The Relationship between Sex Talk and Protective Sexual Behaviors

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					ADOLESCENT SEX TALK AND SEXUAL
   BEHAVIORS AMONG FEMALE
        COLLEGE STUDENTS




 Leah Fortson & Keisha Paxton,
             Ph.D.
 California State University, Dominguez Hills
            Student Research Day
             February 18th, 2010
ADOLESCENT SEXUAL BEHAVIORS
Year                  Estimates of Adolescent Risky Behavior
2004      745,000 pregnancies occurred in U.S. females under age 20

2004      16,000 pregnancies were reported among youth aged 10-14

2006      20,000 adolescents and young adults aged 10-24 years were
          living with HIV or AIDS
2006      1 million adolescents and young adults aged 10-24 years
          were reported to have Chlamydia, gonorrhea, or syphilis
2006      17,000 males and females aged 10-14 years were reported to
          have a STD
2007      15% of high school (HS) students had had 4 or more sex
          partners
2007      39% of sexually active HS students did not use condoms
          during last sexual intercourse


       National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Adolescent and School Health (2009)
INTRODUCTION
   Quality parent–adolescent relationships led to good
    self-control, which led to favorable perceptions of
    adolescents abstaining from sex (Wills et al., 2003).

   Parent-adolescent sex talk moderates adolescent
    involvement in sexual behaviors, and is a protective
    factor for risky sexual behavior (DiIorio et al., 2007).

   Adolescents who had not discussed sex and condoms
    with a parent were more likely to engage in sexual
    behaviors (Whitaker & Miller, 2000).

   Adolescents who talk more with their mothers about
    sex are less likely to engage in intimate sexual
    behaviors and to initiate sexual intercourse than
    those who talk less with their mothers about sex
    (DiIorio et al., 2007).
CURRENT STUDY
   Is the “sex talk” associated with protective
    sexual behaviors in female college students?
HYPOTHESES
1)   Individuals who had the “sex talk” when they
     were growing up will have a positive attitude
     about condom use than those who did not.

2)   Individuals who had the “sex talk” when they
     were growing up will have more HIV/STI
     knowledge than those who did not.

3)   HIV/STI knowledge will be associated with
     an increase in favorable condom attitudes.
PARTICIPANTS
 N = 209 female college students
 Ethnic diversity of sample

               Race          Percent of Sample
               Black               28.1
              White                 8.4
             Hispanic              33.7
               Asian                6.4
          Pacific Islander          1.6

   Age: 18 – 60
       Mean=25.03
   Recruitment:
     Flyers
     Class announcements
MEASURES
   On-line Women’s Wellness Survey

     Demographics
     Condom Attitudes
     HIV/STI Knowledge


       Sex Talk Measures
         “When you were growing up, did anyone ever talk to you
          about sex?”
         “Who were the individuals that talked to you about sex?”
SEX TALK
                Question   Percent of Sample
Sex Talk (Yes or No)             54.1
Mother                           45.9
Female Friend                    17.7
Father                           11.0
Aunts                            10.5
Boyfriend/Girlfriend              7.7
Other adult female                7.2
Male Friend                       6.2
Grandmother & Sisters             5.3
Brothers                          2.4
Step-mothers Uncles               1.4
Other adult male                  1.0
Step-father                       .5
PARTICIPANT’S SEXUAL BEHAVIORS

        Sexual Behaviors     Percent of Sample
Vaginal Sexual Intercourse         73.2
Vaginal Unprotected Sex            36.5
Vaginal Protected Sex              29.7
Anal Unprotected Sex                3.2
Anal Protected Sex                  1.2
Oral Unprotected Sex               36.9
Oral Protected Sex                  2.4
RESULTS: IS “SEX TALK” ASSOCIATED
WITH CONDOM ATTITUDES?
   Analysis: T-Test
       Sex talk was not significantly associated with condom
        attitudes.


   Subgroups

     Sample        Sex Talk        Mean           Sig.
                  with Father
        Black         Yes          81.1667        .068
                      No           73.5172
    Hispanic          Yes          62.1250        .006
                      No           72.3939
RESULTS: IS “SEX TALK” ASSOCIATED
WITH HIV/STI KNOWLEDGE?
   Analysis: T-Test

       Sample        Sex Talk     Mean      Sig.
                    with Father
         All            Yes       11.6111   .050
     Participants       No        10.8545

   Subgroups

       Sample        Sex Talk     Mean      Sig.
                    with Mother
      Age 18-25         Yes       10.9710   .079
                        No        10.5152
RESULTS CONTINUED: IS “SEX TALK”
ASSOCIATED WITH HIV/STI KNOWLEDGE?
    Subgroups

      Sample     General    Mean      Sig.
                 Sex Talk
       White       Yes      11.1538   .063
                   No        9.7500
RESULTS: IS HIV/STI KNOWLEDGE
ASSOCIATED WITH CONDOM ATTITUDES?
   Analysis: Bivariate Correlation
       HIV/STI knowledge was not significantly associated
        with condom attitudes (N= 183, r=.105, p=.158).
DISCUSSION & FUTURE RESEARCH
   Talking to adolescents about sex did not affect
    their condom attitudes as adults.
       Inconsistent with literature (Dilorio, et al., 2007).
   Black women whose fathers talked to them about
    sex had more positive condom attitudes than those
    who did not.
       A sample size with a larger representation of Black
        women can increase our power to find significant
        results.
DISCUSSION & FUTURE RESEARCH con’t

    Contrasting, Hispanic women who talked to their
     fathers about sex had more negative condom
     attitudes than those who did not.
        Consistent with literature (Eisenman & Dantzker,
         2006).
        Nature of “sex talk.”
        A focus group with these participants may provide
         insight into why Hispanic women respond negatively to
         sex talk with their fathers.
DISCUSSION & FUTURE RESEARCH con’t
 Women who talked to their fathers about sex
  had more HIV/STI knowledge than those who
  did not.
 Women between the age of 18 and 25 and who
  talked to their mothers about sex had more
  HIV/STI knowledge than those who did not.
       A larger sample with a greater representation of
        this group may increase our power to find
        significant results.
DISCUSSION & FUTURE RESEARCH con’t
    White women who had the sex talk when they
     were growing up also had more HIV/STI
     knowledge than those who had not.
        A larger sample with a greater representation of
         this group may increase our power to find
         significant results.
    There was no relationship between HIV/STI
     knowledge and attitudes about condoms.
        Inconsistent with literature (Moore, 2008).
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
California State University, Dominguez Hills Faculty:



 Dr. Keisha Paxton

Minority Access to Research Careers / Undergraduate Student Training in
Academic Research (MARC-USTAR) program:


 Dr. Laura Robles
 Tigress Briggs
 Tomanika Taylor
Funded By:    National Institutes of Health (NIH) Minority Access to Research Careers
                         Undergraduate Student Training in Academic Research (MARC-
USTAR).
              Program Grant Number: NIH/MARC USTAR 2 T34 GM008683

				
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