (Appendix 6). We would appreciate your comments on the activity
and any suggestions to help us improve it. Please direct any feedback to NetAlert by email
cybersmartdetectives@acma.gov.au or use the feedback form attached (Appendix 7). For
CEO schools please email the evaluation forms to:
maassen.margaret@cathednet.wa.edu.au for recording and then I will forward on.


2.2 Cybersmart Guide role
Cybersmart Guides are an important part of the game. The Guides respond to questions and
theories posed by the students online and help guide their teams through each of the clues. As
the scenario unfolds, students discuss the risks of certain online and offline behaviours and
ways of managing those risks.

Cybersmart Guides need to have basic computer skills including opening, answering and
sending emails. They also need to feel confident in answering basic online safety questions.
Sample questions and answers are provided in the script (Appendix 1).

It is advisable that Guides develop rapport with the teams they have been assigned. This is
best achieved in the five to ten minutes prior to the game commencing. By this time the
teams should be logged in and the students will be experimenting with the activity.

Guides can ask the teams to announce they are logged in via the message facility, which
operates like an ordinary e-mail system. Guides should encourage students to find their own
answers/solutions to issues discussed. It can however, be useful to recap the scenario at
points where students require help. For example, Guides may refer students to clues in the

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messages for information. Guides may also correct facts where it seems the students may not
have understood the scenario.


Guides should try to keep the students focused on the scenario and may prompt the teams
with questions if they feel they are not submitting questions on a regular basis. Any
nonsensical or silly questions can be deleted by the Guide. Rude or offensive questions can
be saved for later follow-up and offenders may be warned.


2.3 Student role
In the scenario, students play the role of Mr Saunders the Deputy Principal of Narraville
School. He is concerned about the welfare of a new student, Sarah. Guided by a series of
clues, students work in teams of two or three to solve the mystery of what is worrying Sarah
and why.

The students are deliberately asked to assume the role of an adult within the school so that
they look at the situation from a perspective other than their own. This approach enables the
students to consider broader ideas such as support provided by the school system, including
peer support. You might need to remind the students that they are pretending to be Mr
Saunders, the Deputy Principal of Narraville School, if it appears they have forgotten their
role during the game.

Encourage the teams to discuss issues raised in the scenario and to email questions to their
Cybersmart Guide. Please advise your students that not all questions will be answered.
Where a question has been superseded by the release of subsequent information it may be
ignored. Questions that are irrelevant, nonsensical or duplicated may also be deleted by the
Guide. All offensive messages will be saved, and for repeat offenders, teachers will be
notified by NetAlert officers and the team may be removed from the game. See Section 2.5
for rules of the game.

The game provides a good platform to talk about a number of issues raised; for example, a
series of polls invite students to vote on questions such as the use of mobile phones in
schools.

It is important that students do not see the scenario script before the game, though they will
need to understand that they will be assuming the role of Mr Saunders and will be involved
in a scenario about Sarah and her internet safety issues. They will also need to be able to
open, answer and send emails.


2.4 Teaching and delivery strategy
Each school may have up to ten teams. Teams of three are the optimum number and will
allow for a class of 30 students. You may wish to suggest that each team divides the tasks in
the activity: one student to monitor the messages for important information, another watching
for replies from the Guide, and a third typing the questions. These roles may be rotated.
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If you don’t have access to enough computers for the whole class, an alternative is to set up
one computer with a data projector. The students can work as a whole group through the
scenario with you the teacher acting as facilitator. Either a student or support staff member
may be nominated as scribe to type questions.

The allocation of additional teams is possible if you have more than one class. You will need
to request special arrangements and may be required to supply additional Guides (i.e. one for
every five teams). Please contact your state co-ordinator or the NetAlert team.

The Cybersmart Guides can be located in the same room as the students. However, we have
found it is very effective for them to be located in a ‘control room’ at a location elsewhere in
the school. This helps to focus the online communication between the students and their
Guides which is an important aspect of the game.


2.5 Rules of the game
Students have been provided with a short list of rules in the Student Guide. These are:

   1. Work together as a team to answer the questions.
   2. Each team needs to have one person reading scenario emails, one person reading
      Cybersmart Guide emails and another person typing questions. You might take turns
      at these jobs.
   3. You’re pretending to be the Deputy Principal, Mr Saunders, so you need to make
      suggestions and decide on a course of action from the Deputy Principal’s perspective.
   4. Remember Cybersmart Detectives is only a game, although it seems real.
   5. Inappropriate or rude messages are not acceptable. These messages will be saved and
      your teacher will be notified.
   6. Have fun and send lots of messages to your Guides.




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2.6 The scenario in brief
The scenario is set in the first year of secondary school with students aged 12 - 15 years. This
is older than most students who take part in the activity and removes the scenario a step away
from participants while not undermining its authenticity.

The students assume the role of Mr Saunders, Deputy Principal of Narraville School who is
responsible for student welfare, including the ‘Buddy System’. The Buddy System in the
activity helps to establish the link with peer support that occurs in the scenario. You can
choose to make as much of this as is relevant to your school.

Sarah Walker is a 12 year-old Year 7 student who is being stalked online. The scenario also
includes a number of other characters including Georgia Johnson. Georgia is a senior buddy
who is charged with helping a younger buddy. Georgia’s part in the scenario aims to show
how helpful one young person can be for another. This validates peer support as an option for
young people who may find it difficult to approach their teachers or parents. You may wish
to follow this up after the activity and discuss who is appropriate and who is not appropriate
to go to for help.

As we find out in the scenario, Sarah was contacted by a person she did not know who asked
her a lot of personal questions. She liked this, especially when he sent his photograph.
However, Sarah soon began to feel uncomfortable about the way he pestered her with e-mail
and text messages and she did not know how to deal with it. She needed to talk to somebody
and chose her friend Yasmin Habib.

The person who contacted Sarah was really James Clifford, aged 37, pretending to be 17
year-old Kel, but of course Sarah did not know that.

For the full script, including the issues and poll questions, please see Appendix 1.


Scenario key issues and messages
In addition to the Cybersmart messages listed in the Section 1.1 the following issues are
raised in the scenario:
      Think carefully about how much personal information you should provide online.
       Personal information is anything that might allow someone to identify and find you
       and includes your name, age, school, address, phone numbers, where you hang out,
       shop or play sport.

      Not everyone you meet online will tell the truth about who they are and what their
       age is.

      If you arrange to meet someone you have contacted online, always tell an adult so
       that they can go with you. Arrange to meet in a public place during day time.


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       Tell someone you trust (your parents, a teacher or a senior buddy) if you feel that
        something is not right when you are communicating online or if you are being
        harassed or bullied.

       Turn off your computer if you feel scared, threatened, uncomfortable, or you see
        something that makes you upset.

       Computers will store information that can be used to identify who has used a machine
        and what they have done with it.

       Speak up if you think someone may be in trouble; you are not interfering, you are
        helping them.



2.7 Advice to teachers on student welfare
The Cybersmart Detectives scenario is fictional. However, it is based on a number of real
cases. While students need to be reassured that this is not a true scenario, it is realistic. It is
important that students taking part in the game know that the scenario is fictional and that
they are only role playing. It is therefore important to follow up playing the game with a
debriefing session so that students can leave the role behind and air any concerns.

Teachers need to be sensitive as to how this realistic scenario might impact on students.
Some students may have family or friends who have experienced circumstances like this
scenario and it may cause them to recollect uncomfortable or unpleasant thoughts. It might
also have the potential for causing distress to other students. In these cases it might be wise to
refer students to further support services within the school as appropriate. Please ensure that
you refer students to your school social worker, psychologist or contact Margaret
Maassen for contact details if you have any concerns.

The internet is often identified as a useful tool because of the range of content available,
however unwanted online contact is a feature often neglected. While safety devices such as
internet filtering tools provide a measure of protection, children need to be aware that safety
devices are not always installed or that the devices may not provide the level of security they
claim. Therefore, the Cybersmart messages they learn in this game will help them to keep
safe wherever they are accessing the internet.




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Internet safety glossary

The Buddy System: this is a system where older students are partnered with younger
students. The system allows younger students to bring problems and issues to someone closer
to their own age. It also helps establish and foster a caring and helpful attitude in older
students, which may assist in promoting a school family and breaking down age divisions.
Older buddies are able to forward issues to the Deputy Principal, and if necessary, these
issues can be raised on a confidential basis.

Chat - What people do in chat rooms on the internet, talking to others in ‘real time’ using the
computer.

Chat room - Places on the internet where people can go to chat.

lets cht ... – This means 'Let us chat ...' Text messaging has hundreds of shortened words,
some are well known, others are a private code.

Internet - International network of computers linked up to exchange information.

User id - Personal identification for a computer user.

Web - Short for Worldwide Web (www).




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Appendix 1: Cybersmart Detectives script


  Who's Who in the Cybersmart Detectives Scenario

Mr Saunders         Deputy Principal of Narraville School. Students will be adopting this role for the
                    activity. He is introduced in Message 1:
                    [Message 1: Briefing information].

Georgia Johnson     A Year 10 ‘Buddy’ to Yasmin Habib. Georgia is introduced in Message 3:
                    [Message 3: Report from ‘Buddy’].
Yasmin Habib        Sarah's friend and Year 7 Buddy to Georgia Johnson. Yasmin is first referred to in
                    Message 3:
                    [Message 3: Report from ‘Buddy’].
Mrs Walker          Mother of Sarah Walker. Mrs Walker is first referred to in Message 4:
                    [Message 4: Telephone call from Mrs Walker].

Sarah Walker        The student at the centre of our scenario. Sarah is 12 years old and is in Year 7. She
                    is first referred to in Message 4:
                    [Message 4: Telephone call from Mrs Walker].

Mrs Hyde            School Librarian at Narraville School. Mrs Hyde is first introduced in Message 7:
                    [Message 7: Unauthorised Computer Access].

Kel                 Kel’s real identity is not revealed until Message 15. Kel is the name James Clifford
                    uses on the internet, in chat rooms and in text messages. The name Kel is first
                    referred to in Message 7:
                    [Message 7: Unauthorised Computer Access].

Mrs Austin          English teacher at Narraville School. Mrs Austin is first referred to in Message 10:
                    [Message 10: Meeting with Yasmin].

Mrs Smith           A lady who lives opposite Narraville school and sometimes has trouble caused by
                    students. Mrs Smith is first introduced in Message 14:
                    [Message 14: Call from Mrs Smith].

James Clifford      A man who is upsetting Sarah Walker. He is referred to in Message 15:
                    [Message 15: Police Advice].

Narraville          A country town in New South Wales.

Narraville School   A small country school in New South Wales. It caters for students from kindergarten
                    through to Year 12.



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Background detail

Sarah Walker moved with her parents from Glenelg in South Australia to Narraville in
regional New South Wales. Sarah did not want to go, especially because she was leaving her
friends behind.

Her mother and father tried to help and bought Sarah a computer and a mobile phone for her
to keep in touch with her friends in South Australia. Sarah has the computer in her bedroom
at home and uses it on her own. Her parents feel they know very little about computers and
that Sarah knows much more so they leave her alone to use it. They do not use it together.

Sarah started using email and web sites, and then started visiting chat rooms.
Sarah met a boy called Kel in a chat room. Kel asked her a lot of questions about herself and
she told him everything he asked. He was quite grown up. He said he was 17 and that he used
to go to the same school as her. He sent her pictures of himself by email and he looked quite
nice. He asked for her mobile number and she gave it to him, so he started texting her.

Kel told Sarah he would be in Narraville that day and it would be good if he could see her.
She tried getting out of school but her parents made her go. Sarah was not going to say
anything to them because they wouldn’t approve. Kel kept texting her and was getting to be a
bit of a nuisance.

Sarah didn't like the way Kel kept pestering her, but she did not like to say anything and
thought she could handle it. Her mobile phone was confiscated in English class because it
kept receiving messages, the last of which said ‘Lts cht now!’ At the end of English class she
went to the library to use the computer, where she chatted to Kel and arranged to meet him
before recess at the school gate. Sarah left the school grounds to wait for Kel. As she was
waiting, an older man pulled up in a red car and said: 'Hello Sarah, Kel can't get here, but he
has asked me to take you to him’.

Sarah is confused about the situation. She later states to the Deputy Principal: 'Kel said he
would meet me and I did not like the way this old man knew my name. I was a bit scared so I
ran back into school and the car drove off.'
The messages
Students will receive the following messages. The notes in italics aim to help you know what
is happening in the scenario and provide pointers for behind-the-scenes guidance. There are
also sample student and Guide questions and answers. The notes point to the actions your
students might take at each step and contain suggestions for following up with a number of
points after the activity has finished.

Remember, students are to take the role of Mr Saunders, the Deputy Principal and they may
need to be reminded of this during the activity. Teachers should also encourage students to
send relevant questions to their Guides. Generally, we would expect that students will only


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have time to ask one or two questions between the release of each clue. The Cybersmart
Guides will attempt to answer all relevant questions that arise during the course of the

activity but may engage in banter at the beginning to establish rapport and encourage
dialogue.
Scenario

Welcome message to teams.
Message 1: Briefing information

You are Mr Saunders, the Deputy Principal of Narraville School. As Deputy Principal, you
are responsible for student welfare, behaviour and parent communication. You are also in
charge of the Buddy System for the school. This morning you are working in your office at
your computer.

The Buddy System involves older students being mentors or buddies to younger students.
This means that if a younger student is having problems, such as being bullied, they can ask
for help from their older Buddy. Because of your responsibility for the Buddy System,
Buddies are told they must report to you if there is any matter they are unable to help another
student with.
This sets the context of the role the students are going to work through. It highlights that
teachers have a wide range of responsibilities. The scenario needs the teacher to be
available all morning. We have given the students the role of Deputy Principal as this
position generally has reduced face-to-face teaching obligations.

Message 2: Principal’s daily bulletin for all staff to read

You (Mr Saunders), receive an email message from the Principal to all teachers. It is the
daily bulletin. Today’s bulletin asks teachers to remind students about the school’s internet
policy, as there have been cases of unauthorised accessing of prohibited internet sites.
"Yesterday a student tried to gain access to an unauthorised web site on a computer. All staff
must ensure that students using the school computers do so only for proper use and students
must not attempt to access any site that has not been authorised. Unauthorised sites are those
not on the school’s ‘safe’ list, and include portal sites, chat, and instant messaging. All staff
must familiarise themselves with the school policy.”
This is an introduction to the subject and brings up the issue of schools having policies for
computer use, such as the internet. The next hour will highlight the reasons why.

Sample team question: Who is trying to access the Internet sites?

Sample answer: We are not sure yet, the poll will ask your opinion of internet access rules
and lets you see what others think.


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POLL 1
Poll question – Do you think schools should have rules about what you can access on the
internet? (Y/N)
This is the first poll question. Students should answer yes or no. The results of the polls will
be given to students during the activity.


Message 3: Report from ‘Buddy’

Georgia Johnson, a Year 10 Buddy, arrives at your office for a meeting. Georgia tells you
that her Year 7 Buddy, Yasmin Habib, is worried about her friend. Yasmin’s friend has been
very upset lately and she thinks that her friend might be being bullied. Yasmin didn’t want to
tell Georgia the name of her friend because she did not want to go behind her back. Georgia
is not sure what to do about the situation. You thank Georgia for letting you know about this.

This message focuses on support networks that may be in place at school, such as the Buddy
System. It promotes the fact that these are students helping other students. It also raises the
issue that friends can be worried and do not know how to help as well as not wanting to be
seen to interfere. You may want to discuss this with your students. Students will later
discover that Yasmin was worried about her friend Sarah (see Message 10).

Sample team question: Is Yasmin being bullied or is it really her friend?
Sample answer: We don’t know for certain but it is a good thing that Georgia has alerted
you that there is a problem.

POLL 2
Poll question - What would you do if you thought a classmate was being bullied or was upset
about something?

A - Tell a teacher or other people in the class
B - Do nothing
In this poll question students should make a choice from options A or B.

Message 4: Telephone call from Mrs Walker

You (Mr. Saunders), receive a telephone call from the school secretary. Mrs Walker, the
mother of Sarah Walker (a Year 7 student) has asked to see you straight away. Mrs Walker is
very concerned about her daughter and would like to discuss this with you.

While Mrs Walker is on her way to your office, you look up Sarah’s file. Sarah’s records
show that her grades have dropped, her homework has been late and that she has been absent
from school more regularly in the last three months, especially on Fridays.

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This message indicates that schools do facilitate communication channels between home and
school and that parents often seek advice from teachers about the wellbeing of their children.
The message also illustrates how strong home/school links are positive, which may not be
obvious. Students may want to explore the way in which school attendance may relate to
other issues.
Sample team question: Are Sarah’s grades dropping because she is the one being bullied?
Sample answer: Good work team. There is often a link between poor school performance and
being bullied. You will have to try and find out the culprit.


Message 5: Meeting with Mrs Walker

During your meeting, Sarah’s mother (Mrs Walker) tells you that Sarah has been very upset
lately and has not wanted to go to school. In fact, Sarah had refused to attend school this
morning, which is why Mrs Walker brought her by car. Mrs Walker does not know the
reason behind Sarah’s behaviour and wants to find out what is going on. You ask Mrs
Walker about Sarah’s background, because you noticed from her file that she had transferred
to Narraville from a school in South Australia.

Mrs Walker tells you that Sarah is 12 years old. They had recently moved from Glenelg as
Sarah’s dad had changed jobs. Sarah did not want to leave Glenelg and missed her friends.

Because of the move Sarah’s parents bought her a computer so she could email her friends
and keep in touch with them. They also bought her a mobile telephone so she could text
them.

She was soon using the computer a lot. Because the computer was in her bedroom, her
parents couldn’t see what she was doing. Sarah talked about chatting to friends in chat
rooms. Mr and Mrs Walker did not mind too much because they did not know much about
computers and just left Sarah alone. They believed they knew what Sarah was doing.

We now know more about Sarah. We learn that Sarah has access to her own computer that is
in her bedroom. Her parents leave her alone with the computer and do not see what she is
doing.
There are several issues here to consider – some of them are broad issues around internet
safety and some are specific to the game. There are Cybersmart Guides waiting to answer
questions from the students.

Sample team question: Why don’t Sarah’s parents find out what she is doing online by asking
her?

Sample answer: Yes, it is a good idea that parents know what their children are doing online.
As the Deputy Principal this would be a good suggestion to make to Mrs Walker. However,
sometimes parents find it hard to talk to their children about things and another trusted adult
might help.

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POLL 3
Poll question – Where do you think is the best place to put a home computer?

A – In your bedroom
B – In a public room like the living room
In this poll question students should make a choice from options A or B.

Message 6: Looking for Sarah

You offer to speak with Sarah yourself, to see if you can find out what might be troubling
her. Mrs Walker agrees with your suggestion. After Mrs Walker leaves your office, you
check the Year 7 roster to find out where Sarah may be. The roster shows that Sarah is in
Music class, so you send a message to her teacher, calling Sarah to your office.
This message is more scene setting.

Message 7: Unauthorised Computer Access

You receive an email from Mrs Hyde, the school librarian. Mrs Hyde advises you she has
found a copy of an email left on the printer in the library. The email is addressed to a Hotmail
account named ‘SWeetee123’. Mrs Hyde has reported this to the technology teacher but is
concerned about the students’ safety. The email says ‘Hi. I really enjoyed our chat last night.
Like I said I want to see you tomorrow. You promised school wouldn’t be a problem. I’ll be
near school in the morning. I’ll text you when. Kel’.
The email reveals a student is receiving messages from a person named Kel, who wants to
meet them during school hours. We later find out that the student is Sarah Walker
(SWeetee123).
Sample team question: We think that SWeetee123 is really Sarah!
Sample answer: Excellent team work! Do you think that Sarah might be communicating with
someone outside the school?

Message 8: Sarah absent from Music class

You receive a message from Sarah’s music teacher saying that Sarah has not arrived for her
Music class. He has arranged for Sarah’s friend, Yasmin Habib, who usually sits next to
Sarah, to report to you in your office, as she might know where Sarah might be.
Sarah’s unauthorised absence from class indicates that she might be troubled by something
or someone.

Sample Guide questions: What should Mr Saunders do? Should he be worried yet? Should he
tell someone else? Who should he tell?

Teams send their questions or suggestions to their Guide

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Message 9: Breach of school internet policy

While waiting for Yasmin, you receive an email from the technology teacher informing you
that there has been another breach of the school’s internet policy this morning. Some chat
rooms and instant messaging sites have been accessed. He checked the user ID to find out
who the student is. It belongs to Sarah Walker.
Students now know the user ID of the person trying to access the unauthorised web site
belongs to Sarah (see Message 2 for the definition). This confirms that Sarah has been in
contact with someone in a chat room.

Sample Guide question: Do you think that Sarah has been communicating with Kel in the
chat room?

Teams send their questions or suggestions to their Guide.



Message 10: Meeting with Yasmin

Yasmin arrives at your office. She is a little nervous about telling you what had happened
that morning.

‘Sarah was sitting next to me in English. In class she received a few text messages on her
mobile phone from Kel. The last one said ‘Lts cht now!’ She then told me she needed to use
the computer to chat with Kel. She seemed a bit nervous. Mrs Austin was really upset too,
she confiscated Sarah’s mobile because it kept beeping. I think Sarah might have gone to the
library to use the computer’.

You ask Yasmin about Kel. Yasmin explains that Sarah had started talking to Kel in a chat
room He said he was 17 years old and used to go to her old school. Sarah had never met Kel
but he must be really serious about her because he asked a lot of questions about her. Kel had
sent some pictures of himself and she thinks he is a real hottie.

Sarah had given Kel her mobile number so he could text her. He said he was in Narraville
today and wanted to meet her.

Yasmin went on to say, ‘Sarah’s been really grumpy lately and I’ve been worried about her
and haven’t been sure what to do. I told my Buddy that my friend was upset, but I didn’t like
talking behind her back, so I didn’t give her Sarah’s name’.

This confirms our suspicion that Sarah has been in contact with Kel in a chat room. He told
her he was 17 and was recently a student at her old school. He sent pictures that he said
were of him. We will find out something different later.
Sample Team question: Did Kel really go to the school?


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Sample Guide answer: Good question. As the Deputy Principal you can check these details
with Sarah’s old school.
POLL 4

Poll question – Do you think it’s a good idea to give out your mobile phone number in chat
rooms? (Y/N)


Message 11: Chat room

You check with the librarian to see if Sarah is still there. Mrs Hyde says that a girl came in
and was at the computer for a few minutes and then left in a hurry, looking a bit upset. Mrs
Hyde thought this was a little unusual, as no classes were booked in for the library at that
time. She checks the computer and tells you its still logged on to a chat room, the last
message is from a Kel to SWeetee123 and says ‘I’ll be at gate before recess’.
This confirms that Sarah had used the computer and that she is upset and she might be
leaving the school grounds.

Sample Guide question: Should you be looking for Sarah?

Sample team question: Is there more than one gate?

Sample answer: Yes there are three gates. How will you find her?

POLL 5
Poll question - If someone you met in a chat room asked to meet you in person, would you:

A - Say yes but make sure you took your parents or another adult with you
B - Say yes and go on your own to the meeting

Message 12: Sarah’s school in Adelaide

On your way back to the office you check your watch and notice that recess starts in 20
minutes at 10:30am. You ask the school secretary to ring Sarah’s previous school in Adelaide
to ask about Kel. The secretary reports back to you that they have no students named Kel and
have not had anyone by that name in the last five years.

Kel, if that is his real name, has told Sarah lies. It shows that people in chat rooms do not
always tell the truth. This also raises the issue of the photograph that ‘Kel’ sent. Was it really
a picture of him?

Sample team question: If Kel was not at Sarah’s old school who is he? Is he a stranger?
Sample answer: Excellent detective work! We can’t assume that everyone online will tell the
truth about who they are. Do you think Kel sent a real photo of himself?

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POLL 6
Poll question – Can you believe everything that people tell in a chat room? (Y/N)


Message 13: Confiscated mobile phone

You go to see Sarah’s English teacher Mrs Austin. She tells you that she confiscated Sarah’s
phone because Sarah was using it in class. She says Sarah seemed a bit upset, and rushed out
as soon as class ended. You are now very concerned about Sarah, because she cannot be
found. When Mrs Austin hands you Sarah’s phone you notice the last text message is still on
the screen. It says ‘c u at gte now Kel’.
Issue to discuss: ‘Why do you think 12 year olds should have a mobile phone? Should
students be allowed to use mobile phones in school?’

Sample question: Where is Sarah now? What should Mr Saunders be doing to keep Sarah
safe?

POLL 7
Poll question – Do you think that students should be able to use a mobile phone at school?
(Y/N)


Message 14: Call from Mrs Smith

The school secretary answers a telephone call from Mrs Smith, who lives opposite Narraville
School. Mrs Smith is complaining about students hanging around the front gate and people
stopping in the no parking zone there. According to Mrs Smith, this has been happening a lot
over the last month.

Mrs. Smith said that she just saw a teenage girl come out of school. The girl was walking up
and down the road for a few minutes, until a red car pulled up beside the girl in the no
parking zone. A man leaned out and said, ‘Hi Sarah, jump in and I’ll take you to Kel’. Mrs.
Smith said she had also reported the car to the police, she remembered some of the number
plate because it was the same as her age, 74.
A member of the public reports seeing a girl leave school. This is a complaint about the
behaviour of the students leaving the school grounds, but it also gives us useful information
about Sarah and the car at the gate.

Team response: Oh no this is terrible- Sarah is in great danger. We should call the police!

Sample answer: Yes that is a good idea. However, as Mr Saunders you will need to make
sure that Sarah doesn’t leave the school property in the first place.




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Message 15: Police advice

You hurry to the gate. On the way you receive a call on your mobile from the local police.
The Police advise that Mrs. Smith had just been in contact with them about a suspicious
person who she has seen outside the school a few times in the last four weeks. Mrs. Smith
provided the police with a description of the person, along with the car he was driving.

This information revealed that the registration number of the red Ford Laser is NIQ 074. The
owner is James Clifford, 37 years old. His records show that he also uses the name Kel.
The police tell you that contacts have also been made with students on the internet by
someone using the name Kel, who claims to be 17 years of age. Kel has been sending
photographs of 17 year old boys, saying they are pictures of him.
Here we discover that everything Kel said about himself was a lie. He even sent a
photograph of someone else and pretended it was him.
Sample team question: Does Sarah get into the car???

Sample answer: You are not sure but will need to run down to the gate to see what is
happening.

Message 16: Sarah returns to school

You arrive at the school gate to see a red car speeding off up the road. Sarah has arrived back
in school and is very upset.

She tells you that she had starting using a chat room and met a boy called Kel. Kel had asked
her a lot of questions about herself and she told him everything he asked about. This seemed
alright because he said he used to go to the same school as Sarah. He seemed quite grown up
and said he was 17. He sent Sarah pictures of himself by email and he looked hot. Sarah felt
it was cool chatting to a 17 year old hottie.

He said he was going to be in Narraville today and it would be good if he could see her.
Sarah tried getting out of school but her Mum made her go. Sarah did not say anything to her
parents because she knew they would try to stop her meeting Kel.

Sarah said that deep down, she didn’t like the way Kel kept pestering her by email and text.
She did not like to say anything and did not really know how to deal with it. Sarah didn’t
want to tell her parents so she spoke to her friend Yasmin.

Sarah felt pressured into meeting him today. After English she went straight to the computer
lab in the library to chat with Kel and then she quickly ran out of school to try to catch up
with him. After waiting at the front gate for a few minutes, an older man pulled up in a red
car and said, ‘Hello Sarah, Kel can’t get here, but he has asked me to take you to him’.

Because Kel had not told her about this other person picking her up, Sarah did not feel right.
She did not like the way this other man knew her name and she became a little scared. She
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was also confused, because Sarah felt she knew Kel, but she knew nothing about this man in
the car. Sarah remembered her parents’ and teachers’ advice about the dangers of getting into
cars with strangers. After meeting the man she ran back into school and the car drove off.
When the person in the car was not who she expected to see, Sarah remembered all she had
been told by her parents and teachers about being careful when talking to people she did not
know. She knew the person in the car was not the Kel she was expecting and she ran back
into school where she knew she would be safe. She did what was right at last. You might like
to go through the CYBERSMART messages to identify where she had gone wrong up to now.
Sample closing message: Excellent work teams! You have made very good Cybersmart
Detectives today!

Message 17: Close


Thank you for participating in NetAlert’s Cybersmart Detectives program, we hope you had
fun.

Remember the Cybersmart rules and keep yourself safe online.



BE CAREFUL!
Meeting and talking to people online can be fun, but remember they may not be who they say
they are!

CHECK FIRST!
Ask your parents/carer before you give out your real name, phone number or any other
personal details. The best idea is to keep personal information secret.

TAKE SOMEONE WITH YOU!
If you want to meet someone in person, take your parents or another adult with you. Always
meet in a popular public place, preferably during the day.

DON’T STAY!
If someone is rude in a chat room, or posts offensive or scary pictures, don’t respond! Leave
the chat room straight away.

TELL!
If you see or hear something that upsets you tell your parents or another adult you trust.




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Appendix 2: Cybersmart Guides instructions

                Information for Cybersmart Guides

What is the Cybersmart Detectives game?
Thank you for being part of the NetAlert Cybersmart Detective game. This initiative brings
together a number of agencies with an interest in promoting online safety for young people
including: the Australian Communication and Media Authority, education bodies, law
enforcement, industry and child advocacy groups. Your role as a Cybersmart Guide is an
important part of this online game.

The game is based on a real world internet safety scenario delivered as a series of emails
which students read, vote on and ask questions about. The scenario is about a high school
student Sarah who arranges to meet a 17 year old online friend Kel. Unfortunately Kel is not
who he seems online. As the events unfold there are a number of points where students
assuming the role of Sarah’s Deputy Principal Mr Saunders are encouraged to think about the
issues raised.

How the game is played
The teacher will divide their class into teams of two to three students. Each class will have up
to ten teams with each one working at a computer terminal. The role of the teacher will to be
to facilitate the game by moving around the room and helping the students.

The game has been designed to be supported by two Cybersmart Guides. Guides will be
logged onto the game via http://cybersmart.engagelive.net/controlroom . See the log on
section below. Small schools are fine with the one Guide due to your small numbers

Guides will share the ten teams of students, if they wish they can divide the team between
them and take 5 each. The game will take 60 minutes to play. During that time the scenario
will be delivered as a series of email messages. The students need to respond to these
messages in their role as Mr Saunders. They will ask questions or provide ideas in return
emails which you as the Guide will answer as appropriate.

The two Cybersmart Guides will ideally be located elsewhere in the school. This location
will be called the Control Room. This will help all parties to focus on the online
communication. Master Control (operated by ACMA or one of the other agencies from a
central location) will monitor the message load and may allocate additional resources if
necessary.

Your role
You don’t need to be an internet expert to be a Cybersmart Guide! Guides respond to the
questions and theories posed by the students online, and guide their teams through each of
the clues. As the scenario unfolds, the students discuss the risks of certain online and offline
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behaviours, and ways of managing those risks and may ask their Guide questions. Teams will
also have the opportunity to vote on issues in polls.

Cybersmart Guides only need to have basic computer skills including opening, answering
and sending emails. They also need to feel confident in answering basic safety questions.
Sample questions and answers are provided in the Cybersmart Detectives game script
(Appendix 1).

Guides should encourage students to find their own answers/solutions to issues discussed. It
can be useful to recap the story at points where students require help. For example, Guides
may refer students to clues in the messages for information.

Guides may also correct facts where it seems the students may not have understood the
storyline. Guides should also try and keep the students focused on the storyline and prompt
them with questions if they are not sending through questions on a regular basis.

Any nonsensical or silly questions can be deleted. Rude or offensive questions should be
saved for later follow-up.

A few days before the game you will need to:

   1. Read the Cybersmart Detectives script (Appendix 1).
   2. Become familiar with the Cybersmart messages in the box below, to guide your
      answers.
   3. Obtain your username and password from the teacher in charge of the game.
   4. Participate in a training session

BE CAREFUL!
Meeting and talking to people online can be fun, but remember they may not be who they say
they are!

CHECK FIRST!
Ask your parents/carer before you give out your real name, phone number or any other
personal details. The best idea is to keep personal information secret.

TAKE SOMEONE WITH YOU!
If you want to meet someone in person, take your parents or another adult with you. Always
meet in a public place, preferably during the day.

DON'T STAY!
If someone is rude in a chat room, or posts offensive or scary pictures, don't respond! Leave
the chat room straight away.

TELL!
If you see or hear something that upsets you tell your parents or another adult you trust.


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Logging on

If you experience trouble logging in contact one of the NetAlert officers below.

Graham         02 9334 7824
Lara           03 6270 2267


30 minutes before

Go to the web address http://cybersmart.engagelive.net/controlroom. Save the web address
as a favourite on your computer. This will help you to log in again quickly if for some reason
you lose connection to the game server.

Enter your user name and password. This was provided to the teacher in charge of the
game or by NetAlert.

Click ‘Next’ and you will be prompted to select the operating mode.

There are two operating modes for the game, normal and basic. Most browsers and networks
will work fine in normal mode which is the default, so click next. If you experience problems
during the game there is a toggle switch on the right of the tab bar that will allow you to
switch between modes.

Once logged in your screen should look like the screen shot below. Messages will arrive in
your inbox and can come from the Master Control Room, other Guides, and your teams. One
Guide is needed for every 5 teams. There are usually ten teams per class and these are shared
between two Guides. Both Guides will receive all messages, you can answer them as they
come in or if you are in the same location you can agree to divide teams between Guides.
One Guide could select teams 1 to 5, the other 6 to 10 or select specific team names to
manage.
Messages




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You will spend most of your time in the inbox however, if you want to check a previous
message you have sent you will need to click on the Sent tab. You will see grey, green and
magenta coloured messages. Grey messages are from your teams and may need responses.
Green messages are from Master control and contain information for you. Magenta messages
are the automated messages of the script and help you to know where the story is up to.

To open a message click on it and the text of the message will appear in the right hand
window.




Note: When you reply to your first message you should set up your signature block and
turn off the global messages check box. Global messages are accessible by all teams and
tend to distract students so we don’t use this facility.




It is advisable that Guides develop rapport with the teams. This is best achieved by posting a
simple welcome message in the 10 minutes prior to the actual commencement of the game.
By this time the teams should be logged on and the students will be experimenting with the
game. You can do this by selecting the New tab and adding all your teams.



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General replies

Try to respond to as many messages as you can. Although you will see all messages in the
inbox, you will not be able to access any that have been taken by another Guide, as messages
will disappear when opened or at the next refresh (The system automatically refreshes every
60 seconds).

To respond click on a message and then click on the Reply tab in the text box. This will open
a new message window in which to place your response. Click Send at the bottom of the
window to send it. Depending on your screen settings you may need to scroll down in that
window to see the ‘Send’ button.

If the message is nonsensical or if it is old (RED) delete it with the Delete tab. RED
messages have been there for 5-10 minutes and may no longer be relevant and have usually
been outdated by a subsequent question from that team or new information from the scenario.

If the message is offensive click on the Flag tab, which will save the message for follow-up.
If you need to warn a team click on the New tab, add the team and send them a warning. If
you use the new tab you will need to uncheck the global message box for your next reply.

You may get messages at slightly different times to other Guides, the timing depends on
when you logged into the system.

Answers

Try to keep your answers short and encourage the students to think for themselves. Remind
teams that they are acting as the Deputy Principal and reaffirm safety messages.

Delays

If you are experiencing delays in receiving messages or the system is slow click on the New
Messages button on the left of the tab menu. If this does not help change to basic mode by
clicking on the toggle switch on the right of the tab menu or call for assistance.

Offensive messages

For continuing inappropriate behaviour you should notify your local contact or NetAlert.
This could result in the team being removed from the activity.

Statements from students that require follow-up investigation

You may receive information during the activity that you feel needs follow-up action by
police or the school. If this occurs please note the team name and pass details on to your local
contact or NetAlert and use the Flag tab to save the message once the message is opened.

If you have problems call your contact or NetAlert for assistance.


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Appendix 3: Student instructions
                       Information for students

Introduction

During the game you are about to take part in, you will work in teams of 2–3 and
take on the role of Deputy Principal of Narraville High School in regional New South
Wales.

Your name is Mr Saunders, and as Deputy Principal you are in charge of student
welfare and meeting parents. You are also in charge of the Buddy System for the
school. The older students in the Buddy System are able to bring to you any
problems their younger buddies may have.

The story starts in the morning after roll call. You are working in your office when you
are given some information about a student in your school. The information will
come as a series of messages which will arrive every few minutes. When you
receive a message you will need to decide what you are going to do. Sometimes
there may not be anything you can do while other times you will need to take some
action.

As well as having to make some decisions about what to do, there are also people
who you can ask for help. All you need to do is type a question and send it to the
Cybersmart Guides. You should get the answer to your question in a few minutes. At
the end of the game you will need to have figured out what is going on, who is
involved and how you can help keep the students safe.

Remember, you are pretending to be Mr Saunders the Deputy Principal

You should not give out your full name on the internet. Therefore, you should not
give out your name in this game either. The Cybersmart Guides will refer to you by
your team name. For example, ‘Hello team 1, that’s a great suggestion’.

Sending questions

You may find that not all your team’s questions are answered. This may be because
the answer to your question is in the latest message, the question has already been
answered, or your message isn’t a real question. If you send something rude or
offensive your teacher will be informed and you may be removed from the game.

When you send your questions make sure you include enough information for the
Cybersmart Guides to understand what you are asking. They are answering lots of
questions from different teams and may not remember what you asked last time, so
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don’t say, for example, ‘yes’, ‘no’, ‘why?’ Try instead, ‘Why don’t schools lock the
gates to keep kids safe?’

The Action Centre

When you begin the game, you will see the following screen called the
Action Centre. The screen has two sections and four tabs at the top.




                                                                          Answers to
                                                                          other teams


                                                                       Reply to
                                                                        your
                                                       Your            message
                                                      message
                                  Messages
                                  received

The Inbox

This is like a normal email inbox where you will find lots of different messages.

Replies to your team’s questions are coloured GREY.
Poll questions where you can vote on issues are coloured BLUE.
Messages from your Guide or the Control Room are coloured GREEN.
Messages with important information about the scenario are coloured PURPLE.

Read a message

To read a message, click on it. You will see the text of the message in the window
on the right of the screen.


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You should read all message but especially those coloured PURPLE as these are
your clues. If the message is GREY it is a reply to a question you have sent to your
Guide. You will see your original question at the bottom of the message (see screen
shot above).

Send a message

To send a message or ask a question, click the                      tab at the top of the
screen. A text box will appear. Enter a ‘subject’
for example, Where is the Girl?




Then click

Sent messages
To see all messages that your team has sent during the game, click the
tab at the top of the screen.

Ask your teacher if you need help.

That’s all there is to the game, so have fun, send lots of messages and try to work
out what is happening .




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Rules of the game

   1. Work together as a team to answer the questions.
   2. Each team needs to have one person reading scenario emails, one person reading
      Cybersmart Guide emails and another person typing questions. You might take turns
      at these jobs.
   3. You’re pretending to be the Deputy Principal, Mr Saunders, so you need to make
      suggestions and decide on a course of action from the Deputy Principal’s perspective.
   4. Remember Cybersmart Detectives is only a game, although it seems real.
   5. Inappropriate or rude messages are not acceptable. These messages will be saved and
      your teacher will be notified.
Have fun and send lots of messages to your Guides.



Internet safety glossary

Buddy System         A system where older students are partnered with younger
                     students so that the younger students can bring problems and
                     issues to someone closer to their own age. Older buddies can
                     take issues to the Deputy Principal. All problems are dealt with
                     on a confidential basis.

Chat                 People write messages to others using a computer. This is done
                     instantly so people can have a virtual conversation by
                     exchanging messages.

Chat room            Websites on the internet where people can go to chat.

lets cht ...         This means 'Let us chat ...' Text messaging has hundreds of
                     shortened words; some are well known and others are a private
                     code.

Internet             International network of computers linked up to exchange
                     information.

User id              Personal identification of a computer user.

Web                  Shorthand for Worldwide Web (www).




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Appendix 4: Cybersmart Lesson plans


Lesson 1: Being Cybersmart


Aims

   1. Students are introduced to the concept of being cybersmart and key messages of
      cybersafety.

   2. Students gain an overview of the Cybersmart Detectives game and their role.

Overview: Internet safety should be practised when using computers and mobile phones. All
children should be taught the Cybersmart messages and be encouraged to use them. The
Cybersmart Detectives game contains some important themes: revealing personal
information online should be avoided; some people you meet online will pretend to be
someone else; if you feel worried or threatened by someone or something online tell a trusted
adult or friend.

In this lesson students will be focusing on what information they should and shouldn’t
provide online.

It is recommended that the Cybersmart Detectives online game closely follow this lesson.
The game will show what may happen if a young person reveals too much information online
and it gets in the wrong hands.

Teacher advice: Timing of each part of the lesson will depend on the prior knowledge and
experience of the class. This lesson will take on average 30 to 45 minutes.

Class discussion: Conduct a general discussion with the class to find out what type of
internet access students have, how often they are accessing the internet and what they are
using it for. You may wish to raise the following questions:

      How many students use computers at home?
      For what purpose are the computers used?
      Do your parents know what they are using their computers for?
      How many in the group have a mobile phone?
      For what purpose are the phones used?
      How many in the group use instant messaging?


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      Does anyone in the group contribute to a website (e.g. social networking sites such as Penguin
       Club or MySpace sporting group, family, special interest) or play online games (e.g. World of
       Warcraft) or use file sharing sites?


Activity: Protecting personal information
Ask the students to compile a personal profile suitable for posting online. What information
should they include and what should they exclude?

Teacher advice: Allow the students to explore their own ideas about what is suitable to post
about them selves online. It is essential to have a debriefing class, and you can get the
students to re-visit the profiles they develop in this activity and revise them during this time.

It is suggested that the following details could be included in a young person’s online profile:

      first name, nick name, pseudonym
      hobbies/interests (not naming specific details such as the name of a club)
      only photos where specific details cannot be identified (e.g. club uniforms)
      likes and dislikes (such as music, movies or food).

   Do not include:

      full name
      full names of friends or family members
      age
      name of your school or sporting club/team
      photos that can easily identify you (e.g. with school or sport uniforms)
      home address
      home phone number
      mobile number.

There are a number of approaches that you could use to run this activity:

   1. Compile a profile on the board using input from the whole class.
   2. Ask students to discuss in pairs and invite them to summarise findings to the class
      e.g. ask students to discuss how they would provide advice to someone who had
      never used a profile before.
   3. Ask students to develop their own profile. Read a couple profiles out and see if the
      rest of the class can guess who it is. If it is easy to guess the identity of the student
      providing the profile then the student might be revealing too much information.

Handout: Distribute the Cybersmart Detectives Student Guide (Appendix 3). Briefly explain
to the students that they will be playing an online game which looks at an online safety
incident involving a student. Read through the Student Guide with the students so that they
have background detail on the scenario as well as a basic introduction to playing the game.
Ask the students if there are any aspects that they are unsure of so you can clarify the
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information e.g. the concept of student welfare in the Deputy Principal’s role may need to be
clarified.

Conclusion: Place students into teams of three. Remind them to bring along the Student
Guide to the Cybersmart Detectives game so that they can refer to it as needed.




Lesson 2: Debrief – Recommended to closely follow the activity



Aims

   3. Students are provided with an opportunity to debrief on any issues raised during the
      Cybersmart Detectives game.

   4. Students gain an understanding of what is an appropriate amount of information to
      provide online.


Overview: The Cybersmart Detectives scenario has been designed to be a ‘real-world’
example which might be confronting for some students. It also raises a number of issues
which should be addressed in a debrief session. The school might consider involving other
support services available to your school on a needs basis.

In this lesson students will be given an opportunity to examine aspects of the game scenario.
They will also re-examine the profiles they developed in Lesson 1 to consider whether they
should change any details to further protect their identity. Finally, they will draw up a list of
people/organisations they can contact in case they need support or advice about internet
safety.

Teacher advice: Timing of each part of the lesson will depend on the reactions of the class
to the game as well as their prior knowledge and experience. This lesson will take on average
30 to 45 minutes (excluding the extension activity).


Discussion: It is suggested that you examine aspects of the scenario with the class such how
Sarah conducted herself and how the other characters handled the situation.

You may also wish to discuss the following points:

      What should you do when you receive a message that makes you feel worried?
      What would you do if you were worried about your friends and did not know how to help?
      When would you get an adult involved with a friend’s problem?

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      It might also be appropriate to discuss potential dangers linked with specific modes of online
       communication, depending on class usage established in Lesson 1 (for example, social
       networking, gaming sites or internet-enabled phones).


Activity: Identifying student support networks
Ask students to compile their own list of trusted people they would contact if they were
concerned about online harassment by a stranger or if they were being bullied by other
students e.g. hand network activity.

Teacher advice: You may wish to refer students to specific support services available in
your school community such as a school counsellor or buddy system.


Extension Activity: Ask the students to imagine what would have happened if Sarah had
followed the cybersmart messages when she had first met Kel in the chatroom. Either discuss
as a class or ask the students to write an alternative cybersmart version to the scenario.

Conclusion: To wrap up the lesson refer to the Cybersmart messages:


 BE CAREFUL!
 Meeting and talking to people online can be fun, but remember they may not be who they
 say they are!

 CHECK FIRST!
 Ask your parents/carer before you give out your real name, phone number or any other
 personal details. The best idea is to keep personal information secret.

 TAKE SOMEONE WITH YOU!
 If you want to meet someone in person, take your parents or another adult with you.
 Always meet in a public place, preferably during the day.

 DON'T STAY!
 If someone is rude in a chat room, or posts offensive or scary pictures, don't respond!
 Leave the chat room straight away.

 TELL!
 If you see or hear something that upsets you tell your parents or another adult you
 trust.




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Appendix 5: Teachers check list

     Checklist for Cybersmart Detectives program

Two weeks before

    provide school contact details to local contact or NetAlert

    order Cybersmart brochures

    organise ten computers for students/book computer lab

    organise Cybersmart Guides

    check lesson plans for ideas


One week before

    gain parent permission for internet access using normal school protocol

    read Cybersmart Detectives script (please do not show to students)

    class lesson introducing concept of Cybersmart safety

    provide and read through Student Guides


Running Cybersmart Detectives game

    place students in teams of three


30 minutes before game session:

    log all computers onto game site (see Log on sheet Appendix 6)

    orientate students to game before start


After game

    debrief game with class

    run lesson activities as appropriate

    send brochures home for parents/carers

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Appendix 6: Teachers Log On and Training Sheet
Training
Guides and Teachers
Training is held on the Thursday prior to your booking.
Training runs for 30 minutes and is a condensed version of the activity. Both you and your
Guides will be able to log on and familiarise yourselves with the activity. If you are able to
have two computers close to each other this will allow you to see how the interface works
from both the Guides and the Students point of view. You will be able to send messages
between the Guides and the Students.
You do not need to be online for the entire session, once you are comfortable with the
activity you can leave.
The procedure for logging on for training is the same as the activity but the school and guide
usernames and passwords will be different. We strongly suggest that you save the following
links to aid your log on process.

1. Guides log on at: http://cybersmart.engagelive.net/controlroom
Guides will need to use the username provided to the teacher in charge. The username and
password are the same e.g. if the username is waguide1 then the password is the same i.e.
waguide1. They may not be the same for the activity.

Enter your username and password and click next. Once logged in you will receive
automated messages and any messages that the teacher sends You may also see messages
from other teams/schools. You should respond to your team (teacher) messages but you can
leave the others.

Please refer to the Cybersmart Guide instructions (Appendix 2) for more details.


2. Teachers log on as a team at: http://cybersmart.engagelive.net/actioncentre
Teachers will use a training school username, and password for the activity the username is
usually the full name of the school plus ‘team’ and their password e.g. Username: Bundaburg
PS team, password: school (This is the default password used by all schools).




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In the next screen select a team from the drop down box and click on next. For training, type
your school name and click ‘next’, when teachers are logging on teams for the activity each
computer must be logged on to a different team.




* Please refer to Students instructions (Appendix 3) for more details.
Now send messages between each other and see how messages, auto messages and polls are
shown. Have a play you can’t break anything.

If you have problems please call you local contact or NetAlert on 02 9334 7824.

Activity
Teachers

30 minute prior to the start:
   1. You might choose to number computers 1 through 10
   2. log on each computer to http://cybersmart.engagelive.net/actioncentre
   3. enter username and password (if you are using Safari you will need to use basic
      mode)
   4. select team name (a different one for each computer these may be already be
      allocated e.g.1-10)
   5. seat students in teams
10 minutes prior to the start:
   1. Teams will receive a welcome message and that suggests they message their Guides.
   2. Remind students of their role as Deputy Principal and go over student instructions.
   3. Provide general guidance to students.
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Appendix 7: Feedback form

               Cybersmart Detectives feedback form

Could you please fill in this form to help us improve future activities.
School name:________________Teacher name:________________
1. Students
How many children took part?

_______________

What did the children think about the activity?
___________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________

Did the activity keep the children engaged?

___________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________

Was the Student Guide useful?

___________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________

Any other comments?

___________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________

2. Teachers support materials
Did the Teacher Guide give you enough information to prepare for the activity?

___________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________

Were the lesson plans helpful?

___________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________

Do you have any suggestions for the lesson plans?

___________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________
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Any other comments?

___________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________

The Activity
Was the game appropriate for the children taking part?

___________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________

Was the literacy level appropriate?

___________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________

Did you introduce/debrief the topic of the game with the children?

___________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________

Did you have any Technical difficulties?

___________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________

Any other comments?

___________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________

Improvements
Are there any other cyber safety subjects that you feel would be appropriate for this
approach?

___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________

Have you any suggestions on how we might improve Cybersmart Detectives?

___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________

PLEASE RETURN THIS FORM TO:                      Lisa Wait

                                                 Email: lisa.wait@acma.gov.au or

                                                 FAX: 03 9963 6970

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