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Survey Results

VIEWS: 5 PAGES: 28

									    Survey Results
What percentage of students and faculty consider
                                                                                Students      Faculty
the following to be “serious cheating”?
Copying from another student during a test or exam without their
knowledge
Working on an assignment with others when instructor asked for
individual work
Turning in work done by someone else
Fabricating / falsifying research data
Getting Q/A from someone who has taken test
Altering graded test and submitting it for additional credit
Using a false excuse to obtain extension on due date



Source: Student data from survey at Wilfrid Laurier University, Orientation Week, 2004. Faculty data
from survey at Simon Fraser University, see: www.sfu.ca/integritytaskforce/Faculty-Report.htm,
accessed August 28, 2006
    Survey Results
What percentage of students and faculty consider                                Students      Faculty

the following to be “serious cheating”?
Copying from another student during a test or exam without                        88%         87%
their knowledge
Working on an assignment with others when instructor
asked for individual work
Turning in work done by someone else
Fabricating / falsifying research data
Getting Q/A from someone who has taken test
Altering graded test and submitting it for additional credit
Using a false excuse to obtain extension on due date

Source: Student data from survey at Wilfrid Laurier University, Orientation Week, 2004. Faculty data
from survey at Simon Fraser University, see: www.sfu.ca/integritytaskforce/Faculty-Report.htm,
accessed August 28, 2006
    Survey Results
What percentage of students and faculty consider                                Students      Faculty

the following to be “serious cheating”?
Copying from another student during a test or exam without                        88%         87%
their knowledge
Working on an assignment with others when instructor                                5           16
asked for individual work
Turning in work done by someone else
Fabricating / falsifying research data
Getting Q/A from someone who has taken test
Altering graded test and submitting it for additional credit
Using a false excuse to obtain extension on due date

Source: Student data from survey at Wilfrid Laurier University, Orientation Week, 2004. Faculty data
from survey at Simon Fraser University, see: www.sfu.ca/integritytaskforce/Faculty-Report.htm,
accessed August 28, 2006
    Survey Results
What percentage of students and faculty consider                                Students      Faculty

the following to be “serious cheating”?
Copying from another student during a test or exam without                        88%         87%
their knowledge
Working on an assignment with others when instructor                                5           16
asked for individual work
Turning in work done by someone else                                               82           90
Fabricating / falsifying research data
Getting Q/A from someone who has taken test
Altering graded test and submitting it for additional credit
Using a false excuse to obtain extension on due date

Source: Student data from survey at Wilfrid Laurier University, Orientation Week, 2004. Faculty data
from survey at Simon Fraser University, see: www.sfu.ca/integritytaskforce/Faculty-Report.htm,
accessed August 28, 2006
    Survey Results
What percentage of students and faculty consider                                Students      Faculty

the following to be “serious cheating”?
Copying from another student during a test or exam without                        88%         87%
their knowledge
Working on an assignment with others when instructor                                5           16
asked for individual work
Turning in work done by someone else                                               82           90
Fabricating / falsifying research data                                             39           94
Getting Q/A from someone who has taken test
Altering graded test and submitting it for additional credit
Using a false excuse to obtain extension on due date

Source: Student data from survey at Wilfrid Laurier University, Orientation Week, 2004. Faculty data
from survey at Simon Fraser University, see: www.sfu.ca/integritytaskforce/Faculty-Report.htm,
accessed August 28, 2006
    Survey Results
What percentage of students and faculty consider                                Students      Faculty

the following to be “serious cheating”?
Copying from another student during a test or exam without                        88%         87%
their knowledge
Working on an assignment with others when instructor                                5           16
asked for individual work
Turning in work done by someone else                                               82           90
Fabricating / falsifying research data                                             39           94
Getting Q/A from someone who has taken test                                        28           61
Altering graded test and submitting it for additional credit
Using a false excuse to obtain extension on due date

Source: Student data from survey at Wilfrid Laurier University, Orientation Week, 2004. Faculty data
from survey at Simon Fraser University, see: www.sfu.ca/integritytaskforce/Faculty-Report.htm,
accessed August 28, 2006
    Survey Results
What percentage of students and faculty consider                                Students      Faculty

the following to be “serious cheating”?
Copying from another student during a test or exam without                        88%         87%
their knowledge
Working on an assignment with others when instructor                                5           16
asked for individual work
Turning in work done by someone else                                               82           90
Fabricating / falsifying research data                                             39           94
Getting Q/A from someone who has taken test                                        28           61
Altering graded test and submitting it for additional credit                       79           92
Using a false excuse to obtain extension on due date

Source: Student data from survey at Wilfrid Laurier University, Orientation Week, 2004. Faculty data
from survey at Simon Fraser University, see: www.sfu.ca/integritytaskforce/Faculty-Report.htm,
accessed August 28, 2006
    Survey Results
What percentage of students and faculty consider                                Students      Faculty

the following to be “serious cheating”?
Copying from another student during a test or exam without                        88%         87%
their knowledge
Working on an assignment with others when instructor                                5           16
asked for individual work
Turning in work done by someone else                                               82           90
Fabricating / falsifying research data                                             39           94
Getting Q/A from someone who has taken test                                        28           61
Altering graded test and submitting it for additional credit                       79           92
Using a false excuse to obtain extension on due date                               18           40

Source: Student data from survey at Wilfrid Laurier University, Orientation Week, 2004. Faculty data
from survey at Simon Fraser University, see: www.sfu.ca/integritytaskforce/Faculty-Report.htm,
accessed August 28, 2006
                Academic misconduct
 “Academic misconduct is an act by a
 student, or by students … which may result in
 a false evaluation of the student(s), or which
 represents an attempt to unfairly gain an
 academic advantage … Whether or not a
 student intended to commit academic
 misconduct is not relevant for a finding of
 academic misconduct.”


       Source: WLU Undergraduate Academic Calendar 2007-2008
Faculty Teaching Responsibility


 “to be fair and objective in relations with
  students and in grading of student
  assignments;”




   Source: Section 18.2.4.1 Collective Agreement between
   Wilfrid Laurier University and Wilfrid Laurier University Faculty
   Association for Full-time Faculty and Professional Librarians
    July 1, 2005 to June 30, 2008
New educational initiatives
 Academic integrity information sent through
  Headstart program
 Orientation week sessions run by student
  ambassadors
 Upgraded academic integrity website
   www.wlu.ca/academicintegrity
 New teaching cases on academic integrity
 Information for faculty and TAs about
  academic integrity policies/procedures
Overview of new procedures
 New forms to help streamline and clarify the
  process
 Explicit penalty guidelines
 Central registry of offences
 More student involvement in the adjudication
  process

 TAs‟ responsibilities in upholding our
     fundamental values:
1.   Inform the prof when misconduct is suspected
2.   Assist in documenting the incident, completing the relevant
     forms
   Fundamental Values

        Trustworthiness                         Respect
               Honesty                          Responsibility
               Integrity                        Fairness
               Reliability                      Caring
               Loyalty                          Citizenship




Adapted from: Schwartz, M. (2002) “A code of ethics for corporate codes of ethics”
Journal of Business Ethics, Vol.41, 27-43.
Ethics in Academic Work
     Wilfrid Laurier University
        Student to Student
             2008 - 2009
                               Introduction
 The presenters...
 The purpose…
 Agenda
  1)   Cheating – what it is
  2)   Detection
  3)   Consequences
  4)   Importance of academic integrity




             www.wlu.ca/academicintegrity
                                     Discussion

 What are your personal experiences with
  cheating? (Not expecting confessionals)
 How did you react to cheating in your high
  school?




              www.wlu.ca/academicintegrity
                                      Discussion

 How did teachers catch students in high school?
 Did students „tell‟ on one another?




               www.wlu.ca/academicintegrity
                                      Discussion

 What did your previous school do to deal with
  cheaters?




              www.wlu.ca/academicintegrity
               Who does cheating harm?

 The following groups of people are all affected
  by academic misconduct:
     The university
     Your classmates
     YOU!




               www.wlu.ca/academicintegrity
Headlines…
                                           You
 No learning
 Penalties up to and including expulsion from
  the university
 Career difficulties (incidents of academic
  misconduct are noted on your transcript!)
 Stigmatization, ostracism
 Embarrassment, lowered self-concept
 Stress



            www.wlu.ca/academicintegrity
                Get help, ask questions
 Your professor / teaching assistant
 University Calendars (www.wlu.ca/calendars)
 Learning Services      (www.wlu.ca/learningservices)
 Library (www.wlu.ca/library)
 Counselling Services
     (www.mylaurier.ca/counselling)
 Academic Integrity Website
     (www.wlu.ca/academicintegrity)
                    Academic integrity
 Integrity is defined as: "moral uprightness;
  honesty...unimpaired or uncorrupted..."
     Canadian Oxford Dictionary (2004)
 The expectations placed on students at
  Laurier include honesty and integrity in both
  their academics and behaviour on and off
  campus.




             www.wlu.ca/academicintegrity
  Reflections from Ambassadors

 “I didn’t think that that kind of
  dishonesty was so commonplace.”
 “I became more aware of my actions
  and how I handled my work and
  others.”
 “I will be more aware of group work
  and adequate sourcing.”
 “…taking a leadership role… has
  reinforced that I can make a difference
  and that everyone helps to set an
  example for somebody else.”

          Source: 2006 Academic Integrity
                            Ambassadors
Reflections from Ambassadors
  “Academic Integrity: What you do today,
   echoes in eternity.”
  “To show that WLU cares enough to warn
   students about the penalties before having to
   implement them if needed.”
  “….understanding that a person’s flawed
   sense of ethics can affect a larger group of
   people.”

  Source: 2006 Academic Integrity Ambassadors
 Reflections on Prior
 Volunteering/Community Service

Survey of Bu 288 students, Winter 2007 found
 the following outcomes:
   -skill development
   -personality traits affected
   -career possibilities explored
Beyond Laurier

       Other institutions begin to adopt the
        model (Queen’s University, Conestoga
        College)
       New joint initiatives
          Laurier, Conestoga College,
           University of Waterloo
          Public and Catholic school boards
          Training and development for vice
           principals and teachers
          Long term – secondary school
           curriculum change
                 Detection - technology

 Turnitin.com
    Compares your paper to:
         other student papers submitted
          (over 40 million)
        Internet websites (over 12 billion)
        Major newspapers/magazines/journals
         (over 10,000)
 Facebook groups
 Google searches
                                           Source: Turnitin.com


            www.wlu.ca/academicintegrity

								
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