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					                                                     ARMS GUIDE (TECHNIQUES)
                                                   UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS
                                                      2011 Version 15 Effective 1 October 2010
                                                           Last Update: 29 January 2011
The FORSCOM ARMS Guide is neither a regulation nor regulatory in nature. The Guide questions are based on requirements stated in
regulations and various other written directives. The Guide is simply a tool that can be used to address those requirements. The
applicability codes were developed to facilitate and enhance the use of the ARMS Guide. Applicability codes are intended to assist the
user in determining which questions apply to typical Army organizations. As with all attempts to establish absolute rules, there are
special conditions and unique situational variations. If you have a question as to applicability of a question to your organization,
contact the FORSCOM functional area lead listed on this AKO web site https://www.us.army.mil/suite/page/592726. In all cases
applicability of requirements will be determined by the ARMS Team, through direct coordination with the organization, and application
of current regulations and directives.

This Guide is applicable to the Active Army, Army Reserve and Army National Guard Aviation and ATS Units. OSAA SOP references only apply to the
Operational Support Airlift Agency (OSAA) units/detachments.

Applicability Guide: (AC) Aviation Company/ Troop, (AF) Airfield, (AM) Aviation Maintenance Company/Aviation Maintenance Troop, (AS) Aviation
Support Company/Aviation Support Troop, (AT) Air Traffic Services, (BN) Battalion/Squadron, (CO) Contractor, (DE) Detachments, (FS) Forward
Support Company, Forward Support Troop, (IO) Installation Only ATS, (OS) Operational Support Airlift, (OV) Operational Support Airlift Validator,
(SB) Aviation Support Battalion (ASB), (SF) Aviation Support Facility/Army Aviation Support Facility (ASF/AASF), (TO) Tactical Only ATS, (UA)
Unmanned Aircraft Systems, (LU) Lakota Maintenance Only

A-GARRISON STANDING OPERATING PROCEDURES
QUESTION
2.00                AC                   BN        DE          OS               SF       UA
Does the unit have a Hurricane and High Wind / Severe Weather Plan that addresses the following: Evacuation, storage, or tie down of aircraft; Removal of loose objects from
parking areas; Protection of window glass and interiors; Conduct of checks on backup power sources to ensure efficient operation and availability of required fuel and oil?
[FM 3-04.300, para 11-17, TC 1-600]
REFERENCE TEXT
FM 3-04.300, Hurricane and High Wind Plan . 11-17. During a hurricane evacuation, Army commanders of airfields and flight activities will, at their discretion, evacuate
assigned aircraft and impose temporary restrictions on use of flight facilities under their control. A detailed plan should be outlined in the local SOP and implemented when a
hurricane or high wind warning is received. The plan should include but not be limited to— ● Evacuation, storage, or tiedown of aircraft. (Tiedown instructions in the aircraft
operator's manual must be followed.) ● Removal of loose objects from parking areas (for example, chocks, fire extinguisher, boarding ramps, toolboxes, FOD containers, and work
platforms). ● Protection of window glass and interiors by using prefabricated window covers. (To allow for pressure equalization, the building should not be made airtight.)
 ● Conducting checks on backup power sources to ensure efficient operation and availability of required fuel and oil.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will review plan. If plan lacks vital elements, the evaluator will identify shortcomings and suggest recommendations for improvement.

3.00           AC                    BN      DE            OS               SF    UA
Has the commander established policies specifying the flight plans to be used IAW FAA Handbook 7110.10, AIM, and the DOD FLIP GP? [FM 3-04.300, para 10–41; AR 95-23,
para 2–8c]

                                                                                       1
REFERENCE TEXT
FM 3-04.300, FLIGHT PLANS. 10-41. AR 95-1, paragraph 5-2d. states, ―Aircraft will not be flown unless a flight plan (military or civil) has been filed or an operation’s log
completed. Local commanders will establish policies specifying the flight plan to be used.‖ FAA Order JO 7110.10, Aeronautical Information Manual, and DOD FLIP
general planning (GP) provide details on flight plan procedures. AR 95-1, 5-2. d. [additionally states] The pilot in command is responsible for the flight plan and has flight plan
approval authority. When FAA Form 7233–1 (Flight Plan), DD Form 1801 (DOD International Flight Plan), or DD Form 175 are used, they will be filed per DOD/US Government
FLIP. FAA Form 7233–1 can be obtained from the FAA forms Web site at: http://forms.faa.gov. Local commanders will establish policies specifying the flight plan or operations log
to be used. AR 95-23, 2–8. Local flying rules. c. When UASs are authorized to operate in controlled airspace, Army air traffic control (ATC) facilities will use prescribed FAA
separation procedures, when provided, for the category and type of flight being conducted. Separate FAA procedures have not been established for UASs nor have UASs been
categorized for separation purposes.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will review established policies and procedures for flight planning.

4.00                 AC                   BN       DE          OS             SF       UA
Are the installation commander’s published local flying rules integrated in the unit’s SOP? [AR 95-1, para 2-10a; AR 95-23, para 2–8a]
REFERENCE TEXT
AR 95-1, 2-10. Local flying rules. a. Installation and/or garrison commanders having Army aircraft assigned, attached, or tenant to his or her installation will prepare and publish
local flying rules in coordination with the senior aviation mission commander on the installation. Rules will include the use of tactical training and maintenance test flight areas,
arrival and departure routes, and airspace restrictions as appropriate to help control air operations. AR 95-23, 2-8. Local flying rules. a. Installation commanders having Army
UAS assigned, attached, or tenant to their commands will prepare and publish local flying rules. Rules will include the use of tactical training and maintenance flight areas, arrival
and departure routes, and airspace restrictions as appropriate to control UAS operations in their local flying areas.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will review GSOP to ensure local flying rules have been established and published.

5.00                 AC                  BN      DE                             SF       UA
Are noise abatement, fly-neighborly policies or other safe considerations outlined in the SOP and provided to USAASA? [AR 95-1, para 2-10, 2-15a–d; AR 95-23, para 2-13a–d]
REFERENCE TEXT
AR 95-1, 2-10. Local flying rules. c. Installation commanders may set different altitudes based on noise abatement, fly-neighborly policies, or other safety considerations.
These will be displayed in flight operations and provided to the US Army Aeronautical Services Agency (USAASA) for publication in the flight information publications (FLIP).
2-15. Noise abatement. a. Noise-abatement policies will be disseminated by the Commander, USAASA. Installations will develop and publish local noise abatement programs
that minimize aircraft noise footprint on and near the installation and within the local flying area and establish good public relations programs to educate and inform the public. b.
Aviators will participate in noise-abatement and fly neighborly programs to minimize annoyance to persons on the ground when missions and safety are not adversely affected. c.
Noise Sensitive Areas. Unless required by the mission, all Army aircraft will maintain a minimum of 2000 feet above the surface of the following: National Parks, Monuments,
Recreation Areas and Scenic River ways administered by the National Parks Service, National Wildlife Refuges, Big Game Refuges or Wildlife Ranges administered by the U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service, and Wilderness and Primitive areas administered by the U.S. Forest Service. d. Army aviation activities which normally operate in or adjacent to those
areas listed in c above may enter into local agreements with the controlling agency to modify procedures required for mission accomplishment. AR 95-23, 2-13. a. Noise
abatement policies will be disseminated by the Commander, USAASA. Installations will develop and publish local noise abatement programs that minimize aircraft noise footprint
on and near the installation and within the local flying area and establish good public relations programs to educate and inform the public. b. The UAC will participate in noise
abatement and fly-neighborly programs to minimize annoyance to persons on the ground when missions and safety are not adversely affected. c. When operating in noise
sensitive areas, unless required by the mission, all Army aircraft will maintain a minimum of 2,000 feet above the surface of the following: national parks, monuments, recreation
areas and scenic river ways administered by the National Parks Service, National Wildlife Refuges, Big Game Refuges, or Wildlife Ranges administered by the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service, and wilderness and primitive areas administered by the U.S. Forest Service.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will review the GSOP to ensure noise abatement policies have been established and published.

6.00              AC                  BN      DE          OS               SF       UA
Does the unit have procedures established, and has action been taken, to restrict crewmembers from performing duties, who have not completed APART or ATP requirements?
[AR 95-1, para 4-10, para a–e; AR 95-23, para 4-10 para a–c]
REFERENCE TEXT

                                                                                           2
AR 95-1, 4-10. Failure to meet the Aircrew Training Program requirements. a. When ATP requirements other than the pilot in command requirements for certain company
commanders and warrant officer positions are not met, the commander will investigate. This investigation will take no longer than 30 days from the date of notification. After
investigation, the commander will— (1) Take one of the following actions:(a) Authorize the crewmember up to 30-day extension to complete the requirements. The 30-day
extension will start after the commander completes his investigation. Commanders are not authorized to grant themselves an extension. (b) Request a waiver of requirements per
paragraph 4–2.(c) Recommend or convene a flying evaluation board per AR 600–105 for the officer crewmember.(2) Restrict aviators from performing pilot in command duties in
the aircraft (primary, additional or alternate) and if applicable, briefing officer duties, until the missed ATP requirements are met. (3) Enter restrictions imposed and extensions
granted in the Individual Aircrew Training Folder (IATF). (4) Enter extensions and waivers granted to the crewmember on DA Form 759. b. For primary aircraft, if additional time or
waiver is not granted, or if requirements are not met within the authorized period, the commander will— (1) For a military aviator, impose a nonmedical suspension per AR 600–
105 and either— (a) Request a waiver of ATP requirements from the appropriate authority per paragraph 4–2 of this regulation. Or, (b) Recommend or convene a flying evaluation
board per AR 600–105 for the officer crewmember. (2) Terminate flying status order, for a nonrated crewmember, per AR 600–106. (3) Process per the appropriate Federal Civil
Service regulations, for a DAC crewmember. (4) Enter suspensions imposed and/or waivers granted in the IATF.(5) Enter suspensions imposed and/or waivers granted to the
crewmember on DA Form 759. c. When the pilot in command ATP requirements for specific company commander and warrant officer positions are not met, the commander will
impose a nonmedical suspension per AR 600–105 and investigate. This investigation will take no longer than 30 days from the date of notification. After investigation, the
commander will take one of the following actions— (1) Request a 30 day extension from the first colonel (0–6) in the chain of command. If approved, the approval will be reported
to the first general officer in the chain of command. (2) If an extension is not granted or the requirement is not met at the end of the extension, the commander will either— (a)
Place the officer before a Flying Evaluation Board in accordance with AR 600–105. Or, (b) Request a waiver from this requirement from HQDA, G–3/5/7 (DAMO–AV), 400 Army
Pentagon, 3A474, Washington, DC, 20310. (c) Remove the officer from the position. d. Additionally, a crewmember who fails a hands-on performance test will be restricted from
performing the flying duty (para 2–6) for which evaluated. The restriction will apply to all aircraft with similar operating and handling characteristics as listed in the appropriate ATM.
Restrictions will be listed in the IATF on DA Form 7122 and will remain in effect until successful completion of a reevaluation. (1) When the failure is in the crewmember’s primary
aircraft, the commander— (a) Must reclassify the individual to the appropriate RL (b) Must authorize additional training if necessary. (c) Reevaluate aviators or impose a temporary
suspension from flying duties. If suspension is imposed, flying evaluation board provisions of AR 600–105 apply. (d) Reevaluate, provide additional training to, or remove nonrated
crewmembers from flight status per AR 600–106. (2) When the failure is in a crewmember’s additional or alternate aircraft, the commander must— (a) Reclassify the individual to
the appropriate RL. (b) Authorize additional training if necessary. (c) Reevaluate or restrict the crewmember from performing flight duties in that aircraft. e. Results from Flying
Evaluation Boards will be provided to Deputy Chief of Staff, G–3/5/7 (DAMO–AV), 400 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310–0400. AR 95-23, 4-10. Failure to meet the
Aircrew Training Program requirements. a. The commander will investigate when ATP requirements are not met. The commander will complete the investigation within 30 days
of notification of the failure. After investigating, the UAS unit commander will— (1) Take one of the following actions: (a) Authorize up to one 30–day extension granted by
commanders 0–5 and above to complete the requirements. (b) Request a waiver of requirements per paragraph 4–2b. (2) Enter restrictions imposed and extensions granted into
the UAC’s IATF. (3) Enter extensions and waivers for the UAC into that operator’s IFRF. (4) Restrict the UAC from performing AC duties in the UAS until ATP requirements have
been successfully completed. b. For primary UAS, if additional time is not granted, or if requirements are not met within the authorized period, the commander will suspend the
UAC from further UAC duties. Commanders must then either request a waiver according to paragraph 4–2b or initiate proceedings for MOS reclassification. c. The UAC who fails
a hands-on performance test will be restricted from performing the duty for which evaluated. The restriction will apply to all UAS with similar operating and handling characteristics
as listed in paragraph 4–16. Restrictions will be listed in the operator ’ s IATF and will remain in effect until successful completion of a reevaluation. (1) When the failure is in the
UAC’s primary UAS, the commander must— (a) Redesignate the individual to the appropriate RL.(b) Authorize additional training if necessary. (c) For AO, payload operator (PO)
or EO, reevaluate or impose a temporary suspension from flying duties. (d) For other qualified UACs, reevaluate or remove the individual from UAC duties. (2) When the failure is
in an UAC’s additional or alternate UAS, the commander must— (a) Redesignate the individual to the appropriate RL. (b) Authorize additional training if necessary.
(c) Reevaluate, retrain, or restrict the UAC from performing duties in that UAS.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will review GSOP to ensure procedures are published to restrict crewmembers from performing duties in the event they have not completed the APART or ATP
requirements without an extension or waiver.

7.00                AC                    BN       DE          OS              SF     UA
Does the unit have written procedures administratively restricting crewmembers from flying duties, who have not completed an FDME/ FDHS, FDME/ FDHS extension, or
considered for a non-medical DQ and FEB? [AR 40-501, para 6–11i(1)]
REFERENCE TEXT
AR 40-501, 6-11. Issuing DA Form 4186. i. The validity period of the current FDME/FDHS (see para 6-8) may be extended for a period of 1 calendar month
beyond the birth month on the DA Form 4186. After expiration of this extension, the aircrew member or ATC must complete the FDME/FDHS and be medically qualified or be—
(1) Administratively restricted from flying duties if non aero medical DQ exists and be considered for a non-medical DQ and FEB (AR 600–105).
EVAL METH:
The evaluator will review procedures for restricting crew members for not meeting medical flying duty requirements.
                                                                                            3
9.00                AC                 BN        DE        OS             SF       UA
Does the unit SOP list duties and responsibilities of CAFRS personnel? [Centralized Aviation Flight Records System (CAFRS) Administrator's Training Guide]
REFERENCE TEXT
CAFRS Administrator's Training Guide
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will review SOP for compliance with CAFRS duties and responsibilities.


B-TACTICAL STANDING OPERATING PROCEDURES                                                         Text54:
QUESTION
2.00                AC                    BN      DE            OS                         UA
Has the commander established policies specifying the flight plans to be used? [FM 3-04.300, para 10-41; AR 95-1 & AR 95-23, para 5-2d; AIM; DOD FLIP, GP ]
REFERENCE TEXT
FM 3-04.300, FLIGHT PLANS. 10-41. AR 95-1, paragraph 5-2d states, "Aircraft will not be flown unless a flight plan (military or civil) has been filed or an operation's log
completed. Local commanders will establish policies specifying the flight plans to be used." FAA Order JO 7110.10, Aeronautical Information Manual, and DOD FLIP
general planning (GP) provide details on flight plan procedures. Specific information transmitted depends on the type of flight plan and agency to receive it. AR 95-1, 5-2.
d. Flight plan. Aircraft will not be flown unless a flight plan (military or civil) has been filed or an operation’s log completed. The pilot in command is responsible for the flight plan
and has flight plan approval authority. When FAA Form 7233–1 (Flight Plan), DD Form 1801 (DOD International Flight Plan), or DD Form 175 are used, they will be filed per
DOD/US Government FLIP. FAA Form 7233–1 can be obtained from the FAA forms Web site at: http://forms.faa.gov. Local commanders will establish policies specifying the flight
plan or operations log to be used. AR-95-23, 5-2. d. Flight plan. Aircraft will not be flown unless a flight plan (military or civil) has been filed or an operation log completed. When
FAA Form 7233–1 (Flight Plan), DD Form 1801 (DOD International Flight Plan), or DD Form 175are used, they will be filed according to DOD FLIP. The FAA Form 7233–1 can be
obtained from the USAASA, 9325 Gunston Road, Suite N319, Fort Belvoir, VA 22060–5582. Local commanders will establish policies specifying the flight plan or operation log to
be used.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will review TSOP for established policies governing flight plans.

3.00                AC                  BN      DE            OS                         UA
Does the unit have a Hurricane and High Wind / Severe Weather Plan that addresses the evacuation, storage, or tie down of aircraft and removal of loose objects from parking
areas in a Tactical environment? [FM 3-04.300, para 11-17; Unit Tactical SOP ]
REFERENCE TEXT
FM 3-04.300, Hurricane and High Wind Plan. 11-17. During a hurricane evacuation, Army commanders of airfields and flight activities will, at their discretion, evacuate assigned
aircraft and impose temporary restrictions on use of flight facilities under their control. A detailed plan should be outlined in the local SOP and implemented when a hurricane or
high wind warning is received. The plan should include but not be limited to— ● Evacuation, storage, or tiedown of aircraft. (Tiedown instructions in the aircraft operator's manual
must be followed.) ● Removal of loose objects from parking areas (for example, chocks, fire extinguisher, boarding ramps, toolboxes, FOD containers, and work platforms).
 ● Protection of window glass and interiors by using prefabricated window covers. (To allow for pressure equalization, the building should not be made airtight.) ● Conducting
checks on backup power sources to ensure efficient operation and availability of required fuel and oil.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will review TSOP for Hurricane and High Wind Plan. Suggested additional control measures may be the use of tree lines for shielding, vehicles for wind shielding, and
evacuation for aircraft safety.

5.00                AC                     BN       DE         OS                         UA
Is a Tactical Pre-Accident plan established in the TSOP? [DA PAM 385-90, para 2-9a(2); FM 3-04.300, app E-12]
REFERENCE TEXT
DA PAM 385-90, 2-9. a. Commanders will ensure that— (2) The development of detailed, written, pre-accident plans specifying duties, responsibilities, and immediate actions for
personnel involved in accident notification procedures, search and rescue, accident investigation, and equipment recovery. The unit operations officer develops and administers
the pre-accident plan with the technical assistance of the unit ASO (additional guidance on pre-accident planning may be found in DA Pam 385–10). b. Pre-accident plans will—
(1) Interface with airfield/installation and higher headquarters plans. Units/facilities on non-Army and non-DOD airfields will ensure plans are coordinated with appropriate local
                                                                                             4
authorities and comply with applicable Army and DOD requirements. (3) Address both garrison and field/deployment operations. FM 3-04.300, E-12. The Pre-Accident Plan will —
● Interface with airfield/installation and higher headquarters plans. Units/facilities on non-Army and non-DOD airfields ensure that plans are coordinated with appropriate local
authorities to ensure compliance with applicable Army and DOD requirements. ● Focus on organized rescue of personnel, protection of property, preservation of the accident
scene, and notification of appropriate personnel. ● Address both garrison and field/deployment operations. ● Address actions for both aviation and ground accidents. ● Include a
crash alarm system, a crash rescue plan, and a means of notifying board members who will investigate the accident, to include the flight surgeon. AR 385-10 discusses the crash
rescue plan in detail (figure E-1). ● Ensure that an air crash, search, and rescue map of the local area is provided to, and maintained by, each activity listed for the primary crash
alarm systems. ● Direct that wreckage is not disturbed or moved except for purposes of rescue and/or firefighting until released by the president of the aircraft accident
investigation board. DA Pam 385-40 contains guidance on the preservation of wreckage. ● Be systematically rehearsed and reviewed for adequacy quarterly (at a minimum).
● Require a daily test of the primary and secondary crash alarm systems. Figure E-1 (page E-4) provides an example of a unit aviation primary and secondary crash alarm plan.
● Ensure plans rehearsal is coordinated per AR 420-1. Frequent nontenant user flight crews will be fully knowledgeable of the host installation preaccident plan.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will review Tactical Pre-Accident Plan. As a minimum the plan will address all the appropriate agencies of a Primary Crash Alarm network (Fire, Medical, Police, and
ATC Agencies). Although this will change with each deployment, the contact listing form will be established to "fill-in" with the appropriate information for each agency, additionally,
the Secondary Crash Alarm will contain information and sequencing of notification identical to garrison operations. Again, this information may be left blank (non deployed units)
but the procedures for implementing the contact listing must be established in the unit's SOP. Provide guidance as needed for understanding.

6.00                                                                                 UA
Are emergency recovery procedures developed as a contingency plan for IMC using approved DOD and/or U.S. Government procedures in the area of operations and procedures
established for coordinating with the servicing ATC facility? [AR 95-23, para 5-6]
REFERENCE TEXT
AR 95-23, 5-6. Emergency recovery procedures. Emergency recovery procedures will be developed as a contingency plan for IMC. Recovery procedures will be developed
using approved DOD and/or U.S. Government procedures in the area of operations and will be coordinated with the servicing ATC. Pending approval, these recovery procedures
will only be used in VMC or during an actual emergency. The risk associated with the recovery procedure will be mitigated through the mission approval process and further
defined in unit SOP. Manual entry of waypoint data is permissible when using emergency GPS procedures. Flight in IMC which violates FAA, host country, or ICAO
regulations will be considered deviations according to paragraph 1–6 of this regulation and will be treated according to paragraph 2–11 of this regulation.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will look at established IMC procedures.

C-FLIGHT PLANNING                                                                 Text54:
QUESTION
1.00                AC                   BN       DE          OS                 SF     UA
Does flight operation maintain a current Flight Information Publications (FLIP) account and are policies and procedures in place to ensure only current FLIPs are in circulation?
[FM 3-04.300, para 9-8]
REFERENCE TEXT
FM 3-04.300, Flight Operations Section. 9-8. Airfield operations sergeant responsibilities include— ● Ensuring that required publications are current and available.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will look at available FLIPs in Flight Operations, aircraft publications bags, and in individual aviator bags to ensure out of date FLIPs are not being used to perform flying
duties.

3.00                AC                 BN       DE           OS               SF      UA
Is the Aircrew Information Reading File / UAC Training and Information Reading File established and maintained IAW appropriate regulatory guidance? [AR 95-1, para 4-4; AR
95-23, para 4-4; TC 3-04.11, app C, para C-11]
REFERENCE TEXT
AR 95-1, 4–4. Aircrew information reading files. Aviation units will establish and maintain aircrew training and information reading files per FM 3–04.300 and TC 1-210 [sic][now
TC 3-04.11] Assigned aircrew personnel will read and remain familiar with these files. AR 95-23, 2–12. Mission approval process b (2)(d) Assigned flight crews are qualified
and current for the mission in accordance with this regulation, aircrew information reading file currency, and crew experience appropriate for the mission. 4–4. Aircrew
information reading files. Units will establish and maintain UAC training and aircrew information reading file according to DA Pam 385–90 and TC 1–600. Assigned and/or
attached UAC personnel will read and remain familiar with these files. Reading files will include but are not limited to the following publications: appropriate operator’s manuals, DA
                                                                                            5
Pam 385–90, AR 40–8, AR 95–2, AR 95–23, TC 1–600, local policy letters, and unit and facility SOPs. TC 3-04.11, AIRCREW INFORMATION READING FILE, C-11. Information
constantly changes in the aviation area. To ensure aircrews have access to the most current information in a timely manner, each unit will establish an AIRF. In this section of the
SOP, the unit addresses how the AIRF is maintained. This section will also establish the frequency at which crewmembers must read the AIRF (figure C-7).
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will review the AIRF to ensure that all crewmembers are current. If evaluator discovers a crewmember, who is not current, the evaluator must verify the crewmember is
not performing flying duties.

4.00                 AC                   BN       DE          OS                 SF       UA
Does the flight planning room contain a detailed local flying area map showing sub areas, e.g., restricted, hazardous, training areas, special VFR corridors and ranges; and are
they updated at a minimum of every 30 days? [FM 3-04.300, ch 10, para 10-15]
REFERENCE TEXT
FM 3-04.300, Wall Displays and Charts. 10-15. Wall displays and charts for planning and other aeronautical information pertinent to the airfield should also be located in the
flight planning area. Printed maps are required for display even though digital systems may depict flight area information. Examples include— ● Crash rescue map. ● Traffic
pattern diagrams. ● VFR/IFR planning chart of the CONUS. ● Sectional aeronautical chart depicting the local flying area, military operating areas, special VFR corridors and
altitudes, and traffic routes to and from other airports that may conflict with local or transient traffic. ● A 1:50,000 map of the installation showing range information, flight and wire
hazards, and NOE and instrument training areas. (This map should be updated, at a minimum, every 30 days. The latest date the map was updated should be posted on or near
the map.) ● NOTAM system as prescribed in AR 95-10. ��Large-scale airfield diagram depicting runways, taxiways, ramps, aprons, field elevation, controlled movement area,
precision approach critical areas, traffic pattern directions and altitudes, airfield obstructions, and other pertinent airfield information. ● Planning charts with a cord-type mileage
indicator that shows statute and nautical miles. ● Weather briefings. ● Radio frequencies for ground control, tower, approach control, ground-controlled approach, and departure
control. ● Nondirectional radio beacon frequencies for use in radio checks. ● Bulletin boards or displays containing pertinent flight information and reference materiel such as:
 ● Local IFR recovery procedures. ● Lost communication procedures.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will check map(s) for the date last updated and initials of person who updated the map(s) to ensure a 30 day minimum is met.

5.00                 AC                  BN       DE         OS               SF     UA
Does the unit have the capability for crewmembers to view their Individual Flight Record Folders (IFRF)? [FM 3-04.300, para 6-5, Centralized Aviation Flight Records System
(CAFRS) Administrator Training Guide, v2.1, para 21.0, 21.1, 21.10]
REFERENCE TEXT
FM 3-04.300, USER ROLES/PERMISSIONS. 6-5. Users perform different functions within CAFRS based on the unit manning document or the role(s)/permissions assigned
when the CAFRS account is created. CAFRS will limit access to data based on user role(s)/permissions. Access privileges to CAFRS data will be constrained by the unit affiliation
of the user. All individuals with an IFRF, IATF, or ATC record require a CAFRS account. Normally a unit will appoint two administrators to manage the unit database and assign
role(s)/permissions to individuals within their unit. CAFRS, 21.0. Permissions within CAFRS. 21.1. Admin Permission. The Admin permission allows you to: • Grant
permissions (you may only grant permissions you have to units or persons you have authorization to).• Create a person in CAFRS. • Edit a person in CAFRS. • Create a unit.
• Edit a unit. • Import legacy AFRS data. 21.10. View IFRF Permission. The View IFRF permission allows you to view an IFRF. You cannot edit an IFRF with only this permission.
As a minimum any aviation person within CAFRS that has a login and password may view their own IFRF. This permission does not have to be granted for the individual to view
their own IFRF. This permission can be granted to an individual to allow for the viewing of a unit or person.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will review the published method for crewmembers to view their IFRF.

6.00               AC               BN            DE          OS                        UA              Text54: Text5
Does the flight planning room have access to local publications? [EA Reg 95-1 Appendix A]
[8th Army (FA) units only]
REFERENCE TEXT
(EA Reg 95-1,Appendix A)
References Section I. Required Publications ACCR 55-3 (Identification and IFF/SIF Procedures) (Classified). ACCR 60-8 (Prevention of Inadvertent Overflight of Non-Friendly
Borders). AR 95-1 (Flight Regulations). AR 95-2 (Airspace, Airfield/Heliports, Flight Activities, Air Traffic Control, and Navigational Aids). AR 215-1 (Military Morale, Welfare, and
Recreation Programs and Nonappropriated Fund Instrumentalities). AR 360-1 (The Army Public Affairs Program). AR 700-138 (Army Logistics Readiness and Sustainability).


                                                                                             6
CFC/USFK Memo 95-1 (ROK-U.S. Combined Forces Command and United States Forces, Korea Staff Administrative Aviation Support). DA Pam 25-30 (Consolidated Index of
Army Publications and Blank Forms). DOD 4515.13-R (Air Transportation Eligibility). FAR Part 105 (Fed ACQ Reg). FM 3-04.301 (Aeromedical Training for Flight Personnel).
TC 1-210 (Aircrew Training Program, Commander’s Guide to Individual, Crew, and Collective Training). TC 21-24 (Rappelling). TM 1-1500-250-23 (Aviation Unit and Aviation
Immediate Maintenance for General Tie-down and Mooring on all Series Army Models, AH-64-, UH-60, CH-47, UH-1, AH-1, OH-58 Helicopters). UNC/CFC/USFK Reg 95-3
(Korean Tactical Zone (RK) P-518 Flight Procedures). UNC/CFC/USFK Reg 9514 (Flight Information and Flight-Following Services (Low-Level)). USFK Pam 25-30 (Index of
Administrative Publications and Blank Forms). Section II. Related Publications USFK Reg 55-355 (Korea Traffic Management). USFK Reg 95-4 (Procedures for Requesting and
Allocating Army Aircraft Support. ACCR 51-1 (Flying Training, Low Level Navigation). ACCR 55-9 (Procedures for Use of Training Areas). AR 15-6 (Procedures for Investigating
Officers and Boards of Officers). AR 40-8 (Temporary Flying Restrictions Due to Exogenous Factors Affecting Aircrew Efficiency). AR 95-27 (Operational Procedures for Aircraft
Carrying Hazardous Materials (AFJI 11-204). Republic of Korea Aeronautical Information Publications. Section III. Reading File Requirements The following list of publications
constitutes the minimum to be contained in the aircrew information reading file. AR 95-1, appendix A, lists additional references that should be on hand, but are not required in the
reading file. AR 40-8 (Temporary Flying Restrictions Due to Exogenous Factors Affecting Aircrew Efficiency). AR 95-1 (Flight Regulations). AR 95-2 (Airspace, Airfield/Heliports,
Flight Activities, Air Traffic Control, and Navigational Aids). Aviation-related DA policy messages. Army In Korea Reg 95-1 (Army In Korea General Aviation Provisions, Flight
procedures and Training Guidance). Eighth Army Aviation policy letters, messages, and STAMs. Flight Information Bulletins. Operations, standardization, and ground handling
annexes to unit SOPs. UNC/CFC/USFK Reg 95-3 (Korean Tactical Zone (RK) P-518 Flight Procedures). UNC/CFC/USFK Reg 95-14 (Flight Information and Flight-Following
Services (600 Feet AGL and below). USFK Reg 95-4 (Procedures for Requesting and Allocating Army Aircraft Support for Administrative and Tactical Operations and Civil/Military
                                                th
Emergencies). Unit airfield traffic patterns. 607 WS Pam 15-5 (Korean Theater Weather Support and Climatology).
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will ensure publications are on hand in hard copy or digital forms.

D-FLIGHT OPERATIONS                                                                Text54:
QUESTION
5.00                AC                    BN       DE            OS                SF      UA
Does flight operations element maintain publications necessary to maintain flight operations, (If electronic publications are used, are reading and printing capability available)?
[FM 3-04.300, para 1-19]
REFERENCE TEXT
FM 3-04.300, Flight Dispatch Element. 1-19. The flight dispatch element consists of two aviation operation sergeants. The flight dispatch element processes flight plans through
the combat airspace system or host nation system; it develops and maintains local checklists, logs, and other required documentation to support functional area responsibilities.
The element also provides flight planning services to include current publications, maps and charts, NOTAM display, and weight and balance forms for Class 2 aircraft. Flight
dispatch also— ● Develops local instructions for— ▪ Inbound and outbound aircraft. ▪ Distinguished visitors. ▪ Aircraft requiring special handling (such as air evacuation and
hazardous cargo). ▪ Airfield restrictions (prior permission required [PPR]). ▪ Crash alarm system. ▪ FLIPs. ▪ In-flight advisories. ▪ Foreign object damage (FOD) checks of the airfield
at least once per shift. ● Establishes and maintains current flight information developed within the theater.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will review unit's reference file for regulations. If unit states it maintains the electronic versions verify operations personnel is able to access electronic publications.

6.00                AC                   BN      DE          OS               SF     UA
Are copies of the DA Form 5484-R retained in unit files for at least 30 days and are mandatory items completed? [AR 95-1, para 2-14a(5), AR 95-23, app B]
REFERENCE TEXT
AR 95-1, 2-14. Mission approval process. a . Definitions. (5) DA Form 5484 (Mission Schedule/Brief). Instructions for completing DA Form 5484 are located at appendix C.
Copies of the DA Form 5484 will be retained in unit files with the corresponding RAW for at least 30 days. AR 95-23, app B The briefer is responsible for ensuring that all key
mission elements noted on the mission schedule/brief have been briefed according to paragraph 2–12 of this regulation and for documenting completion of the briefing on the
mission schedule/brief. Mission briefings may be in the form of an air mission coordinator’s brief, a detailed operations order, or locally developed briefing formats as long as all the
minimum mandatory items are covered. The mission brief may be accomplished by telephonic or other means provided all key elements are addressed and recorded by both
parties to the brief on the front side.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will check for the last 30 days of DA Form 5484-R review for accuracy.

7.00               AC                   BN       DE          OS               SF      UA

                                                                                             7
Are risk assessment forms completed for each flight and filed with the mission briefing Form? [AR 95-1, para 3-16a, b; AR 95-23, para 2-12a(4) ,TC 3-04.11, Chap 6]
REFERENCE TEXT
AR 95-1, 3-16, Composite Risk management. a. Commanders will integrate composite risk management into aviation mission planning and execution at every level. Guidance
on composite risk management is contained in TC 1-210 [sic] [now TC 3-04.11], FM 5–0, FM 5–19, and AR 385–10. b. Commanders or comparable authority for organizations
lacking a military commander will develop local checklists and risk assessment worksheets (RAW) for briefing officers to use in assessing aircrew mission planning and risk in
accordance with paragraph 2–14 above. The RAW will be filed with the mission briefing sheet per FM 3–04.300. AR 95-23 2-12. Mission approval process. a. Definitions. (4)
Risk assessment worksheets. Unit commanders will develop local risk assessment worksheets (RAWs) to assess aircrew mission planning and risk. The RAW will be constructed
using the concepts outlined in FM 5–19. The commander will combine guidance from higher commanders with personal knowledge of the unit and experience to assign levels of
risk to particular parameters. Risk levels are used to elevate items of interest to successive levels of command for visibility and acceptance.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will determine if the unit utilizes a risk assessment matrix, if so, then the inspector will validate that the risk matrix is maintained with the mission briefing Form. Evaluator
will look at unit's method of determining risk level and check to see if risk assessments are used for each flight.

8.00                  AC                     BN      DE            OS                SF      UA
Are flight plans properly filed for all flights? [AR 95-1, para 5-2d, AR 95-23, para 5-2d, and General Planning]
REFERENCE TEXT
AR 95-1, 5-2. Preflight d. Flight plan. Aircraft will not be flown unless a flight plan (military or civil) has been filed or an operation’s log completed. The pilot in command is
responsible for the flight plan and has flight plan approval authority. When FAA Form 7233-1 (Flight Plan), DD Form 1801 (DOD International Flight Plan), or DD Form 175 are
used, they will be filed per DOD FLIP. FAA Form 7233-1 can be obtained from the U.S. Army Aeronautical Service Agency (USAASA), 9325 Gunston Road, Suite N319, Fort
Belvoir, VA 22060-5582. Local commanders will establish policies specifying the flight plan or operations log to be used. d(4) Locally produced operations logs may be used for
local flights. (5) A crew and passenger manifest is required for all flights. For tactical or tactical training flights the passenger manifest will be prepared and retained by the
supported unit. AR 95-23, 5–2. Preflight. d. Flight plan. Aircraft will not be flown unless a flight plan (military or civil) has been filed or an operation log completed. When FAA
Form 7233–1 (Flight Plan), DD Form 1801 (DOD International Flight Plan), or DD Form 175 are used, they will be filed according to DOD FLIP. The FAA Form 7233–1 can be
obtained from the USAASA, 9325 Gunston Road, Suite N319, Fort Belvoir, VA 22060–5582. Local commanders will establish policies specifying the flight plan or operation log to
be used.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will ensure that flight plans are filed for all flights and that flight plans are on file for at least 90 days. In the case where a unit uses only an operation log, the evaluator
will ensure a file exists for at least the past 30 days.

10.00                                                                                     UA
Has the unit commander designated an aircraft commander and mission coordinator in writing for each UAS flight? [AR 95-23, para 4-18a.-g, 4-21a.-f.]
REFERENCE TEXT
AR 95-23, 4–18. Aircraft commander. The AC acts as the commander of the aircraft. Commanders in the grade of O–5 and above will select the AC based on their experience,
maturity, judgment, and ability to effectively mitigate risk to the UAS and designate them by name and in writing. Commanders will establish an AC training and certification
program to ensure standardization and understanding for personnel defined in paragraphs 4–17 and 4–18 of this regulation. The AC will be— a. Responsible and have final
authority for operating, servicing, and securing the UAS they command. b. Selected for each flight or series of flights. c. Qualified, current, and RL 1 in the MTD UAS to be flown.
d. Listed in the flight plan or unit operation log. e. At a crew station with access to the flight controls. f. The UT, IO, or SO—when evaluating or instructing with access to the flight
controls—will be the commander of the aircraft. (Access to the controls for the AO can also be achieved from sitting in the back of the shelter; however, for the EO station, the IO
must physically be at the EO primary control box.) g. Approved according to the mission approval process before each mission. (The UT, IO, or SO—when performing duties from
other than the A or P seat—will participate in the mission approval process.) 4–21. Mission coordinator. Commanders in the grade of O–5 and above will select the MC based on
recent aviation experience, maturity, judgment, their abilities for mission situational awareness, the understanding of the commander’s intent and not necessarily upon rank or
grade. Commanders will establish the MC training and certification program to ensure standardization and understanding for airspace, weather, risk mitigation, mission approval
process, and the system being employed. The designation of MC is an assignment of responsibility and is not a crew duty assignment. The MC will— a. Hold a U.S. Army
occupational specialty of 150U, a U.S. military aeronautical designation, or personnel authorized to operate Army UAS according to paragraph 2–1 of this regulation. b. Be
selected for each flight or series of flights. c. Participate in the mission approval process along with each AC of each aircraft and may receive the final mission approval for all
crews. d. Be listed in the unit operation log. e. Be responsible for crew briefings including mission changes and updates. f. Be briefed by a commander-designated briefing officer
and/or NCO before each mission and perform a back brief. g. Pass a semiannual written exam according to TC 1–600, paragraph 3–15, on the UAS in which the MC duties
will be performed. h. Participate in the unit no-notice program.

                                                                                              8
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will verify an aircraft commander and a mission coordinator are designated in writing for all UAS flights.

12.00               AC                  BN      DE           OS               SF      UA
Does the unit conduct regular backups of the CAFRS database to an external source such as an external drive or CD? [CAFRS 48.0]
REFERENCE TEXT
CAFRS, 48.0 Backup and Restore. The Backup/Restore option allows you to perform a CAFRS database backup or restore your CAFRS database in case of database
corruption. You can restore your database back to a point in time where the data is valid. The Backup button allows you to copy files to a second source (a disk or tape) as a
precaution in case the first medium fails. One of the major rules in using computers is to backup your files regularly. It is recommended to perform a backup whenever data has
been changed. Also, clean up the old backup files when they become obsolete.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will review established procedures.

13.00                AC                  BN       DE         OS             SF     UA
Has the Commander designated the primary and alternate CAFRS administrators on appointment orders? [FM 3-04.300, para 6-5]
REFERENCE TEXT
FM 3-04.300, USER ROLES/PERMISSIONS. 6-5. Users perform different functions within CAFRS based on the unit manning document or the role(s)/permissions assigned
when the CAFRS account is created. CAFRS will limit access to data based on user role(s)/permissions. Access privileges to CAFRS data will be constrained by the unit affiliation
of the user. All individuals with an IFRF, IATF, or ATC record require a CAFRS account. Normally a unit will appoint two administrators to manage the unit database and assign
role(s)/permissions to individuals within their unit.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will verify permissions in CAFRS.

14.00               AC                     BN     DE           OS                 SF       UA
Are all assigned operations personnel and personnel, who are required to have an account (IFRF, IATF, or ATC), able to log into CAFRS? [CAFRS, 19.0 thru 20.1.2]
REFERENCE TEXT
19.0 Understanding User Accounts and Permissions. To establish a CAFRS User account you must first understand what constitutes a CAFRS User and the definition of
Aviation Personnel. 19.1 CAFRS User. The CAFRS User is a person in the system that does not have an associated flight record. 19.2 Managing CAFRS Users. When a person
is created in CAFRS, whether a crewmember or a CAFRS User, the Administrator who creates the new person will have direct ownership of that person. This means in order to
create a person, you must first have Administrator permission. When a CAFRS User is created, the Administrator which creates that user will have at that time direct permission to
that specific user. That means at a later time the permission for the administrator to that user may be modified. Since the CAFRS User is not associated with a specific unit or
organization, the method to manage the CAFRS User is directly associated to permission to the User person. The CAFRS User is not identified as having a Primary Record. The
Primary Record only applies to crewmembers. This means that CAFRS Users will only be visible should you have permission over that specific CAFRS User. The Administrator
permission or other permissions you control will permit you to view the CAFRS User in the Navigation tree. HINT: If the CAFRS User is not displayed in the NAV tree, ensure that
you have imported the User data into the local database and make sure that your permissions in the local data base have been update to reflect the current permissions over the
Users. 19.3 Aviation Personnel. Aviation Personnel are flight personnel that have a User ID and Password that allows them to login to the CAFRS system. 19.4 Roles and
Permissions. Permission is an authorization to perform a certain task within CAFRS. Permissions may be applied individually or collectively through the use of a role template.
The selection of a single permission will provide a visual indication for all like permissions contained within the roles on the permission tree. A Role is defined by a typical duty
perform within an aviation unit. These are very generic roles which may be individually tailored for each person within CAFRS. Selection of the role applies all associated
permission grouped for the role. The role may be expanded to view the permissions grouped for the selected role. The CAFRS Unit Administrator may activate permissions
associated with the role template for individual tailoring. This individual tailoring is performed by deselecting permissions associated with the role or selecting additional
independent permissions to accompany the role permissions. 20.0 Roles and Associated Permissions. Below are different roles with their associated permissions and a brief
description of their responsibilities. 20.1 CAFRS Unit Admin Role. The CAFRS Unit Admin role is applied to the person responsible for managing CAFRS. There should be a
primary and an alternate designate for each unit. NOTE: If the Admin permission is granted to a CAFRS User but the CAFRS User does not have Admin permission
granted to their person, the permission tab on the Person Editor window for that designated CAFRS User will not display the Add or Remove Permission buttons. This
is due to the Admin permission providing other functions on the Person Editor window that do not apply due to their individual status as a CAFRS User. Should a
CAFRS User have the Admin Permission granted to their person, the Add or Remove Permission buttons on the Person Editor Permissions tab will be selectable. The method for
the CAFRS User that does not have the Admin Permission granted to their person to manage their permissions is through the Manage Permissions located on the Personnel
button on the Utility toolbar or the Tools pull down manage Permissions option. HINT: The center window, Step 3. Select Person/Unit on the Manage Permissions window or Step
                                                                                           9
2. Select Person/Unit on the Permissions tab of the Person Editor will be empty if you have not been granted the Admin permission. The Select Person/Unit window only displays
the items that you or the person you have selected has the Admin permission granted to. 20.1.1 Admin Permission. The Admin permission allows you to: • Grant permissions
(you may only grant permissions you have to units or persons you have authorization to). • Create a person in CAFRS. • Edit a person in CAFRS. • Create a unit. • Edit a unit.
• Import legacy AFRS data. • View the person which you have direct Admin permission to the person (the person may not be assigned to your unit). • View personnel to the unit
which you have Admin permission. • Access to all data contained on the Person Editor (Biographical Information, Aviation Personnel Data, Aircraft Qualifications, ATP,
Permissions and User Account). 20.1.2 View IFRF Permission. The View IFRF permission allows you to view an IFRF. You cannot edit an IFRF with only this permission. As a
minimum any aviation person within CAFRS that has a login and password may view their own IFRF. This permission does not have to be granted for the individual to view their
own IFRF. This permission can be granted to an individual to allow for the viewing of a unit or person.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will conduct random spot checks of personnel authorized to log into CAFRS.




E-PREACCIDENT PLAN                                                              Text54:
QUESTION
1.00                AC                     BN       DE         OS               SF        UA
Has a pre-accident plan been developed, is it maintained, and does it interface with the host pre-accident plan if tenant unit? [DA Pam 385-90, para 2- 9b; FM 3-04.300, app E,
para E-12; AE Reg 385-40, Para 10a(2)&10b]
REFERENCE TEXT
DA Pam 385-90, 2-9. a. Commanders will ensure that – (2) The development of detailed, written, pre-accident plans specifying duties, responsibilities, and immediate actions for
personnel involved in accident notification procedures, search and rescue, accident investigation, and equipment recovery. The unit operations officer develops and administers
the pre-accident plan with the technical assistance of the unit ASO (additional guidance on pre-accident planning may be found in DA Pam 385–10). b. Pre-accident plans will—
(1) Interface with airfield/installation and higher headquarters plans. Units/facilities on non-Army and non-DOD airfields will ensure plans are coordinated with appropriate local
authorities and comply with applicable Army and DOD requirements. (3) Address both garrison and field/deployment operations. (4) Address actions for both aviation and ground
accidents. FM 3-04.300, E-12. The Pre-Accident Plan will— ● Interface with airfield/installation and higher headquarters plans. Units/facilities on non-Army and non-DOD airfields
ensure that plans are coordinated with appropriate local authorities to ensure compliance with applicable Army and DOD requirements. ● Focus on organized rescue of personnel,
protection of property, preservation of the accident scene, and notification of appropriate personnel. ● Address both garrison and field/deployment operations. ● Address actions
for both aviation and ground accidents. ● Include a crash alarm system, a crash rescue plan, and a means of notifying board members who will investigate the accident, to include
the flight surgeon. AR 385-10 discusses the crash rescue plan in detail (figure E-1). ● Ensure that an air crash, search, and rescue map of the local area is provided to, and
maintained by, each activity listed for the primary crash alarm systems. ●. Direct that wreckage is not disturbed or moved except for purposes of rescue and/or firefighting until
released by the president of the aircraft accident investigation board. DA Pam 385-40 contains guidance on the preservation of wreckage. ● Be systematically rehearsed and
reviewed for adequacy quarterly (at a minimum). ● Require a daily test of the primary and secondary crash alarm systems. Figure E-1 (page E-4) provides an example of a unit
aviation primary and secondary crash alarm plan. ● Ensure plans rehearsal is coordinated per AR 420-1. Frequent non-tenant user flight crews will be fully knowledgeable of the
host installation pre accident plan.

[Europe Only] AE Reg 385-40, para 10a(2)&10b: Pre-accident plans will include control measures to protect personnel from accident-site hazards. Accident site hazards include
but are not limited to the following:
(a) Advanced composite materials (for example, fiberglass, graphite, Kevlar)
(b) Biological hazards (blood-borne pathogens)
(c) Fire.
(d) Hazardous cargo
(e) Mechanical hazards (for example, sharp edges on equipment)
(f) Natural hazards at the site of the accident (i.e. snakes, spiders, and animals)
(g) Pressurized containers
(h) Radiation
(i) Toxic substances

                                                                                       10
10. PREACCIDENT PLAN
Commanders will develop effective preaccident plans to be used in case of aviation and ground accidents in both garrison and field environments.
a. Preaccident plans will—
(1) Prevent further injury or loss of life, help avoid unnecessary damage to property, and establish coordination
requirements at the accident site and immediate notification procedures (AR 385-40 and DA Pam 385-1).
(2) Include control measures to protect personnel from accident-site hazards. Accident-site hazards include but are
not limited to the following:
(a) Advanced composite materials (for example, fiberglass, graphite, Kevlar).
(b) Biological hazards (bloodborne pathogens).
(c) Fire.
(d) Hazardous cargo.
(e) Mechanical hazards (for example, sharp edges on equipment).
(f) Natural hazards at the site of the accident (for example, snakes, spiders, other animals).
(g) Pressurized containers.
(h) Radiation.
(i) Toxic substances.
b. The unit’s preaccident plan must also outline the issue, use, and disposal of personal protective equipment for all
exposed personnel at the accident site.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will review the Pre-Accident Plan utilizing FM 3.04-300 and DA Pam 385-90 as guides. Before determining whether the unit has an acceptable plan the inspector will get
with the ARMS team safety representative to ensure both inspectors give the same assessment of the plan.

2.00                AC                  BN      DE           OS              SF      UA
Is the Pre-accident plan exercised quarterly/ annually and documented? [FM 3-04.300, app E, E-12; DA Pam 385-90, para 1-4l(8)]
REFERENCE TEXT
FM 3-04.300, E-12. The preaccident plan is coordinated with all commanders and appropriate personnel. Emergency personnel must be familiar with the crash alarm system and
the pertinent provisions of AR 385-10 and DA Pam 385-90. All responsible personnel must be ready to respond to an emergency at any time. Preaccident plans will— ● Be
systematically rehearsed and reviewed for adequacy quarterly (at a minimum). ● Require a daily test of the primary and secondary crash alarm systems. Figure E-1 (page E-4)
provides an example of a unit aviation primary and secondary crash alarm plan. DA PAM 385-90, 1-4l. Operations officers. Operations officers should do the following: (8)
Rehearse, review, and document the adequacy of the unit pre-accident plan. This must be a systematic review and is conducted at least quarterly. The degree of response by
elements in the pre-accident plan can vary; however, an exercise requiring all elements to physically respond must be conducted at least annually.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will review unit's documentation to determine if quarterly and annually execution of the Pre-Accident Plan has been accomplished.

5.00                 AC                   BN      DE           OS              SF       UA
Are operations personnel familiar with the pre-accident plan and know what to do when an accident occurs? [DA Pam 385-90, app C, para C-1b(1); FM 3-04.300, app E, E-11]
REFERENCE TEXT
DA Pam 385-90, C-1. Pre-accident plan. b. Primary crash alarm system . (Use of a cover sheet should be considered to reflect the immediate actions required of an individual
who is notified of an accident.) If informed of a crash, the following procedures will be followed: (1) Flight operations. Flight operations personnel should : (a) Activate the primary
crash alarm system and notify all parties in the primary system. (b) Activate the Secondary alarm system by informing all parties in the system and specifying an assembly point.
(c) Control, direct, coordinate and dispatch personnel, aircraft, equipment, and convoys to locate or to service crash scene. (d) Establish and control an adequate crash PASS
SYSTEM. (e) Monitor requests from the crash area for special or additional assistance or equipment. (f) Serve as the control center for general direction of post-accident activities.
FM 3-04.300, E-11. Commanders will ensure— ● All operations personnel must be familiar with the pre-accident plan and know what to do if an accident occurs.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will quiz operations personnel to determine if they understand the Pre-Accident Plan and their duties and responsibilities.

6.00              AC                  BN      DE           OS              SF     UA
Does the unit Pre-Accident Plan include both aviation and ground accident procedures? [FM 3-04.300, app E, para E-12]

                                                                                          11
REFERENCE TEXT
FM 3-04.300, E-12. Pre Accident plan will— ● Address actions for both aviation and ground accidents.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will review Pre Accident Plan for aviation and ground accident procedures.

7.00                AC                    BN      DE          OS              SF       UA
Does the Pre-accident plan include procedures for the quarantining and management of records maintained in CAFRS? [CAFRS, para 20.2.8; DA Pam 385-40, para 2-2d(2) ]
REFERENCE TEXT
CAFRS, 20.2.8. Apply Quarantine Permission. This permission allows you to Quarantine an IFRF using the Quarantine or Unquarantine record dialog. The quarantine is a
process by which an authorized CAFRS user with appropriate permission granted may apply a state to a record which will restrict the viewing of the data while removing the ability
to edit the data. CAFRS will capture and place the current DA Form 759 period data in a frozen state at the time the quarantine is applied. Any previous DA Form 759 closeouts
that are pending certification or overdue are placed in this state and cannot be edited. CAFRS permits the addition of additional DA Form 2408-12 data to an IFRF in a quarantined
state. The addition of flight hours will not be computed and displayed as part of the totals captured at the time the quarantine was imposed. The additional DA form 2408-12 data
will be displayed in the DA Form 2408-12 Army Aviators Flight Records folder but will not be displayed in the DA Form 759-1 folder. The state may be removed by an authorized
CAFRS user with permission to remove the quarantine. Flight hour calculations will resume once the quarantine state has been removed. DA Pam 385-40, 2–2. Preliminary
accident site procedures d. Preservation of evidence. (2) Records pertaining to the accident equipment and its crew/personnel must be gathered and secured. These records
include— (a) The logbook. (b) Historical records. (c) The appropriate inspection and maintenance records. (d) Individual/crew member records, to include personnel, medical,
dental, and training records. (e) Documents pertaining to the mission/activity/event must also be gathered. (f) A weather observation for the time of the accident from the closest
weather reporting facility.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will review Pre Accident plan for post accident records management procedures.

F-INDIVIDUAL FLIGHT RECORDS RATED AVIATOR                                                 Text54:
NOT APPLICABLE

G-INDIVIDUAL FLIGHT RECORDS NON-RATED / FS                                                Text54:
QUESTION
1.00               AC                   BN     DE            OS              SF      UA
Are paper copies of DA Forms 759, 759-1, and 759-3 (Consolidated Flight Pay Computation Worksheets) for Nonrated Crewmembers, Flight Surgeons, and Fly-for-Pay Aviators
correctly arranged and permanently filed on the right side of the DA Form 3513, IFRF? [FM 3-04.300, para 6-18, fig 6-3]
REFERENCE TEXT
FM 3-04.300, Right Side of DA Form 3513. 6-18. Arrange DA Form 759, DA Form 759-1, and DA Form 759-3 for rated and nonrated crewmembers on the right side of the IFRF.
Place the most current closeout on top. Label all forms included with a closeout with the series number only. Figure 6-3 shows examples of the arrangement of closeout forms.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will inspect IFRFs for proper placement of DA Forms 759, 759-1, and 759-3 IAW FM 3-04.300.

2.00                AC                   BN     DE            OS           SF      UA
Are DA Form 759 closeouts numbered consecutively? [FM 3-04.300, para 6-20]
REFERENCE TEXT
FM 3-04.300, 6-20. Number each DA Form 759 consecutively; if an individual’s records have been closed three times
and this is the fourth closeout, the sheet number will be four.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will scan the close outs and determine if they are numbered consecutively.

6.00                 AC                 BN      DE            OS             SF       UA
Are certificates of course completion, or when a certificate of course completion is not available, are DA Forms 1059 (Service School Academic Evaluation Reports) placed in the
"Orders Section" of the IFRF until a replacement certificate can be obtained for the following crewmembers: Nonrated instructor (FI), standardization instructor (SI), (SO)
                                                                                        12
standardization operator, (IO) instructor operator, and aviation badge orders (basic, senior, master)? [FM 3-04.300, para 6-16]
REFERENCE TEXT
FM 3-04.300, Orders. 6-16. ● Course completion certificates for IP, IE, MP, AQC, nonrated crewmember instructor (FI), and nonrated crewmember SI in this section. When a
course completion certificate is not available, use DA Form 1059 (Service School Academic Evaluation Report). ● Current DA Form 7120-R, top page only. Ensure commander
and crewmember signatures are present. ● Basic/senior/master aviator badge orders for rated aviators. ▪ AR 600-105 contains the procedures for determining eligibility for
aeronautical ratings (senior or master Army aviator). ▪ Compute aviator’s total operational flying duty credit (TOFDC) from his flight records using the definition of TOFDC in AR
570-4. ▪ Request a copy of the officer records brief (ORB) from the unit S-1 section. ● Basic/senior/master aviation (or flight surgeon) badge orders for crewmembers/
noncrewmembers. ▪ AR 600-105 contains the procedures for determining eligibility criteria for aeronautical ratings (senior or master aviation/flight surgeon badge). ▪ AR 600-8-22
contains eligibility criteria for these badges.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will review Orders Section of IFRF.

7.00                                                                                UA
Does the IO have a copy of the IO course completion certificate and has the commander designated individual to perform SO duties in writing? [AR 95-23, para 4-22, 4-23]
REFERENCE TEXT
AR 95-23, 4-22. Instructor operator. a. The IO will train and evaluate UACs in accordance with the appropriate ATM. b. The IOs must be designated, in writing, by the unit
commander and be qualified and current in the UAS to be operated. c. To become qualified as an IO, the UAC must successfully complete one of the following: (1) A DA-
approved IO course in the aircraft category in which IO duties are to be performed. (2) An IO equivalency evaluation administered by a standardization operator (SO) selected by
USAACE&FR DES in the aircraft category in which IO duties are to be performed. Commanders will coordinate with DES (ATZQ–ES) Fort Rucker prior to submitting request for
equivalency evaluation to DAMO–AV. (3) In the absence of a Department of the Army IO qualification course for the UAS, additional IO qualification procedures will be developed
by DES, USAACE&FR for UA IOs who are already qualified per paragraph 4–22c(1) or (2) of this regulation. 4-23. b. The IOs will be designated, in writing, as SOs by the unit
commander and be qualified and current in the UAS to be flown and/or operated. Commanders may authorize SOs to instruct and evaluate from any designated crew station.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will review Orders Section of IFRF and ensure that a copy of IO course completion certificate is present and IO is designated to perform SO duties in writing.

8.00               AC                BN      DE         OS             SF     UA
Is the current copy of DA Forms 7120-R (Top Page Only) with the commanders and crewmembers signatures, and date being maintained in the orders section of the IFRF? [FM 3-
04.300, para 6-16]

REFERENCE TEXT
FM 3-04.300, Orders. 6-16. The following are maintained in the orders section of DA Form 3513 (examples are provided in figure 6-1 (page 6-3) and figure 6-2 (page 6-5):
● Current DA Form 7120-R, top page only. Ensure commander and crewmember signatures are present.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will review orders section of IFRF and ensure that current copy of DA Form 7120-R (Top Page Only) is filled out completely.

9.00                AC                  BN        DE          OS                 SF      UA
Are flight records closed out IAW FM 3-04.300, chapter 8, with all appropriate blocks properly filled out and all standard and mandatory remarks annotated in the remarks section
of DA Form 759? [FM 3-04.300, para 8-1 , table 8-1 thru 8-5]
REFERENCE TEXT
FM 3-04.300, TEMPORARY WORKSHEET. 8-1. DA Form 759-3 is used as both a temporary worksheet and a consolidation worksheet for flights performed by a CRM/NCRM,
UAS personnel, and fly for pay aviators. It incorporates requirements from AR 37-104-4 to manage monthly flight hours.. 8-20. Table 8-5 lists the mandatory and standard remarks
used to complete Part IV of DA Form 759 .Table7-6 (page 7-15) shows the service component designations for Part I, block 9. AIRCRAFT CLOSEOUT SUMMARY. 8-15. Use DA
Form 759-1 as a record of flight time, by flying duty and flight condition, for each aircraft (and/or flight simulator for flight surgeons) in which an individual performs duties during the
closeout period. Table 8-3 provides detailed instructions. Figure 8-5 (page 8-11), figure 8-6 (page 8-12), and figure 8-7 (page 8-13) provide examples. CLOSEOUT. 8-18. Prepare
a DA Form 759 when closing flight records of all individuals on flying status. Detailed instructions for completing DA Form 759 are in table 8-4. At closeout, arrange flight record
forms in the DA Form 3513, as shown in figure 6-2 (page 6-6). Examples of completed DA Forms 759 are shown in figure 8-8 (page 8-19) and figure 8-9 (page 8-20). Figure 8-10
(page 8-21), and figure 8-11 (page 8-22) show examples of a completed closeout. 8-19. DA Form 759 contains four parts; complete all parts. Type all entries. The DA Form 759
must be signed by the individual’s unit commander to be valid. 8-20. Table 8-5 lists the mandatory and standard remarks used to complete Part IV of DA Form 759. Table 7-6
(page 7-15) shows the service component designations for Part I, block 9.
                                                                                             13
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will determine if the records custodian has completed flight record closeout and ensure all standard and mandatory remarks are properly annotated.

13.00               AC                     BN       DE         OS            SF      UA
Is a current copy of DA Form 4186 (Medical Recommendation for Flying Duty) completed IAW AR 40-501 and ATB: DA FORM 4186 USAGE? [AR 40-501, para 6-11d ; ATB]
REFERENCE TEXT
AR 40-501, 6-11. d. Each item of the DA Form 4186 will be completed as directed by the Commander, USAAMC. (See ATB 10, DA Form 4186.) Three copies of the DA Form
4186 will be completed. Copy 1 is placed in the outpatient medical record. Copy 2 is forwarded to the examinee’s unit commander who signs and forwards it to the flight
operations officer for inclusion in the flight records (AR 95–1 and FM 3–04.300). Copy 3 is given to the examinee. ATB: DA FORM 4186 USAGE, 3. Who prepares a DA Form
4186? Any medical or dental officer, who must inform a commander of the status of an aircrew member, may prepare and sign a DA Form 4186 recommending temporary medical
suspension (DNIF). A recommendation returning the aircrew member to flying duties (FFD) must be signed by a flight surgeon; aeromedical physician assistant (APA);
aeromedical nurse practitioner (AMNP); aviation medical examiner (AME). Note: with update to AR 40-501 (specifically 6-11e, 6-11h, and 6-11j(2)), APAs and AMNPs may issue
the 4186 without flight surgeon co-signature.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will determine if the records custodian has screened and filed appropriate documents accurately.

14.00                 AC                   BN       DE           OS               SF     UA
Are copies of medical suspensions, terminations, extensions and reporting to new duty station DA Forms 4186 being maintained in the IFRF for the appropriate close out period?
[FM 3-04.300, para 6-14, 6-15 and table 6-1; AR 40-501, para 6-11b]
REFERENCE TEXT
FM 3-04.300, Medical Documents. 6-14. Place DA Form 4186 in the IFRF. Enter effective date and expiration date of DA Form 4186 into CAFRS adding all required remarks.
Commanders, individuals, and flight surgeons must complete their areas before it is filed in the IFRF, per AR 40-501. File the commander’s copy of DA Form 4186 in the IFRF
along with any copies of medical suspensions and subsequent up-slips throughout the year. The annual DA Form 4186 for fitness of flying duty after the completion of the
member’s medical examination should be maintained in the IFRF throughout the entire year. (See table 6-1 for retention of DA Form 4186.) AR 40-501, 6-11. Issuing DA Form
4186 b. The DA Form 4186 will be completed— (1) After the completion of an FDME/FDHS. (2) After an aircraft mishap. (3) After an FEB. (4) When reporting to a new duty
station or upon being assigned to operational flying duty. (5) When admitted to and discharged from any medical or dental treatment facility (inpatient or outpatient, military
or civilian), sick in quarters, interviewed for or entered into a drug/alcohol treatment program, or when treated by a health care professional who is not a military S/APA/AMNP/AME
or otherwise authorized to issue a DA Form 4186.(6) When treated as an outpatient for conditions or with drugs that are disqualifying for aviation duties; and upon return to flight
duties after such treatment and recovery. (7) Upon return to flight status after termination of temporary medical suspension, issuance of waiver for aviation service, or equalification
after medical or nonmedical termination of aviation service. (8) Other occasions as required by the FS/APA/AMNP/AME.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will determine if the records custodian has filed appropriate documents accurately.

15.00            AC                    BN      DE           OS             SF     UA
Are unit assignment/instruction orders maintained in the IFRF under "Supplemental Documents"? [FM 3-04.300, para 6-13]



REFERENCE TEXT
FM 3-04.300, DA FORM 3513, Supplemental Documents. 6-13. Post miscellaneous documents in the supplemental documents section. Items such as 120-day notices, ATP
extensions/waivers, National Guard Bureau (NGB)/USAR assignment instructions, and other aviation-related documents designated as required by the commander but that do not
fall under any other classification.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will review supplemental Section of IFRF for unit assignment orders for NGB & USAR soldiers.

18.00               AC                   BN         DE        OS            SF     UA
Are flight records closed out and digitally certified in CAFRS by the ATP Commander or delegated authority within 10 days (Active Duty) or 30 Calendar days (Reserve
Component) from the end of the end of the birth month and provide a copy to the Individual? [FM 3-04.300, para 6-19, 6-22, 7-19, table 8-4; CAFRS Administrator's Training

                                                                                          14
Guide]
REFERENCE TEXT
FM 3-04.300, CLOSING FLIGHT RECORDS. 6-19. Prepare DA Form 759 and DA Form 759-1 when the flight records are closed. These forms are required for individuals on
flight status. Prepare a consolidated DA Form 759-3 when the records of crewmembers/noncrewmembers, UAS operators, and aviators in a fly-for-pay status are closed.
Complete a birth month closeout within 10 working days (active duty) or 30 calendar days (reserve component) from the end of the birth month and provide a copy to the
individual. Close records at the following times: ● End of the birth month (also applies to individuals who are in a nonoperational position). ● Upon a change of assignment or
attachment governing flying duty. (A closeout is not required when the flight records custodian does not change.) ��Upon termination of flying status. ● Upon a change of
designation (noncrewmember to crewmember or vice versa), change of duty status (operational to nonoperational), or change of aviation service (active or reserve). ● When the
aviator attends a skill qualification identifier type school (such as MP, IP Course). ● When directed by an aircraft accident investigation board. ● Upon death ● Upon disqualification
from flying status. 6-22. Upon completion of DA Form 759, the flight records custodian will submit the closeout to the commander for certification. The commander’s signature
certifies the accuracy of the DA Form 759. The certifying commander is the officer who authorized flight duties on DA Form 7120-R. For units fielded CAFRS the commander must
digitally sign the closeout in CAFRS. If the commander is unable to digitally sign the closeout a remark must be added to part IV of the 759. 7-19. DA Form 759 contains four parts;
all parts must be completed and all entries must be typed. The individual’s commander must sign and date the form to certify the accuracy of the closeout data. If the individual’s
commander is not the certifying officer who authorized flight duties on DA Form 7120-R, the certifying officer authorizing flight duties will sign and date the closeout to certify the
accuracy of the closeout data. The DA Form 759 must be digitally signed in CAFRS. If the commander is unable to digitally certify within CAFRS a remark must be added to part IV
of the 759.


EVAL METH:
Evaluator will review records in CAFRS database and copies of DA Form 759 posted in the IFRF.

19.00                AC                     BN      DE           OS                SF    UA
Are all DA Forms 4186 entered into CAFRS and mirror the copy received from the medical facility? [CAFRS Administrator's Training Guide, 37.0; FM 3-04.300, para 6-14]
REFERENCE TEXT
CAFRS Administrator's Training Guide, 37.0 Understanding DA Form 4186 within CAFRS. The DA Form 4186 is an official document used to notify aviation personnel of the
certification of medical fitness for all classes of military and civilian aircrew members. Authorized personnel may view this data to determine the medical fitness for flight duties.
Certain events in a crewmembers health status will result in the issue of a new DA Form 4186. These events may cause the crewmember to be temporarily or permanently
suspended from performing aerial flight duties. At the initiation of this course of action, the crewmember will receive a DA Form 4186 which will impose a medical suspension.
Once the medical condition has been addressed and the crewmember is reevaluated, a new DA Form 4186 is issued if flight duties are to resume. This new DA Form 4186 will
remove the medical suspension. During the current 759 period of time, the aircrew member may receive several DA Form 4186s.The DA Form 4186(s) then becomes a part of the
individual flight record for the 759 period. Under certain circumstances, an aircrew member performing only flight simulation duties may be medically suspended for an indefinite
period of time. The crewmember may continue to perform duties but only in a simulation device FM 3-04.300, 6-14. Place DA Form 4186 in the IFRF. Enter effective date and
expiration date of DA Form 4186 into CAFRS adding all required remarks. Commanders, individuals, and flight surgeons must complete their areas before it is filed in the IFRF,
per AR 40-501. File the commander’s copy of DA Form 4186 in the IFRF along with any copies of medical suspensions and subsequent up-slips throughout the year. The annual
DA Form 4186 for fitness of flying duty after the completion of the member’s medical examination should be maintained in the IFRF throughout the entire year. (See table 6-1 for
retention of DA Form 4186.)
EVAL METH:
Evaluator review DA Forms 4186 in CAFRS database.

20.00               AC                 BN       DE          OS           SF     UA
Is the ATP data up to date in the Person Editor for each crewmember? [CAFRS Administrator's Training Guide, 20.5.2, 20.5.7]
REFERENCE TEXT
CAFRS, 20.5.2 Edit IFRF Permission. The Edit IFRF Permission allows you to edit the data contained on the Aviation Personnel Data tab, Aircraft Qualifications tab and the
ATP tab of the Person Editor. 20.5.7 Edit ATP Permission. The Edit ATP permission allows you to edit part 3 info (the part where your data resides) on the Current 759 Part 3
ATP tab.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will review in CAFRS database.


                                                                                          15
H-AIRFIELD/BASE OPERATIONS ADMINISTRATION                                                 Text54:
NOT APPLICABLE

I-MOS PROFICIENCY AND TRAINING                                                 Text54:
NOT APPLICABLE


                                                                   STANDARDIZATION
A-PROGRAM MANAGEMENT
QUESTION
1.00            AC      BN     DE       OS      SF      UA
Did the unit develop and execute a corrective action plan to fix problem areas identified during the previous ARMS? [AR 1-201, para 2-2e]
REFERENCE TEXT
[AR 1-201, para 2-2e]
e. Followed up. Inspections expend valuable resources and are not complete unless the inspecting unit or agency develops and executes a follow-up inspection or plan to ensure
the implementation of corrective actions. Likewise, the inspected unit must develop and execute a corrective action plan that fixes those problem areas identified during an
inspection and prevents recurrences of those same problems. Follow-up actions can include re-inspections, telephone calls (or visits) to units or proponents to check on the
progress of corrective actions, or a request for a formal response from a unit or proponent that attests to the completion of the corrective action. To reduce the administrative
burden on inspected units, a formal response to inspection reports is optional unless specifically requested.
EVAL METH:
Review the unit’s records and compare results from the current and previous ARMS. To receive a SAT, the unit must have developed and executed a corrective action plan to fix
deficient areas identified.

3.00            AC    BN       DE   OS       SF     UA
Does the unit's SOP address Instrument Flight and Inadvertent Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IIMC)? [DA Pam 385-90, para 2-12b]
REFERENCE TEXT
[DA Pam 385-90, para 2-12b]
Commanders will ensure that an SOP is developed for all unit functional areas and for all aviation operations executed in the command. The SOP may, where applicable, be
consolidated at the battalion/squadron or regiment/brigade/group level. The systematic risk management process should be integrated in all unit operational procedures.
Command approved risk-control options should be integrated into the SOP as task performance standards. At a minimum, the following subjects will be addressed in the SOP if
they are applicable to the unit mission:
b. Instrument flight and inadvertent instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) procedures.
EVAL METH:
Review the unit's SOP for compliance. To receive a SAT, the SOP must address;
a. Instrument flight.
(1) Minimum hours.
(2) Academic.
(3) Evaluation requirements.
b. Inadvertent instrument meteorological conditions (IIMC) procedures.
(1) The SOP should include IIMC procedures for single and multi-ship operations.

25.00        AC     BN     DE     OS     SF                        UA
Does the Commander's ATP SOP address academic training (subjects, scheduling, make-up and documentation)? [TC 3-04.11, para 4-54; OSAA SOP, Chapter 6, para 1-29; FM
                                                                                       16
3-04.155 para 1-4]
REFERENCE TEXT
[TC 3-04.11, para 4-54]
ADDITIONAL TRAINING REQUIREMENTS
4-54. Commanders will list any additional aviation training requirements in the ATP portion of the unit SOP and include the conduct of this training in the unit’s short and long-term
training plans. A continuing program of academic training is required to ensure RCM and NCM are up to date on new equipment, concepts, tactics, and regulations. Commanders
must use every resource available to support this ongoing education.
[OSAA SOP, Chapter 6, para 1-29]
1-29. ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAM.
a. All crewmembers will receive periodic academic training. Attendance will be documented and make up classes scheduled to ensure compliance.
b. A lesson plan should be prepared for each class.
c. After Action Reviews (AARs) will be completed IAW FM 7-0 and 7-1.
d. Schedule of Academic Training:
(1) Semiannually: Weather Briefing
(2) Annually: Located in Table 2
Aeromedical
Aircraft Survivability Equipment (ASE) / Computer Based ASE Training (CBAT)
Aircrew Coordination Training Refresher
Airport ground operations to include runway incursion prevention.
Aviation Life Support Equipment (ALSE)
Ground and Flight Operations in Snow and Ice
Contingency Procedure Training (C-12, C-26, UC-35 units only)
Reduced Vertical Separation Minimum (UC-35 units only)
Operations in High Ambient Temperature Environments
Emergency Egress
Fratricide Prevention Training
Handling of methanol (C-26 units only)
High Altitude Airport Operations
Petroleum Oils and Lubricants (POL) Safety
Risk Management Training. (Reference TC 3-04.11 paragraph 5-3.)
Simultaneous Close Parallel ILS/PRM or LDA/PRM Approaches.
Thunderstorm/Turbulence Avoidance

FM 3-04.155 para 1-4. UAS organizations must be proficient in the following areas:
Attack operations (if applicable).
Call-for-fire operations.
Reconnaissance and security operations.
Intelligence operations.
Emergency procedures.
Base security.
C2.
CBRN exposure avoidance, surveys, and decontamination.
Airspace command and control (AC2).
Basic tactical skills (unit task lists, aircrew training manuals, and Soldier training publications).

EVAL METH:
Review the SOP. To receive a SAT, the SOP must:
a. List all aviation academic training requirements (subject and frequency).
                                                                                               17
b. Include the unit’s procedures for scheduling, make-up, and documentation.
c. Be documented on the unit’s short and long range training plans (schedules).
d. Additionally, documentation must be available that crewmembers have completed annual academic training requirements, as established in the SOP.

31.00                                                                      UA
Has the commander organized a standardization committee and are they meeting as required? [AR 95-23, para 4-30]
REFERENCE TEXT
[AR 95-23, para 4-30]
4–30. Army Command, Army Service Component Command, Direct Reporting Unit, and National Guard Bureau Army Aviation Standardization Committees
a. Commanders monitor the implementation of the U.S. Army Aviation Standardization Program. They provide the command with a continuing assessment of the program.
b. The UAS unit commanders will coordinate with the aviation brigade standardization committee. In the absence of an aviation brigade, the UAS unit commander will coordinate
with the nearest aviation unit (for example, flight detachment).
c. Aviation standardization committees will be organized to—
(1) Recommend and review directives, provide guidance, and respond to specific inquiries and requests.
(2) Coordinate requests for support from subordinate aviation units.
(3) Prepare and review recommended changes to aviation standardization literature and forward to proponents.
(4) Develop ARMS checklists for command approval.
(5) Write and publish supplements to this regulation.
(6) Meet at the call of the chairman.
Note. Funds for travel, per diem, and overtime (if required) will be provided by the member’s parent organization.
d. Members will be designated, in writing, by the commander as follows:
(1) A chairman and secretary.
(2) Commander of subordinate aviation unit.
(3) An aviation safety officer, aviation maintenance officer, flight surgeon, aircraft standardization instructor pilot (SP), helicopter SP, instrument flight examiner, maintenance test-
flight evaluator, tactical operations officer, master gunner, and air traffic services representative.
(4) An UA system IO/SO provided by UAS unit commanders.
e. Standardization and training issues that require action by USAACE&FR or presentation at the Aviation Senior Leaders Conference will be addressed to Commander, U.S. Army
Aviation Center of Excellence and Fort Rucker 18 AR 95–23 • 7 August 2006/RAR 2 July 2010 (ATZQ–ES), Fort Rucker, AL 36362–5214. Issues that require action by HQDA will
be sent to the Deputy Chief of Staff, G–3/5/7 (DAMO–AV), 400 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310–0400.
EVAL METH:
The evaluator will review the SOP and standardization meeting records for compliance. To receive a SAT:
a. The Commander must have designated in writing instructors, examiners, evaluators, and/or unit trainers in support of installation standardization committees.
b. Include the Commander, platoon leader, operations technician, SO, and safety officer/NCO in platoon level committees.
c. The unit must be meeting quarterly at platoon level (installation meetings that meet quarterly will suffice).

32.00                                                                      UA
Does the unit’s SOP address night operations? [DA Pam 385-90 para 2-12f; TC 1-600, para 2-41]
REFERENCE TEXT
[DA Pam 385-90, para 2-12f]
Commanders will ensure that an SOP is developed for all unit functional areas and for all aviation operations executed in the command. The SOP may, where applicable, be
consolidated at the battalion/squadron or regiment/brigade/group level. The systematic risk management process should be integrated in all unit operational procedures.
Command approved risk-control options should be integrated into the SOP as task performance standards. At a minimum, the following subjects will be addressed in the SOP if
they are applicable to the unit mission:
f. Night operations
EVAL METH:
Review the SOP for compliance. To receive a SAT, the SOP must address;
a. Night operations.


                                                                                           18
33.00                                                                   UA
Does the unit’s SOP address extreme environmental operations (blowing snow, desert, over water, and so forth)? [DAM Pam 385-90, para 2-12x]
REFERENCE TEXT
[DA Pam 385-90, para 2-12x]
Commanders will ensure that an SOP is developed for all unit functional areas and for all aviation operations executed in the command. The SOP may, where applicable, be
consolidated at the battalion/squadron or regiment/brigade/group level. The systematic risk management process should be integrated in all unit operational procedures.
Command approved risk-control options should be integrated into the SOP as task performance standards. At a minimum, the following subjects will be addressed in the SOP if
they are applicable to the unit mission:
x. Extreme environmental operations (blowing snow, desert, over-water, and so forth).
EVAL METH:
Review the SOP for compliance. To receive a SAT, the SOP must address extreme environmental operations (blowing snow, desert, over-water and so forth).

34.00                                                                   UA
Does the unit’s SOP address a CBRN evaluations program? [TC 1-600, para 2-4]
REFERENCE TEXT
[TC 1-600, para 2-41]
Commanders will establish, in writing, a CBRN evaluation program. Units may conduct CBRN evaluations as part of the commander's no-notice program, along with the APART,
or during ARTEP evaluations
l. CBRN evaluation program
EVAL METH:
Review the SOP for compliance. To receive a SAT, the SOP must address a written CBRN evaluation program.

35.00                                                                    UA
Has the commander designated FAC levels? [TC 1-600, para 2-6]
REFERENCE TEXT
[TC 1-600, para 2-6]
All operational UAS positions and other designated operator positions in the ATP are classified as one of three flight activity categories (FACs). Unit commanders designate each
position FAC 1, FAC 2, or FAC 3. They base these designations on the proficiency required by the table of organization and equipment (TOE) or table of distribution and allowance
(TDA) position.
EVAL METH:
Review the ATP SOP and/or written guidance. To receive a SAT, the SOP and/or written guidance must designate each operational flying position as either FAC 1, 2, or 3.
Indication solely on the CTL is unsatisfactory.

36.00                                                                    UA
Do units have a no-notice proficiency evaluation program established? [TC 1-600, para 3-10]
REFERENCE TEXT
[TC 1-600, para 3-10]
Each commander will establish a no-notice evaluation program to measure crewmember effectiveness. Evaluations may consist of flight or a compatible simulator and an oral or
written examination.
EVAL METH:
Review the SOP and IATFs for compliance. To receive a SAT:
a. The SOP must establish a no-notice proficiency and evaluation program.
b. IATFs must indicate compliance with the written program.

37.00                                                                    UA
Has the commander established, in writing, a formal flight crew qualification and selection program which addresses qualification, selection and evaluation requirements for unit
flight crew members? [AR 95-23, para 4-17]
REFERENCE TEXT
                                                                                        19
[AR 95-23, para 4-17]
UAS unit commanders must establish, in writing, formal UAS flight crewmember qualification and selection programs. Programs will contain qualification and selection criteria and
evaluation requirements. UAS instructor operators and safety personnel will aid commanders in the selection process. UAS crewmembers will be designated in writing by their unit
commander, who will specify the UAS duties and crew stations that the UACs are authorized to occupy in accordance with TC 1–600. Flight crews will be evaluated during the
APART period in each flight control crew station at which they are authorized to perform UAC duties.
EVAL METH:
Review written guidance for compliance. To receive a SAT, the unit must:
a. Provide the commander’s written guidance
b. The guidance must contain crew qualification and selection criteria as well as evaluation requirements.
c. Crew members must be designated by the commander, specifying the duties and flight crew stations that they are authorized to occupy.

38.00                                                                 UA
Has the Commander determined which orientation items are required for the local area orientation flight? [TC 1-600, para 2-32]
REFERENCE TEXT
[TC 1-600, para 2-32]
2-32. Local Area Orientation Flight. Before progressing to RL 1, crewmembers must receive a local area orientation flight. (Units may conduct this flight along with other training.)
The commander will determine which orientation items are required for the flight and if it should be accomplished both day and night. Items peculiar to the local area or those that
cannot be adequately covered during the ground portion will be pointed out, demonstrated, or discussed during the flight. The orientation flight should include familiarization with
local—
• Boundaries.
• Flight corridors.
• Reporting points.
• Prominent terrain features.
• Noise abatement procedures.
• Maintenance test flight areas.
• Restricted areas and no-fly areas.
• Tactical training and range areas.
• Airfields, helipads, and frequently used LZs.
• Obstacles or hazards to flight.
EVAL METH:
Review the SOP or Commander’s written guidance for compliance. To receive a SAT:
a. The SOP must provide guidance as to which orientation items are required for the local area orientation flight.
b. Whether they should be accomplished in both day and night modes.

39.00                                                                      UA
Has the unit developed and specified an emergency recovery procedure as a contingency for inadvertent IMC in the SOP? ] [AR 95-23, para 5-6]
REFERENCE TEXT
[AR 95-23, para 5-6]
5–6. Emergency recovery procedures
Emergency recovery procedures will be developed as a contingency plan for IMC. Recovery procedures will be developed using approved DOD and/or U.S. Government
procedures in the area of operations and will be coordinated with the servicing ATC. In locations without approved DOD and/or U.S. Government procedures, an emergency
recovery procedure will be developed and coordinated with the servicing ATC. Pending approval, these recovery procedures will only be used in VMC or during an actual
emergency. The risk associated with the recovery procedure will be mitigated through the mission approval process and further defined in unit SOP. Manual entry of waypoint data
is permissible when using emergency GPS procedures. Flight in IMC which violates FAA, host country, or ICAO regulations will be considered deviations according to paragraph
1–6 of this regulation and will be treated according to paragraph 2–11 of this regulation.
EVAL METH:
Review the unit's SOP and other written guidance for compliance. To receive a SAT, the unit must provide in their SOP a plan for emergency recovery in their current area of
operation.
                                                                                         20
40.00              AC                  BN       DE          OS                       UA
Do aviation companies, troops, or detachments perform at least two no-notice evaluations quarterly for assigned RCM and NCM? [AK Reg 95-1 para 4-1b]
  th
[8 Army (FA) units only]
REFERENCE TEXT
(AK Reg 95-1 para 4-1b)
b. Aviation companies will conduct at least two no-notice evaluations quarterly. Aviation companies with non-rated crewmembers will conduct at least two no-notice evaluations
quarterly. The focus of the no-notice program will be on individuals who have attained RL1 status.
EVAL METH:
Review the Commander’s written guidance. To receive a SAT, verify that no-notice evaluations were conducted and documented for RCM and NCM as appropriate.

41.00              AC                  BN       DE          OS                       UA
                     th
Are the appropriate 8 Army (FA) Supplemental Training Gates accomplished before progression to the next readiness level? [AK Reg 95-1, Appendix E]
  th
[8 Army (FA) units only]
REFERENCE TEXT
(AK Reg 95-1, Appendix E)
An aircrew member must progress through the supplemental requirements per this Appendix and the standardized RL system to achieve a mission ready status in Korea.
EVAL METH:
Review the standardization program and the individual aircrew training folders. To receive a SAT, verify that the supplemental training gates were met prior to designation as RL1.

B-RCM IATF
NOT APPLICABLE

C-NCM IATF
QUESTION
19.00            AC                  BN       DE        OS                         UA
Are area type qualifications unique to the Republic of Korea (ROK) or unit specific operations or tasks (e.g. Hoist, Water Bucket, DLQ) documented on DA Form 7122-R, DA Form
4507-R, or standardized unit designated form? [AK Reg 95-1, para 4-9]
[8th Army (FA) units only]
REFERENCE TEXT
(AK Reg 95-1, para 4-9) b. For area type qualifications unique to the ROK, the DA Form 7122-R may be used to indicate qualification and validation. However, the DA Form
4507-R (Crewmember Grade Slip) or a standardized unit designed form may be better able to track and consolidate area type training requirements, qualifications, or validations.
The DA Form 4507-R will be locally reproduced. 7-11. Environmental, Unit Peculiar And Special Training Areas Aviation Unit Commanders shall establish training programs
and SOPs that support unit specific missions and Mission Essential Task Lists. 7
EVAL METH:
Review the standardization program and the individual aircrew training folders. To receive a SAT, verify that the training, qualification or validations are documented.

21.00                                                                        UA
Does the commander initial and date all corrections and amendments to DA Form 7120-R and associated enclosures throughout the crewmember's ATP training year? [TC 1-600,
para 5-4]
REFERENCE TEXT
[TC 1-600, para 5-4]
Commanders may amend the DA Form 7120-R and associated enclosures throughout the crewmember's ATP training year. They must, however, initial and date all changes to
the form and its enclosures to certify their approval.
EVAL METH:
Review DA Form 7120-R series. To receive a SAT, changes to the DA Form 7120-R series must be initialed and dated.
                                                                                          21
22.00                                                                           UA
Has the commander listed all mandatory base, mission, and additional task performance and evaluation requirements for each individual crewmember on the DA Form 7120-1-R?
[TC 1-600, para 5-10]
REFERENCE TEXT
[TC 1-600, para 5-10]
The ATM specifies the minimum base task performance and evaluation requirements for the individual crewmember. It also details other mandatory base and mission task
requirements for crewmembers depending on circumstances such as their duty position, FAC, aircraft, and authorized flight duties. DA Form 7120-1-R (figure 5-3) details the base,
mission, and additional task performance and evaluation requirements for each crewmember; therefore, commanders must ensure that all mandatory requirements for the
crewmember are included.
EVAL METH:
Review DA Form 7120-1-R. To receive a SAT, all mandatory requirements for the crewmembers must be included on the DA Form 7120-1-Rs.

23.00                                                                           UA
Does the folder contain the previous training years DA Form 7120 series? [TC 1-600, Figure 5-1]
REFERENCE TEXT
[TC 1-600, Figure 5-1]
The preceding DA Form 7120-R, DA Form 7120-1-R, DA Form 7120-2-R, and DA Form 7120-3-R.
EVAL METH:
Review the IATFs. To receive a SAT, the IATFs must contain the previous training years DA Form 7120 series.

24.00                                                                               UA
Is the CERTIFICATION block on previous DA Form 7120-3-R completed, to include crewmember signature, date and the appropriate statement "have" or "have not" circled or
lined through? [TC 1-600, para 5-15, Figure 5-4]
REFERENCE TEXT
[TC 1-600, para 5-15]
An example of a completed DA Form 7120-3-R is in figure 5-4. Instructions for completing DA Form 7120-3-R are given below.
Remarks. Enter pertinent remarks or any additional requirements such as NBC or environmental training.
Certification. At the end of the ATP training year, crewmembers must certify that they have or have not completed their ATP requirements. Have the crewmember sign and date
the form.
[Figure 5-4]
See figure.
EVAL METH:
Review previous DA Form 7120-3-R. To receive a SAT, the CERTIFICATION Block must have been completed.

25.00                                                                              UA
Does the DA Form 7122-R contain an entry for assignment to current unit? [TC 1-600, para 5-19]
REFERENCE TEXT
[TC 1-600, para 5-19]
5-19. The DA Form 7122-R will be used to collect data during the year for input to the DA Form 759.
GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS
Event. Enter a short description of the event. The following are defined as events and must be recorded accurately and timely:
• Unit assignments and reassignments.
EVAL METH:
Review DA Form 7122-R. To receive a SAT, the DA Form 7122-Rs must contain an entry for the current assignment.

26.00                                                                          UA
Is the commander’s evaluation and ATP integration completed within 45 calendar days after the crewmember signs into the unit or effective date of flight orders/date of transfer?

                                                                                        22
[TC 1-600, para 2-10]
REFERENCE TEXT
[TC 1-600, para 2-10]
The commander's evaluation determines the initial RL of newly assigned crewmembers. This evaluation consists of a records review and possibly a proficiency flight evaluation.
Active Army. The commander or designated representative will complete the evaluation within 45 calendar days after the crewmember signs in to the unit or after the effective date
of the crewmember’s flying status orders, whichever occurs last.
Reserve Component. The commander or designated representative must complete the evaluation within 45 calendar days after the effective date of the crewmember's operational
flying status orders or the effective date of transfer.
EVAL METH:
Review DA Form 7122-R. To receive a SAT, all crewmembers must have been integrated into the ATP within the required time period.

27.00                                                                              UA
Are RL progressions completed within 90 days (AC)/1 year (RC), to include any exclusion period if applicable? [TC 1-600, para 2-16]
REFERENCE TEXT
[TC 1-600, para 2-16]
Progression
Active Army UACs, USAR technicians, and USAR Active Guard and Reserve (AGR) UACs have 90 consecutive days to progress from one RL to the next. USAR crewmembers
have 1 year to progress. All ARNG crewmembers, including AGR crewmembers and technicians, progress according to Nation Guard regulations. Readiness level progression will
exclude days lost because of—
Temporary duty (TDY).
Medical or nonmedical suspension from operations.
Leave approved by the unit commander.
Grounding of UASs.
UASs that are unavailable or in transit due to unit deployment.
If the exclusion period exceeds 45 consecutive days, operators must restart their current RL progression. They will restart on that date and have 90 consecutive days to progress
to the next readiness level. (ARNG crewmembers should refer to ARNG regulations.) An operator may progress to the next RL in less time than prescribed above (paragraph 2-16,
first bullet) by demonstrating proficiency to an IO/SO. During RL progression, crewmembers must demonstrate proficiency in each mode of flight (day or night) required by the
ATM and CTL for each task. The provision pertaining to the more demanding mode of flight does not apply. RL progression evaluations may be continuous. When a crewmember
is reclassified to RL 2 or RL 3 because of a flight deficiency, the crewmember needs to demonstrate proficiency in only the tasks that were graded unsatisfactory. When an
operator has not progressed within the required period, the unit commander will take action according to AR 95-23.
EVAL METH:
Review DA Form 7122-R. To receive a SAT;
(a) Active Army UACs, USAR technicians, and USAR Guard and Reserve (AGR) UACs must have progressed within 90 days.
(b) USAR crewmembers must have progressed within 1 year.
(c) All ARNG crewmembers, including AGR crewmembers and technicians, must have progressed according to Nation Guard regulations.

28.00                                                                           UA
If the RL progression exclusion period (45 days for AC & active Guard or Reserve, 90 days otherwise) is exceeded, do crewmembers restart their current RL progression training?
[TC 1-600, para 2-16]
REFERENCE TEXT
[TC 1-600, para 2-16]
Progression
Active Army UACs, USAR technicians, and USAR Active Guard and Reserve (AGR) UACs have 90 consecutive days to progress from one RL to the next. USAR crewmembers
have 1 year to progress. All ARNG crewmembers, including AGR crewmembers and technicians, progress according to Nation Guard regulations. Readiness level progression will
exclude days lost because of—
Temporary duty (TDY).
Medical or nonmedical suspension from operations.
Leave approved by the unit commander.

                                                                                       23
Grounding of UASs.
UASs that are unavailable or in transit due to unit deployment.
Note: If the exclusion period exceeds 45 consecutive days, operators must restart their current RL progression. They will restart on that date and have 90 consecutive days to
progress to the next readiness level. (ARNG crewmembers should refer to ARNG regulations.) An operator may progress to the next RL in less time than prescribed above
(paragraph 2-16, first bullet) by demonstrating proficiency to an IO/SO. During RL progression, crewmembers must demonstrate proficiency in each mode of flight (day or night)
required by the ATM and CTL for each task. The provision pertaining to the more demanding mode of flight does not apply. RL progression evaluations may be continuous. When
a crewmember is reclassified to RL 2 or RL 3 because of a flight deficiency, the crewmember needs to demonstrate proficiency in only the tasks that were graded unsatisfactory.
When an operator has not progressed within the required period, the unit commander will take action according to AR 95-23.
EVAL METH:
Review DA Form 7122-R. To receive a SAT, all crewmembers whose exclusion period was exceeded must have restarted their phase of RL progression.

29.00                                                                              UA
During RL progression, do crewmembers demonstrate proficiency in each mode of flight (D, N) required by the ATM for each task? [TC 1-600, para 2-16]
REFERENCE TEXT
[TC 1-600, para 2-16]
Progression
Active Army UACs, USAR technicians, and USAR Active Guard and Reserve (AGR) UACs have 90 consecutive days to progress from one RL to the next. USAR crewmembers
have 1 year to progress. All ARNG crewmembers, including AGR crewmembers and technicians, progress according to Nation Guard regulations. Readiness level progression will
exclude days lost because of—
Temporary duty (TDY).
Medical or nonmedical suspension from operations.
Leave approved by the unit commander.
Grounding of UASs.
UASs that are unavailable or in transit due to unit deployment.
If the exclusion period exceeds 45 consecutive days, operators must restart their current RL progression. They will restart on that date and have 90 consecutive days to progress
to the next readiness level. (ARNG crewmembers should refer to ARNG regulations.) An operator may progress to the next RL in less time than prescribed above (paragraph 2-16,
first bullet) by demonstrating proficiency to an IO/SO. During RL progression, crewmembers must demonstrate proficiency in each mode of flight (day or night) required by the
ATM and CTL for each task. The provision pertaining to the more demanding mode of flight does not apply. RL progression evaluations may be continuous. When a crewmember
is reclassified to RL 2 or RL 3 because of a flight deficiency, the crewmember needs to demonstrate proficiency in only the tasks that were graded unsatisfactory. When an
operator has not progressed within the required period, the unit commander will take action according to AR 95-23.
EVAL METH:
Review DA Form 7122-R. To receive a SAT, crewmembers must have demonstrated proficiency in each mode of flight (day or night) required by the ATM or CTL for each task.

30.00                                                                                  UA
Are all crewmembers ―Aircrew Coordination‖ qualified prior to RL1, receive sustainment training annually thereafter, and is their qualification annotated on their DA Form 7122-R?
[TC 1-600, para 1-22 thru 1-25]
REFERENCE TEXT
[TC 1-600, para 1-22 thru 1-25]
1-22. Aircrew coordination is a set of principles, attitudes, procedures, and techniques that transforms individuals into an effective crew. It is a vital part of the overall ATP. As
directed by the Department of the Army, all crewmembers must become aircrew coordination qualified.
Note. At the time of this revision, suspense dates for qualification in aircrew coordination are being staffed and will be issued by message at a later date.
1-23. Units will conduct initial aircrew coordination qualification training according to this publication and the USAAWC aircrew coordination exportable training package (ETP). The
ETP includes slides and video tapes. To obtain information about this ETP, units may write to the Commander, U.S. Army Aviation Center, ATTN: ATZQ-ATB-NS, Fort Rucker,
Alabama 36362-5218.
Qualified instructors. An SO or IO qualified in aircrew coordination must conduct the pre-training and final evaluations of crewmembers. Properly trained UTs may conduct the
academic and flight training, but they may not conduct the evaluations. A qualified SO or IO can qualify other SOs and IOs.
Documentation. The aircrew coordination qualification will be annotated on the individual's DA Form 7122-R (Crew Member Training Record). It also will be noted in the Remarks
section of the individual's DA Form 759 (Individual Flight Record and Flight Certificate–Army).

                                                                                         24
1-24. Aircrew coordination should be emphasized during readiness level (RL) progressions. It will be evaluated during the annual proficiency and readiness test (APART).
1-25. Including aircrew coordination in ATM task descriptions reflects the philosophy that a preflight, flight, or postflight task is not an individual undertaking; each task can be
performed more effectively and safely by the coordinated efforts of the entire crew. ATM revisions will include individual and crew-coordinated actions in the task descriptions.
EVAL METH:
Review DA Form 7122-R. To receive a SAT;
(a) DA Form 7122-R must indicate that crewmembers are ―Aircrew Coordination‖ qualified prior to RL1.
(b) Crewmember’s must be receiving sustainment training annually and the training is being properly documented on the DA Form 7122-R.

31.00                                                                                    UA
Does the DA Form 7122-R contain an entry for completion of all flight, oral and written evaluations? [TC 1-600, para 5-19]
REFERENCE TEXT
[TC 1-600, para 5-19]
The following are defined as events and must be recorded accurately and timely:
All evaluations, to include those for MC, IO, SO, UT and APART.
Completion of the aircraft operator's manual examination.
All proficiency flight (oral or written) evaluations. (Specify the type of evaluation; for example, a no-notice evaluation, the flight portion of a commander's evaluation, or an aircraft
currency evaluation.
EVAL METH:
Review the DA Form 7122-Rs. To receive a SAT, DA Form 7122-R must have evaluations annotated.

32.00                                                                           UA
Does the DA Form 7122-R contain an entry for completion of all APART requirements? [TC 1-600 Para 5-19]
REFERENCE TEXT
[TC 1-600 para 5-19]
The following are defined as events and must be recorded accurately and timely:
Completion of all APART requirements.
EVAL METH:
Review DA Form 7122-R. To receive a SAT, DA From 7122-R must have the appropriate ―APART Complete‖ entry.

33.00                                                                                 UA
Does the DA Form 7122-R contain an entry for completion of annual flying duty medical evaluation (DA Form 4186 -Medical Recommendation for Flying Duty)? [TC 1-600,
para 5-19]
REFERENCE TEXT
[TC 1-600, para 5-19]
The following are defined as events and must be recorded accurately and timely:
Completion of the flying duty medical evaluation on receipt of DA Form 4186.
EVAL METH:
Review DA Form 7122-Rs. To receive a SAT;
(a) DA form 7122-R must have an entry for the completion of the flying duty medical evaluation.
(b) If the date is beyond the last day of the individual’s birth month, see if a request for extension was requested and approved.

34.00                                                                                   UA
Does the crewmember initial all entries on the DA Form 7122-R? [TC 1-600, para 5-19]
REFERENCE TEXT
[TC 1-600, para 5-19]
CM Init. Crewmembers will initial this block to show that they are aware of the entry on the form and any remarks. Their initials signify that they have been advised of and
understand any change in status. Crewmembers must immediately initial any entry resulting in a change of status such as an unsatisfactory evaluation or a MC designation. They
will initial routine entries such as assignment to a unit or completion of the aircraft operator's manual examination as soon as practical.

                                                                                             25
EVAL METH:
Review DA Form 7122-R. To receive a SAT, all entries must be initialed by the crewmember.

35.00                                                                             UA
Does the commander sign required approval entries entered on the DA Form 7122-R? [TC 1-600, para 5-21]
REFERENCE TEXT
[TC 1-600, para 5-21]
Certain events on the DA Form 7122-R require the commander's approval and signature. These events are nonmedical suspensions, flight (or other proficiency) suspensions, the
crewmember's return to duty after these two events, and extensions or waivers. If the commander has certified another document for the event and the entry on the DA Form
7122-R is a summary of the event, the commander does not need to sign the DA Form 7122-R. Events that produce a new or revised CTL do not require the commander's
signature on the DA Form 7122-R.
EVAL METH:
Review DA Form 7122-R. To receive a SAT, The commander must have approved the following:
(a) Nonmedical suspensions.
(b) Flight (or other proficiency) suspensions.
(c) Crewmember's return to duty after a and b, above.
(d) Extensions or waivers.

36.00                                                                                 UA
Are waivers and extensions applied correctly? [AR 95-23, para(s) 1-7, 4-2 and 4-10; TC 1-600, para 5-21]
REFERENCE TEXT
[AR 95-23, para 1-7, 4-2, & 4-10]
1–7. Waivers and delegation of authority
a. Authority to grant waivers is stated in specific paragraphs of this regulation. Authority granted to ACOMs, ASCCs, DRUs, or NGBs per this regulation may be further delegated
by the ACOM, ASCC, or DRU commander, or the Chief, NGB except when expressly prohibited. All other commanders may not further delegate waiver authority unless authorized
in the specific paragraph.
b. When waiver authority is not specified in specific paragraphs, waivers to provisions in chapters 2 through 5 may only be granted by Deputy Chief of Staff, G–3/5/7 (DAMO–AV),
400 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310–0400 and chapters 6 and 7 by Deputy Chief of Staff, G–4, (DALO–AV), 500 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310–0500.
c. Waivers required to be processed through the FAA or a host nation should be coordinated and/or processed through the Commander, U.S. Army Aeronautical Services Agency
(USAASA), 9325 Gunston Road, Building 1466, Suite N319, Fort Belvoir, VA, as appropriate.
 4–2. Waivers to training requirements
a. Unit waivers to primary ATP requirements may be granted only by the following:
(1) Commanders of ACOM, ASCC, DRU and USSOCOM.
(2) Commander, U.S. Army Reserve Command.
(3) Chief, National Guard Bureau.
(4) Commanders colonel (O–6) and above and the state Army aviation officer (SAAO) may grant unit waivers and/ or extensions to ATP requirements for units under their
command, or state and/or territory affected by operational deployments. These commanders may grant unit extensions for up to 180 days from their self-established ―start training
date‖ after redeployment.
b. Individual waivers to primary UAS ATP requirements may be granted by the first commander, O–6 or above, in the individual’s chain of command.
c. Waivers will state the specific requirement that is to be waived.
d. The ATP requirements are waived for UACs assigned to units, commands, or installations with no UAS assets available. The UAC will maintain a current flying duty medical
examination in accordance with AR 40–501.
4–10. Failure to meet Aircrew Training Program requirements
a. The commander will investigate when ATP requirements are not met. The commander will complete the investigation within 30 days of notification of the failure. After
investigating, the UAS unit commander will—
(1) Take one of the following actions:
(a) Authorize up to one 30–day extension granted by commanders 0–5 and above to complete the requirements.
(b) Request a waiver of requirements per paragraph 4–2b.

                                                                                       26
(2) Enter restrictions imposed and extensions granted into the UAC’s IATF.
(3) Enter extensions and waivers for the UAC into that operator’s IFRF.
(4) Restrict the UAC from performing AC duties in the UAS until ATP requirements have been successfully completed.
b. For primary UAS, if additional time is not granted, or if requirements are not met within the authorized period, the commander will suspend the UAC from further UAC duties.
Commanders must then either request a waiver according to paragraph 4–2b or initiate proceedings for MOS reclassification.
c. The UAC who fails a hands-on performance test will be restricted from performing the duty for which evaluated. The restriction will apply to all UAS with similar operating and
handling characteristics as listed in paragraph 4–16. Restrict ions will be listed in the operator’s IATF and will remain in effect until successful completion of a reevaluation.
(1) When the failure is in the UAC’s primary UAS, the commander must—
(a) Redesignate the individual to the appropriate RL.
(b) Authorize additional training if necessary.
(c) For AO, payload operator (PO) or EO, reevaluate or impose a temporary suspension from flying duties.
(d) For other qualified UACs, reevaluate or remove the individual from UAC duties.
(2) When the failure is in an UAC’s additional or alternate UAS, the commander must—
(a) Redesignate the individual to the appropriate RL.
(b) Authorize additional training if necessary.
(c) Reevaluate, retrain, or restrict the UAC from performing duties in that UAS.
[TC 1-600, para 5-21]
Certain events on the DA Form 7122-R require the commander's approval and signature. These events are nonmedical suspensions, flight (or other proficiency) suspensions, the
crewmember's return to duty after these two events, and extensions or waivers. If the commander has certified another document for the event and the entry on the DA Form
7122-R is a summary of the event, the commander does not need to sign the DA Form 7122-R. Events that produce a new or revised CTL do not require the commander's
signature on the DA Form 7122-R.
EVAL METH:
Review DA Form 7122-R. To receive a SAT, all waivers and extensions must have been applied and recorded correctly:
a. Waivers.
(1) Specific item(s) waived.
(2) Appropriate authority’s signature is recorded.
b. Extensions.
(1) Specific item(s) extended, i.e., flight time, APART evaluation, etc.
(2) Defined period of extension.
(3) Commander’s signature.
(4) Disposition of extension is recorded.
(5) Appropriate administrative action taken if ATP requirements not met.
c. Crewmembers are suspended from flight duties until completion of the commander’s investigation and the extension or waiver is granted.

37.00                                                                        UA
Do all crewmembers in an operational/designated crewmember position have an IATF prepared? [TC 1-600 para 5-1]
REFERENCE TEXT
[TC 1-600, para 5-1]
5-1. Commanders must ensure that an IATF is prepared and maintained for each crewmember in an operational/designated crewmember position assigned or attached to their
unit (see figure 5-1).
EVAL METH:
Review the IATF’s. To receive a SAT, all crewmembers in an operational/designated position assigned or attached must have an IATF prepared.

38.00                                                                           UA
Does the DA Form 7122-R contain an entry for transcription of data from the DA Form 7122-R to the DA Form 759? [TC 1-600, para 5-19]
REFERENCE TEXT
[TC 1-600, para 5-19]
Event. Enter a short description of the event. The following are defined as events and must be recorded accurately and timely:
                                                                                        27
Transcription of data from the DA Form 7122-R to the DA Form 759.
EVAL METH:
Review DA Form 7122-R. To receive a SAT, transcription data must be entered.

D-MISSION APPROVAL PROCESS
QUESTION
21.00                                                                        UA
Has the commander designated, in writing, Briefing Officers/NCOs? [AR 95-23, para 2-12a(2)]
REFERENCE TEXT
[AR 95-23, para 2-12a(2)]
 (2) Briefing officer and/or noncommissioned officer. Briefing officers and/or NCOs will be designated in writing by commanders in the grade of O–5 or above to identify, assess,
and mitigate risk. The briefing officers and/or NCOs will be selected based on their level of experience, maturity, judgment, and ability to effectively mitigate risk to the UA and
crew. Experience is critical for briefing officers and/or NCOs to identify hazards, assess hazards, and develop control measures for the crews which are key components of the risk
management process.
EVAL METH:
Review supporting documents. To receive a SAT, the Commander in the grade of LTC or above must have designated Briefing Officers/NCOs in writing.

22.00                                                                        UA
Has the commander designated Final Mission Approval Authorities in writing and the level of risk (low, moderate, high, extremely high) they are authorized to approve? [AR 95-23,
para 2-12(3)]
REFERENCE TEXT
[AR 95-23, para 2-12(3]
(3) Final mission approval authority. Final mission approval authorities are members of the chain of command who are responsible for accepting risk and approving all UAS
operations within their unit. They approve missions for a specific risk level. Individuals with final mission approval authority may only approve those missions where the
assessed risk level is commensurate with their command level. Commanders in the grade of O–5 and above will select final mission approval authorities from the chain of
command and designate them in writing along with the level of risk (low, moderate, high, or extremely high) mission they are authorized to approve.
At a minimum, battalion commanders and above are the final mission approval authority for moderate-risk missions, brigade commanders and above for high-risk missions, and
the first general officer in the chain of command for extremely high-risk missions. Approval authorities are based upon levels of command authority and not rank. For units lacking
these positions, the ACOM/ASCC/DRU commander, or the Chief, NGB may adjust them within these guidelines. During bona fide absences, battalion and brigade commanders
may authorize their field grade executive officer or S–3 to accept the risk and approve the operation on their behalf provided they are properly trained and notify the commander as
soon as possible.
EVAL METH:
Review supporting documents. To receive a SAT:
a. The Commander (in the grade of lieutenant colonel and above) must have designated Final Mission Approval Authorities.
b. The Commander (in the grade of lieutenant colonel and above) must have designated the level of risk they are authorized to approve.

23.00                                                                      UA
Has the commander developed a training and certification program for Briefing Officers/NCOs and Final Mission Approval Authorities? [AR 95-23, para 2-12]
REFERENCE TEXT
[AR 95-23, para 2-12]
2–12. Mission approval process
Commanders in the grade of O–5 (lieutenant colonel) and above will develop and publish policies and procedures for the mission approval process for those UAS units under their
command. If the chain of command lacks a commander in the grade of O–5, the ACOM, ASCC, or DRU commander, or the Chief, NGB may adjust this requirement.
Adjustment authorities granted throughout this paragraph will not be delegated below the general officer level. Approval authorities and procedures established for tactical and
combat operations may differ from those utilized for garrison operations. Unit commanders will establish a training and certification program for mission briefer and
mission approval authorities to ensure standardization and understanding of the mission approval and risk management process for personnel defined in paragraph a below.
EVAL METH:
Review the Commander’s Briefing Officer/NCO and Mission Approval Authority training program. To receive a SAT, the Commander must have developed a training program for
                                                                                        28
Briefing Officers/NCOs and Mission Approval Authorities.

24.00                                                                        UA
Is the unit using the three-step mission approval process? [AR 95-23, para 2-12b]
REFERENCE TEXT
[AR 95-23, para 2-12b]
b. Mission approval process. The mission approval process for UAS operations is accomplished in three steps that must be completed prior to mission execution.
(1) Step one: Initial mission approval. The initial mission approval authority approves the mission in accordance with the commander’s policies and procedures by considering
some of the following factors: alignment with the unit’s mission essential task list, aircraft required and available, availability of required special mission equipment, trained
aircrew availability, other training and mission impacts, tactical and threat considerations, and so on. This step is not a detailed hazard and risk analysis for specific flight
operations but rather an assessment of the unit’s capability to accomplish the mission. Initial approval may occur at different levels of command depending on how the mission is
generated. For example, a mission generated at the brigade level might be accepted by the battalion operations officer while a platoon training mission might be accepted by the
company commander.
(2) Step two: Mission planning and briefing. This step involves detailed planning, risk assessment, and risk mitigation by the aircrew and review by the briefing officer and/or NCO.
Briefing officers are authorized to brief missions regardless of the level of mitigated risk. Self-briefing is not authorized unless approved by the first officer in
the grade of O–5 or above in the chain of command. Interaction between crew and briefer is paramount to identify, assess, and mitigate risk for the specific flight or mission.
Briefing officers are responsible for ensuring key mission elements are evaluated, briefed, and understood by the MC. Mission briefing officers and/or NCOs will, at a minimum,
review and assess the following key areas in the mission planning process:
(a) The flight is in support of an operational unit mission and has been approved by step one.
(b) The crew understands the mission and possesses situational awareness of all tactical, technical, and administrative mission details.
(c) Assigned flight crews have been allocated adequate pre-mission planning time and the mission is adequately planned to include performance planning, Notice to Airmen
(NOTAM), and coordination with supported units.
(d) Assigned flight crews are qualified and current for the mission in accordance with this regulation, aircrew information reading file currency, and crew experience appropriate for
the mission.
(e) Forecast weather conditions for the mission—including departure, en route, and arrival weather—meet the requirements of this regulation and local directives.
(f) Flight crews meet unit crew endurance requirements.
(g) Procedures in the commander’s risk management program are completed and mitigated to the lowest level possible.
(h) Required special mission equipment is operational.
(3) Step 3: Final mission approval. Based on the resulting mitigated risk, the appropriate final approval authority reviews the mission’s validity, planning, and risk mitigation and
authorizes the flight and/or operation in accordance with the commander’s policy. The final approval authority indicates authorization for flight by initialing the RAW and the briefing
officer initials the DA Form 5484 indicating completion of the briefing. Briefing officers and final approval authorities may give oral approval if necessary. If a crewmember changes
or a mission parameter changes which increases the resultant risk, the MC will be rebriefed and reapproved as required.
EVAL METH:
Review the unit's mission approval process. To receive a SAT, the unit must be using the 3-step process outlined in AR 95-23:
a. The Commander approves the flight schedule (DA Form 5484).
b. Detailed Planning and Risk Mitigation is accomplished. At a minimum, address the key areas of the mission planning process.
c. The approving officer/NCO initials the risk assessment worksheet authorizing the flight and the briefing officer initials the DA Form 5484 (UAS Mission Schedule/Brief) indicating
completion of the briefing.
d. Copies of the DA Form 5484 and the risk assessment worksheet are retained in unit files for at least 30 days.

25.00                                                                   UA
Has the Commander established and retained the Risk Assessment Worksheet (RAW)? [AR 95-23, para 2-12(4) thru (5)]
REFERENCE TEXT
[AR 95-23, para 2-12(4) thru (5)]
(4) Risk assessment worksheets. Unit commanders will develop local risk assessment worksheets (RAWs) to assess aircrew mission planning and risk. The RAW will be
constructed using the concepts outlined in FM 5–19. The commander will combine guidance from higher commanders with personal knowledge of the unit and experience to
assign levels of risk to particular parameters. Risk levels are used to elevate items of interest to successive levels of command for visibility and acceptance.
(5) DA Form 5484. Copies of the DA Form 5484 (Mission Schedule/Brief) will be retained in unit files with the corresponding RAW for at least 30 days.

                                                                                          29
EVAL METH:
To receive a SAT, the unit must have a Risk Assessment Worksheet (RAW) and have these attached and retained for 30 days with DA Form 5484.


E- GUNNERY
NOT APPLICABLE


                                                                           TACOPS
A-PROGRAM MANAGEMENT
NOT APPLICABLE

B-TRAINING/OPERATIONS
NOT APPLICABLE


                                                           NIGHT VISION DEVICES
A-PROGRAM MANAGEMENT
NOT APPLICABLE

B-MAINTENANCE
NOT APPLICABLE

                                    WAREHOUSE, TECHNICAL AND UNIT SUPPLY
A-PLL MANAGEMENT
NOT APPLICABLE

B-SSA MANAGEMENT
NOT APPLICABLE

C-SHOP STOCK MANAGEMENT
NOT APPLICABLE


                                                                                  30
D-PROPERTY ACCOUNTABILITY
QUESTION
6.00                AC AF AM AS AT BN            DE FS      OS           SB SF TO UA
Are all items required to be tracked by serial number and registration number posted to the primary hand receipt? [AR 710-2, para 2-5.l(3), page 23 and 24.]
REFERENCE TEXT
AR 710-2, 2-5. Property book system. l. Following are the three types of property book records: (1) Basic. (2) Supplemental. (3) Serial number. The serial number property
book record contains the serial numbers of items requiring accounting by serial number. Items recorded in the property book and meeting any of the following conditions require
serial number accounting: (a) Items with a U.S. Army registration number. The registration number will be recorded as the serial number. (b) Items listed in the AMDF contained
on FEDLOG with a CIIC of other than ―U‖ or that is blank, and the item has a serial number; also applies to similar commercial items not listed in the AMDF contained on FEDLOG.
(c) Information management processing equipment (IMPE) and external peripheral components (except keyboards and end user operated items (less CCI)). (d) Items determined
pilferable by the PBO, whether or not they are listed in the AMDF contained on FEDLOG or have a CIIC. (e) Post the lot number and the serial numbers for Class 5 items.
EVAL METH
Review the commander’s primary hand receipt to ensure all equipment requiring serial number tracking has been posted. If serial numbers have not been posted there will be an
error on the primary hand receipt from PBUSE. Unit commanders must reconcile the difference of on hand quantity and number of serial numbers required for posting (quantity on
hand and serial numbers must match).

15.00            AC AF AM AS AT BN              DE FS       OS          SB SF TO UA
Are equipment loss adjustments initiated within the required timeframe IAW Chapter 12 and 13, AR 735-5? [AR 735-5, paras 12-3c(1), (2), 13-8 a- c]
REFERENCE TEXT
AR 735-5, 12-3. c. (1) Active Army / USAR. The Active Army will initiate and furnish a DD Form 362 to FAO within 5 workdays after the date of discovering the discrepancy. The
USAR will accomplish this action within 60 days. For personnel departing the installation on an ETS/PCS move and hand carrying a DD Form 362 to the FAO, commanders,
PBOs, and accountable officers will not affix clearing signatures or stamps on their clearance forms until after the individual returns to them a copy of the DD Form 362 annotated
by FAO indicating receipt by the FAO. (2) ARNG. The ARNG will initiate and forward a DD Form 362 to the USPFO within 45 workdays after the date of discovering the
discrepancy. For personnel departing the installation on an ETS/PCS move and hand carrying a DD Form 362 to the USPFO, commanders, PBOs, and accountable officers will
not affix clearing signatures or stamps on their clearance forms until after the individual returns to them a copy of the DD Form 362 annotated by the USPFO indicating receipt by
the USPFO. 13-8. a. Active Army. The Active Army will initiate and present financial liability investigations of property loss to the appointing authority or approving authority as
appropriate not later than 15 calendar days after the date of discovering the discrepancy. As an exception, financial liability investigations of property loss initiated to account for
missing organizational clothing and individual equipment issued to soldiers in an absent without leave status will be initiated and presented to the appointing authority or approving
authority as appropriate on the day the soldier is dropped from the rolls. b. Army Reserve. The USAR will initiate and present financial liability investigations of property loss to the
appointing authority or approving authority as appropriate not later than 75 calendar days after the date of discovering the discrepancy. c. ARNG. The ARNG will initiate and
present financial liability investigations of property loss to the appointing authority or approving authority as appropriate not later than 45 calendar days after the date of discovering
the discrepancy.
EVAL METH
Review DD Form 200 (Financial Liability Investigation of Property Loss (FLIPL), blocks number 1 and 3 (Make sure the narrative block coincides with block 3) to ensure FLIPL was
initiated in the proper timeframe.

16.00              AC AF AM AS AT BN            DE FS       OS        SB SF TO UA
Is all equipment on a valid hand receipt and signed by the PHRH and sub-hand receipt holders including commercial off the shelf (COTS), MTOE, CTA, special tools and
government purchase card procurement items? [AR 710-2, app F, F-1, b ; DA Pam 710-2-1, para 5-3a, b(1), (2)]
REFERENCE TEXT
AR 710-2, F. Procedures for Hand Receipt Holders. F-1. General. b. When the PBO issues items to an individual for use or to a supervisor for a subordinate’s use, the person
receiving the property from the PBO signs a hand receipt for the property. This receipt is called the primary hand receipt and it documents to whom the PBO gave that property.
The person who signs for the property from the PBO is called the primary hand receipt holder (PHRH) and by his or her signature has indicated that he or she has received the
property and accepts responsibility for it. If the PHRH then further issues that hand receipt, it shows that the subordinate now has the property. The subordinate who received the
property and signed the sub-hand receipt is called the sub-hand receipt holder (SHRH). By signing the sub-hand receipt the SHRH acknowledges that he or she has received the
listed property and now has the responsibility for it. Whenever a new person takes over the hand receipt or sub-hand receipt, an inventory must be done to make sure that all
property listed on the hand receipt and being signed for is actually there. DA Pam 710-2-1, 5-3. Hand receipt procedures. a. Hand receipts are required whenever property

                                                                                            31
book or durable items are issued. The hand receipt lists the property that has been issued. The signature of a person on a hand receipt establishes direct responsibility. Prepare
separate hand receipts for installation and organization property. b(1) For hand receipts prepared by the PBO; the original is kept by PBO. Copy number 2 is provided to the hand
receipt holder. b(2) For sub-hand receipts prepared by the hand receipt holders; the original is kept by the hand receipt holder. Copy number 2 is provided to the sub-hand receipt
holder. There is no restriction on the number of times property can be sub-hand receipted, but under normal circumstances, should not exceed from the commander, to the
supervisor, to the user.
EVAL METH
Review hand receipts.

E-COMMAND SUPPLY DISCIPLINE PROGRAM (CSDP)
NOT APPLICABLE

F-HAND TOOL AND SKOT ACCOUNTABILITY
NOT APPLICABLE

G-BENCH STOCK MANAGEMENT
NOT APPLICABLE

I-UNIT MOVEMENT
QUESTION
9.00              AC      AM AS AT BN          DE FS        OS         SB       TO UA
Has the unit prepared, approved and is it maintaining a unit movement plan tailored to the goals and missions specific to real world contingencies for mobilization (RC),
deployment (AC) (RC) and exercise scenarios (AC) (RC)? [FR 55-1, paras 1-5a, 2-12; FM 4-01-011, app L, page L-1 thru L16]
REFERENCE TEXT
FR 55-1, 1-5a page 6 and Para 2-12 page 11. Movement plans are prepared to execute a move. Mobilization movement plans govern movement from home station (HS) to
mobilization station (MS). Deployment movement plans govern movements from MS to air or seaports of embarkation. RC units will develop mobilization movement plans. Active
Component units will develop deployment movement plans. Reserve Component units will develop deployment plans, if directed in writing by the mobilization station. This
requirement will include written guidance provided to the RRC/ DRU / JFHQ-ST who will in turn forward it to the units. Movement plans are prepared at various levels of
command. They are prepared to address mobilization, deployment, redeployment, and demobilization and must consider operational and logistics planning movement
parameters. Units will develop unit movement plans based on MS guidance, scenario driven regional contingencies / OPLANs, and identified strategic aerial / seaports.
FM 4-01-011, pg L-1 thru L16. The movement plan must be signed by the commander or a specify authorized representative. If the signature is not reproduced or on subsequent
copies, authentication by the appropriate coordinating staff officer is required. Annexes (Annexes are used for those items that would require too much space in the basic plan. If
an annex is not necessary, or unused, type title and N/A). The movement plan contains all annexes and appendices. Those not used are marked not applicable (NA) so that later
developing planning data may be added to the existing plan. The operation order has specific movement instructions and is dated and signed. The annexes contain information
required to support the plan.
EVAL METH
Review unit movement plans.
The movement plan must be signed by the commander or specifically authorized representative. If the signature is not reproduced or on subsequent copies, authentication by the
appropriate coordinating staff officer is required.
Annexes (Annexes are used for those items that would require too much space in the basic plan. If an annex is not necessary or unused type title and N/A).

ANNEX A - Procurement. This annex includes sources for specific commodities and services.
ANNEX B - Class I - Subsistence.
ANNEX C - Class II. This annex covers all guidance on clothing, individual equipment, tentage, organizational tool sets, NBC, hand tools, electronics, administrative housekeeping
supplies, and weapons.
ANNEX D - Class III. This annex gives guidance for aircraft and surface vehicles, coolants, deicing and antifreeze compounds (together with components and additives of such
                                                                                         32
products) and coal, hydraulic and compressed gases and lubricants.
ANNEX E - Class IV. This includes information on material for securing vehicle secondary loads and securing major end items to transportation assets.
Appendix 1 - Blocking, bracing, packing, crating, and tie-down (BBPCT) material for secondary cargo loads in vehicles, trailers and containers, dunnage and shoring for air
deployment, and plastic pallet covers for 463L pallets.
Appendix 2 - Required documentation. This includes work order requests or memoranda for blocking, bracing, tie-down (BBT). (Requisitions are used to order packing, crating,
and plastic covers).
ANNEX F - Class V. Class V includes ammunition of all types (including NBC and special weapons), bombs, explosives, mines, fuses, detonators, pyrotechnics, propellants and
other associated items. This annex should include the time and location of issue.
ANNEX G - Class VII. Class VII includes final combinations of end products that are ready for their intended use (that is, tanks, launchers, mobile machine shops and vehicles,
MHE, compressors, and construction equipment). The annex covers procedures for loading and accounting for equipment moved by commercial truck or rail. It also includes the
time major end items will be loaded on commercial assets (reference - unit N-Hour sequence).
ANNEX H - Class VIII. Class VIII is medical material, including medical peculiar repair parts. In addition to Class VIII, this annex covers en route medical support - first aid kits and
medical support at POEs.
ANNEX I - Class IX . This annex covers guidance on repair parts (less medical peculiar repair parts and components), to include kits, assemblies and subassemblies, repairable
and nonrepairable, required for maintenance support of all equipment.
ANNEX J - Pre-movement Maintenance Support. This annex covers such items as equipment status, contact teams, drivers’ licenses, PMCS, sequence of events for maintenance
operations, nonrepairable equipment, tow bars, and topping off of vehicles.
ANNEX K - Equipment Maintenance Support. This covers maintenance during the actual move. It discusses abandoned vehicles, roadside repairs, tow bars, contact teams, repair
services (and parts), and maintenance vehicles.
ANNEX L - Air Transportation. This annex always covers personnel, TAT, and baggage. It also covers equipment if the OPLAN/OPORD indicates.
Appendix 1 - Documentation.
Documentation includes:
_ DD Form 2130-1, C5 Cargo Manifest
_ DD Form 2130-3 ,C141 Cargo Manifest
_ DD Form 2130-6 ,KC10 Cargo Manifest
_ DD Form 2130-13, C17 Cargo Manifest
_ DD Form 2327, Unit Aircraft Utilization Plan
This appendix reflects:
_ Equipment/TAT/cargo to deploy by air.
_ Number of personnel and cargo to deploy.
_ Bulk, oversized, and outsized equipment designated to deploy by air.
Appendix 2 - Listing of Pintle-Hook Vehicles.
Appendix 3 - Air Loading Procedures:
This may include:
_ TAB A - Planeload commander’s SOP.
_ TAB B - Load team SOP.
_ TAB C - Shoring material requirements.
_ TAB D - 463L pallet and tie-down requirements.
_ TAB E - Motor and aviation fuels for movement of organic air equipment.
_ TAB F - Special handling cargo certification.
ANNEX M - Convoy Requirements.
Appendix 1 - Request for Convoy Clearance, DD Form 1265 (FM 55-30).
Appendix 2 -Request for Special Hauling Permit, DD Form 1266 (for outsized and overweight equipment).
Appendix 3 - Convoy Commander’s Checklist.
Appendix 4 - Drivers’ Strip Maps.
Appendix 5 - Convoy Commander’s Safety Briefing.
The briefing should be used to ensure:
_ Drivers are licensed for vehicles being driven.
_ If hazardous material is part of the load, it is identified on DD Form 1750, UDL, and DD Form 836.
                                                                                           33
_ Vehicles are properly prepared for movement. Considerations include:
_ Shipping configuration.
_ Fuel levels.
_ Secured secondary loads.
_ Shackles.
_ Purging requirements.
_ Flags.
_ Convoy signs.
_ Highway warning kits.
_ First aid kits.
_ Convoy speeds.
ANNEX N - Rail Requirements (Included only for those units where rail movement is projected).
Appendix 1 - Load Team SOP.
Appendix 2 - Documentation and Procedures for Rail Loading Equipment, which include as a minimum: This appendix includes a rail load plan and is used to ensure training is
validated and vehicles are properly prepared for movement. Guidance on vehicle preparation includes:
_ Shipping configuration.
_ Fuel levels.
_ Secondary loads secured.
_ Shackles.
_ Markings (UIC and SUN).
_ MSLs.
_ Purging requirements.
_ First aid kits.
_ If HAZMAT is part of the load, vehicle placard.
ANNEX 0 - Commercial Movements Requirements.
Appendix 1 - Packing List (DD Form 1750). See Annex __.
Appendix 2 – Miscellaneous.
ANNEX P – Facilities and Equipment.
This annex covers facilities en route and equipment requirements for loading at point of origin and unloading at destination.
ANNEX Q - Points of Contact Listing.
ANNEX R - Safety.
This annex covers:
_ Motor vehicle operations.
_ Rail load operations.
_ Air load operations.
_ Accident/injury prevention.
_ Ammunition and explosive/POL safety.
_ Prevention of carbon monoxide poisoning.
_ Senior vehicle occupant responsibilities.
ANNEX S - N-Hour Sequence.
This annex identifies and schedules movement tasks.
ANNEX T - Plan Coordination Documentation.
This annex includes—
_ Documentation requiring action from another command or agency, intermediate headquarters, and local agencies or businesses.
_ OPLAN information - location and procedures.
ANNEX U - Appointment Memorandums and Training Certificates and/or Validations.
ANNEX V - Plan Approval.
Plans will be validated and approved by the chain of command.
ANNEX W - Unit Movement Data.
                                                                                     34
It is not necessary to forward this annex for approval unless required by approving authority.
Appendix 1 - OEL Printout.
This cross matches with DD Form 1750.
Vehicle load cards must cross match with OEL and packing list using SUN sequence.
Appendix 2 - Packing list (DD Form 1750).
This list for air, rail, convoy, and commercial movement must cross match with OEL and higher headquarters SUN sequence.

12.00               AC      AM AS AT BN          DE FS     OS           SB    TO UA
Is the unit maintaining a current copy of their DEL (TC ACCIS) or OEL / UDL (TC AIMS II)? [FR 55-1, para 1-5, page 5, 7]
REFERENCE TEXT
FR 55-1, 1-5. Unit Movement Data (UMD) is a list of equipment and supplies the unit plans to deploy to accomplish its mission. It includes the transportability data necessary to
plan the move. Movement can be severely affected without valid UMD. Planning UMD is kept on file and updated IAW schedule published in FORSCOM Reg 55-1. The printed,
formatted listing is called the Automated Unit Equipment List (AUEL). It reflects current on-hand equipment. When the unit is alerted for an actual mission, their AUEL is updated
and tailored for the specific movement. The execution UMD is provided as a printed report called the Deployment Equipment List (DEL). For TC AIMS II, the terms change to
Organizational Equipment List (OEL) and Unit Deployment List (UDL), respectively.
EVAL METH
Verify unit AUEL and / or OEL data and make recommendations or changes, if necessary.



              MAINTENANCE AND AVIATION SUPPORT EQUIPMENT OPERATIONS
A- MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT
QUESTION
1.00              AC       AM AS       BN CO DE             OS           SB SF      UA LU
Does the Unit Daily Aircraft Status Report contain timely accurate information? [TC 3-04.7 para 6-24/25; C-12 / RC-12 / UC-35 SOW para 3.0; C-23 PWS para 3.5; GMM para
4.5.1 and 4.6; C-26 PWS para 3.5; OSAA SOP Chapter 9, RQ7B SOW]
REFERENCE TEXT
TC 3-04.7, Para 6-24. The aircraft daily status report is based on data migration via the send disks, local area network, or wireless from the maneuver companies. PC will
continually update the aircraft status. The ULLS-A (E) server is automatically updated once data migration is complete. The PC clerk is responsible for informing the PC OIC,
assistant PC OIC, and NCOIC of any changes.
Para 6-25. The PC board (table 6-3) is a depiction of displayed data on aircraft status, shop operations, or unique issues. Accurate and prompt information recorded on the board
is used to control current operations, plan anticipated work, and measure work performed. Although maintenance managers have quick access to information through ULLS-A (E),
a well-planned and informative PC board (equipment status board) can serve as a handy, quick-look source of information for the commander and other personnel (such as
platoon leaders and section chiefs). The status board serves as a good source of information on the progress of non-standard goals or missions associated with the MOE.
 C-12 / RC-12 / UC-35 SOW, Para 3.0: ―The Contractor shall submit Aircraft Status Reports (daily, monthly) IAW DI-MNTY-81067. Prior to submission of this report, each BB
report shall be reviewed and approved/signed by the appropriate COR. The Contractor shall forward disagreements as to the contents of the report to PCO.‖
C-23 GMM Para 4.5.1 and 4.6 Aircraft Daily Status Reporting
C-26 PWS Para 3.5: ―M-7 shall report the MC rates each month o the Monthly Aircraft Status Report. M-7 shall include each day’s hours of FMC, PMC, reportable time, flying
hours, landings, and other data reported by each Main Operating Base’s (MOB) Site Manager and confirmed by the Government Representative in this report. M-7 shall calculate
and report this information at the end of the month for each aircraft‖.
RQ7B SOW.
EVAL METH
Review unit daily status reports; compare them to the AMSS for automated users. Compare DA Form 1352-1 to daily status reports. Verify aircraft status accuracy by selecting an
aircraft six month file. ULLS-A, have production controller go into operational processes and open closed faults-- review closed faults for X conditions, circle X conditions to ensure
accuracy of information submitted on DA Form 1352. Evaluator will review as many aircraft files as time permits. OS UNITS: Units will develop local procedures for daily aircraft
                                                                                          35
status reports from contractors to the COR and /or flight operations. Contractors submit daily status reports to the ARMY/USAF PMO’s per individual contracts.

2.00                                        CO               OS                      UA
Are aircraft being reported on the contractor status reports correctly? [C-12 / RC-12 / UC-35 SOW para 3.0; C-23 PWS para 3.5; C-26 PWS para 3.5, RQ7B SOW (Systems
Status Report)]
REFERENCE TEXT
C-12 / RC-12 / UC-35 SOW, Para 3.0: " The Contractor shall maintain each aircraft at a Mission Capable (MC) rate of at least 80 percent except Site 185 (Desiderio AAF, Korea)
and Site 516 (Wiesbaden AB, GE). Site 185 and Site 516 will maintain each aircraft at a Mission Capable (MC) rate of at least 85 percent. For all sites, calculations will be made
per aircraft as described in Appendix D. …. The Contractor shall submit Aircraft Status Reports (daily, monthly) IAW DI-MNTY-81067. Prior to submission of this report, each BB
report shall be reviewed and approved/signed by the appropriate COR. The Contractor shall forward disagreements as to the contents of the report to PCO‖
C-23 PWS, Para 3.5 and GMM Para 4.5
C-26 PWS para 3.5"For the ARNG, M-7 shall meet a monthly Mission capability (MC) rate of not less than 80% for each aircraft. LSI shall also meet a monthly FMC rate of 80%
for each ARNG aircraft. LSI shall refer to Appendix Q, Required Equipment List (REL) for ARNG for the appropriate aircraft status when an aircraft system or component is
inoperative. … M-7 shall report the MC rates each month o the Monthly Aircraft Status Report. M-7 shall include each day’s hours of FMC, PMC, reportable time, flying hours,
landings, and other data reported by each Main Operating Base’s (MOB) Site Manager and confirmed by the Government Representative in this report. M-7 shall calculate and
report this information at the end of the month for each aircraft. M-7 shall report the MC rates each month o the Monthly Aircraft Status Report.‖
EVAL METH
Review contractor daily status reports for completeness and accuracy.

11.00               AC     AM AS      BN CO DE            OS           SB SF       UA LU
Are all controlled exchanges approved by the appropriate authority and are records maintained for each item removed (Production Control / Quality Control)? [AR 750-1 para 4-9
d; TC 3-04.7 para 6-33/34/37; TM 1-1500-328-23 para 10-4d; C-12/RC-12/UC-35 LCCS Procedure 8023; C-23 GMM para 3.7.7.3.2; C-26 General Maintenance Manual (GMM)
page 82; RQ7B SOW; USAREUR Suppl to AR 750-1, Fig K-1]
REFERENCE TEXT
AR 750-1, Para 4-9 d: Controlled exchange by using units is authorized only when—
(1) All the unserviceable reparable materiel involved is owned or under control of the organization performing the controlled exchange. (2) It is the only means reasonably available
to eliminate an adverse effect on the operational readiness of the unit, organization, or activity performing the controlled exchange. (3) Approved by the commander of the
organization performing the controlled exchange. e. Controlled exchange by Field and Sustainment levels of maintenance will be authorized only when— (1) It is the only means of
providing an FMC end item or weapon system to a supported unit within the time frame indicated by the IPD on the maintenance request. (2) Approved by the Field maintenance
or Sustainment maintenance commander, IMMO, or a designated representative. f. During mobilization or combat, ACOM, ASCC, and DRU commanders may modify the
controlled exchange conditions as deemed necessary. g. Controlled exchange is not authorized when the investigating officer has not formally released materiel involved in an
accident. h. Controlled exchange is not authorized on ORF assets. i. Control exchange documents and a controlled exchange log will be maintained in accordance with AR 25–
400–2. Documentation will be filed in accordance with the record retention schedule located at https://www.arims.army.mil.

TC 3-04.7, Para 6-33. Controlled exchange is the removal of serviceable components from unserviceable, economically reparable end items for immediate reuse in restoring a like
item or weapon system to a mission capable condition. AR 750-1 sets forth the following criteria:
• Approval authority remains with the commander of the organization in formal control of the system. • Controlled exchange by field- and sustainment-levels of maintenance is
authorized only when— • It is the only means of providing an FMC end item or weapon system to a supported unit within the period indicated by the initial PD on the maintenance
request. • Approved by the field or sustainment maintenance commander, installation materiel maintenance officer, or a designated representative.
Para: 6-34. In all cases, the individual owning aircraft unit commanders will be notified when controlled exchange actions are to be conducted and documentation will be furnished
to the unit responsible for reporting aircraft status on DA Form 1352 (Army Aircraft Inventory, Status and Flying Time). Approval authorities stated above are IAW approvals as
directed in AR 750-1 and TM 1-1500-328-23.
Para 6-37. Control exchange documents and logs are locally produced and maintained IAW AR 25-400-2. Controlled exchange maintenance procedures should not be considered
complete until all forms and records are closed out and filed. Upon controlled exchange action approval, an authorization form is initiated in four copies and distributed as follows:
• A copy is used by the PC office for DA Form 1352 reporting purposes; this copy is filed in the PC office controlled-exchange logbook. Controlled-exchange sheets for each
reporting period are filed with the DA Form 1352 as supporting documentation IAW AR 700-138. • A copy is given to QC for its controlled exchange files. • A copy is filed in the
donor aircraft logbook; aircraft records are annotated to reflect item controlled exchanged to aircraft serial number. If the component is a serial-numbered item, the serial number of

                                                                                          36
the component is annotated. • A copy is filed in the gaining aircraft logbook; aircraft records are annotated to reflect item controlled exchanged to aircraft serial number. If the
component is a serial numbered item, the serial number of the component is annotated.
Note. Refer to chapter 4 for information on SSF procedures and chapter 7 for information on RX and controlled exchange procedures. Note. The ULLS-A (E) database lists only
reportable items for the controlled exchange process. Non-listed reportable items must be manually input into the controlled exchanges process. For example, a wheel and tire are
not reportable items in the ULLS-A (E) database; therefore, a manual input is required when completing the commanders comments.

TM 1-1500-328-23, Para. 10-4d. Removal and installation of items involved in controlled exchange or cannibalization actions must be documented on DA Form 2408-13-l per DA
Pamphlet 738-751.

C-12/RC-12/UC-35 LCCS Procedure 8023 Controlled Substitution.

C-23 GMM, Para 3.7.7.3.2

C-26 General Maintenance Manual (GMM) page 82;

[Europe Only],USAREUR Suppl to AR 750-1, Fig K-1
CONTROLLED-EXCHANGE RECORD
1. Gaining aircraft serial number:
2. Donor aircraft serial number:
3. Mission requirement:
4. Signature of approving authority:
5. Document number of requisition:
6. Document number of turn-in:
7. Signature of technical supply personnel (certifying that a lateral supply search has been conducted, local purchase is not possible, and a replacement part is on requisition):
8. Signature of maintenance supervisor (certifying that local manufacture is not possible and that
inspection requirements of component exchange have been completed):
9. Component serial numbers:
a. Serviceable:
b. Unserviceable:
10. Total flight hours:
11. Receiving aircraft:
12. Donor aircraft:
13. Signature of the quality-control inspector (certifying that all aircraft forms and records have been annotated according to DA Pam 738-751):
14. Other locally required information:

EVAL METH
Are the procedures outlined in the SOP being followed? Verify all controlled exchange actions have been approved by the appropriate authority and disposition of records are
correct. Look for a controlled exchange write up on a 2408-13-1. Evaluator will compare controlled exchange log with entries on DA Form 1352/ (or similar document (UAS)) in
addition to ensuring QC has a file that contains controlled exchange sheets. Form disposition, one copy in permanent file in QC, one copy to gaining aircraft, one copy to losing
aircraft and one copy of controlled exchange sheet will be filed with the DA Form 1352/ (or similar document (UAS)) for a total of four copies.

12.00             AC      AM AS       BN       DE                        SB SF       UA LU
Does the unit SOP clearly define current operations to include the following areas? [AR 750–1, para 3.7.b; DA Pam 385-90, para 2-12] Ensure following items are included in the
SOP:
____Controlled Exchange [TM 1-1500-328-23 para 10-2 e]
____Material Readiness Reporting [AR 700-138 para 3-2 f (3); DA Pam 750-3 para 2-3 i]
____ULLS-AE / ELAS [ULLS-AE / ELAS End Users Manual]
____Aircraft Recovery / Evacuation [FM 3-04.513 para 1-21, 1-24, 1-25, Apndx B (sample SOP)]

                                                                                          37
____Army Records Information Management System [DA Pam 750-3 para 2-3 p]
____Rescue Hoist maintenance procedures.
REFERENCE TEXT
AR 750–1, Para 3.7.b: Standing operating procedures will be established and maintained by all Army organizations and activities performing maintenance operations.
DA Pam 385-90, Para 2-12: Commanders should ensure that an SOP is developed for all unit functional areas and for all aviation operations executed in the command. The SOP
may, where applicable, be consolidated at the battalion/squadron or regiment/ brigade/group level.

Controlled Exchange: TM 1-1500-328-23, Para 10-2 e: Detailed instructions and control procedures for conducting cannibalization and controlled exchange actions must be
included in the Unit's Standing Operating Procedures (SOP).

Material Readiness Reporting: AR 700-138, Para 3-2 f (3) Supporting maintenance units or activities will provide feeder data to owning organizations and activities, as required, for
those aircraft and components in repair above the unit level. Supporting maintenance units or activities will provided this data via ULLS-A/SAMS 1 data exchange, DA Form 1352-
1, DA Form 2407, or a locally standardized and commander approved form captured in the unit’s SOP.
DA Pam 750-3, Para 2–3. Areas to address in standing operating procedures. As a minimum, the following areas of the SOP should be addressed in detail: i.Readiness reporting.

ULLS-A: ULLS-A / AE End Users Manual.

Aircraft Recovery/ Evacuation: FM 3-04.513, Para 1-21. The operational battalion/squadron commander retains initial responsibility for aircraft recovery. Aircraft recovery
operations are planned within the context and urgency of the mission, force size, and the density of recovery assets at the disposal of commanders. Aircraft recovery procedures
are included in unit SOPs, contingency plans, operation orders, and air mission briefs (AMBs).

Files Management (ARIMS): DA Pam 750-3, Para 2-3 p: As a minimum, the following areas of the SOP should be addressed in detail: p. Army Record Information Management
System (ARIMS) filing system.
EVAL METH
Unit personnel will be asked to show the evaluator all areas as requested. The evaluator will question personnel on daily operations to ensure compliance. Unfamiliarity by staff is
cause for failure. SOPs that do not clearly define local procedures or are not IAW published directives will receive an unsat for this question. Ensure SOP addresses the following
areas: Controlled Exchange, Material Readiness Reporting, Unit Level Logistic System Aviation (ULLS-A), aircraft recovery and evacuation procedures, ARIMS, Rescue Hoist
maintenance procedures if applicable.


B- QUALITY CONTROL
QUESTION
1.00               AC       AM AS        BN       DE                      SB SF  UA LU
Are Standing Operating Procedures established and maintained for current operations? [AR 750-1 para 3-7b]
In addition to normal quality control functions, ensure the SOP includes:
____Weight and Balance [AR 95-1 para 7.1 d],
____FOD [AR 385-10 para 15-8; DA Pam 385-90 para 2-8 b]
____AOAP [DA Pam 750-3 para 2-3 d (3)], N/A RQ7B
____Shop inspection procedures [TC 3-04.7 para 9-19/20/21]
____Corrosion Prevention and Control [TM 1-1500-328-23 para 8-2.b.; TC 3-04.7 para 3-48]
____ARIMS Files [DA Pam 750-3 para 2-3p]
REFERENCE TEXT
AR 750-1, Para 3-7b: Standing operating procedures will be established and maintained by all Army organizations and activities performing maintenance operations.

Weight and Balance: AR 95-1, Para 7-1d (1 & 2): This chapter provides a weight and balance control system for operation of Army aircraft.
d. Commanders of installations and units that operate, maintain, repair, or modify Army aircraft will—
(1) Ensure effective application of these policies and procedures.
(2) Develop command directives to implement these policies and procedures.

                                                                                         38
FOD: AR 385-10, Para 15–8. Foreign Object Damage Prevention Program a. A Foreign Object Damage Prevention Program will be established to find and correct potential
hazards and to eliminate the causes of foreign object damage.
DA Pam 385-90, Para 2-8 b: The unit FOD prevention program will be in writing. All unit personnel will be familiar with the contents of the FOD prevention program. A sample FOD
prevention SOP is in appendix C. Foreign object damage prevention countermeasures will be integrated throughout the unit SOP. However, each unit’s SOP will be adapted to
meet local FOD needs.

AOAP: DA Pam 750-3, Para 2-3d (3): As a minimum, the following areas of the SOP should be addressed in detail: d. Preventive maintenance checks and services (PMCS) are as
follows: (3) Army Oil Analysis Program (AOAP).

Shop inspection procedures: TC 3-04.7, Para 9-19. QC inspections of maintenance and shop areas are detailed with the overall goal of establishing sound and disciplined
maintenance procedures and practices. A QC inspection focuses on the maintenance facility, including maintenance and shop areas (safety).
Para 9-20. When performing the maintenance and shop safety and equipment inspection, TIs check for cleanliness and serviceability and absence of corrosion on GSE. The
inspection also includes checking for unobstructed fire lanes, serviceability of the hangar, serviceability of the fire extinguisher, and installation and use of equipment safety
devices. Additional guidance for fire extinguisher inspections is found in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1910.157. Note. Active duty units will conduct these inspections
monthly. National Guard and Reserve Component units will conduct these inspections quarterly.
Para 9-21. Safety inspection forms are maintained and filed in the QC section according to AR 25-400-2. A copy of the inspection is given to the appropriate shop or maintenance
section NCOIC for corrections of any deficiencies. Inspectors will forward copies of the inspection results to the ASO or unit safety manager to incorporate uncorrected deficiencies
into the safety information collection and analysis program and hazard log for tracking. If deficiencies are found, shop or maintenance sections are re-inspected to ensure
compliance.

CPC: TM 1-1500-328-23, Para 8-2. General. b. All activities that have control of aircraft and associated equipment will prepare a CPC plan in writing. The CPC plan and
Implementing instructions should be included in the Unit's Standing Operating Procedures (SOP).
TC 3-04.7, Para 3-48. Aviation units responsible for aircraft maintenance shall establish CPC programs. The type of program depends on the environment in which the aircraft and
equipment may be exposed.

ARIMS: DA Pam 750-3, Para 2-3p. Areas to address in standing operating procedures. As a minimum, the following areas of the SOP should be addressed in detail: p. Army
Record Information Management System (ARIMS) filing system.
EVAL METH
Unit personnel will be asked to show the inspector all areas as requested. Inspector will question personnel as to what day to day operations are to ensure compliance.
Unfamiliarity by staff is cause for failure. SOPs not descriptive of local procedures or not followed is cause for failure. Ensure procedures for weight and balance, FOD, AOAP,
shop inspection procedures, CPC, ARIMS.

2.00               AC      AM AS        BN        DE                     SB SF       UA LU
Are personnel appointed in writing for the following duties? [TC 3-04.7 para 9-7, 9-8, 9-9]
____Commander (assumption of command orders).
____TIs (DA PAM 738-751). [DA Pam 738-751 para 1.6 a (11)]
____Limited TIs (DA PAM 738-751). [DA Pam 738-751 para 1.6 a (11)]
____MEs and MPs (AR 95-1 and TM 1-1500-328-23). [TM 1-1500-328-23 para 3-3] (N/A RQ7B)
____Unit safety officer and NCO (AR 385-10). [DA Pam 385-90 para 1-4 j (3) (c)]
____Personnel signing equipment and component condition tags for turning in components and equipment (aircraft maintenance only) (DA PAM 738-751).
____Personnel authorizing evacuation of aircraft with a grounding condition (X) status for a onetime evacuation mission (DA PAM 738-751). [DA Pam 738-751, para 1-10]; (N/A
RQ7B)
____Personnel authorized to change an aircraft with a grounding condition (X) status to (—) status for the performance of a one-time test flight (DA PAM 738-751). [DA Pam 738-
751 para 1-11]; (N/A RQ7B)
____Personnel inspecting aircraft first-aid kits (TM 1-1500-328-23). [TC 3-04.72 Appendix A para 13(6); TM 1-1500-204-23-1 para 11-4]
____Weight-and-balance technician (AR 95-1). [AR 95-1 para 7-1d (3)]
____Technical supply officer. [TC 3-04.7 para 7-1]

                                                                                         39
____TMDE support coordinator and alternate (AR 750-43). [AR 750-43 para 6-4]
____Publications officer or NCO (DA PAM 25-33). [TC 3-04.7 para 9-8] (N/A RQ7B)
____CPC program monitor (TM 1-1500-328-23). [TM 1-1500-328-23 para 8-3a (2)]
____FOD prevention officer and NCO (AR 385-10). [AR 385-10, para 15-8b; DA Pam 385-90 para 2-8d (1) (a)]
____AOAP monitor (TB 43-0211). [TB 43-0211 Section II para 2-1]; (N/A RQ7B)
____Unit maintenance (PC) officer (AR 750-1). [AR 750-1 para 3-7a]
____Controlled exchange officer (AR 750-1). [AR 750-1 para 4-9 e]
____Records management officer (AR 25-400-2). [TC 3-04.7 para 9-8]
____ULLS-A (E) administrator. [TC 3-04.7 para 9-8]
REFERENCE TEXT
TC 3-04.7, Para 9-7. Delegation of authority orders for performing specific duties must be approved by the unit commander. This authority is designated, in writing, by
memorandum. The memorandum will state the functions, responsibilities, and duration of assigned duties.
Para 9-8. Completed delegation of authority orders (memorandums) are maintained on file until revoked, rescinded, or no longer applicable. Units will maintain orders
(memorandums) on: • Commander (assumption of command orders). • TIs (DA PAM 738-751). • Limited TIs (DA PAM 738-751). • MEs and MPs (AR 95-1 and TM 1-1500-328-
23). • Unit safety officer and NCO (AR 385-10). • Personnel signing equipment and component condition tags for turning in components and equipment (aircraft maintenance only)
(DA PAM 738-751). • Personnel authorizing evacuation of aircraft with a grounding condition (X) status for a onetime evacuation mission (DA PAM 738-751). • Personnel
authorized to change an aircraft with a grounding condition (X) status to (—) status for the performance of a one-time test flight (DA PAM 738-751). • Personnel inspecting aircraft
first-aid kits (TM 1-1500-328-23). • Weight-and-balance technician (AR 95-1). • Technical supply officer. • ASES OIC/NCOIC. • TMDE support coordinator and alternate (AR 750-
43). • Publications officer or NCO (DA PAM 25-33). • CPC program monitor (TM 1-1500-328-23). • FOD prevention officer and NCO (AR 385-10). • Personnel responsible for the
FOD prevention plan (AR 385-10). • AOAP monitor (TB 43-0211). • Unit maintenance (PC) officer (AR 750-1). • Controlled exchange officer (AR 750-1). • Records management
officer (AR 25-400-2). • ULLS-A (E) administrator.
Para 9-9. Army publications affecting the above designations are reviewed periodically for changes and revisions. Additions, deletions, or modifications of orders are made at that
time.

Technical Inspectors / Limited Technical Inspectors: DA PAM 738-751, Para 1-6a (11): (11) Commanders and persons in equal management positions of Department of Defense
(DOD) contract support maintenance activities may appoint a designated representative to sign for and represent them in their absence for entries on forms and records. When a
designated representative is appointed the authority must be in writing; such as, on a memorandum (letter), orders, or a DA Form 1687 (Notice of Delegation of Authority-Receipt
for Supplies) (see DA Pamphlet 710–2– 1).

Maintenance test pilot: TM 1-1500-328-23, Para 3-3: All pilots must meet the requirements of AR 95-1, Flight Regulations, before being appointed by the Unit Commander, As a
―Maintenance Test Pilots‖ for a specific mission, type design, and series aircraft.

Unit Safety Officer and NCO (DA Pam 385-90 Para 1-4 j (3)): j. Commanders provide the following functions: (3) Appoint and rate the ASOs at regiment/brigade/group level and
below.

Authorize evacuation of aircraft with grounding condition (X) status for a onetime evacuation mission: DA Pam 738-751, Para 1-10a: If it is deemed possible, with an acceptable
degree of risk, to evacuate an aircraft while the condition status is a Red ―X,‖ the commander, or an equal management or supervisory person in a DOD contract maintenance
support activity or their designated representative (usually a maintenance officer) may authorize a one-time evacuation mission.

Authorize change of aircraft with grounding condition (X) status to (-) for the performance of a one-time test flight: DA Pam 738-751, Para 1-11a: When an in-flight deficiency, with
a Red ―X‖ status, does not recur during ground tests and a maintenance test flight, for verification, is deemed possible, with an acceptable degree of risk, the commander or an
equal management supervisory person in a DOD contract maintenance support activity or designated representative may authorize the following actions.

Personnel inspecting aircraft first-aid kits: FM 1-508, Para 2-13 Commanders must make sure that only trained, qualified personnel, either military or civilian, perform maintenance
on ALSE according to AR 95-1.
TM 1-1500-204-23-1, Para 11-4. Maintenance of ALSE will be performed only by school-trained, qualified personnel, either military or civilian personnel trained in accordance with
paragraph 11-19 may inspect first aid kit. General purpose, panel mounted, NSN 6545-00-919-6650, for aircraft. Also maintenance personnel must be graduates of the U.S. Army


                                                                                         40
600-ASIQ2, U.S. Air Force C3AABR92230-000, U.S. Navy LSE C-602-2010, or other courses of instruction approved by U.S. Army Aviation Logistics School (USAALS), Ft.
Eustis, VA. USAALS has responsibility for training ALSE maintenance personnel. Refresher courses do not qualify personnel to service ALSE.

Weight and Balance Technician: AR 95-1, Para 7-1 d(3): d. Commanders of installations and units that operate, maintain, repair, or modify Army aircraft will— (3) Appoint in
writing, weight and balance technicians.

Technical supply officer: TC 3-04.7, Para 7-1. The battalion or squadron CW3 AMO is the technical supply officer. …… The position of the technical supply officer is a primary
rated duty and commanders will appoint these officers on orders.

TMDE support coordinator and alternate: AR 750-43, Para 6–4. Support coordinator. Each command, installation, and unit that uses TMDE will designate a TMDE C&RS
coordinator in writing.

Publications Officer or NCO: TC 3-04.7, Para 9-8. Completed delegation of authority forms (memorandums) are maintained on file until revoked, rescinded, or no longer
applicable. Units will maintain a memorandum (orders), as applicable, on the following designated representatives: Publications Officer or NCO.

Corrosion Prevention and Control Program monitor: TM 1-1500-328-23, Para 8-3a (2): A CPC monitor is appointed and placed on Unit Orders.

FOD Prevention Officer & NCO: AR 385-10, Para 15-8b. A unit foreign object damage prevention officer/NCO, other than the ASO, will be appointed to implement the unit foreign
object damage prevention program.
DA Pam 385-90, Para 2-8d (1) (a): d. Management of the foreign object damage program will encompass the following: (1) Unit commanders will establish an FOD prevention
program tailored to the needs of the unit: (a) Appoint an FOD prevention officer/NCO to implement the unit FOD prevention program. This may be an additional duty for any unit
officer/NCO other than the ASO/aviation safety noncommissioned officer (ASNCO) or the aviation maintenance officer.

Personnel responsible for the FOD prevention plan: AR 385-10, Para 15-4. A CSC and an enlisted safety council (ESC) will each be designated in writing at battalion level and
above.

Army Oil Analysis Program (AOAP) monitor: TB 43-0211, Section II Para 2-1. Commanders. ……One of the most important tasks you have is to appoint a command
representative to monitor the AOAP within assigned units.

Unit Maintenance (PC) officer: AR 750-1, Para 3-7a: An officer or civilian equivalent qualified in maintenance management will be appointed as maintenance officer, in writing, at
each level of command. Maintenance officers will provide staff supervision of materiel maintenance operations within the organization. MTOE units that have insufficient officers for
these duties may appoint a qualified noncommissioned officer as the maintenance officer.

Controlled exchange officer: AR 750-1, Para 4-9e. Controlled exchange by Field and Sustainment levels of maintenance will be authorized only when— (1) It is the only means of
providing an FMC end item or weapon system to a supported unit within the time frame indicated by the IPD on the maintenance request. (2) Approved by the Field maintenance
or Sustainment maintenance commander, IMMO, or a designated representative.

Records Management Officer: TC 3-04.7, Para 9-8. Completed delegation of authority forms (memorandums) are maintained on file until revoked, rescinded, or no longer
applicable. Units will maintain a memorandum (orders), as applicable, on the following designated representatives: Records Management Officer (AR 25-400-2).

ULLS–A Administrator: TC 3-04.7, Para 9-8. Completed delegation of authority forms (memorandums) are maintained on file until revoked, rescinded, or no longer applicable.
Units will maintain a memorandum (orders), as applicable, on the following designated representatives: ULLS-A Administrator.
EVAL METH
When the commander retains authority for a specific duty in writing (SOP) no order is required. Verify the unit has the orders listed in the orders file / book. Missing orders or
orders with incorrect references will be graded as an unsat.

5.00                 AC      AM AS       BN CO DE                      SB SF          UA
If the unit is using Technical Inspector Stamps: [TC 3-04.7 para 9-57]

                                                                                           41
____Is a register / inventory maintained?
____Are unissued stamps secured under lock and key?
____Are relieved stamps not assigned for six months?
REFERENCE TEXT
TC3-04.7, Para 9-57: The following requirements must also be met: • Keep stamps that have not been issued under lock and key. • Destroy illegible stamps. • Do not assign
relieved stamps for six months. • Keep a stamp inventory or register (see table 9-3) in the QC section.
EVAL METH
If TIs are using TI Stamps ensure a locally produced register/inventory is maintained. Verify unused stamps are secured under lock and key. Verify relieved stamps are not issued
for a period of time not less than six months.

6.00                 AC       AM AS      BN CO DE      OS               SB SF     UA
Is aircraft status and unit level maintenance documented accurately using DA Form 2408-13, 2408-13 -1 / -2 / -3, (to include phase checklist)? [DA PAM 738-751 para 1-6a, 1-7a,
and 1-8a; ULLS-A End Users Manual & ULLS-A(E) End Users Manual; C-12, RC-12, UC-35; C-23 Contractor IAW Site Operation Manual; C-26 PWS 3.7.5.1; RQ7B SOW]
REFERENCE TEXT
DA Pam 738-751, Para 1-6a / 1-7a / 1-8a:
Para 1-6: General instructions. a. Specific details on how to use, fill out, process, and dispose of aviation equipment forms and records will be found in the related chapters.
Para 1-7: Responsibilities of forms. a. The forms and records called for in this pamphlet are more than just a collection of paper and data. They provide technical inspectors,
maintenance managers, and commanders a maintenance management tool, as well as a picture of the condition, use, operation, maintenance status, and logistic needs of the
aircraft and aviation-associated equipment. The final purpose of this information is to be sure of safe and reliable aviation equipment that is fully mission capable (FMC) and
ready for worldwide deployment.
Para 1-8a (1): Red ―X‖ status symbol. A Red ―X‖ is the most serious status symbol. You put a Red ―X‖ on the form or record that applies when there is a fault, deficiency, or
condition that makes the aircraft, system, or associated equipment inoperative or unsafe to fly.

ULLS-A End Users Manual, Para 7.1.2.1.1 ENTER FAULT AGAINST - AIRCRAFT. The Aircraft selection is used to enter faults directly associated with the aircraft/airframe and
AMCOM tracked DA Form 2410 components. Selecting this option will post/default an "A" in the System Code field of the Aircraft Inspection and Maintenance Record screen
(Figure 7-25). The Logistics Support Activity (LOGSA) has developed a list of Subsystems/Weapons Systems that require independent readiness reporting. Do not use Aircraft
option if the NMC fault is against one of these subsystems.

ULLS-A (E) End Users Manual.

C-12/RC-12 SOW, Para 3.3.2.1, ―The Contractor shall initiate, maintain, and complete the required C-12/RC-12 logbook, historical records, and related forms IAW DA PAM 738-
751.‖

UC-35 SOW, Para 3.3.2.2, ―Maintaining Aircraft Logbooks, forms, and records IAW DA PAM 738-751 is not required for the UC-35. However the Contractor has elected to use DA
PAM 738-751 in lieu of commercial requirements for the UC-35 aircraft.‖

C-23, Para 3.7.1 ―The Contractor shall initiate, maintain, and complete the required C-23 logbook, historical records, and related forms IAW DA PAM 738-751.‖

C-26 PWS 3.7.5.1 ―M-7 The Contractor shall initiate, maintain, and complete the C-26 logbooks, historical records, and related forms. Army forms and records shall be completed
IAW DA PAM 738-751‖. ―All data shall be entered into the aircraft logbooks, historical records, and shall remain at the aircraft’s BB site‖.
EVAL METH
Incomplete or inaccurate forms noted during the inspection will be considered as not in compliance with regulatory guidance. The inspector will inspect as many six month files as
time permits. All errors will be noted to include aircraft serial #, date of flight pack and a brief description of the error noted. Ensure faults are written against the proper
system/subsystem. Ensure aircraft are placed on an X status when a grounding condition exists. Ensure DD 1613 PILOT'S COMPASS CORRECTION CARD, CADS/PADS
information is entered into ULLS-A (E). Units issued Rescue Hoists: A review of hoist logbook will be accomplished to ensure proper maintenance documentation is on hand.

9.00              AC      AM AS        BN CO DE        OS              SB SF       UA LU

                                                                                       42
____Are all airworthiness releases for modifications, statement of airworthiness qualification, and airworthiness approval located in the aircraft during its operation?
____Are AWR entries properly annotated on DA Form 2408-13-1, or in the historical records if required by the AWR special instructions? [AR 70-62 para 1-4h (2), and 2-1]
REFERENCE TEXT
AR 70-62, Para 1-4h (2): Operational unit commanders. All commanders of operational units will ensure that—
(1) An airworthiness release is requested through their major Army higher headquarters and material developer and is obtained before modifying or using any aircraft incorporating
a modification (see para 2–7) to the qualified or standard configuration assessed as impacting airworthiness.
(2) A copy of all applicable airworthiness releases are located in the aircraft logbook or equivalent unmanned aircraft record during its operation and when it is transferred, until the
document is superseded, or the aircraft system is restored to the unmodified qualified or standard configuration.
Para 2–1. Airworthiness requirements for flight, other piloted, and test operations
a. Army aviators and unmanned aircraft system operators will not operate aircraft in the performance of official duties if there is no airworthiness release or airworthiness approval.
EVAL METH
Verify a copy of all AWRs is located in the logbook, in the historical records as required, or inputted into HELOTRAC. AWRs for all aircraft can be obtained at https://upw.jtdi.mil.

12.00           AC     AM AS        BN CO DE          OS              SB SF       UA
DA Form 2408-18 (Equipment Inspection List). Are all required inspections accurately entered on the DA Form 2408-18 and accomplished when due? [DA Pam 738-751 para 2-
13; C-12/RC-12 SOW, para 3.3.2.1; UC-35 SOW, para 3.3.2.2; C-23, para 3.7.1; C-26 PWS 3.7.4.1 ; RQ7B SOW]
REFERENCE TEXT
DA Pam 738-751, Para 2–13: DA Form 2408–18, Equipment Inspection List a. Purpose of the DA Form 2408–18. This form provides a ready reference list of all inspections,
services, checks, and replacements listed in the Special Inspections section of the aircraft maintenance manual, TM-23, that are not done during scheduled maintenance
inspections and are not recorded on other forms and records (fig 2–13).

C-12/RC-12 SOW, Para 3.3.2.1: ―The Contractor shall initiate, maintain, and complete the required C-12/RC-12 logbook, historical records, and related forms IAW DA PAM 738-
751.‖

UC-35 SOW, Para 3.3.2.2, ―Maintaining Aircraft Logbooks, forms, and records IAW DA PAM 738-751 is not required for the UC-35. However the Contractor has elected to use DA
PAM 738-751 in lieu of commercial requirements for the UC-35 aircraft.‖

C-23, Para 3.7.1: ―The Contractor shall initiate, maintain, and complete the required C-23 logbook, historical records, and related forms IAW DA PAM 738-751.‖

C-26 PWS 3.7.4.1, ―M-7 shall initiate, maintain, and complete the C-26B logbook, historical records, and related forms IAW DA PAM 738-751.‖
EVAL METH
Compare the technical manual to the 2408-18 and ensure all inspections are entered on the -18. Entries noted that are not accurately recorded / not entered or that are overdue
inspections will be considered not in compliance. Ensure rescue hoist logbooks are checked against special inspections from the rescue hoist technical manual.

17.00           AC      AM AS       BN CO DE        OS            SB SF       UA
Are DA Form 2408-5 (Equipment Modification Record) and DA Form 2408-5-1 (Equipment Modification Record (Component)) complete and accurate?
[DA Pam 738-751 para 1-6a (16), 4-3a, 4-4a; C-12/RC-12 SOW para 3.3.2.1; UC-35 SOW para 3.3.2.2; C-23 para 3.7.1; C-26 PWS para 3.7.5.1; RQ7B SOW]
REFERENCE TEXT
DA Pam 738-751, Para 1-6a (16): Forms and records must be readable, correct, and complete.
Para 4–3. DA Form 2408–5, Equipment Modification Record. a. Purpose of DA Form 2408–5. Records the requirement for and the application of all authorized DA modifications
to the aircraft and aircraft training devices/simulators listed in appendix D. (See fig 4–1) Note. DA Form 2408–5 will not be used to record aircraft SOF messages, ASAMS, or TBs.
They are recorded on DA Form 2408–15.
Para 4–4. DA Form 2408–5–1, Equipment Modification Record (Component). a. Purpose. The DA Form 2408–5–1 shows SOF messages/ASAMs/TBs, other one-time
inspections, and MWOs on serialized reportable components/modules listed in TB 1–1500–341–01(See fig 4–2). (Not applicable to fixed-wing aircraft.)

C-12/RC-12 SOW, Para 3.3.2.1: ―The Contractor shall initiate, maintain, and complete the required C-12/RC-12 logbook, historical records, and related forms IAW DA PAM 738-
751.‖

                                                                                           43
UC-35 SOW, Para 3.3.2.2, ―Maintaining Aircraft Logbooks, forms, and records IAW DA PAM 738-751 is not required for the UC-35. However the Contractor has elected to use DA
PAM 738-751 in lieu of commercial requirements for the UC-35 aircraft.‖

C-23, Para 3.7.1: ―The Contractor shall initiate, maintain, and complete the required C-23 logbook, historical records, and related forms IAW DA PAM 738-751.‖

C-26 PWS para 3.7.5.1; ―M-7 shall initiate, maintain, and complete the C-26 logbooks, historical records, and related forms. Army forms and records shall be completed IAW DA
PAM 738-751. All data shall be entered into the aircraft logbooks, historical records, and shall remain at the aircraft’s BB site‖.

EVAL METH
Incomplete or inaccurate forms noted during the inspection will be considered as not in compliance with regulatory guidance.   All errors will be noted to include aircraft serial #
and brief description of the fault found.

18.00             AC     AM AS        BN CO DE         OS              SB SF     UA
Is DA Form 2408-15 (Historical Record for Aircraft) complete and accurate? [DA Pam 738-751 para 1-6a (16), 4-5a; C-12/RC-12 SOW para 3.3.2.1; UC-35 SOW para 3.3.2.2; C-
23 para 3.7.1; C-26 PWS para 3.7.5.1; RQ7B SOW]
REFERENCE TEXT
DA Pam 738-751, Para 1-6a (16) Forms and records must be readable, correct, and complete.
Para 4–5. DA Form 2408–15, Historical Record for Aircraft. a. Purpose. The DA Form 2408–15 provides historical data on the aircraft and associated equipment throughout its
service life (see fig 4–3).

C-12/RC-12 SOW Para 3.3.2.1, ―The Contractor shall initiate, maintain, and complete the required C-12/RC-12 logbook, historical records, and related forms IAW DA PAM 738-
751.‖

UC-35 SOW, Para 3.3.2.2, ―Maintaining Aircraft Logbooks, forms, and records IAW DA PAM 738-751 is not required for the UC-35. However the Contractor has elected to use DA
PAM 738-751 in lieu of commercial requirements for the UC-35 aircraft.‖

C-23 Para 3.7.1. ―The Contractor shall initiate, maintain, and complete the required C-23 logbook, historical records, and related forms IAW DA PAM 738-751.‖

C-26 PWS para 3.7.5.1; ―M-7 shall initiate, maintain, and complete the C-26 logbooks, historical records, and related forms. Army forms and records shall be completed IAW DA
PAM 738-751. All data shall be entered into the aircraft logbooks, historical records, and shall remain at the aircraft’s BB site‖.
EVAL METH
Incomplete or inaccurate forms noted during the inspection will be considered as not in compliance with regulatory guidance.   All errors will be noted to include aircraft serial #
and brief description of the fault found.

20.00                AC     AM AS       BN CO DE       OS            SB SF       UA
Are DA Forms 2408-16 / 2408-16-1 (Aircraft Component Historical Record / History Recorder, Component, Module Record) complete and accurate? [DA Pam 738-751 para 1-6a
(16), 4-7a, 4-8a; items as required in TB 1-1500-341-01; C-12/RC-12 SOW para 3.3.2.1; UC-35 SOW para 3.3.2.2; C-23 para 3.7.1; C-26 PWS para 3.7.5.1 ; RQ7B SOW]
REFERENCE TEXT
DA Pam 738-751, Para 1-6a (16): Forms and records must be readable, correct, and complete.
Para 4–7: DA Form 2408–16, Aircraft Component Historical Record. a. Purpose. This form provides a permanent record of historical data and events for selected TC, RC, and
CC components/modules and parts that are removed and replaced at specific aircraft operating hours. This form will stay with the aircraft, component/module, and/or parts
throughout their service life (see fig 4–5).
Para 4–8. DA Form 2408–16–1, History Recorder, Component, Module Record. a. Purpose. (1) This form provides a permanent record of historical data for selected TC, RC, and
CC components and subcomponents for turbine engines equipped with a history recorder to collect total cumulative operating hours and history recorder counts, including the Low
Cycle Fatigue (LCF-1 and LCF-2), Time-Temperature Index (TTI), and engine, component, or subcomponent operating hours. The data recorded on the DA Form 2408–16–1 is
important information and extra care should be taken to keep it current and occur ate. The data is used to complete DA Form 2410s, and by AMCOM to track and manage

                                                                                       44
selected items. (2) The DA Form 2408–16–1 provides a permanent record of historical data for H-60 series aircraft APUs and installed components, that are listed in TB 1–1500–
341–01. Data collected includes the number of prior overhauls, starts since overhaul, starts since new, and operating hours since new in the LCF1, LCF2, TTI, and Operating
Hours blocks. (3) This form will remain in the aircraft historical file as long as the turbine engine or APU is installed on the aircraft. The form will stay with the APU, engine, major
component, or subcomponent when the item is removed for evacuation to supply, or support maintenance, including depot. (See figs 4–6 through 4–13.) (Not applicable to fixed-
wing aircraft.)

C-12/RC-12 SOW, Para 3.3.2.1, ―The Contractor shall initiate, maintain, and complete the required C-12/RC-12 logbook, historical records, and related forms IAW DA PAM 738-
751.‖

UC-35 SOW, Para 3.3.2.2, ―Maintaining Aircraft Logbooks, forms, and records IAW DA PAM 738-751 is not required for the UC-35. However the Contractor has elected to use DA
PAM 738-751 in lieu of commercial requirements for the UC-35 aircraft.‖

C-23 Para 3.7.1 ―The Contractor shall initiate, maintain, and complete the required C-23 logbook, historical records, and related forms IAW DA PAM 738-751.‖

C-26 PWS para 3.7.5.1; ―M-7 shall initiate, maintain, and complete the C-26 logbooks, historical records, and related forms. Army forms and records shall be completed IAW DA
PAM 738-751. All data shall be entered into the aircraft logbooks, historical records, and shall remain at the aircraft’s BB site‖.
EVAL METH
Incomplete or inaccurate forms noted during the inspection will be considered as not in compliance with regulatory guidance.        All errors will be noted to include aircraft serial #
and brief description of the fault found.

21.00              AC      AM AS      BN CO DE        OS            SB SF     UA
Is DA Form 2408-17(Aircraft Inventory Record) complete and accurate? [DA Pam 738-751 para 1-6a (16), 4-9a, Fig 4-14A para 6b; C-12/RC-12 SOW para 3.3.2.1; UC-35 SOW
para 3.3.2.2; C-23 para 3.7.1; C-26 PWS para 3.7.5.1; RQ7B SOW] [UAS DA Form 2062]
REFERENCE TEXT
DA Pam 738-751, Para 1-6a (16): Forms and records must be readable, correct, and complete.
Para 4–9. DA Form 2408–17, Aircraft Inventory Record. a. Purpose. The form provides a checklist of items assigned to an aircraft that are subject to a periodic inventory. (See fig
4–14.)
Figure 4-14A. Para 6 b. LOCATION/REMARKS. Enter the exact location of items installed or removed, using area name and fuselage stations when it applies. Enter the authority
to install or remove, such as MWO number and date (dd mm yyyy), and the PID of the person making the entry.

C-12/RC-12 SOW Para 3.3.2.1, ―The Contractor shall initiate, maintain, and complete the required C-12/RC-12 logbook, historical records, and related forms IAW DA PAM
738-751.‖

UC-35 SOW, Para 3.3.2.2, ―Maintaining Aircraft Logbooks, forms, and records IAW DA PAM 738-751 is not required for the UC-35. However the Contractor has elected to use DA
PAM 738-751 in lieu of commercial requirements for the UC-35 aircraft.‖

C-23 Para 3.7.1 ―The Contractor shall initiate, maintain, and complete the required C-23 logbook, historical records, and related forms IAW DA PAM 738-751.‖

C-26 PWS para 3.7.5.1; ―M-7 shall initiate, maintain, and complete the C-26 logbooks, historical records, and related forms. Army forms and records shall be completed IAW DA
PAM 738-751. All data shall be entered into the aircraft logbooks, historical records, and shall remain at the aircraft’s BB site‖.

EVAL METH
Incomplete or inaccurate forms noted during the inspection will be considered as not in compliance with regulatory guidance. All errors will be noted to include aircraft serial # and
brief description of the fault found.

29.00            AC     AM AS       BN CO DE         OS             SB SF      UA
____Does the weight and balance technician meet the requirements of AR 95-1? [AR 95-1 para 7-2a/b; C-12/RC-12, UC-35 SOW para 3.2.4.5; C-23 PWS para 4.4.5;C-26 PWS
para 3.7.4.5; RQ7B SOW, AR 95-23 para 7-11d.(3)] [UAS N/A this question]
                                                                                           45
____Are weight and balance records current and accurate for each aircraft, by serial number? [AR 95-1 para 7-2c (1); DA Pam 738-751 para 1-6a (16); UAS: AR 95-23 para 7-1]
REFERENCE TEXT
AR 95-1, Para 7–2: Weight and balance technicians: a. To qualify as a weight and balance technician, an individual must satisfactorily complete the 15 series career management
field (CMF) Basic Non-Commissioned Officer Course (BNCOC), Aviation Maintenance Manager Course or comparable weight and balance course approved by TRADOC.
b. If a weight and balance technician trained in accordance with paragraph a above is not available in the unit, commanders may delegate the task.
Para 7-2c (1): Weight and balance technicians will— (1) Prepare and maintain up-to-date and accurate individual aircraft weight and balance files as described in paragraph 7-4 for
all aircraft under their jurisdiction.
Para 7-4a (2): Duplicate copies of all DD Forms 365-4 in the file are carried aboard the aircraft.

DA Pam 738-751, Para 1-6a (16): Forms and records must be readable, correct, and complete.

C-12/RC-12,UC-35 SOW, Para 3.2.4.5 ―The Contractor shall perform aircraft weighing and balancing IAW OEM manuals, TM 55-1500-342-23 or its replacement and AR 95-1. The
Contractor shall maintain all equipment required to perform aircraft weighing requirements as outlined in AR 95-1 and prepare all forms as specified by Technical Manual 55-1500-
342-23 or its replacement, for acceptance by the on-site COR.‖

C-23 PWS, Para 4.4.5 ―The Contractor shall perform aircraft weighing and balancing IAW OEM manuals, TM 55-1500-342-23 and AR 95-1. The Contractor shall maintain all
equipment required to perform aircraft weighing requirements as outlined in AR 95-1. The Contractor shall prepare all forms as specified by Technical Manual 55-1500-342-23, for
acceptance by the on-site COR and Weight and Balance technician. The contractor shall prepare a 90 day weight and balance update for the C-23 Aircraft Weight and Balance
Records using OEM forms for on-site COR and Weight and Balance technician’s approval.‖

C-26 PWS para 3.7.4.5 ―M-7 shall perform aircraft weighing and balancing IAW OEM manuals, Technical Manual (TM) 55-1500-342-23 and AR 95-1. The Contractor shall
maintain all equipment required to perform aircraft weighing requirements as outlined in AR 95-1 and prepare all forms as specified by TM 55-1500-342-23 or its replacement, for
acceptance by the on-site COR. The Contractor shall utilize an automated W&B program as prescribed by AR 95-1‖.

RQ7B: AR 95-23, Para 7-1. Overview. The UA platforms shall be within weight and balance limitations (as specified in the appropriate UAS operator’s manual) for the entire
duration of a flight. This chapter provides a weight and balance control system for operation of the Army UA.
d. commanders of installations and units that operate, maintain, repair, or modify Army UA will— (3) Appoint, in writing, qualified weight and balance technicians.
EVAL METH
____Incomplete or inaccurate forms noted during the inspection will be considered not in compliance with regulatory guidance. All errors will be noted to include aircraft serial #
and brief description of the fault found.
____Ensure the most current version of AWBS is used for weight and balance management. Ref: AR 95-1, Chapter 7
____Check orders to ensure appropriate person is on DD Form 365.
____Ensure DD Form 365-1 was updated when aircraft is received by the unit, annually, prior to weighing and when items are removed and not reinstalled.
____Ensure DD Form 365-2 is on hand and reflects required data when aircraft is weighed. Equipment used, weighing points, calibration data. Ensure date weighed on 365-2
matches chart C / 365-3 entry. Ref: TM 55-1500-342-23, Para 4-7
____Review DD Form 365-4 and ensure the basic weight on 365-3 matches.
____Ensure weight and balance records are reviewed every 90 days IAW AR 95-1 Para 7-6a.
____Ensure items removed are accurately recorded on DA Form 2408-13-1 and records (DD Form 365-1 / 365-3) are updated if items have exceeded 90 days IAW AR 95-1 Para
7-5b.
____Ensure weight and balance records are reviewed annually, inventory must be accomplished and Chart C / 365-3 entry must reflect a review. Ref: AR 95-1, Chapter 7
____Ensure Weight and Balance Authority Signature block on the Form F / 365-4 match the DD Form 365 (Record of Weight and Balance Personnel) in accordance with TM 55-
1500-342-23, Par 4-9.
____Ensure the 365-4 on file in the weight and balance file corresponds with 365-4 in aircraft and operations. Ref: AR 95-1, Chapter 7
____Ensure Chart C/ 365-3 reflects aircraft modifications (as applicable) as entered on DA Form 2408-5 and DA Form 2408-5-1. Ref: TM 55-1500-342-23, par 4-8
____MEDEVAC: Ensure hoist removal / installation is properly recorded in weight and Balance records.

31.00            AC      AM AS       BN    DE     OS            SB SF        UA
____Is the Army Records Information Management System (ARIMS) used within the unit? [AR 25-400-2 para 1-6] Unit / COR files are required to be IAW (ARIMS).
                                                                                        46
____Are files labeled correctly? [AR 25-400-2 Chapter 6]
____Is the ARIMS Office Records List (ORL) prepared and on hand for the selected files? [AR 25-400-2 para 5-10a]
REFERENCE TEXT
AR 25-400-2, Para 1–6: Application of Army Records Information Management System. a. The ARIMS applies to—
(1) All unclassified Army records, including For Official Use Only (FOUO), regardless of medium. (2) All classified Army records through SECRET. Records that are TOP SECRET
may be set up under ARIMS or in any manner that will make accountability and control easier. Regardless of the arrangement used, however, the disposition instructions in the
ARIMS Records Retention Schedule–Army (RRS–A) will be applied to TOP SECRET records. The security classification of a record does not change its retention value.
Chapter 6 Labeling Procedures, Para 6–2. Army Records Information Management System record labels. a. All folders and containers used to store official records, including
records in electronic form, will be labeled.
Para 5–10. Office records lists. a. Office records lists (ORLs) are required and will be prepared using the Records Management Assistance (RM–Assist) module in ARIMS to the
greatest extent possible. ORLs are primarily used to identify long-term and permanent records for transfer or retirement and to ensure that the records listed thereon identify and
document the business of an office or unit. https://www.arims.army.mil/
EVAL METH
Inspect files and ensure compliance with AR 25-400-2. Labels must be current and all required information entered.

32.00              AC      AM AS      BN       DE     OS            SB SF      UA LU
Are electronic messages filed separately by type messages (SOFs, SOUs, ASAMS, MAMS, AMAMS, MIMS and (UAS Technical Field Notices, (TFN)), EIR, PQDR, DA Form 2028
and technical advisory messages? [TC 3-04.7 para 9-40; AR 25-400-2 Chapter 6; AR 750-6]
REFERENCE TEXT
TC 3-04.7, Para 9-40: QC personnel maintain separate message files for each model of aircraft assigned or supported. They maintain one file for general messages. Messages
are either informational or apply to specific models of aircraft. For more guidance on SOF messages, ASAMs, and files management, refer to AR 95-1 and AR 25-400-2.

AR 25-400-2, Chapter 6 Labeling Procedures, Para 6–2. Army Records Information Management System record labels. a. All folders and containers used to store official records,
including records in electronic form, will be labeled…….

See also AR 750-6 Army Equipment Safety and Maintenance Notification System.
EVAL METH
Review files and ensure separate files (electronic or hard copy) are maintained. Units issued rescue hoists: Check for hoist messages.

33.00               AC      AM AS         BN       DE                   SB SF        UA LU
Are shop inspections completed, corrective action taken and the results filed as per references? [TC 3-04.7 para 9-19/20/21; DA Pam 385-90 para 2-10f; AR 25-400-2 Chapter 6]
*******Notify the ASO of failure of this question. *******
REFERENCE TEXT
TC 3-04.7, Para 9-19. QC inspections of maintenance and shop areas are detailed with the overall goal of establishing sound and disciplined maintenance procedures and
practices. A QC inspection focuses on the maintenance facility, including maintenance and shop areas (safety).
Para 9-20. When performing the maintenance and shop safety and equipment inspection, TIs check for cleanliness and serviceability and absence of corrosion on GSE. The
inspection also includes checking for unobstructed fire lanes, serviceability of the hangar, serviceability of the fire extinguisher, and installation and use of equipment safety
devices. Additional guidance for fire extinguisher inspections is found in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1910.157. Note. Active duty units will conduct these inspections
monthly. National Guard and Reserve Component units will conduct these inspections quarterly.
Para 9-21. Safety inspection forms are maintained and filed in the QC section according to AR 25-400-2. A copy of the inspection is given to the appropriate shop or maintenance
section NCOIC for corrections of any deficiencies. Inspectors will forward copies of the inspection results to the ASO or unit safety manager to incorporate uncorrected deficiencies
into the safety information collection and analysis program and hazard log for tracking. If deficiencies are found, shop or maintenance sections are re-inspected to ensure
compliance.

DA Pam 385-90, Para 2-10f. The commanders and staff should maintain a file/log of hazards to track control-option implementation and effectiveness. The file/log should be
maintained as a permanent reference for future hazard analysis.


                                                                                         47
AR 25-400-2, Chapter 6 Labeling Procedures, Para 6–2. Army Records Information Management System record labels. a. All folders and containers used to store official records,
including records in electronic form, will be labeled…….
Record Title: Safety hazards, Record Description: Information on technical review and advice on safety hazards and identifying, eliminating, or controlling safety hazards. Included
are hazard reports and similar information. Disposition: KE6. Event is after 5 years or when no longer necessary for current operations. Keep in CFA until event occurs and then
until no longer needed for conducting business, but not longer than 6 years after the event, then destroy after 5 years or when no longer necessary for current operations.
EVAL METH
Non compliance of any of the references results in a failure of this question. Review all records of shop inspections. Ensure copies were forwarded IAW the references. No
notification is a failure. File copies not maintained in either area constitutes a failure. Are all items not correctable by the shop forwarded to the commander and unit safety officer
for assistance? No notification is a failure. Repetitive findings without notification of problems to the commander are a failure.

35.00             AC       AM AS       BN       DE                      SB SF      UA LU
____Is the shop technical library and Publications Familiarization Record managed IAW TC 3-04.7? [TC 3-04.7 para 8-51/52, para 9-29/30/31/32/33/34/35, para 9-145/146]
____Are quarterly reviews of the technical library accomplished and documented? [TC 3-04.7 para 9-30/32/146]
REFERENCE TEXT
TC 3-04.7, Para 8-51. Although the master reference and publications library is located in the QC section, every section, shop, and platoon responsible for conducting aircraft
maintenance repairs and procedures is authorized a reference and publications library. Every section, shop, and platoon NCOIC is responsible for researching and verifying
technical publications requirements for his assigned maintenance and component repair areas. NCOICs are responsible for ensuring their reference and publications libraries are
current and updated with the latest published changes. Timely updates of assigned reference and publications libraries are essential to proper maintenance practices. NCOICs
must also train their assigned maintenance personnel in posting reference/publications changes. A fielded change not promptly posted makes that corresponding TM unusable.
Para 8-52. Assigned maintenance personnel are responsible for familiarizing themselves with the appropriate TMs to include the latest changes, before conducting maintenance
procedures. Section, shops, and platoon NCOICs monitor assigned maintenance personnel compliance with aircraft TM familiarization using an updated and current familiarization
record. By-the-book maintenance not only includes having the corresponding aircraft TMs open but also using them to conduct maintenance procedures. Note. Refer to AR 25-30
for posting reference and publications requirements.
Para 9-29. QC, shops, and maintenance personnel establish and maintain a complete, up-to-date set of technical publications for supported aircraft and equipment. These
publications provide instructions on operation, maintenance, repair, modification, serviceability standards, testing, inspection, and storage of equipment. Publication personnel are
appointed in the unit and responsible for ordering and maintaining unit publication accounts.
Para 9-30. TIs perform a quarterly review of publication files (technical libraries) to ensure completeness and currency.
Para 9-31. TIs provide guidance in preparing and submitting recommendations for changes to maintenance and administrative publications. Recommendations for changes are
submitted on DA Form 2028. TIs establish and maintain a file of recommended changes IAW AR 25-400-2.
Para 9-32. QC, shop, and maintenance personnel will maintain technical data publications to ensure maintenance personnel understand changes to publications relevant to their
duties. Familiarization validations are updated quarterly or when a publication is changed. All publications used to maintain supported aircraft and related aviation equipment, and
the names of maintenance personnel are listed in the familiarization record.
Para 9-33. Shop, sections, and maintenance platoon NCOICs are responsible for tracking and announcing pertinent information updates requiring familiarization. It is the NCOIC’s
sole responsibility to keep assigned maintainers familiar with all changes affecting aircraft maintenance TMs and publications.
Para 9-34. Maintenance personnel validate and record their familiarization for each publication to indicate currency. Delete shops/maintenance personnel validations as new
changes are received and announced.
Para 9-35. After a new change is announced, posted, and reviewed, shops and maintenance personnel record their currency to indicate familiarity with the new change. Each
maintenance section or shop maintains separate familiarity records. TIs check the records during publication review to ensure: • All publications used by maintenance sections or
shops are listed and current to include the latest changes. • All maintenance section or shop personnel are listed. • All personnel have validated their familiarization with the latest
change or revision to the publications. Note. If using a printed record, IAW DA PAM 25-40, use only a black lead pencil to annotate printouts. After posting changes, write the word
―posted‖ at the top of the change instruction sheet with initials and date.
Para 9-145. Technical files and libraries are required on all assigned and attached equipment. Reference technical libraries are located in an area convenient to maintenance
personnel. Immediate supervisors and QC personnel provide maintainers with the most current maintenance publications and references.
Para 9-146. TIs are responsible for two types of libraries: master and shop. The master library is located in the QC office and used by all personnel. It contains publications
required to maintain all series of aircraft and components owned or supported by the aviation maintenance companies. The shops library contains manuals on the specific duties of
the shop. Inspectors ensure these manuals are complete and up-to-date. TIs also check the master and shop libraries quarterly to ensure— • Libraries are located conveniently to
users. • Libraries are set up alphanumerically. • All required manuals are on-hand or on-order. • No unnecessary hardcopy publications are on-hand. • Changes are posted and
indexes reflect the status of publications on hand. • No superseded or rescinded manuals are used. • Classified manuals are controlled according to the AR 380 series.
                                                                                           48
EVAL METH
Is a complete and up to date technical reference library maintained for assigned aircraft, subsystems, Aviation Associated Equipment, and Ground Support Equipment (AGSE)?
(TC 3-04.7). Are all required (sections’ distribution requirements) technical publications, regulations with current changes posted and or CD-ROM on hand? Review as many books
at random throughout the shop library. If any of the reviewed manuals have one or more changes missing this constitutes an unsatisfactory library. Primary maintenance manuals
without current changes posted constitutes an unsat. (Example and organization support UH-60 helicopters must have primary manuals for the aircraft and installed equipment
(example avionics, hoist etc.) available and posted. Any obsolete, superseded, rescinded manual found constitutes an unsatisfactory library. (If electronic publications are used is
reading and printing capability available?) Verify unit personnel are able to use Electronic Media, computer equipment is available to read the information, and that printing
capability is available. If the library contains ETMs, non-availability of computer support is cause for failure. Personnel unable to use the programs for reading information are
cause for failure.

38.00              AC      AM AS     BN     DE      OS             SB SF       UA
Are six-month files kept IAW DA Pam 738-751 para 2-10d (documentation not maintained in the ULLS-A system (test flight sheets etc.))? [DA Pam 738-751, para 2-10d;
ULLS-A End Users Manual; C-12/RC-12 SOW para 3.3.2.1; UC-35 SOW para 3.3.2.2; C-23 PWS para 3.7.1; C-26 PWS para 3.7.5.1]
REFERENCE TEXT
DA Pam 738-751, Para 2-10d: Disposition. The closed out Flight Pack will be sent to the unit or activity maintenance office. All completed DA Forms 2408–13–1 that were filled
out during maintenance operations will be reviewed for accuracy and neatness, and cross-checked with related historical forms, records, and files. The forms are part of the Flight
Pack, and are filed in the 6-month file. They are kept for 6 flying months, plus the current month, then destroyed.

C-12/RC-12 SOW Para 3.3.2.1, ―The Contractor shall initiate, maintain, and complete the required C-12/RC-12 logbook, historical records, and related forms IAW DA PAM 738-
751.‖

UC-35 SOW, Para 3.3.2.2, ―Maintaining Aircraft Logbooks, forms, and records IAW DA PAM 738-751 is not required for the UC-35. However the Contractor has elected to use DA
PAM 738-751 in lieu of commercial requirements for the UC-35 aircraft.‖

C-23 Para, 3.7.1 ―The Contractor shall initiate, maintain, and complete the required C-23 logbook, historical records, and related forms IAW DA PAM 738-751.‖

C-26 PWS para 3.7.5.1; ―M-7 shall initiate, maintain, and complete the C-26 logbook, historical records, and related forms IAW DA PAM 738-751.
EVAL METH
Failure to have current and previous six months records on hand is cause for failure. Incomplete or inaccurate forms not corrected prior to the inspection are cause for a not in
compliance rating.

39.00                AC      AM AS        BN CO DE      OS               SB SF       UA LU
Is an effective unit aviation Corrosion Prevention and Control (CPC) Program established and followed? Is training documentation available confirming all unit personnel have
received initial and refresher training? [TM 1-1500-328-23 para 8-1, 8-2, 8-3a (1). Has the contractor established and followed an effective CPC program documenting detection
and treatment of corrosion? C-12/RC-12/UC-35 SOW para 3.2.4.4, 4.1.3, 4.2.3.c; C-23 PWS para 4.4, 4.4.4, 5.1.2, 5.2.1.c; C-26 PWS para 4.1.2 and 4.1.3; RQ7B SOW]
REFERENCE TEXT
TM 1-1500-328-23, Para 8-1: Aviation Corrosion Prevention and Control Policy. Commanders and maintenance officers, at all levels must ensure that all Army policy and
procedures for the detection and treatment of corrosion for aircraft and associated equipment are followed.
Para 8-2. General. a. Commanders will ensure compliance with these requirements and will establish additional Corrosion, Prevention and Control (CPC) procedures, as
necessary, for all aviation resources under their control.
b. All activities that have control of aircraft and associated equipment will prepare a CPC plan in writing. The CPC plan and implementing instructions should be included as part of
the Unit’s Standing Operating Procedures (SOP).
Para 8-3. Responsibilities. a. Commanders will integrate CPC awareness to all levels of maintenance including depot and inter-service contracts (contractors). CPC directives will
be published to provide adequate instructions and awareness without reducing mission effectiveness. Commanders will ensure the following: (1) CPC directives address all
aviation maintenance levels.

C-12/RC-12/UC-35 SOW, Para 3.2.4.4 ―The Contractor shall schedule and perform maintenance on all support equipment IAW applicable FAA/OEM/Army approved procedures

                                                                                         49
and regulations.‖
Para 4.1.3 ―Any time the aircraft is completely repainted, the Contractor shall perform an in-depth corrosion inspection, including treatment and repair of all defective areas which
shall be accomplished IAW OEM/ FAA approved standards.‖
Para 4.2.1.c ―Incorporating corrosion protection coating SERMETEL 5380DP or other PCO approved coating to the compressor section and gas generator case, and all other
components thereof (include in the FFP for the overhaul) for the C-12/RC-12.‖ (Not applicable to UC-35)

C-23 PWS, Para 4.4 ―The Contractor shall perform all required maintenance work on aircraft, aircraft systems/components, and GFP IAW FAA/OEM/Army approved procedures
and regulations.‖
Para 4.4.4 ―The Contractor shall schedule and perform maintenance on all support equipment IAW applicable FAA/OEM/Army approved procedures and regulations.‖
Para 5.1.2 ―The Contractor shall remove old paint and completely repaint aircraft interior and exterior at the written direction of the PCO. Any time the aircraft
is completely repainted, the Contractor shall perform an in-depth corrosion inspection, including treatment and repair of all defective areas which shall be accomplished IAW OEM/
FAA approved standards and TM-55-1500-345-23.‖
Para 5.2.1.c ―Incorporating corrosion protection coating SERMETEL 5380DP or other PCO approved coating to the compressor section and gas generator case, and all other
components thereof (include in the FFP for the overhaul) for the C-23.‖

C-26 PWS para 4.1.2 and 4.1.3, ―CPC accomplished by M-7 shall include all support actions required for operating and maintaining the aircraft, aircraft subsystems, and support
equipment.‖ Para 4.1.3, ―M-7 shall maintain the C-26 interior and exterior appearance IAW the standards listed in Appendix H.‖ ―LSI shall provide complete C-26B/RC-26B
maintenance support for the aircraft and systems. M-7 shall perform all scheduled and unscheduled maintenance and inspections IAW current manufacturer’s instructions, FAA
regulatory guidance and service unique manuals.‖ Para 4.1.2, ―M-7 shall accomplish an in-depth corrosion inspection, treatment and repair of all defective areas which shall be
accomplished IAW OEM/FAA approved standards.‖
EVAL METH
Read the units SOP for Corrosion Prevention. Ensure it meets the requirements of the regulatory guidance. Ensure training documentation is on hand and all personnel have
completed initial and annual refresher training.


C- GROUND SUPPORT EQUIPMENT
QUESTION
1.00             AC      AM AS     BN       DE                       SB SF     UA LU
Is the Ground Support Equipment SOP available in the shop and followed? [TC 3-04.7 para 3-120; DA PAM 750-3 para 2-2, 2-3]
REFERENCE TEXT
TC 3-04.7, Para 3-120. To ensure GSE availability, the ASES OIC and NCOIC will— • Ensure GSE operation and maintenance standards are detailed in the unit SOP.

DA Pam 750-3, Para 2–2. Need for standing operating procedures
All units performing maintenance are required to have a maintenance standing operating procedures (SOP) signed by the unit commander per AR 750–1, chapter 2. The
maintenance SOP may be an annex to the unit’s SOP, an annex to the unit’s logistics SOP, or a stand-alone document. Regardless of where it’s found, its purpose is to formally
describe the way a unit performs maintenance on weapons, vehicles, nuclear, biological, and chemical (NBC) gear, and other individual and unit equipment. The unit maintenance
SOP should be written in enough detail to give someone who is recently assigned a firm grasp of how maintenance is to be accomplished in the unit. Personnel should have an
opportunity to review it during in-processing.
Para 2–3. Areas to address in standing operating procedures. As a minimum, the following areas of the SOP should be addressed in detail:
a. Maintenance related duties and responsibilities for key unit personnel.
b. How the unit’s (or FSC’s) field maintenance platoon/section is organized.
c. The Army Maintenance Management System (TAMMS) (Note: This addresses minor deviations or procedures not covered in DA Pamphlet 750–8) as follows. (1) Dispatch
procedures for unit equipment. (2) Standard Army Maintenance System-Enhanced/Unit Level Logistics System (SAMS–E/ULLS) Operations/Automation Enablers as follows.
(a) Routine transaction/report requirements. (b) Connectivity (very small aperture terminals (VSATS), Combat Service Support Automated Information Systems Interface (CAISI),
and so forth). (c) Logistics Information Warehouse (LIW)-LIDB (DA Form 2408–9 (Equipment Control Record), requisition status, asset visibility, usage verification, and publication
listings). (d) LIW (portion that was formerly Integrated Logistics Analysis Program (ILAP)), (Excessive Defense Articles (EDA)), requisition status, and so forth). (e) Army
electronic product support (AEPS) (Modification Work Order (MWO), Modification Management Information System (MMIS), Safety Of Use Message (SOUM), Product Quality
Deficiency Report (PQDR) submissions online, Weapons Data management online, and so forth). (f) Quality control procedures for maintenance/dispatching equipment.

                                                                                          50
d. Preventive maintenance checks and services (PMCS) are as follows: (1) Procedures to be followed by personnel during scheduled Field PMCS periods. (2) Procedures to be
followed by all unit personnel associated with Field PMCS (scheduled services). (a) Fault recording/correction procedures. (b) Support provided to operators for PMCS by field
maintenance activity. (3) Army Oil Analysis Program (AOAP). (4) Calibration of tools and Test, Measurement, and Diagnostic Equipment (TMDE).
e. Tool accountability and control procedures.
f. Safety requirements as follows: (1) All applicable safety guidance associated with equipment maintenance. (2) SOP/SOUM. (3) Environmental/proper handling and disposal of
hazardous chemicals (HAZMAT). (4) Lifting and holding device servicing. (5) Arc welding/cutting. (6) Chemical Agent Resistant Coating (CARC).
g. Unit maintenance training as follows: (1) The unit’s program for operator/crew and mechanic sustainment training. (2) Procedures required to obtain a Government equipment
operator’s license (DA Form 5984–E (Operator’s Permit Record)/OF 346 (U.S. Government Motor Vehicles Operator’s Identification Card)). (3) The unit driver/mechanic awards
program. (4) Single-/multi-piece rims and wheels training.
h. Motor pool security.
i. Readiness reporting.
j. Publications.
k. Work order management as follows: (1) Maintenance priorities/task management. (2) Controlled exchange procedures/requirements. (3) Manhour accounting.
(4) Maintenance evacuation requirements and procedures.
l. Equipment classifications are as follows: (1) End item/component classifications. (2) Estimated/Actual Cost of Damage (ECOD/ACOD) preparation procedures.
(3) Maintenance expenditure limit (MEL).
m. Battlefield damage assessment and repair/recovery (BDAR/R)
n. Repair parts (Class IX) management as follows: (1) Product Quality Deficiency Report (QDR) preparation/reporting. (2) Involvement in equipment dispatch, scheduled services,
command inspections. (3) Development of Shop Supply List (SSL)/Authorized Stockage List (ASL). (4) Battery management program. (5) Recoverables management.
(6) Scrap material management (non-HAZMAT). (7) Tire/track/road/wheel management.
o. Warranty Management Program.
p. Army Record Information Management System (ARIMS) filing system.
q. Equipment winterization/extreme climate program .
EVAL METH
The evaluator will read the AGSE SOP and determine if the SOP addresses current operations, operator selection, training, qualifying, testing, maintenance operations and
procedures to request support maintenance.

3.00                                       CO        OS                          UA
Does the contractor have all required maintenance manuals for ground support equipment on hand and/or available on-line? [C-12, RC-12, UC-35 SOW para 3.2.5; C-23 PWS
para 3.14; C-26 PWS para 3.7.4 and 3.7.6]
REFERENCE TEXT
C-12/RC-12/UC-35 SOW, Para 3.2.5 ―The Contractor shall maintain current technical libraries that contain all necessary publications to maintain the aircraft fleet including OEM
and FAA subscription services with aircraft and subsystem manufacturers. The Contractor shall provide the Government access to the libraries. Government furnished publications
are listed in Appendix K.‖
C-23 PWS, Para 3.14 ―The Contractor shall maintain current beddown site, FWPMO, OSAA technical libraries that contain all necessary publications to maintain the aircraft fleet
including OEM and FAA subscription services with aircraft and subsystem manufacturers. The Contractor shall provide the Government access to the libraries and will tell how the
Government will gain access to the information. Government inventory publications are listed in Appendix K.‖
C-26 PWS para 3.7.4 and 3.7.6, ―M-7 Shall organize and maintain the currency of a technical publications library in each BB containing all pertinent publications, including OEM
manuals, Government Furnished Manuals, vendor manuals, and Service Actions to support the aircraft and ISR mission equipment.‖
EVAL METH
Review library and ensure all applicable manuals are on hand and up to date. If electronic media is used, verify personnel are able to use Electronic Media. The question is a
failure if personnel cannot access information during the evaluation.

4.00              AC     AM AS         BN CO DE       OS            SB SF       UA LU
____Do military and DA Civilians that operate Ground Support Equipment have a valid license (OF 346)? [AR 600-55 para 7–1; TC 3-04.7 para 3-120]
____Do contractor personnel maintain documentation confirming operators are qualified to operate equipment? [IAW Contractor procedures: C-12/RC-12/UC-35 SOW para
3.4.2; C-23 PWS para 4.4.16; C-26 CSOW para 1.2, C-26 Contract page 55 H-10]
                                                                                       51
REFERENCE TEXT
AR 600-55, Para 7–1. Qualification to operate
a. All military personnel and DA civilians must have an OF 346 and demonstrate their proficiency in order to operate the following mechanical or ground support equipment:
(1) Electrical power generating equipment, 0.5 KW and above (electric motor driven, diesel engine driven, gasoline engine driven, and gas turbine driven sets). (2) Gas generating
equipment, all sizes and capacities (such as oxygen, nitrogen, and acetylene). (3) Water purification sets, all sizes and capacities. (4) Air compressors, all pressures (not to
include installed automatically controlled units). (5) Materiel or cargo handling equipment, all sizes and capacities, for example, forklift trucks, warehouse tractors and cranes,
straddle trucks, and flightline tugs. (6) Railroad equipment, all sizes and capacities (locomotive, locomotive cranes, and motor cars). (7) Bridging equipment, all bridge erection
boats, mobile assault float bridge or ferry transporters, and outboard motors. (8) Self-propelled amphibious equipment, all sizes and capacities (LARC–V, –XV, and –LX, and
LACV–30). (9) Construction equipment or off-road equipment, all sizes and capacities (including but not limited to tractors, wheeled or tracked; cranes, wheeled or tracked; front
loaders; small emplacement excavators (SEEs); motorized or self-propelled scrapers, rollers, sweepers, and earth augers, saw mills; chain saws; snow plow-rotary; ditching
machines; rock crushing and screening plants; asphalt batch plants; concrete mixers and plants; asphalt and concrete spreaders; water and bituminous distributors; hot oil heaters;
and hydraulic or mechanical vibrating tampers). (10) Heating and cooling equipment, all sizes and capacities (such as air conditioning and refrigeration units powered by liquid fuel
engines, space duct-type heaters using liquid fuel, and steam cleaning equipment). (11) Pumping equipment; all pumps 50 gallons per minute (GPM) and above, when powered
by liquid fuel engines. (12) Printing presses and paper cutters, all makes and models, excluding manually operated paper cutters. (13) Mine-detecting equipment, truck mounted;
all makes and models. (14) Utility element (power plant) used with the medical unit, self-contained, transportable hospital elements, all makes and models. (15) Miscellaneous
equipment, any equipment determined by the local commander or higher authority to warrant licensing such as powered lawn mowers; agricultural machinery; food preparation
equipment; field ranges; immersion heaters; laundry equipment; snowmobiles; detecting sets, mine portable, AN/PRS–7 and AN/PSS–11.
b. Application of these procedures will begin with the selection of persons to be licensed. The tests prescribed herein will be given throughout the Army. Successful completion of
the prescribed tests will not automatically qualify a person for retention as an Army vehicle or equipment operator if, for medical, disciplinary, or other reasons (including prior
accident record, attitude toward driving, use of intoxicants or pathogenic drugs), he or she appears to be incapable of continuing as a safe and competent vehicle or equipment
operator. The issuing authority may revoke an operator’s OF 346 based on the recommendations of safety or medical personnel.
c. Training and education programs designed to establish and reinforce safe operating habits and positive attitudes toward driving are required for motor vehicle licensing and
apply to all operators. Minimum training requirements are contained in chapter 4 for vehicles and chapter 7 for other equipment. ACOM and MUSARC commanders may
establish more stringent training programs.

TC 3-04.7, Para 3-120. To ensure GSE availability, the ASES OIC and NCOIC will— • Emphasize individual responsibility and verify all operators are trained and licensed before
using GSE maintained by the ASES.

C-12/RC-12/UC-35 SOW, Para 3.4.2 ―Contractor ground and flight operations shall be in compliance with AR 95-20 and local facility safety requirements. The Contractor shall
provide flight operation and maintenance support on transient (not permanently assigned to BB) C-12/RC-12/UC-35 aircraft. The Contractor shall perform routine flight operations
to include aircraft directing, parking, securing, and providing technical assistance to flight crews.‖

C-23 PWS, Para 4.4.16, ―Contractor ground and flight operations shall be in compliance with AR 95-20 and changes/updates, and local facility safety requirements. The
Contractor shall provide flight operation and maintenance support on transient (not permanently assigned to beddown base) C-23 aircraft. The Contractor shall perform routine
flight operations support to include aircraft directing, parking, securing, and providing technical assistance to flight crews.‖

C-26 Contract page 55 H-10, ―M-7 shall comply with Army Regulation (AR) 95-20.‖
H-10, ―M-7 shall ensure all personnel performing ground operations are trained and authorized to conduct each operation. M-7 shall ensure authorization is carried by contractor
personnel when conducting operations.‖
EVAL METH
The evaluator will review procedures in the Aviation Ground Support Equipment (AGSE) SOP. Ensure selecting, training, testing, and qualifying procedures are IAW applicable
regulations, TBs, and the unit SOP. Review initial and sustainment training documentation (DD Form 348 or SAMS-E/ULLS-G equivalent). Training documentation must be on
hand and reflected on DD Form 348 or SAMS-E/ULLS-G equivalent.

5.00               AC      AM AS       BN CO DE       OS               SB SF       UA LU
____Has the unit / contractor established and implemented an effective (CPC) Corrosion Prevention and Control program for all ground support equipment assigned or hand
receipted? [C-23 PWS, Contract Section I-94 e (2), para 4.4.4, and site procedures manual; C-26 CSOW, Section I; C-26 CSOW para 1.5; C-26 PWS para 3.8.1.3, GMM pages
191 and 192; C-12/RC-12/UC-35 SOW para 3.2.4.4]
                                                                                         52
____Is ground support equipment scheduled for a 180-day CPC inspection or as stated in the applicable TM for the item? [TM 1-1500-328-23 para 8-1 and para 8-8] (Contractors
IAW individual procedures)
REFERENCE TEXT
TM l-1500-328-23, Para 8-1. Aviation Corrosion Prevention and Control Policy. Commanders and maintenance officers, at all levels, must ensure that all Army policy and
procedures for the detection and treatment of corrosion for aircraft and associated equipment are followed.
Para 8-8. Aviation Associated Equipment. Items such as, Aviation Ground Support Equipment and Aviation Life Support Equipment, will be scheduled for CPC inspections per
the applicable TM. When no TM has been developed for the item, or if a CPC inspection interval is not included, a CPC inspection will be due every 180 days. Document on DD
Form 314, Preventive Maintenance Schedule and Record, per DA Pamphlet 750-8. More frequent inspections are authorized due to operational requirements or environment.

C-12/RC-12/UC-35 SOW, Para 3.2.4.4 ―The Contractor shall schedule and perform maintenance on all support equipment IAW applicable AA/OEM/Army approved procedures
and regulations.‖

C-23 PWS, Para 4.4.4 ―The Contractor shall schedule and perform maintenance on all support equipment IAW applicable FAA/OEM/Army approved procedures and regulations.‖

C-26 PWS para 3.8.1.3, GMM pages 191 and 192, ―M-7 shall be responsible for the shipment, receipt, storage, maintenance, repair, replacement, accountability and reporting
status of any GFP provided on this contract. At the Contractor’s Program Management level, an individual knowledgeable in the acquisition, identification, storage, marking,
handling, maintenance, and disposal of GFP shall be identified as the focal point for GFP management. If acquired, GFP will be incorporated in Appendix N of the PWS. The
Contractor shall provide Physical Inventory Report, subtitle – Government Furnished Property (GFP) Status Report IAW DI-MGMT-80259, CDRL A013‖.
EVAL METH
The evaluator will look for a well established and documented program for AGSE CPC. The evaluator will inspect as many records as time permits. Inspect equipment for
corrosion (rust) and review equipment forms and records to ensure 180 day CPC inspections were accomplished and documented (314s or ULLS-G). The CPC /AGSE SOP must
define how the unit is conducting the CPC inspections and how inspections are documented.

6.00            AC      AM AS      BN     DE        OS                SB SF       UA LU
Does equipment on hand meet Army serviceability standards (10 / 20) / or as prescribed by contract? [AR 750-1 para 3-2; C-12/RC-12/UC-35 SOW para 3.4.2; C-23 PWS para
4.4.16; C-26 CSOW para 1.2; C-26 PWS para 3.8.1.3, GMM pages 191 and 192]
REFERENCE TEXT
AR 750-1, Para 3–2. The Army maintenance standard
a. The Army has one maintenance standard, TM XX-10/20.
b. Army equipment meets the maintenance standard when the following conditions exist: (1) The equipment is fully mission capable (FMC). (2) All faults are identified following
prescribed intervals using the ―items to be checked‖ column of the applicable TM XX–10 and XX–20 series PMCS tables. Aviation faults are determined by using the aircraft
preventive maintenance inspection and service (PMIS) per TM 1–1500–328–23. (3) All repairs, services, and other related work that will correct field-level equipment/materiel
faults for which the required parts/supplies are available have been completed in accordance with DA Pam 750–8 or DA Pam 738–751. (4) Parts and supplies required to
complete the corrective actions, but which are not available in the unit, are on a valid funded requisition in accordance with AR 710–2. (5) Corrective actions that are not
authorized at field level by the MAC must be on a valid support maintenance request (DA Form 5990–E and DA Form 2407). (6) Scheduled services are performed at the service
interval required by the applicable technical publication. Because of competing mission requirements, units are authorized a 10 percent variance when performing scheduled
services. Procedures to apply this variance are found in DA Pam 750–8 for ground equipment and TM 1–1500–328–23 for aviation equipment. (Afloat prepositioning ships–Afloat
are excluded from this variance requirement.). (7) All routine, urgent, and emergency MWOs are applied to equipment in accordance with AR 750–10. In addition, actions required
by one-time safety-of-use messages and emergency safety-of-flight messages are completed per AR 750–6 and AR 95–1. (8) All authorized BII and COEI are present and
serviceable or on a valid supply request. For aircraft, all authorized flyaway items and items listed on the aircraft inventory master guide are present and serviceable or on a valid
supply request.
c. The Army maintenance standard applies to all equipment except equipment used as training aids that require frequent disassembly and assembly.
d. Proper use, care, handling, and conservation of materiel per applicable technical publication are mandatory.

C-12/RC-12/UC-35 SOW, Para 3.4.2 ―Contractor ground and flight operations shall be in compliance with AR 95-20 and local facility safety requirements. The Contractor shall
provide flight operation and maintenance support on transient (not permanently assigned to BB) C-12/RC-12/UC-35 aircraft. The Contractor shall perform routine flight operations
to include aircraft directing, parking, securing, and providing technical assistance to flight crews.‖

                                                                                         53
C-23 PWS, Para 4.4.16, ―Contractor ground and flight operations shall be in compliance with AR 95-20 and changes/updates, and local facility safety requirements. The
Contractor shall provide flight operation and maintenance support on transient (not permanently assigned to beddown base) C-23 aircraft. The Contractor shall perform routine
flight operations support to include aircraft directing, parking, securing, and providing technical assistance to flight crews.‖

C-26 PWS para 3.8.1.3, GMM pages 191 and 192, ―M-7 shall be responsible for the shipment, receipt, storage, maintenance, repair, replacement, accountability and reporting
status of any GFP provided on this contract. At the Contractor’s Program Management level, an individual knowledgeable in the acquisition, identification, storage, marking,
handling, maintenance, and disposal of GFP shall be identified as the focal point for GFP management. If acquired, GFP will be incorporated in Appendix N of the PWS. The
Contractor shall provide Physical Inventory Report, subtitle – Government Furnished Property (GFP) Status Report IAW DI-MGMT-80259, CDRL A013‖.
EVAL METH
The evaluator will look for a well organized ―PMCS‖ Program. Failure to complete required inspections to include operator PMCS and organizational maintenance of assigned
equipment is cause for failure. The program must be well documented and documentation must be on hand for inspection. Evaluator will select equipment to be inspected i.e.
cranes, work stands, lifting devices, forklift, AGPU, tug etc. AOAP will be reviewed for accuracy.

7.00               AC     AM AS      BN CO DE      OS                SB SF      UA LU
Are TAMMS forms maintained on ground support equipment confirming operator / organizational maintenance has been accomplished? [Units using ULLS-G will follow
requirements in the User Manual and DA Pam 750-8 para 3-1 a, b, c, d; OS Units will follow contract requirements; C-12/RC-12/UC-35 SOW para 3.2.4.4; C-23 PWS para 4.4.4;
C-26 CSOW para 1.2; C-26 CSOW para 3.3; C-26 PWS para 3.7.5.1]
REFERENCE TEXT
DA Pam 750-8, Para 3-1 (a, b, c, d): 3–1. General This chapter explains how to plan, manage, report and control maintenance and maintenance related shop/section supply
related functions when using ULLS–G and SAMS automation. It also explains how to use manual procedures for scheduling, performing, recording, and managing maintenance on
equipment using appropriate forms and records.
a. The ULLS collects maintenance and supply data and provides management information at the unit level.
b. The ULLS automates/replaces portions of TAMMS. Commanders ensure that portions of TAMMS not replaced by ULLS are accomplished using the procedures outlined in the
pamphlet. The following DA and DD maintenance forms have been automated and ULLS-generated printouts (shown with a -E) are authorized replacements:
(1) AWCMF452. DD Form 314 can still be used (for example, arms room and nuclear, biological, chemical (NBC) room).
(2) DA Form 5988–E. This form replaces both DA Forms 2404 and 2408–14.
(3) DA Form 5989–E (Maintenance Request Register) and DA Form 2405 (Maintenance Request Register).
(4) DA Form 5990–E and DA Form 2407.
c. The forms and records produced and recorded in ULLS–G are maintained by all units, organizations, and activities on all equipment that require maintenance to be performed in
accordance with appropriate –10, –20, and –30 technical manuals and lube orders.
d. Units operating under ULLS use printouts or automated reports in place of the manual forms in other chapters. The automated processes in ULLS supersede all manual
procedures. In cases where there is a conflict on form disposition, this pamphlet takes precedence.

C-12/RC-12/UC-35 SOW, Para 3.2.4.4 ―The Contractor shall schedule and perform maintenance on all support equipment IAW applicable FAA/OEM/Army approved procedures
and regulations.‖

C-23 PWS, Para 4.4.4 ―The Contractor shall schedule and perform maintenance on all support equipment IAW applicable FAA/OEM/Army approved procedures and regulations.‖

C-26 PWS para 3.7.5.1, ―M-7 shall comply with Army Regulation (AR) 95-20.‖ ―All records, files, documents, and work papers provided to the Government or generated by M-7 in
support of the contract are Government property and shall maintain and disposed of per DA PAM 750-8 and DA PAM 738-751 for ARNG.
―M-7 shall be responsible for shipment, receipt, storage, maintenance, repair, accountability, and reporting status of all GFP listed in Appendix N.‖
EVAL METH
The evaluator will ensure applicable maintenance forms either manual or ULLS-G forms are used to record maintenance of assigned AGSE. All AGSE assigned must be enrolled
in a PMCS program and maintenance documentation must be on hand to verify PMCS accomplishment.


D- TEST MEASUREMENT AND DIAGNOSTIC EQUIPMENT
QUESTION
                                                                                      54
3.00           AC     AM AS       BN       DE                    SB SF       UA LU
Has a TMDE SOP been developed for current operations? [TB 750-25 para 3-10a (1) (2); TC 3-04.7 para 3-103]
REFERENCE TEXT
TB 750-25, Para 3-10a (1) (2): TMDE Support Coordinator’s Duties
a. The organizational structure of different activities may require the TMDE support coordinator to perform other duties, but there are certain specific requirements for this duty
which are listed below. This list is not necessarily all inclusive.
(1) Serves as the unit’s central point of contact for matters concerning TMDE calibration and repair support.
(2) Develops/implements SOP(s) for identification and control of TMDE requiring calibration and repair support.

TC 3-04.7, Para 3-103. The TMDE support coordinator must enforce compliance with the unit TMDE SOP. He ensures TMDE users identify their calibration and repair needs and
conducts regular follow-ups to adhere to the schedules and procedures for obtaining the required support. The TMDE support coordinator performs the following: • Serves as the
central POC for matters concerning TMDE calibration and repair support. • Develops and implements the SOP for identification, turn-in, and control of TMDE requiring calibration
and repair support.
EVAL METH
The SOP will include but not limited to; duties and responsibilities of support coordinator and monitor, turn in procedures of scheduled calibration and unscheduled calibration of
suspect TMDE, accountability procedures of TMDE when turned in for calibration, turn in procedures of unserviceable TMDE or excess TMDE, procedures for required physical
inventory of TMDE and documentation method, procedures for reviewing TMDE management reports for calibration requirements and intervals as compared to TB 43-180 and
documentation method, procedures for storing Calibrate Before Use items, and any other specific local TMDE procedures.

5.00              AC      AM AS      BN      DE    OS                SB SF      UA LU
Has a physical inventory been conducted and documented to verify the types and quantities of on-hand TMDE that requires C&RS? [AR 750-43 para 2-10 f & g; TC 3-04.7 para
3-101; C-12/RC-12/UC-35 SOW para 3.2.6; C-23 PWS para 3.15; C-26 PWS para 3.7.7]

REFERENCE TEXT
AR 750-43, Para.2-10 f & g: 2–10. Commanders at all levels will—f. Compare their property books, or TMDE inventory, with TB 43–180 to initially determine the C&RS
requirements for their instruments. Upon request, the supporting TMDE support activity (TSA) can provide technical assistance to the TMDE owners/users in their identification of
TMDE requiring support. g. Ensure all TMDE is identified to include TMDE that may be embedded in sets, kits, outfits, or other assemblages. Initial identification of TMDE
requiring C&RS will be coordinated with the TSA or the field/sustainment unit for proper documentation. Additions, changes, and deletions in TMDE inventories that require C&RS
shall be identified to the supporting activity calibration coordinator.

TC 3-04.7, Para 3-101. Commanders will designate, in writing, a unit TMDE support coordinator under the direct control of the ASES leader. The commander, ASES leader, and
TMDE support coordinator are responsible for— • Comparing the unit property books or TMDE inventory with TB 43-180 to initially determine the calibration and repair support
requirements for the unit TMDE items; upon request, the supporting TMDE support activity can provide technical assistance to the TMDE owners/users in the identification of
TMDE requiring support. • Ensuring all TMDE is identified to include TMDE that may be embedded in sets, kits, outfits, special tools, or other assemblages.

C-12/RC-12/UC-35 SOW Para 3.2.6 ―The Contractor shall store, maintain, calibrate, and control Government furnished and Contractor furnished Test, Measurement and
Diagnostic Equipment (TMDE) items required to meet the requirements of this SOW.‖

C-23 PWS Para 3.15 ―The Contractor shall store, maintain, calibrate, and control Government furnished and Contractor furnished Test, Measurement and Diagnostic Equipment
(TMDE) items required to meet the requirements of this PWS.‖

C-26 CSOW PWS para 3.7.7, ―M-7 shall store, maintain, calibrate, and control TMDE items required to meet the requirements of this PWS. Contractor use of Government
calibration facilities may be authorized by coordination with the COR, if space is available‖.
EVAL METH
Question the TMDE Coordinator on procedures utilized to ensure all TMDE on hand is entered in the calibration program (should be included in the SOP). A set procedure must
be established and documented to verify review accomplishment. Documentation of reviews not on hand, TMDE found during the inspection that is not entered in the program is
cause for failure of this question. Ensure unit is using the commanders Property Book Unit Supply Enhanced (PBUSE) hand receipt along with any other non-property book
documents to verify the master calibration listing has all the units calibration items identified.
                                                                                          55
7.00              AC     AM AS      BN       DE                      SB SF      UA LU
Are TMDE calibration requirements and intervals verified and documented? [TB 750-25 para 3-10a (4), 3-10 b (3); TC 3-04.7 para 3-101, 3-103]
REFERENCE TEXT
TB 750-25, Para 3-10a. TMDE Support Coordinator’s Duties (4) Reviews the IMRF to ensure that all authorized TMDE is contained therein and that the listed information is
correct.
Para 3-10b (3). Is TB 43-180 used as a guide to establish calibration requirements and intervals?

TC 3-04.7, Para 3-101. The commander, ASES leader, and TMDE support coordinator are responsible for— • Comparing the unit property books or TMDE inventory with TB 43-
180 to initially determine the calibration and repair support requirements for the unit TMDE items; upon request, the supporting TMDE support activity can provide technical
assistance to the TMDE owners/users in the identification of TMDE requiring support.
Para 3-103. The TMDE support coordinator performs the following: • Reviews the IMRF monthly to ensure all authorized TMDE requiring calibration or repair support is contained
therein and the listed information is correct, notifying ATST of any changes. The matching standard is 98 to 102 percent between the IMRF and the unit internal inventory list.
EVAL METH
Check SOP procedures and ensure intervals are verified and documentation is on hand confirming completion. Recommend that calibration intervals be verified annually at a
minimum or cyclic throughout the year.

8.00            AC      AM AS      BN CO DE         OS              SB SF       UA LU
Does TMDE in use have a current DA Label 80 or 163 affixed and properly annotated? [TB 750-25 para 2-5; TC 3-04.7 para 3-107, 3-114] Contractor civilian equivalent. [C-12/RC-
12/UC-35 SOW para 3.2.6); C-23 PWS para 3.15; C-26 PWS para 3.7.7]
REFERENCE TEXT
TB 750-25, Para. 2-5: Calibration Forms, Labels and Tags. DA Label 80 (U. S. Army Calibration Instrument), DA Label 163 (U. S. Army Limited or Special Calibration Label), and
DA Form 2417 (U. S. Army Calibration System Rejected Instrument) will be used by all activities providing C&RS. All TMDE and calibration standards will have either a DA Label
80, DA Label 163, or DA Form 2417 affixed to it.

TC 3-04.7, Para 3-107. The following checklist applies to unit TMDE users and representatives; additional checklists in applicable regulations also address compliance
requirements and objectives that should be met by all TMDE users: • Does TMDE in use have a current DA Label 80 or DA Label 163 (U.S. Army Limited or Special Calibration)
affixed and correctly annotated? • Are preventive maintenance services performed on TMDE as listed in the appropriate technical publications, and are faults recorded on DA Form
2404 (Equipment Inspection and Maintenance Worksheet)? • Is DD Form 314 (Preventive Maintenance Schedule and Record) maintained at unit level for all calibration not
required items of TMDE requiring scheduled periodic preventive maintenance services other than calibration?
Para 3-114. A DA Label 80 or DA Label 163 must be affixed to all calibration standards and TMDE identified in TB 43-180 as requiring calibration. This labeling certifies the
instruments have been calibrated to required specifications and indicates support dates. Note. Refer to TB 750-25 for detailed instructions on the preparation of these labels.
Instructions for maintenance forms are in DA PAM 750-8.

C-12/RC-12/UC-35 SOW Para 3.2.6 ―The Contractor shall store, maintain, calibrate, and control Government furnished and Contractor furnished Test, Measurement and
Diagnostic Equipment (TMDE) items required to meet the requirements of this SOW.‖

C-23 PWS Para 3.15 ―The Contractor shall store, maintain, calibrate, and control Government furnished and Contractor furnished Test, Measurement and Diagnostic Equipment
(TMDE) items required to meet the requirements of this PWS.‖

C-26 PWS para 3.7.7, ―M-7 shall store, maintain, calibrate, and control TMDE items required to meet the requirements of this PWS. Contractor use of Government calibration
facilities may be authorized by coordination with the COR, if space is available‖.

EVAL METH
Verify all TMDE is correctly labeled. Inspect owning sections for proper documentation. Inspect tool crib items. Any equipment found not calibrated or incorrectly labeled will be
considered as not in compliance for this question. Compare labels to master listing for accuracy.


                                                                                        56
9.00              AC      AM AS      BN CO DE                         SB SF      UA LU
Are Calibrate Before Use (CBU), and calibrated items stored separately? [TB 750-25 para 3-10a (10), 3-10b (23), (24); TC 3-04.7 para 3-107.]
REFERENCE TEXT
TB 750-25, Para 3-10a. …..there are certain specific requirements for this duty which are listed below. This list is not necessarily all inclusive. (10) Maintains a record of all items in
administrative storage by nomenclature, model, and serial number. Ensures that the equipment is operational and the affixed DA Label 80 has been over stamped CBU IAW
appendix C. Notifies the supporting TSA, in writing, what TMDE has been placed in administrative storage so that these items may be removed from the cyclic calibration
schedule. Ensures that a designated administrative storage area is established for locating CBU items IAW paragraph 2-7a above. Constant monitoring of the TMDE inventory is
required to achieve maximum effectiveness. Items that are seldom used should be placed in storage. Items never used should be turned in to supply and deleted from the owner’s
property book.
Para 3-10 b. The following checklist is applicable to TMDE users and TMDE support coordinators for compliance with regulatory requirements of the TMDE support program:
(23). Are instruments designated for storage removed from the work area? (24) Is the storage area segregated from the work area?

TC 3-04.7, Para 3-107. • Is the storage area segregated from the work area?
EVAL METH
Verify all CBU items are stored separately. Inspect serviceability of CBU items. Check tool crib items. Zero tolerance.


E- HANGAR AND SHOP OPERATIONS
QUESTION
2.00              AC     AM AS     BN     DE                      SB SF       UA LU
Has the commander established a documented maintenance training program that tracks MOS progression / sustainment training for all soldiers? [AR 750-1 para 3-9 a & b. (1);
TC 3-04.7 para 1-100/101/102]
REFERENCE TEXT
AR 750-1, Para 3–9.a & b. (1): 3–9: Field maintenance. a. Field maintenance is the first function of the Army maintenance system. b. Operator/crew maintenance is the most
critical operation of the Army maintenance system. It requires continuous emphasis by all commanders and leaders. (1) Commanders must establish a command climate that
ensures assigned equipment is maintained to the maintenance standard defined in paragraph 3–2 and are responsible for providing resources, assigning responsibility, and
training soldiers to achieve this standard.

TC 3-04.7, Para 1-100. Commanders must initiate and maintain a viable MOS sustainment and continuation training program. Maintenance supervisors must coordinate efforts to
establish effective training. IAW the commander’s guidance, subordinate leaders, and supervisors will identify critical or high frequency tasks, and establishes their recurring
training requirements. MOS training must encompass the use of TMs to reinforce proper maintenance procedures. Supervisors will ensure critical tasks in support of the METL and
unit mission receive formal training at a frequency outlined in the appropriate STP for each skill level. If no current STP exists, supervisors will establish a critical task-training plan.
Note. Interface with the technical training bases to assists in unit program development when STPs are not available.
Para 1-101. While deployed, commanders must continue this process to sustain or retrain certain tasks as needed. The commander’s program will include individual training for
Soldiers in the unit to routinely evaluate and document their MOS proficiency. The MOS training program must integrate individual training with phase and progressive
maintenance operations, and other collective training. The MOS training plan will maximize utilization of sister unit integration (for low density MOS), cross training, train-up, and
sustainment programs.
Para 1-102. Conducting daily maintenance operations provides opportunities for NCOs (primary trainers) to conduct formal MOS sustainment training, based on established
procedures, with applicable standards from approved publications. Increased risk of damage to equipment and injury to personnel could result when approved procedures are not
followed. To develop an effective unit training program, commanders will employ a seven-step cycle: • Step 1. Establish maintenance-training objectives. • Step 2. Plan resources
(personnel, time, facilities, and training aids). • Step 3. Train the trainers. • Step 4. Provide resources. • Step 5. Assess risk and safety considerations. • Step 6. Conduct training. •
Step 7. Evaluate results based on the objectives.
EVAL METH
Review local training records. Ensure training is addressed in the unit SOP and training has been conducted. Ensure class attendance rosters are available, and all personnel
requiring the training were in attendance. Make up classes/training has been conducted for all who missed the training. Units that do not conduct training or do not complete
make-up training will receive a UNSAT for this question. Flight companies are required to continue MOS proficiency training in addition to flight training.

6.00               AC       AM AS        BN CO DE         OS               SB SF        UA LU
                                                                                            57
____Does the unit / contractor have a tool control program? [TC 3-04.7 para 3-75/77, 3-90/91, 8-21/22; TM 9-243. para 2.2.2; DA Pam 710-2-1 para 6-2(e & f)]
Contractor IAW SOW. [C-12, UC-35 LCCS procedures manual procedure LCCS-2731; C-23, para 3.13.1; C-26 GMM page 173]
____Are all tools, hardware, and other equipment accounted for at the end of each maintenance operation? [DA Pam 385-90 para 2-8 d (3) (e); TC 3-04.7 para 3-75/77]
____Are tools marked for ease of accountability? [DA Pam 385-90 para 2-8 d (3) (e); TC 3-04.7 para 3-75/77]
____Are tools inventoried and inspected by responsible personnel for accountability and serviceability? [TC 3-04.7 para 8-21/22; TM 9-243. para 2.2.2]
REFERENCE TEXT
DA Pam 385-90, Para 2-8 d (3) (e): d. Management of the foreign object damage program will encompass the following: (3) All unit personnel will implement the FOD prevention
program by: (e) Ensure all tools, hardware, and other equipment is properly accounted for at the end of each maintenance operation; mark tools for ease of accountability.

DA Pam 710-2-1, Para 6-2. (e & f): e. Component hand receipts will be prepared by the person issuing the property. Prepare component hand receipts in two copies. The preparer
will keep the original. The using individual will keep the copy. The user’s copy will be filed or kept with the issued equipment. File component hand receipts according to AR 25–
400–2, as applicable. f. Keep component hand receipts current. Do this by posting changes as they occur or by using change documents. When change documents are used,
follow the procedures in paragraph 5–3d.

TC 3-04.7, Para 3-75. Toolboxes store hand receipt holder tools. Portable toolboxes enable carrying and storing a variety of hand tools. Canvas tool bags supplement these
capabilities but provide little to no security. Paint, etch, tape, or mark all tools for easy identification during inventories. Each marked tool coincides with the associated toolbox
identity (for example, each tool in toolbox B-1 is engraved with ―B-1‖ to associate that tool with the corresponding toolbox.) Toolboxes must contain shadowed tool positions; if
toolboxes/bags cannot be shadowed then an alternate, adequate, or practical means of tool accountability will be used.
Para 3-77. Considerations for tool box use are: •Toolboxes will be inventoried before any maintenance is conducted and re-inventoried at the completion of said maintenance.
•Toolboxes and work area are cleaned and maintained prior to departure from the work area or at the end of the workday IAW TM 1-1500-204-23-series. •Toolboxes will not be
laid on aircraft surfaces. Heavy tools will be properly secured when used on aircraft to prevent their falling and causing injury to personnel or damage to aircraft. • All mechanics
toolboxes are locked except when in actual use. The Soldier using the toolbox remains in the immediate area. • Broken tools will not be stored in toolboxes or bags for accounting
purposes. Broken tools must be turned in to unit supply immediately and an appropriate turn-in document placed in their shadow location until replaced. Note. Units shall develop
an SOP outlining tool accountability procedures (lost tools, marking of tools, required inventories, and replenishment procedures).
Para 3-90. The efficiency of an aircraft maintainer and the tools he or she uses are determined largely by the condition in which the tools are kept and maintained. Tools will be
wiped clean and dry before being placed in a toolbox. If their use is not anticipated in the near future, they should be lubricated to prevent rust. This is especially true if tools are
stored under conditions of extreme humidity or are continuously exposed to salt air. Remove all unserviceable tools from toolboxes and tool rooms and turn in for replenishment.
Para 3-91. Note. At the completion of a maintenance procedure, all aircraft maintainers should conduct an inventory of their toolbox when used. Complete accountability of
assigned tools will reduce FOD accidents/incidents. All tools should be returned to their rightful place once maintenance is complete or at the end of the business day.
Para 8-21. Maintenance personnel also will use only authorized tools when conducting aircraft maintenance. Maintenance supervisors will inventory toolboxes at least monthly in
the active component. ARNG and Army Reserve units will perform this inventory quarterly. Maintenance personnel assigned toolboxes will inventory their toolbox after each
maintenance task to help control FOD.
Para 8-22. A supervisor inventory is not required when toolboxes are placed in administrative storage. Corrosion control measures must be completed to ensure tools remain in a
serviceable condition while in administrative storage. Annual inventories of toolboxes in administrative storage must be completed IAW AR 710-2 and DA PAM 710-2-1. Leaders
will conduct replenishment operations as required following each inventory to replace missing or unserviceable tools and components.

TM 9-243, Para 2.2.2. Keep Your Tools in Good Condition. Keep them free of rust, nicks, burrs, and breaks.

C-12/RC-12/UC-35 SOW Para 5.2.1 ―…. The Contractor shall have in place a tool control plan meeting acceptable commercial standards.

C-23 PWS Para 3.13.1, ―….The Contractor shall have in place a tool control plan meeting acceptable commercial standards.‖

C-26 GMM page 173-186, ―Personal tools shall be the responsibility of the individual mechanics but shall be marked and controlled IAW M-7 tool control procedures as outlined
inour GMM. C-26 CSOW Para 4.6.3, ―LSI shall utilize an effective FOD Prevention/Tool Control Program which emphasizes cleanliness of area during the performance of work,
including ramp and hangar areas: thorough cleaning of components and assemblies; control of personal items; repair process generated debris, and scrap materials; and
protection of the product and associated components during handling, installation, and operations. … M-7 shall include the FOD Prevention/Tool Control Plan in the C-26 General
Management Manual.‖
EVAL METH

                                                                                           58
Conduct a tool box inventory. If a tool box has a missing or unserviceable tool this is cause for failure of this question. Ensure tool box inventories are accomplished IAW Unit
SOP and applicable published guidance. Inventories are required daily after use and monthly. Recommend inventory sheets are kept in the tool box. Shortages must be reflected
on a shortage annex.

7.00                AC      AM AS       BN CO DE       OS                SB SF      UA LU
Are aircraft parked in the hangar, properly grounded and safed, with drip pans and protective covers in place? [TM 1-1500-204-23-1 para 2-6 b/d/g/h, 3-2.d, 3-4.a; DA Pam 385-90
para 2-8 d (3) (d); TM 9-1055-460-13&P para 3-5; applicable aircraft TM; Unit SOP; C-12/RC-12/UC-35 LCCS Procedures 2608 and 2631; C23 GMM 9.5.1.2.5; C-26 Site
Procedures Manual]
REFERENCE TEXT
TM 1-1500-204-23-1, Para 2-6 b/d/g/h: b. Parking of Aircraft in Hangars. Observe the following parking precautions: • Aircraft shall be static-grounded from basic structure of
aircraft to a low resistance ground. • After parking aircraft, chock securely and release parking brake.
d. Usage of Drip Pans. Drip pans shall be placed under aircraft engines to collect oil. Drip pans shall be emptied daily.
g. Static Grounding of Aircraft. All aircraft parked in a hangar must be grounded (earthed) at all times.
h. Static Grounding of Ground Support Equipment. Ground support equipment in a hangar must be grounded (cable or power cord) at all times when in contact with the aircraft
being worked on.
Para 3-2.d. Parking and Mooring. The following are general precautions for all aircraft. • All aircraft parked inside enclosures will be grounded at all times.
Para 3-4.a. Grounding Requirements • All aircraft parked in a hangar must be grounded at all times.

DA Pam 385-90, Para 2-8.d.(3)(d): Para 2-8.d. Management of the foreign object damage program will encompass the following: (3) All unit personnel will implement the FOD
prevention program by: (d) Ensure all aircraft openings, ports, lines, holes, ducts and so forth, are properly protected to keep foreign objects from accidentally entering.

TM 9-1055-460-13&P, Para 3–5: GENERAL. Before you start any maintenance procedures, take the following precautions: a. Aircraft: 1. Ground aircraft in accordance with
appropriate aircraft procedures. 2. Shut off armament circuit breaker. 3. Shut off armament switch.

C-12/RC-12/UC-35 LCCS Procedures 2608 and 2631

C23 GMM 9.5.1.2.5

C-26 Site Procedures Manual
EVAL METH
Review the references for the type aircraft and ensure all requirements are met. Example: Safing procedures for AH-64 IAW applicable TM.

8.00               AC     AM AS       BN CO DE        OS              SB SF      UA LU
Are parts or items removed from aircraft marked and stored properly? [TC 3-04.7 para 1-84, para B-41; Pam 738-751 para 3.20 b (1); TM 1-1500-204-23-1 para 5-2 and 5-3; C-
12/RC-12/UC-35 SOW para 3.3.1; LCCS Procedures Manual LCCS-8004, pg 1, para 4B1; C-23 PWS para 3.6.1 and C-23 GMM 3.7.4; C-26 GMM pages 74-78]
REFERENCE TEXT
TC 3-04.7, Para 1-84. Aircraft maintainers and crew chiefs must ensure removed components are properly cleaned and inspected to determine serviceability. They must properly
tag and store serviceable parts removed from an aircraft and inspected by a technical inspector (TI) to ensure parts are on-hand and serviceable when it is time to reinstall them.
Aircraft maintainers and crew chiefs must properly tag unserviceable components, have QC technically inspect and sign the tag, and promptly turn in components to the technical
supply section.
Para B-41. To minimize shop-related accidents, the facility NCOIC will satisfactorily address the following questions: • When parts or items are removed from aircraft, are they
marked and stored in plain sight? (Refer to this publication.)

DA Pam 738-751, Para 3-20 b (1): b. Use. (1) Completed Materiel Condition Tags/Labels will be securely attached to all uninstalled or stored aeronautical and air delivery items.
When items are packaged or stored in a container, attach a duplicate tag/label to the outside of the container. Use waterproof blue or black ink on Materiel Condition Tags/Labels.
Make sure the tag will be protected during handling operations or while exposed to outside elements, such as sun, rain, snow, sand, and so forth. No substitute will be used when
a materiel condition tag/label is required. When serviceable components; such as, seats, panels, and stanchions, are removed from the aircraft and temporarily stored to facilitate

                                                                                        59
maintenance, a DD Form 1574, Serviceable Tag, does not need to be completed for each item. A plain manila tag may be used to mark these items. Each tag must have, as a
minimum, the last three digits of the aircraft serial number entered on the tag. This does not delete the requirement to tag unserviceable items, items in storage, or items turned
into supply activities.

TM 1-1500-204-23-1, Para 5-2: Marking Requirements. A single materiel conditions tag shall be used to identify each aeronautical component, assembly, kit, or set which is
assigned a FSN and is stocked, stored and issued as a single line item of supply. However, individual parts of components… which are identified and listed as a single line item of
supply shall be individually tagged when physically separated.
Para 5-3: Materiel Marking. The following are the only materiel condition tags and labels authorized for use on Army aeronautical items. These tags and labels are in addition to
applicable maintenance forms, records, or tags required by DA PAM 738-751. • Serviceable Tag-Materiel (DD Form 1574) and Serviceable Label Materiel (DD Form 1584-1).
• Unserviceable (Repairable) Tag-Materiel (DD Form 1577-2) and Unserviceable (Reparable) Label-Materiel (DD Form 1577-3). • Unserviceable (Condemned) Tag-Materiel (DD
Form 1577) and Unserviceable (Condemned) Label-Materiel (DD Form 1577-1). • Suspended Tag-Materiel (DD Form 1575) and Suspended Label-Materiel (DD Form 1575-1).
• Test/Modification Tag-Materiel (DD Form 1576) and Test/Modification Label Materiel (DD Form 1576-1).

C-12/RC-12/UC-35 SOW, Para 3.3.1, ―The Contractor shall manage all material requirements necessary to support this program to include procurement, stock control, receipt,
storage, issuance, packing, packaging, transportation, and quality assurance for all parts and material utilized in support of aircraft and sub-systems.
C-12/RC-12/UC-35 LCCS Procedures Manual LCCS-8004, pg 1, Para 4B1: All parts/components removed from the aircraft will be inspected and tagged serviceable or
unserviceable as appropriate.

C-23 PWS, Para 3.6.1, ―The Contractor shall manage all material requirements necessary to support this program to include procurement, stock control, receipt, storage, issuance,
packing, packaging, transportation, and quality assurance for all parts and material utilized in support of aircraft and sub-systems.‖
C-23 GMM, Para 3.7.4)

C-26 GMM pages 74-78, ―When a repairable part is removed from the aircraft or equipment at the MOB, and repair of the removed item is beyond the capability of the MOB, the
item shall be processed to an FAA approved repair facility. The mechanic at the MOB shall prepare a tag form 001. … Receiving/Inspecting: Parts are properly identified and
tagged IAW FAA and Government directives.‖

EVAL METH
Any parts found not marked and or tagged fails this question. Panels and major parts may have the ACFT SN permanently marked.

13.00              AC      AM AS       BN CO DE       OS             SB SF       UA LU
Are individuals removing jewelry before performing maintenance? [TC 3-04.7 para 3-39; TM 1-1500-204-23-9 para 2-8.b. (1) (j); C-12/RC-12/UC-35 SOW para 5.2.4; C-23 PWS
para 3.13.4; C-26 GMM page 251]
REFERENCE TEXT
TM 1-1500-204-23-9, Para 2-8.b. (1) (j): Jewelry shall not be worn while performing any maintenance.

TC 3-04.7, Para 3-39. When an aircraft ingests foreign objects or fluids, FOD has occurred. Assigned personnel will ensure the following hazards are avoided during all aspects of
aviation maintenance operations: • Jewelry – ensure no jewelry (such as rings, watches, identification. tags, and pin-on rank) is worn during maintenance, inspections, and
servicing of aircraft and GSE.

C-12/RC-12/UC-35 SOW, Para 5.2.4 SAFETY ENGINEERING, The Contractor shall provide Safety Engineering Support in support of Paragraph 3.0, Operational Readiness, and
Paragraph 4.0, Depot/Propulsion/Over and Above, of this SOW. The contractor shall execute a safety program IAW the safety portion of the Engineering Support Approach,
‖applicable Government regulations and local facility safety requirements. These activities shall include safety awareness briefings, safety inspections of the work place, and
process to amend maintenance procedures to reduce safety hazards.

C-23 PWS, Para 3.13.4 SAFETY ENGINEERING, The Contractor shall provide Safety Engineering Services, in support of Paragraph 3.5, Operational Readiness, and Paragraph
5.0, Depot/Propulsion/ Over and Above, of this PWS. The contractor shall execute a safety program IAW the safety portion of the Engineering Support Approach, applicable
Government regulations and local facility safety requirements. These activities shall include safety awareness briefings, safety inspections of the work place, and process to
amend maintenance procedures to reduce safety hazards.
                                                                                          60
C-26 GMM page 251, ―M-7 shall develop and implement a safety program which complies with AR 95-20, Safety, Fire Protection and Health Specification. M-7 shall summarize
the Safety Program Plan in the C-26 Management Plan. Each Site Lead A&P Mechanic shall be required to develop and implement supplemental safety instructions and SOPs
unique to their MOB’s characteristics, operating conditions, and host required safety requirements.‖
EVAL METH
Observation of individuals wearing jewelry while performing maintenance tasks is cause for failure of this question.

17.00               AC      AM AS           BN CO DE       OS               SB SF      UA LU
If a fixed quick drenching facility for flushing eyes and body is provided in the hangar, is it flushed weekly and inspected annually? Are portable/self-contained eye washes
inspected IAW manufacturers’ specification? [29 CFR 1910.151 para (c); ANSI/ISEA Z358.1-2009 Section 4, Section 5, Section 6, Section 7, Appendix B]
REFERENCE TEXT
29 CFR 1910.151, Para (c): Where the eyes or body of any person may be exposed to injurious corrosive materials, suitable facilities for quick drenching or flushing of the eyes
and body shall be provided within the work area for immediate emergency use.

ANSI/ISEA Z358.1-2009, Section 4, Section 5, Section 6, Section 7, Appendix B
Section 4. Emergency Showers.
Sect. 4.6.2. Plumbed emergency showers shall be activated weekly for a period long enough to verify operation and ensure that flushing fluid is available. (See Appendix B7)
Sect. 4.6.5. All emergency showers shall be inspected annually to assure conformance with Section 4.5 requirements of this standard.
Section 5. Eyewash Equipment.
Sect. 5.5.2. Plumbed eyewashes shall be activated weekly for a period long enough to verify operation and ensure that flushing fluid is available. (See Appendix B7)
Sect. 5.5.3. Self-contained eyewashes shall be visually checked to determine if flushing fluid needs to be changed or supplemented. Such inspection shall be conducted in
accordance with manufacturer’s instructions.
Sect. 5.5.5. All eyewashes shall be inspected annually to assure conformance with Section 5.4 requirements of this standard.
Section 6. Eye/Face Wash Equipment.
Sect. 6.5.2. Plumbed eye/face washes shall be activated weekly for a period long enough to verify operation and ensure that flushing fluid is available. (See Appendix B7)
Sect. 6.5.5. All eye/face washes shall be inspected annually to assure conformance with Section 6.4 requirements of this standard.
Section 7. Combination Units.
Sect. 7.5.2. Plumbed combination units shall be activated weekly for a period long enough to verify operation and ensure that flushing fluid is available. (See Appendix B7)
Sect. 7.5.5. All combination units shall be inspected annually to assure conformance with Section 7.4 requirements of this standard.
Appendix B7. Weekly Activation for Plumbed Emergency Eyewash and Shower Equipment. The intent of the weekly activation to be conducted on the plumbed emergency
eyewash and shower equipment is to ensure that there is a flushing fluid supply at the head of the device and to clear the supply line of any sediment build-up that could prevent
fluid from being delivered to the head of the device and minimize microbial contamination due to stagnant water. The duration of this test is dependant on the volume of water
contained in the unit itself and all sections of pipework that do not form part of a constant circulation system (also known as ―dead leg‖ portions). Water in these sections is
stagnant until a flow is activated by opening a valve. The goal is to flush out stagnant water in the dead leg completely. Where mixing valves are used, both the hot water and
cold water supplies to the valve must be considered.
EVAL METH
Inspect eyewash for all applicable requirements. A zero tolerance is allowed. Dust accumulated in eyewash bowl or around shower head is indication weekly flushing may not be
adequately accomplished.

19.00            AC      AM AS       BN      DE                       SB SF      UA
Are personnel who work with or handle pressurized gas cylinders reviewing AR 700-68 annually? [TB 385-4 para 6.2.3]
REFERENCE TEXT
TB 385-4, Para 6.2.3: Pressurized Gas Cylinders. Handle pressurized gas cylinders in accordance with Title 29 CFR 1910, Subpart M, and AR 700-68. All personnel who work
with or handle pressurized gas cylinders will review AR 700-68 annually. Maintenance activities will maintain a record of these reviews.
• Secure cylinders to avoid accidental tipping. • Keep no more than two cylinders of the same gas at a work station at any one time. Remove the cylinders from the work station
when they are empty. Be careful when handling the empty cylinders as they may still contain a small amount of gas. • Do not handle cryogenic gas containers in any room where
lasers are being tested. • Store cryogenic gas containers in open and well ventilated areas. • Check container valves and seals regularly.

                                                                                         61
EVAL METH
Evaluator will verify that maintenance activities are maintaining reviews of AR 700-68.

21.00               AC     AM AS        BN CO DE                       SB SF         UA
Are laser safety signs posted as required and warning labels placed on aircraft laser components? [TB 385-4 para 4.9, 4.10, 4.10.1; TC 3-04.7 para B-41; TB MED 524 para 5-2,
para 5-4, para 6-12; Appropriate aircraft manuals]
REFERENCE TEXT
TB 385-4, Para 4.9: CLASS 3 AND 4 LASERS DANGER signs must posted near the door or entrance to a Class 3b or 4 laser firing area. Figure 4-1 is an example of a DANGER
sign.
Para 4.10: Class 2 and Higher Laser Equipment WARNING Do not make direct eye contact with the beam of a Class 2 laser device.
Para 4.10.1: Caution and Warning Labels. Verify that caution or warning labels are permanently affixed to all Class 2 or higher laser equipment. If any such laser equipment that
does not contain a label, notify a supervisor or the laser safety officer.

TC 3-04.7, Para B-41. To minimize shop-related accidents, the facility NCOIC will satisfactorily address the following questions: • Does the facility NCOIC or supervisor emphasize
accident prevention measures and check for marking and width of personnel safety aisles, safety and warning posters, and smoking and nonsmoking areas? (Refer to this
publication, TM 1-1500-204-23-1, and DA PAM 385-1.) • Are necessary accident prevention signs posted in the shop area? (Refer to TM 1-1500-204-23 series.)

TB MED 524, Para 5–2. Types of control measures. Most control measures fall into the category of common sense practices aimed at limiting the laser exposure, thus reducing
the risk. ..b. Administrative controls. ..Table 5-1 lists required control measures for the various hazard classes of lasers. Some examples of administrative controls are (1)
Guidelines or SOPs. (2) Authorization of personnel to operate laser equipment. (3) Laser safety training and education for select personnel. (4) Posting warning signs, and labels.
[see Table 5-1]
Para 5-4. Warning signs. Placarding of potentially hazardous areas should be accomplished according to local guidelines or SOPs for Class 3b and Class 4 lasers. The signs
shown in figures 5–1 through 5–7 are examples.
Para 6-12. Hangar, garage, and maintenance shop procedures. a. All testing performed in shop areas will be strictly controlled with barriers and signs.
EVAL METH
Review the references for the type aircraft ensure all requirements are met. Ensure labels / signs are posted as required. Review the unit SOP to ensure laser operations are
addressed and safety procedures are clearly identified.


F- BATTERY SHOP
NOT APPLICABLE

G- AVIONICS / ARMAMENT
NOT APPLICABLE

H- UNIT PUBLICATIONS MANAGEMENT
NOT APPLICABLE

I- NON-DESTRUCTIVE TESTING
NOT APPLICABLE

                                                               SAFETY MANAGEMENT
                                                                                          62
A-COMMAND FACTORS
QUESTION
2.00                AC AF AM AS       BN       DE        OS         SB SF        UA
Is there a school trained ASO assigned to the TDA, TOE, MTOE authorized full-time position? [DA Pam 385-90, para 1-4j(2)]
REFERENCE TEXT
1-4j(2) Maintain current authorized full-time positions for qualified ASOs at army headquarters, corps, installations or facilities that support aviation activities, and aviation unit
levels (regiment/brigade/group, battalion/squadron, company/troop, detachment and comparable size activities).
EVAL METH:
Evidence that the ASO is qualified and assigned to a para/line of the current TOE/TDA.

3.00                 AC AF AM AS AT BN            DE FS       OS          SB SF TO UA
Has an appropriately trained additional duty aviation safety officer been appointed in aviation organizations without authorized ASO positions, and in non-aviation organizations,
not staffed with full-time safety personnel to perform required safety and accident prevention functions? [DA Pam 385-90, para 1-4j(3)(b); AR 385-10, para 2-7g; DA Pam 385-10,
para 3-3f; AE Command Policy Letter #5, para 6d ]
REFERENCE TEXT
1-4j(3)(b) Units that do not have table of organization and equipment (TOE)/TDA-authorized ASO positions will utilize the expertise of the next higher authorized ASO in the chain
of command. Additionally, commanders not authorized full-time ASOs by the TOE/TDA will appoint additional duty Safety Officers (SOs)/non-commissioned officers (NCOs). 2-7g.
Safety organizations will be augmented by additional duty (military) or collateral duty (Army civilian) safety personnel to perform required safety and accident prevention functions
in Army units, industrial, and administrative activities. Additional/collateral duty safety personnel will— (1) Be appointed by commander on written orders. (2) Be a commissioned
officer, at battalion and higher unit levels. (3) Be in the rank of staff sergeant or higher, at the company level. (4) Have met or will meet the training requirements of chapter 11. (5)
Have 1 year or more retainability in the unit upon duty appointment. (6) Give their safety duties proper priority. (7) Report directly to their unit commander on safety–related
matters. (8) Coordinate activities with their installation or garrison safety office. h. Army Civilian collateral safety personnel may be used to augment the safety organization. When
used, they will—(1) Be appointed in writing on orders. (2) Have met or will meet the requirements of 29 CFR 1960.58— training of collateral duty safety and health personnel and
committee members. (3) Give their safety duties proper priority. (4) Report directly to their unit commander/director on safety–related matters. (5) Coordinate activities with their
supporting safety office. DA Pam 385-10, para 3-3f. In addition to the standard safety organization structure identified in figure 3–1, there is also a requirement for activity safety
personnel who perform the safety duty as ―other duty as assigned role‖. This individual should be referred to as the Additional Duty Safety Officer (ADSO) or Collateral Duty Safety
Officer (CDSO). This usually occurs in activities where the table of organization and equipment/table of distribution and allowance/modified table of organization and equipment
(TOE/TDA/MTOE) based on required functions/task does not support a full time safety officer. The person designated as the ADSO/CDSO will be of sufficient rank to perform
these duties normally a commissioned officer/warrant officer at Battalion or higher unit levels; staff sergeant at company or detachment levels; or a Department of the Army (DA)
civilian as needed. The person selected must have at least 12 months remaining with the unit after appointment. The appointment will be confirmed in orders designating the unit
safety officer by name. The unit safety officer will have received, or will receive training for this position as soon as possible, but no later than 3 months after being appointed the
specific area.

[Europe Only] AE Command Policy Letter #5, para 6d The minimum training for additional-duty safety officers is completing the Additional Duty Safety Course and attending SOC
40.
EVAL METH:
Check appointment orders and qualification documents for the additional duty ASO.

4.00                AC AF AM AS AT BN            DE FS       OS          SB SF TO UA
Is a safety-trained NCO or qualified individual appointed by the unit commander, in writing, to assist the safety manager in aviation units? [DA Pam 385-90, para 1-4j(3)(d); AE
Command Policy Letter #5, para 6c]
REFERENCE TEXT
1-4j(3)(d) Safety-trained NCO or qualified individuals will be appointed by unit commanders, in writing, to assist the ASOs.

[Europe Only] AE Command Policy Letter #5, para 6c The minimum training for Senior Noncommissioned Officer’s is completing the Commanders Safety Course, and the Senior
NCO Safety Course or attending SOC 40.

                                                                                            63
EVAL METH:
A certificate of completion from a formal safety course & appointment orders for the safety NCO or alternate to the ASO.


B-SAFETY ADMINISTRATION
QUESTION
1.00               AC AF AM AS AT BN        DE FS         OS         SB SF TO UA
Do the safety management portions of the SOP list step by step procedures for accomplishing program requirements to ease the transition between program managers? [DA Pam
385-90, para 1-4j(6), para 2-12]
REFERENCE TEXT
(6) Integrate risk controls into standing operating procedures (SOP) and ensure that written SOPs exist for all functional areas and for all operations within the command. (A stand
alone written commander’s accident prevention plan is no longer required.) SOPs will include the following: 2–12. Standing operating procedures Commanders should ensure
that an SOP is developed for all unit functional areas and for all aviation operations executed in the command. The SOP may, where applicable, be consolidated at the
battalion/squadron or regiment/brigade/group level. The systematic risk management process should be integrated in all unit operational procedures. Command approved risk-
control options should be integrated into the SOP as task performance standards. At a minimum, the following subjects will be addressed in the SOP if they are applicable to the
unit mission:
EVAL METH:
Review the safety portion of the SOP for clear procedures on how the safety program functions in the unit.

2.00             AC AF AM AS AT BN             DE FS        OS          SB SF TO UA
Does the safety manager maintain a current library of safety regulations, accident prevention directives, and instructional materials? [DA Pam 385-90, para 1-4m(6)(h)]
REFERENCE TEXT
1-4m(6)(h) Acquiring and maintaining a current reference library of aviation literature. (see app A)
EVAL METH:
As a minimum, access to current regulations in printed or electronic format. Recommending printed copies of the minimum daily core regulations (385 series)

3.00             AC AF AM AS AT BN            DE FS        OS           SB SF TO UA
Does the safety manager maintain current unit safety functional files? [AR 25-400-2, para 1-7a, b; https://www.arims.army.mil; DA Pam 385-90, para 2-10f]
REFERENCE TEXT
1–7. Principles of ARIMS a. ARIMS focuses on the management of long-term and permanent records and allows the business process to manage the short-term records. It
addresses only the record copy of information; all other copies of the same information may be disposed of when no longer needed for business not to exceed the time that the
record copy is kept. ARIMS simplifies recordkeeping for individuals; shifts retention and disposition burdens to records holding areas (RHAs), improves records processing for
deployed units in contingency operations (CONOPS); and provides a host of support services and automated tools on the Web. b. Records are identified according to the primary
 directive that prescribes those records be created, maintained, and used; Army directives are available on the U.S. Army Publishing Agency (USAPA) Web site
(http://www.usapa.-army.mil) or on AEL CD–ROM (EM 0001).. 2-10f. The commanders and staff should maintain a file/log of hazards to track control-option implementation and
effectiveness. The file/log should be maintained as a permanent reference for future hazard analysis. The file/log should contain the following elements: (1) A reference or log
number. (2) Description of the hazard, including source or root cause. (3) Determination of potential impact on the unit/mission RAC. (4) Recommended control options. (5)
Command decision on control options and implementation directives, including responsible agent and suspense. (6) A plan to verify the effectiveness of controls. (7) Status
based on verification of effectiveness. g. Provide feedback through appropriate channels on hazards that affect other units or Army systems.
EVAL METH:
Review unit functional safety files checking labels and content.

5.00               AC AF AM AS AT BN          DE FS       OS          SB SF TO UA
Has the safety manager established written procedures for the awards program, to include procedures for impact awards? [AR 385-10, para 8-5; DA Pam 385-90,
para 1-4(m)(6)(q); DA Pam 385-10, para 1-6]
REFERENCE TEXT

                                                                                         64
8–5. Army Headquarters and organization–level awards a. Army Accident Prevention Award of Accomplishment. This award is presented to TOE or TDA detachments;
company–size units, battalions, or equivalent; brigades or equivalent; and divisions, installations, or activities that have completed 12 consecutive months, or a major training
exercise, or an actual deployment of greater than 120 days without experiencing a class A, B, or C accident. b. U.S. Army Aircrew Member Safety Award. Commanders present
this award to aircrew members with at least 500 flight hours of accident free hours as a crewmember. c. Other individual and organizational awards. Leaders at all levels will
recognize safe performance of individuals and subordinate organizations. Leaders are encouraged to develop awards that are tailored to recognize the accident prevention
accomplishments within their sphere of activity, interest or operation. Leaders may use DA Form 1119–1 (Management Control Evaluation Certification Statement) or are
authorized to design and use locally produced certificates or trophies. d. Unit Impact Awards. Commanders are encouraged to develop and issue policies for safety impact awards
to promote safety awareness through on the spot recognition of safety related actions that are above and beyond what is required of an individual or organization. 1-4(m)(6)(q)
Managing the unit’s safety award program. This should be done in consonance with the unit administration officer and according to the guidelines contained in DA Pam 385–10.
 15-1 (7) Ensure that all aviation units have SOPs that include subjects listed in DA Pam 385–90. 1–6. Funding Each organization will include funding at the level required for
full implementation of the Army safety program, the Army Accident Prevention Awards Program and other requirements of this pamphlet in their budget submissions.
EVAL METH:
Verify all applicable safety awards programs are functioning. Policy and evidence of issue during the evaluation period (unit, individual, impact, and safe drivers). Ensure the
program is funded down to the unit level. Review the SOP to find if this area is covered. If this area is not recognized, ask the ASO for evidence the program is functioning.

C-REPORTS AND INVESTIGATIONS
QUESTION
1.00               AC AF AM AS AT BN        DE FS      OS           SB SF TO UA
Are administrative procedures for management and submission of accident or incident reports and investigations established in the organization’s SOP? [DA Pam 385-90,
para 1-4j(6); AE Reg 385-40, para 7]
REFERENCE TEXT
1-4j(6) Integrate risk controls into standing operating procedures (SOP) and ensure that written SOPs exist for all functional areas and for all operations within the command (A
stand alone written commander’s accident prevention plan is no longer required.) SOPs will include the following: (a) Composite risk management (CRM) procedures and
responsibilities for training and operations. (b) Risk controls for hazards most frequently experienced. (c) Command level authority to accept each level of risk, (low, moderate,
high, and extreme high). (d) Pre-accident plans, including immediate actions, investigation procedures (See DA Pamphlet (Pam) 385–40.), reporting and records (see AR 385–10),
and corrective action responsibilities. (See app C for sample pre-accident plan.)

[Europe Only] AE Reg 385-40, para 7.
ACCIDENT REPORTING AUTOMATED SYSTEM (ARAS)
ARAS is the preferred method for reporting all class C and D ground and class D through F aviation accidents in the Army in Europe. All Army in Europe units will attempt to
comply with this automated report submission requirement. Units with automation deficiencies or in a deployed status may submit hard-copy reports through normal reporting
channels. ARAS access is available using Army Knowledge Online (AKO) credentials. The ARAS website provides online audiovisual tutorials and context-sensitive help screens.
The ARAS website is at https://crc.army.mil. Approval and submission of accident reports are authorized at the company level. USAREUR major subordinate commands (AE Reg
10-5, app A) may issue supplemental guidance to require higher-level approvals before submission. Commanders will incorporate these procedures in unit standing operating
procedures.

EVAL METH:
Review the SOP to find if this area is covered. If this area is not recognized, ask the ASO.

2.00             AC       AM AS      BN      DE          OS         SB SF TO UA
Are Abbreviated Aviation Accident Reports, Abbreviated Ground Accident Reports, and Unmanned Aircraft System Accident Reports submitted for all applicable mishaps and file
copies maintained? [DA Pam 385-40, para 1-4, 1-5]
REFERENCE TEXT
1–4. Methodology
 a. Accidents should be investigated to the degree necessary to identify the immediate mistake(s)/error(s)/failures(s), and system inadequacy(ies) which may have caused, or
contributed to, the accident being investigated. The techniques and procedures contained in this pamphlet and AR 385–10 will be used in preparation of all accident reports.
Appropriate forms (DA Form 2397-series (Technical Report of U.S. Army Aircraft Accident), DA Form 2397–AB (Abbreviated Aviation Accident Report (AAAR)), DA Form 285
                                                                                         65
(Technical Report of U.S. Army Ground Accident), D A F o r m 2 8 5 – A B (Abbreviated Ground Report (AGAR)) will be used for reporting the results of accident
investigations. b. Recommendations will be provided that will remedy the causes and minimize the chances for similar recurrences. If the Army accident investigation
reveals unsafe conditions or practices affecting an item of equipment or technical publication, the safety of an entire model or series of an Army item of equipment may be
involved. The appropriate commander should be notified immediately; and the U.S. Army Combat Readiness Center (USACRC) contacted telephonically. 1–5. Concept Accidents
are caused by adverse interactions of man, machine, and environment. Investigation and assessment of these elements should reveal human, materiel, and/or environmental
factors that caused or contributed to the accident. These factors can be attributed to one or more system inadequacy (or sometimes referred to as ―root cause‖). The system
inadequacies responsible for human error are categorized as leader, standards, training, individual, or support failure. Although an accident investigation occurs ―after the fact,‖ its
primary focus must be on identifying what happened and why it happened. Once this has been accomplished, the appropriate activity(ies) responsible for correcting each identified
system inadequacy can be notified. This procedure is called the ―3W‖ approach to information collection, analysis, and corrective actions (see fig 1–1). The procedures used
throughout this pamphlet are designed to assist the investigator in answering the following three basic questions: a. What happened (mistake/error/failure). Identify key factors
(human, materiel, environmental) which caused or contributed to the accident. In the case of injuries, explain how they happened. b. Why it happened (system
inadequacy(ies)/root cause(s)). Identify the system inadequacy that permitted the accident to occur. Explain how and under what conditions those mistakes/errors/failures
occurred. c. What to do about it (recommendations). Identify the recommended actions and identify the proponent activity or lowest level of command that is most responsible for
correcting the deficiency.
EVAL METH:
Review the completed AAARs/AGARs/UASAR. Ensure the suspense’s were met.

4.00              AC AF AM AS AT BN         DE FS     OS         SB SF TO UA
Are blank Operational Hazard Reports (OHR) (DA Form 2696-R) and DA Forms 4755 (Employee Report of Alleged Unsafe or Unhealthful Working Conditions readily available?
[DA Pam 385-90, para 2-7b, DA Pam 385-90, para 2-13d(5), (6)]
REFERENCE TEXT
2-7b. The operational hazard report uses DA Form 2696 to identify and report potential hazards to Army aviation. (1) DA Form 2696 (Operational Hazard Report (OHR)) RCS
CSGPA 1633, is used to record information about hazardous acts or conditions before accidents occur. This form is available on the Army Publishing Directorate (APD) Web
site (http://www.apd.army.mil). Blank copies of the report forms will be readily available to all aviation-related personnel. 2–13. Safety information bulletin boards d. The most
recent AAPS results. The information should include Command Safety Messages (for example, holiday safety reminders), a completed DD Form 2272 (Department of Defense
Safety and Occupational Health Protection Program), annual safety training topics and schedule, and safety-related newspaper clippings, and posters, and so forth. All information
posted to the safety bulletin board should emphasize accident prevention and/or lessons learned. Safety bulletin boards shall display: (5) blank DA Forms 2696 (Operational
Hazard Report); (6) blank DA Forms 4755 (Employee Report of Alleged Unsafe or Unhealthful Working Conditions)
EVAL METH:
Ensure DA Forms 2696 and 4755s are readily available. Check the safety bulletin board.

5.00                AC AF AM AS AT BN         DE FS       OS           SB SF TO UA
Is follow-up action documented on operational hazard reports to include the responsible commander’s signature and are completed reports maintained on file for two years?
[DA Pam 385-90, para 2-7b4(f), 2-7c]
REFERENCE TEXT
2-7b4(f) A copy of each report should remain on file for 2 years, in case the investigating ASO needs to refer to the information. 2-7c. Commanders will ensure that procedures
are established to manage OHR functions to insure that each report is quickly processed and appropriate corrective action taken. These management procedures will include:
(1) Emphasizing the importance of the OHR as a CRM tool. (2) Promptly reporting and investigating hazards. (3) Promptly correcting hazards. (4) Emphasizing that the
OHR and flight violation reports are two separate systems that may be used simultaneously to enhance safety. (5) Forwarding the OHR to the next higher command when
recommendations exceed the capabilities of the receiving unit. (6) Reviewing, signing, and returning the completed OHR to the ASO within 10 working days of the date, the
report was received.
EVAL METH:
Check submitted OHRs. Ensure the suspense dates have been met and the commander has signed the completed OHR.


D-INFORMATION COLLECTION
QUESTION
1.00               AC AF AM AS AT BN            DE FS        OS          SB SF TO UA
                                                                                          66
Are procedures for the survey and inspection programs established in the SOP? [DA Pam 385-90, para 1-4j(6)]
REFERENCE TEXT
1-4j(6) Integrate risk controls into standing operating procedures (SOP) and ensure that written SOPs exist for all functional areas and for all operations within the command
(A stand alone written commander’s accident prevention plan is no longer required.) SOPs will include the following: (a) Composite risk management (CRM) procedures and
responsibilities for training and operations. (b) Risk controls for hazards most frequently experienced. (c) Command level authority to accept each level of risk, (low, moderate,
high, and extreme high). (d) Pre-accident plans, including immediate actions, investigation procedures (See DA Pamphlet (Pam) 385–40.), reporting and records (See AR
385–10.), and corrective action responsibilities. (See app C for sample pre-accident plan.) (e) Procedures and responsibilities for safety-related programs. (See chap 3.)
EVAL METH:
Review the SOP to find if this area is covered. If this area is not recognized, inquire of the ASO how the program is managed.

2.00              AC AF AM AS AT BN            DE FS    OS         SB SF TO UA
Are required accident prevention surveys performed? [DA Pam 385-90, para 2-11]
REFERENCE TEXT
2–11. Aviation accident prevention survey
Commanders of all aviation units will conduct an aviation accident prevention survey (AAPS) annually, at a minimum. A survey of a functional area (or sub-area) will be
accomplished when a new program manager is appointed. This may be conducted in concert with the annual Standard Army Safety and Occupational Health Safety Inspection
(SASOHSI) ―Guide to Aviation Resource Management for Aircraft Mishap Prevention‖ or a similar guide should be used as a reference. When possible, the AAPS should be
administered from the battalion/squadron level consolidating the safety staff into a survey team and using supplemental expertise from outside the unit. Surveys conducted by
external sources (brigade, installation, or Army Headquarters aviation resource management surveys; standard Army safety and occupational health inspections; regional accident
prevention surveys) may count toward annual accident-prevention surveys, provided all applicable functional areas for the organization are surveyed. An external survey may
count toward the annual requirement for Reserve component units. The AAPS may be concurrent with internal command inspection programs as long as all unit functional areas
are surveyed. The AAPS is a major source in the hazard identification step of the CRM process. All hazards identified during the AAPS must be thoroughly assessed for their risk
level, and control options must be developed for command decision-making and implementation. Hazards found during the AAPS will be tracked through the unit hazard tracking
system. Files on subordinate unit surveys may be maintained at battalion/squadron level if the subordinate unit commander has immediate access to the files for control option
followup and research purposes.
EVAL METH:
Request documentation of annual accident prevention surveys. Any checklist format or process is acceptable as long as all applicable functional areas are surveyed for the
organization.

3.00                AC AF AM AS AT BN            DE FS        OS          SB SF TO UA
Are all functional areas, applicable to the organization, evaluated during the Aviation Accident Prevention Survey? [DA Pam 385-90, para 2-11]
REFERENCE TEXT
2–11. Aviation accident prevention survey
Commanders of all aviation units will conduct an aviation accident prevention survey (AAPS) annually, at a minimum. A survey of a functional area (or sub-area) will be
accomplished when a new program manager is appointed. This may be conducted in concert with the annual Standard Army Safety and Occupational Health Safety Inspection
(SASOHSI) ―Guide to Aviation Resource Management for Aircraft Mishap Prevention‖ or a similar guide should be used as a reference. When possible, the AAPS should be
administered from the battalion/squadron level consolidating the safety staff into a survey team and using supplemental expertise from outside the unit. Surveys conducted by
external sources (brigade, installation, or Army Headquarters aviation resource management surveys; standard Army safety and occupational health inspections; regional accident
prevention surveys) may count toward annual accident-prevention surveys, provided all applicable functional areas for the organization are surveyed. An external survey may
count toward the annual requirement for Reserve component units. The AAPS may be concurrent with internal command inspection programs as long as all unit functional areas
are surveyed. The AAPS is a major source in the hazard identification step of the CRM process. All hazards identified during the AAPS must be thoroughly assessed for their risk
level, and control options must be developed for command decision-making and implementation. Hazards found during the AAPS will be tracked through the unit hazard tracking
system. Files on subordinate unit surveys may be maintained at battalion/squadron level if the subordinate unit commander has immediate access to the files for control option
followup and research purposes.
EVAL METH:
Review the results of accident prevention surveys ensuring all applicable areas were surveyed.


                                                                                          67
4.00            AC AF AM AS AT BN       DE FS      OS            SB SF TO UA
When a new program manager assumes program responsibility are applicable functional areas, or sub areas, surveyed? [DA Pam 385-90, para 2-11]
REFERENCE TEXT
2–11. Aviation accident prevention survey
Commanders of all aviation units will conduct an aviation accident prevention survey (AAPS) annually, at a minimum. A survey of a functional area (or sub-area) will be
accomplished when a new program manager is appointed. This may be conducted in concert with the annual Standard Army Safety and Occupational Health Safety Inspection
(SASOHSI) ―Guide to Aviation Resource Management for Aircraft Mishap Prevention‖ or a similar guide should be used as a reference. When possible, the AAPS should be
administered from the battalion/squadron level consolidating the safety staff into a survey team and using supplemental expertise from outside the unit. Surveys conducted by
external sources (brigade, installation, or Army Headquarters aviation resource management surveys; standard Army safety and occupational health inspections; regional accident
prevention surveys) may count toward annual accident-prevention surveys, provided all applicable functional areas for the organization are surveyed. An external survey may
count toward the annual requirement for Reserve component units. The AAPS may be concurrent with internal command inspection programs as long as all unit functional areas
are surveyed. The AAPS is a major source in the hazard identification step of the CRM process. All hazards identified during the AAPS must be thoroughly assessed for their risk
level, and control options must be developed for command decision-making and implementation. Hazards found during the AAPS will be tracked through the unit hazard tracking
system. Files on subordinate unit surveys may be maintained at battalion/squadron level if the subordinate unit commander has immediate access to the files for control option
followup and research purposes.
EVAL METH:
Review the results of accident prevention surveys ensuring functional areas are surveyed when new program managers are appointed.

E-HAZARD ANALYSIS AND TRACKING
QUESTION
1.00               AC AF AM AS AT BN             DE FS      OS         SB SF TO UA
Is the hazard identification, analysis, and countermeasures implementation and control program (hazard tracking system) established in the SOP? [AR 385-10, para 18-5]
REFERENCE TEXT
18–5. Standing operating procedures a. Standing operating procedures will be developed for all hazardous operations in accordance with the requirements of DA Pam 385–10 and
provide supervisors and operators the level of detail necessary to execute the task or operation in an efficient, effective, and safe manner. Written standards (for example, work
plans, internal operating plans, operating manuals, work instructions, FMs, and so forth) may be substituted for SOPs when they provide the level of detail necessary to execute
the task or operation in an efficient, effective and safe manner. b. Standing operating procedures and revisions will be based on the results of a complete composite risk
assessment of all phases of the task or operation and resulting recommended controls. c. Standing operating procedures will describe all necessary operational and safety and
health requirements. d. Standing operating procedures will be reviewed and concurred with by subject matter experts within the executing organization and supporting
organizations. At a minimum, SOPs will be reviewed annually or at change of command. e. Standing operating procedures will address emergency response procedures, required
PPE, and equipment required to execute the operation safely. f. Supervisors will train, observe, and enforce all requirements of the SOP. g. Supervisors will read and indicate they
understand all the requirements of the SOP relative to the operation and that it can be executed in an efficient, effective, and safe manner following the SOP. h. All employees
will read and indicate they understand all the requirements of the SOP relative to their job and can execute it in an efficient, effective, and safe manner following the SOP.
EVAL METH:
Review the SOP to find if this area is covered. If this area is not recognized inquire of the ASO how the program is functioning.

2.00              AC AF AM AS AT BN             DE FS      OS           SB SF TO UA
Has the organization implemented a file or log of hazards and deficiencies? [DA Pam 385-10, para D-4(g); DA Pam 385-90, para 2-10f]
REFERENCE TEXT
D-4(g). All violations of standards detected during SASOHI will be entered on DA Form 4754 (Violation Inventory Log) or equivalent. (See app G for a sample form.) This log will
be used to monitor compliance. It will show all violations in order of discovery and prescribe an abatement date and the date for follow-up on correction of the deficiencies. h.
Procedures will be established to follow up on the correction of deficiencies identified during a SASOHI. If corrective action has not been accomplished or it is discovered that
interim safety measures are not being enforced, the inspector will inform the installation SOH official who will determine remedial action, to include notifying the installation or
activity commander if appropriate. For all uncorrected violations, entries on DA Form 4756 will reflect the revised corrective action schedule and appropriate remarks. 2-10f. The
commanders and staff should maintain a file/log of hazards to track control-option implementation and effectiveness. The file/log should be maintained as a permanent
reference for future hazard analysis. The file/log should contain the following elements: (1) A reference or log number. (2) Description of the hazard, including source or root
cause. (3) Determination of potential impact on the unit/mission RAC. (4) Recommended control options. (5) Command decision on control options and implementation

                                                                                         68
directives, including responsible agent and suspense. (6) A plan to verify the effectiveness of controls. (7) Status based on verification of effectiveness. g. Provide feedback
through appropriate channels on hazards that affect other units or Army systems.
EVAL METH:
Check organization’s files for a hazard tracking system that meets requirements.

4.00                AC AF AM AS AT BN             DE FS     OS         SB SF TO UA
Is follow-up action taken to correct noted deficiencies? [DA Pam 385-10, para D-4g; DA Pam 385-90, para 2-10f]
REFERENCE TEXT
D-4g. All violations of standards detected during SASOHI will be entered on DA Form 4754 (Violation Inventory Log) or equivalent. (See app G for a sample form.) This log
will be used to monitor compliance. It will show all violations in order of discovery and prescribe an abatement date and the date for follow-up on correction of the deficiencies.
h. Procedures will be established to follow up on the correction of deficiencies identified during a SASOHI. If corrective action has not been accomplished or it is discovered that
interim safety measures are not being enforced, the inspector will inform the installation SOH official who will determine remedial action, to include notifying the installation or
 activity commander if appropriate. For all uncorrected violations, entries on DA Form 4756 will reflect the revised corrective action schedule and appropriate remarks. 2-10f.
 The commanders and staff should maintain a file/log of hazards to track control-option implementation and effectiveness. The file/log should be maintained as a permanent
reference for future hazard analysis. The file/log should contain the following elements: (1) A reference or log number. (2) Description of the hazard, including source or root
cause. (3) Determination of potential impact on the unit/mission RAC. (4) Recommended control options. (5) Command decision on control options and implementation
directives, including responsible agent and suspense. (6) A plan to verify the effectiveness of controls. (7) Status based on verification of effectiveness. g. Provide feedback
through appropriate channels on hazards that affect other units or Army systems.
EVAL METH:
Check the hazard log and ensure that a high percentage of deficiencies are being completed. Check the suspense system to ensure it is current (excessive past due suspense
dates indicate no follow-up system). Note the items open for multiple years and look for a progression of action. Validate the action with the Council minutes.

7.00               AC AF AM AS AT BN       DE FS       OS           SB SF TO UA
Are minutes of the Command Safety Council meetings published with action officers and suspense dates assigned to action items? [DA Pam 385-90, para 2-4f]
REFERENCE TEXT
2-4f. Safety council minutes will document command decisions on risk-control options. Council minutes should be very specific in describing the risk control option, the responsible
individual that is responsible for implementing the control option, and the date by which the commander expects the action to be completed. The commander will approve and
sign the council minutes. Wide dissemination of safety council actions should be ensured through safety awareness meetings and by posting minutes to safety bulletin boards.

EVAL METH:
Review the council minutes noting the assignment of action officers and suspense dates for open items.

8.00             AC AF AM AS AT BN            DE FS       OS           SB SF TO UA
Does each council meeting include a review of unit hazard-tracking log and present an opportunity for decision-making on proposed risk control options for newly identified
hazards? [DA Pam 385-90, para 2-4c]
REFERENCE TEXT
2-4c. At a minimum the agenda of each council meeting should include a review of unit hazard-tracking log and recent accidents, address the effectiveness of risk control options,
and present an opportunity for decision-making on proposed risk control options for newly identified hazards. The ASO should organize the meeting to allow the commander to
select the best COA and task the appropriate staff/subordinate commander with control option action. The CSC should focus on tactical and leadership issues that require
command visibility and decision-making.
EVAL METH:
Review the council minutes noting the discussion of previous and newly discovered hazards and action items.


F-SAFETY COUNCILS
QUESTION
1.00               AC AF AM AS AT BN            DE FS        OS          SB SF TO UA

                                                                                          69
Are the procedures for the safety council established in the SOP? [DA Pam 385-90, para 1-4j(6)]
REFERENCE TEXT
1-4j(6) Integrate risk controls into standing operating procedures (SOP) and ensure that written SOPs exist for all functional areas and for all operations within the command (A
stand alone written commander’s accident prevention plan is no longer required.) SOPs will include the following: (a) Composite risk management (CRM) procedures and
responsibilities for training and operations. (b) Risk controls for hazards most frequently experienced. (c) Command level authority to accept each level of risk, (low, moderate,
high, and extreme high). (d) Pre-accident plans, including immediate actions, investigation procedures (See DA Pamphlet (Pam) 385–40.), reporting and records (See AR
385–10.), and corrective action responsibilities. (See app C for sample pre-accident plan.) (e) Procedures and responsibilities for safety-related programs. (See chap 2.)
EVAL METH:
Review the SOP to find if this area is covered. If this area is not recognized, inquire of the ASO.

2.00            AC AF AM AS AT BN            DE FS       OS           SB SF TO UA
Is a Command Safety Council established that meets at least quarterly? [DA Pam 385-90, para 1-4j(14), DA Pam 385-10, para 3-3g]
REFERENCE TEXT
1-4j(14) Designate, in writing, a Command Safety Council (CSC) to be convened a minimum of quarterly for the purpose of reviewing risk-control options, making risk-control-
option decisions, and directing implementation of risk control options. Enlisted safety councils (ESC) may be established at the discretion of the commander to convene under
the direction of the senior NCO. When an ESC is not established the commander will designate enlisted members to the CSC. Commanders may consolidate subordinate unit
councils at no higher than battalion/squadron level. Councils should be the minimum size necessary to facilitate the safety management program. Large councils are difficult to
manage and should be avoided. On a case by case basis, the commander may direct additional personnel to attend council meetings to provide expertise on or insight into specific
issues. DA Pam 385-10, 3-3g. Safety councils/committee are established at each level of command and chaired by commander (see DA Pam 385–1 for procedures).
EVAL METH:
Review the orders or the SOP for the council. Ensure currency.

6.00             AC AF AM AS AT BN        DE FS       OS         SB SF TO UA
Does the safety manager organize the Command Safety Council? [DA Pam 385-90, para 2-4c]
REFERENCE TEXT
2-4c. At a minimum the agenda of each council meeting should include a review of unit hazard-tracking log and recent accidents, address the effectiveness of risk control options,
and present an opportunity for decision-making on proposed risk control options for newly identified hazards. The ASO should organize the meeting to allow the commander to
select the best COA and task the appropriate staff/subordinate commander with control option action. The CSC should focus on tactical and leadership issues that require
command visibility and decision-making.
EVAL METH:
Review the council orders and or council minutes to ensure that the ASO is functioning as the council’s recorder. Note the deficiencies recorded in the council minutes; issues
resolved, issues carried to completion.

7.00               AC AF AM AS AT BN           DE FS      OS         SB SF TO UA
Are safety council minutes maintained on file? [AR 25-400-2; www.arims.army.mil, RRSA Update.]
REFERENCE TEXT
RRSA Update These records concern administration of the Army safety program, which is directed toward accident prevention Army-wide. Program responsibilities include
conducting studies and surveys to determine unsafe practices and conditions, ensuring that mishaps are reported and investigated, establishing reporting format procedures,
analyzing and evaluating accident reports, providing safety education, and maintaining statistical data on accident prevention. Records on nuclear accidents and incidents, and
some other elements on safety, are placed in respective subject series. Record Title: Aviation safety council files. Record Description: Information relating to meetings of aviation
safety councils. Included are minutes of meetings and similar information. Disposition: K2. Keep in CFA until record is 2 years, then destroy.
EVAL METH:
Verify that the CSC minutes are on file in the safety office.

G-SAFETY EDUCATION AND TRAINING
QUESTION
                                                                                          70
1.00              AC AF AM AS AT BN             DE FS       OS           SB SF TO UA
Are the procedures for the safety training program established in writing? [DA Pam 385-90, para 2-12]
REFERENCE TEXT
2–12. Standing operating procedures. Commanders should ensure that an SOP is developed for all unit functional areas and for all aviation operations executed in the command.
The SOP may, where applicable, be consolidated at the battalion/squadron or regiment/brigade/group level.
EVAL METH:
Review the SOP for procedures for the safety training program.

2.00              AC AF AM AS AT BN         DE FS       OS          SB SF TO UA
Has the Commander established a safety education and training program that ensures safety training is conducted monthly for full time organizations and quarterly for all others?
[AR 385-10, para 15-5; DA Pam 385-90, para 2-4g]
REFERENCE TEXT
15–5. Safety meetings will be conducted monthly for Active Army and full–time RC units/facilities and quarterly for all others. DA Pam 385-90 2-4g. Unit safety training meetings
will be conducted at least monthly by commanders for active component and fulltime reserve component units/facilities and quarterly for all others. (1) Safety training meetings
should include training and open dialog on aviation and ground hazards affecting the unit. The commander may conduct separate ground and aviation safety meetings as long as
all personnel receive training pertinent to their duty positions and off-duty activities. (2) Safety meetings should be programmed at least twelve months out and included on the unit
training schedule. Commanders will develop a ―make-up‖ system that ensures that personnel not able to attend a safety training meeting will receive the same quality of training as
those who attended. If the unit has the equipment available, videotaped meetings are an effective make-up tool. (3) Safety training meetings may be consolidated at
battalion/squadron or even brigade/group level. However, safety training and dialog is most effective when conducted at the lowest unit level.
EVAL METH:
Verify procedures have been established for the safety education and training program for the unit.

4.00               AC AF AM AS AT BN         DE FS      OS            SB SF TO UA
Is a system in place and implemented to make up missed safety training? [DA Pam 385-90, para 2-4g]
REFERENCE TEXT
2-4g. Unit safety training meetings will be conducted at least monthly by commanders for active component and fulltime reserve component units/facilities and quarterly for all
others. (1) Safety training meetings should include training and open dialog on aviation and ground hazards affecting the unit. The commander may conduct separate ground and
aviation safety meetings as long as all personnel receive training pertinent to their duty positions and off-duty activities. (2) Safety meetings should be programmed at least
twelve months out and included on the unit training schedule. Commanders will develop a ―make-up‖ system that ensures that personnel not able to attend a safety training
meeting will receive the same quality of training as those who attended. If the unit has the equipment available, videotaped meetings are an effective make-up tool. (3) Safety
training meetings may be consolidated at battalion/squadron or even brigade/group level. However, safety training and dialog is most effective when conducted at the lowest unit
level.
EVAL METH:
The safety manager will produce the make-up system and verify by signature or alternative method that the meetings are made-up.

5.00              AC AF AM AS AT BN             DE FS       OS         SB SF TO UA
Is documentation of safety training maintained to include summaries or other methods to facilitate make up training? [DA Pam 385-90, para 2-4g, 1-4j(10)]
REFERENCE TEXT
2-4g. Unit safety training meetings will be conducted at least monthly by commanders for active component and fulltime reserve component units/facilities and quarterly for all
others. (1) Safety training meetings should include training and open dialog on aviation and ground hazards affecting the unit. The commander may conduct separate ground and
aviation safety meetings as long as all personnel receive training pertinent to their duty positions and off-duty activities. (2) Safety meetings should be programmed at least
twelve months out and included on the unit training schedule. Commanders will develop a ―make-up‖ system that ensures that personnel not able to attend a safety training
meeting will receive the same quality of training as those who attended. If the unit has the equipment available, videotaped meetings are an effective make-up tool. (3) Safety
training meetings may be consolidated at battalion/squadron or even brigade/group level. However, safety training and dialog is most effective when conducted at the lowest unit
level. 1-4j(10) Ensure sufficient information is provided during after action reviews (AARs) to determine if the performance met the commander’s safety guidance (goals,
objectives, and priorities).
EVAL METH:
                                                                                         71
The safety manager will maintain the synopsis, slide presentation, or outline, that details training accomplished to facilitate make up training.



                                                                   CMD SPT PROGRAMS

A-HEARING CONSERVATION
QUESTION
4.00               AC AF AM AS AT BN         DE FS       OS          SB SF TO UA
Are hearing tests performed on personnel who work in a noise hazardous environment and meet minimum requirements to be included in the hearing conservation program?
[DA Pam 40-501, para 3-3]
REFERENCE TEXT
3-3. Initiation a. Personnel will be enrolled in a comprehensive HCP when they are exposed to— (1) Steady-state noise with a TWA of 85 A-weighted decibels (dBA) or
greater. (This criterion applies only to energy in the audible range up to 16000 Hz). (2) Impulse noise of 140 decibels, peak measurement (dBP) or greater. (3) Airborne high-
frequency or ultrasonic noise, regardless of duration, in any of the one-third octave bands exceeding the corresponding value listed in table 3-1. (4) Known or suspected
ototoxins. b. Excessive exposures to a workplace ototoxin (ear poison) can on its own result in hearing loss. See table 3-2 for the potential ototoxic chemicals. In combination
with noise exposure, even marginal noise exposures, ototoxins can have a synergetic impact on hearing, producing more damage than a higher exposure to either hazard.
Activities where noise and ototoxins often combine include, but are not limited to— (1) Painting. (2) Printing. (3) Boat building. (4) Construction. (5) Furniture making. (6)
Manufacturing of metal, leather, and petroleum products.
EVAL METH:
Spot check for personnel in the program. Procedures for non-crewmember personnel are frequently missing. Check for annual testing, and flagging if appropriate.

6.00             AC AF AM AS AT BN          DE FS      OS           SB SF TO UA
Do ALL noise exposed personnel receive hearing conservation health education annually? [DA Pam 40-501, para 8-1]
REFERENCE TEXT
8–1. Requirements The HCPM or designee must provide hearing conservation health education at least annually to ALL noise-exposed personnel. Instruction will cover — a.
The effects of noise on hearing. b. The purpose, advantages, disadvantages, and attenuation of various types of hearing protectors. c. The selection, fit, care, and use of hearing
protectors. d. The purpose and procedures of audiometric evaluations. e. The structure and elements of the HCP. f. The mandatory requirement to wear assigned protective
equipment and the administrative actions which may follow for failure to do so. g. The use of hearing protection during noise-hazardous, off-duty activities.
EVAL METH:
Look for documentation that hearing conservation training has been conducted as required.

B-FIRE PREVENTION
QUESTION
2.00               AC AF AM AS AT BN            DE FS        OS          SB SF TO UA
Has the unit established written procedures for the fire prevention program or are procedures established to obtain fire prevention program support from other sources? [DA Pam
385-90, para 3-2, 2-12; DA Pam 385-10, para 9-1]
REFERENCE TEXT
3–2. Fire prevention and protection. Commanders will implement a unit fire prevention and protection program to ensure compliance with AR 420–1, 29 CFR 1910.106,
1910.252, and local directives. 2–12. Standing operating procedures Commanders should ensure that an SOP is developed for all unit functional areas and for all aviation
operations executed in the command. The SOP may, where applicable, be consolidated at the battalion/squadron or regiment/brigade/group level. The systematic risk
management process should be integrated in all unit operational procedures. Command approved risk-control options should be integrated into the SOP as task performance
standards. DA Pam 385-10, 9–1. Introduction a. Every effort is taken to eliminate, control, or reduce hazards and associated risks through other methods of the correction
precedence. However, far too often reliance must be placed on adopting procedures as a control method. Therefore, it is important that a method be established to ensure tasks
are executed in an efficient, effective, and safe manner. b. SOPs are written procedures that must be followed when performing a task. An SOP is required when tasks are

                                                                                           72
complex or involve hazardous materials. A correctly developed SOP leads to work that is performed satisfactorily and efficiently, with minimal risk, and the highest possible levels
of safety. An SOP should be designed to provide safety, security, and environmental protection.
EVAL METH:
Look for a program (unit or battalion) or look for documentation (MOU/MOA) indicating that the fire prevention objectives are being met by another organization. If the unit is
functionally a tenant, they should have a copy of the program for the installation. Check for a fire prevention SOP that states how program requirements are accomplished in the
unit.

4.00               AC AF AM AS AT BN            DE FS         OS         SB SF TO UA
Are fire extinguishers accessible, maintained in a fully charged and operable condition to include hydrostatic test, and kept in designated places not obscured from view? [29 CFR
1910.157(c)(1)&(4), (e)(3) ]
REFERENCE TEXT
(c) (1) The employer shall provide portable fire extinguishers and shall mount, locate and identify them so that they are readily accessible to employees without subjecting the
employees to possible injury. (c)(4). The employer shall assure that portable fire extinguishers are maintained in a fully charged and operable condition and kept in their
designated places at all times except when in use. 1910.157(e)(3). The employer shall assure that portable fire extinguishers are subjected to an annual maintenance check.
Stored pressure extinguishers do not require an internal examination. The employer shall record the annual maintenance date and retain this record for one year after the last
entry or the life shell, whichever is less. (f)(1). Hydrostatic testing. The employer shall assure that hydrostatic testing is performed by trained persons with suitable testing
equipment and facilities.
EVAL METH:
Look for extinguishers to be charged, properly maintained, accessible, and ready for use.

10.00                AC AF AM AS AT BN             DE FS       OS           SB SF TO UA
Is fire prevention training and fire extinguisher training conducted at least annually? 29 CFR 1910.38 b, 1910.39d, 1910, 157(g)(1), (2)]
REFERENCE TEXT
1910 39(b)Written and oral emergency action plans. An emergency action plan must be in writing, kept in the workplace, and available to employees for review. However, an
employer with 10 or fewer employees may communicate the plan orally to the employees. (c) Minimum elements of an emergency action plan. An emergency action plan must
include at a minimum: (1) Procedures for reporting a fire or other emergency; (2) Procedures for emergency evacuation, including type of evacuation and exit route assignments;
(3) Procedures to be followed by employees who remain to operate critical plant operations before they evacuate; (4) Procedures to account for all employees after evacuation;
(5) Procedures to be followed by employees performing rescue or medical duties; and (6) The name or job title of every employee who may be contacted by employees who need
more information about the plan or an explanation of their duties under the plan. (a) Application. An employer must have a fire prevention plan when an OSHA standard in
this part requires one. The requirements in this section apply to each fire prevention plan. 1910.39(d) Employee information. An employer must inform employees upon initial
assignment to a job of the fire hazards to which they are exposed. An employer must also review with each employee those parts of the fire prevention plan necessary for
self-protection. 157(g)(1) Where the employer has provided portable fire extinguishers for employee use in the workplace, the employer shall also provide an educational program
to familiarize employees with the general principles of fire extinguisher use and the hazards involved with incipient stage fire fighting. (g)(2) The employer shall provide the
education required in paragraph (g)(1) of this section upon initial employment and at least annually thereafter. (g) (3) The employer shall provide employees who have been
designated to use fire fighting equipment as part of an emergency action plan with training in the use of appropriate equipment. (4) The employer shall provide the training required
in paragraph (g)(3) of this section upon initial assignment to the designated group of employees and at least annually thereafter
EVAL METH:
Check for documentation of training and annual refresher.


C-HAZARDS COMMUNICATION
QUESTION
3.00            AC AF AM AS AT BN            DE FS     OS         SB SF TO UA
Is hazard communication training conducted and documented? [29 CFR 1910.1200(h)(1)]
REFERENCE TEXT
1200(h)(1). Employee information and training. (1). Employers shall provide employees with effective information and training on hazardous chemicals in their work area at the
time of their initial assignment, and whenever a new physical or health hazard the employees have not previously been trained about is introduced into their work area. Information
and training may be designed to cover categories of hazards (e.g., flammability, carcinogenicity) or specific chemicals. Chemical-specific information must always be available
                                                                                         73
through labels and material safety data sheets.
EVAL METH:
Check for ―Right to know training‖ and additional training for new hazards.

4.00              AC AF AM AS AT BN            DE FS         OS           SB SF TO UA
Are all hazardous materials present in the organization listed on the inventory? [29 CFR 1910.1200(e)(1)(i); 29 CFR 1910.1200 appendix E, para 3 ]
REFERENCE TEXT
1200(e)(1). A list of the hazardous chemicals known to be present using an identity that is referenced on the appropriate material safety data sheet (the list may be compiled for
the workplace as a whole or for individual work areas). 1910.1200 App E, 3. "Identify Hazardous Chemicals in the Workplace." The standard requires a list of hazardous
chemicals in the workplace as part of the written hazard communication program. The list will eventually serve as an inventory of everything for which an MSDS must be
maintained. At this point, however, preparing the list will help you complete the rest of the program since it will give you some idea of the scope of the program required for
compliance in your facility. The best way to prepare a comprehensive list is to survey the workplace. Purchasing records may also help, and certainly employers should establish
procedures to ensure that in the future purchasing procedures result in MSDSs being received before a material is used in the workplace. The broadest possible perspective
should be taken when doing the survey. Sometimes people think of "chemicals" as being only liquids in containers. The HCS covers chemicals in all physical forms - liquids, solids,
gases, vapors, fumes, and mists - whether they are "contained" or not. The hazardous nature of the chemical and the potential for exposure are the factors which determine
whether a chemical is covered. If it's not hazardous, it's not covered. If there is no potential for exposure (e.g., the chemical is inextricably bound and cannot be released), the rule
does not cover the chemical. Look around. Identify chemicals in containers, including pipes, but also think about chemicals generated in the work operations. For example, welding
fumes, dusts, and exhaust fumes are all sources of chemical exposures. Read labels provided by suppliers for hazard information. Make a list of all chemicals in the workplace that
are potentially hazardous. For your own information and planning, you may also want to note on the list the location(s) of the products within the workplace, and an indication
of the hazards as found on the label. This will help you as you prepare the rest of your program. Paragraph (b) of this section, scope and application, includes exemptions for
various chemicals or workplace situations. After compiling the complete list of chemicals, you should review paragraph (b) of this section to determine if any of the items can
be eliminated from the list because they are exempted materials. For example, food, drugs, and cosmetics brought into the workplace for employee consumption are exempt. So
rubbing alcohol in the first aid kit would not be covered. Once you have compiled as complete a list as possible of the potentially hazardous chemicals in the workplace, the next
step is to determine if you have received material safety data sheets for all of them. Check your files against the inventory you have just compiled. If any are missing, contact
your supplier and request one. It is a good idea to document these requests, either by copy of a letter or a note regarding telephone conversations. If you have MSDSs for
chemicals that are not on your list, figure out why. Maybe you don't use the chemical anymore. Or maybe you missed it in your survey. Some suppliers do provide MSDSs for
products that are not hazardous. These do not have to be maintained by you. You should not allow employees to use any chemicals for which you have not received an MSDS.
The MSDS provides information you need to ensure proper protective measures are implemented prior to exposure.
EVAL METH:
Spot check materials found in the work place and ensure they are on the inventory.

5.00               AC AF AM AS AT BN            DE FS       OS         SB SF TO UA
Are all applicable Material Safety Data Sheets located so the employees have access to them at all times? [29 CFR 1910.1200(g)(8); 29 CFR 1910.1200 appendix E, para 3]
REFERENCE TEXT
1200(g). Material safety data sheets. (8) The employer shall maintain in the workplace copies of the required material safety data sheets for each hazardous chemical, and shall
ensure that are readily accessible during each work shift to employees when they are in their work area(s). (Electronic access, microfiche, and other alternatives to maintaining
paper copies in the material safety data sheets are permitted as long as no barriers to immediate employee access in each workplace are created by such options.) 3. "Identify
Hazardous Chemicals in the Workplace." The standard requires a list of hazardous chemicals in the workplace as part of the written hazard communication program. The list will
eventually serve as an inventory of everything for which an MSDS must be maintained. At this point, however, preparing the list will help you complete the rest of the
program since it will give you some idea of the scope of the program required for compliance in your facility. The best way to prepare a comprehensive list is to survey the
workplace. Purchasing records may also help, and certainly employers should establish procedures to ensure that in the future purchasing procedures result in MSDSs being
received before a material is used in the workplace. The broadest possible perspective should be taken when doing the survey. Sometimes people think of "chemicals" as being
only liquids in containers. The HCS covers chemicals in all physical forms - liquids, solids, gases, vapors, fumes, and mists - whether they are "contained" or not. The hazardous
nature of the chemical and the potential for exposure are the factors which determine whether a chemical is covered. If it's not hazardous, it's not covered. If there is no
potential for exposure (e.g., the chemical is inextricably bound and cannot be released), the rule does not cover the chemical. Look around. Identify chemicals in containers,
including pipes, but also think about chemicals generated in the work operations. For example, welding fumes, dusts, and exhaust fumes are all sources of chemical exposures.
Read labels provided by suppliers for hazard information. Make a list of all chemicals in the workplace that are potentially hazardous. For your own information and planning,
you may also want to note on the list the location(s) of the products within the workplace, and an indication of the hazards as found on the label. This will help you as you
                                                                                          74
prepare the rest of your program. Paragraph (b) of this section, scope and application, includes exemptions for various chemicals or workplace situations. After compiling the
complete list of chemicals, you should review paragraph (b) of this section to determine if any of the items can be eliminated from the list because they are exempted materials.
For example, food, drugs, and cosmetics brought into the workplace for employee consumption are exempt. So rubbing alcohol in the first aid kit would not be covered. Once
you have compiled as complete a list as possible of the potentially hazardous chemicals in the workplace, the next step is to determine if you have received material safety data
sheets for all of them. Check your files against the inventory you have just compiled. If any are missing, contact your supplier and request one. It is a good idea to document
these requests, either by copy of a letter or a note regarding telephone conversations. If you have MSDSs for chemicals that are not on your list, figure out why. Maybe you
don't use the chemical anymore. Or maybe you missed it in your survey. Some suppliers do provide MSDSs for products that are not hazardous. These do not have to be
maintained by you. You should not allow employees to use any chemicals for which you have not received an MSDS. The MSDS provides information you need to ensure proper
protective measures are implemented prior to exposure.
EVAL METH:
Spot check materials to ensure the MSDS are on hand and readily available.

D-WASTE MANAGEMENT
QUESTION
4.00                AC AF AM AS AT BN          DE FS     OS          SB SF TO UA
Has a site spill contingency plan been developed? [AR 200-1, para 11-4b(1),(2),(3),(4),(5) ]
REFERENCE TEXT
11-4b. Oil and hazardous substance spills. (1) Develop and implement a spill prevention, control, and countermeasures plan (SPCCP), as required. (LD: CWA Section 311(j), 40
CFR 112, and OPA) (2) Ensure that the SPCCP addresses secondary containment (or lack thereof) at oil and hazardous material storage facilities. (LD: 40 CFR 112.7) (3)
Develop and implement a facility spill contingency plan (SCP) for each oil and hazardous material storage facility that does not have adequate spill prevention structures in place.
(LD: 40 CFR 112.7) (4) Ensure secondary containment is provided for oil and hazardous material storage facilities, including piping. If it is determined that secondary containment
is impracticable, the installation must address this in the SPCCP and facility SCP (an SCP is only required if adequate spill prevention structures are not in place). (LD: 40 CFR
112.7) (5) Ensure the SPCCP is reviewed at least once every 5 years.
EVAL METH:
Review the unit/facility spill plan.

E-FOD PREVENTION
QUESTION
2.00              AC AF AM AS        BN       DE           OS            SB SF      UA
Is a FOD prevention program established in writing and include all the required items? [DA Pam 385-90, para 2-8 and para 2-12]
REFERENCE TEXT
2–8. Prevention of foreign object damage to aircraft. Foreign object damage (FOD) is damage to or malfunction of an aircraft caused by an object that is alien to an area or
system or is ingested by or lodged in a mechanism of an aircraft or strikes the aircraft. Foreign object damage may cause material damage or it may cause a system or equipment
to be unusable, unsafe or less efficient. Some examples of FOD are ingestion of loose hardware or grass by an engine, flight controls jammed by hardware or tools, and tires cut
or propellers or tail rotors damaged by debris on the ramp or taxiway. a. The objectives of an FOD prevention program are to find and correct potential hazards and to eliminate
the causes of FOD. Training, work-site design, discipline, motivation and follow-up on FOD incidents are key factors of a sound program. All unit personnel will take an active
role in FOD prevention. An effective FOD prevention program can enhance combat readiness by saving material, manpower and money. Therefore, FOD prevention must be an
essential part of each unit’s aviation accident-prevention program. b. The unit FOD prevention program will be in writing. All unit personnel will be familiar with the contents
of the FOD prevention program. A sample FOD prevention SOP is in appendix C. Foreign object damage prevention countermeasures will be integrated throughout the unit
SOP. However, each unit’s SOP will be adapted to meet local FOD needs. d. Management of the foreign object damage program will encompass the following: (1) Unit
commanders will establish an FOD prevention program tailored to the needs of the unit: (a) Appoint an FOD prevention officer/NCO to implement the unit FOD prevention
program. This may be an additional duty for any unit officer/NCO other than the ASO/aviation safety noncommissioned officer (ASNCO) or the aviation maintenance officer.
(b) Ensure FOD prevention is an integral part of the unit safety program. (c) Ensure FOD prevention is discussed and FOD accidents are reviewed at all unit safety meetings. (d)
Ensure all unit personnel are made aware of their responsibilities for FOD prevention. (2) The FOD prevention officer/NCO will— (a) Administer the unit FOD prevention
program. (b) Monitor the unit tool accountability program. (c) Delegate specific areas of responsibility (such as a hangar) to appropriate unit personnel. (d) Conduct surveys and
documents results (minimum once per month) and inspections of all unit areas to ensure the FOD prevention program is viable and working; notifies the unit ASO of hazards
found during surveys for analysis and control option development. (3) All unit personnel will implement the FOD prevention program by: (a) Taking an active role in FOD
                                                                                         75
prevention. (b) Perform all maintenance tasks according to prescribed technical data. (c) Use the ―clean-as-you-go‖ approach to maintenance; make a thorough check of the
area after each task is completed. (d) Ensure all aircraft openings, ports, lines, holes, ducts and so forth, are properly protected to keep foreign objects from accidentally
entering. (e) Ensure all tools, hardware, and other equipment is properly accounted for at the end of each maintenance operation; mark tools for ease of accountability. (f)
Inspect all equipment prior to use to ensure it will not cause damage. Ensure care is taken when installing any piece of test equipment. (g) Check engine inlet screens for loose,
trapped or broken objects that may produce FOD. (h) Immediately report FOD and potential FOD to the first-line supervisor. (i) Place all residue and objects that may produce
FOD in the proper container. e. Foreign object prevention suggestions and publicity. All personnel are encouraged to recommend new ways to prevent FOD. Suggestions should
be sent to Commander, USACRC, ATTN: CSSC–OA, Fort Rucker, AL 36362–5363. To obtain publicity material , promoting FOD control within the unit , contact Commander
,USA CRC , ATTN : CSSC–SM, Fort Rucker, AL 36362–5363. 2–12. Standing operating procedures. Commanders should ensure that an SOP is developed for all unit
functional areas and for all aviation operations executed in the command. The SOP may, where applicable, be consolidated at the battalion/squadron or
regiment/brigade/group level. The systematic risk management process should be integrated in all unit operational procedures. Command approved risk-control
options should be integrated into the SOP as task performance standards.
 EVAL METH:
Read the operating FOD SOP to determine if program requirements are met. Review the FOD SOP for tool control and accountability and control of FOD producing items such as
jewelry and pin on uniform items.

F-DRIVERS TRAINING
QUESTION
2.00                 AC AF AM AS AT BN            DE FS       OS            SB SF TO UA
Is a drivers’ training program established in the unit or does the unit obtain drivers’ training and or education from other sources? [AR 600-55, paras 1-4g(3), 6-1]
REFERENCE TEXT
1-4g(3) Delegate to subordinate commanders in writing the authority to train, test, and license noncommercial vehicle and equipment operators. However, driver and operator
 training, testing, and licensing will be conducted at battalion level or higher. For installations or commands below battalion size, operator training will be conducted at the
highest level possible. ( 4 ) Ensure that sufficient qualified and experienced vehicle operators are available to support mobilization requirements. (5) Implement this regulation
and any additional requirements (not in conflict with this regulation) made necessary by local traffic conditions, civil restrictions, accident data, and desired standards of operator
 performance and preventive maintenance. The installation transportation officer has staff oversight for commercial and non-tactical vehicle operator training programs. In
organizations without a transportation officer, the motor maintenance officer or a designated individual may be assigned this function. 6–1. Control of Issuance a. The issuance
of vehicle driver and equipment operator permits will be controlled at the battalion or higher level of command. The issuing authority is the driver testing station, unit, or
activity that has been granted authority, in writing, to test and qualify drivers and operators. The issuing official is the commanding officer or representative authorized in
writing by the commanding officer. Facsimile signatures are authorized per AR 25–50. Permit ledgers will be maintained according to paragraph 5–1d. b. The qualifying official is
the examiner, who is a person designated in writing by the commanding officer to conduct driver testing and to verify driver performance qualification. This person must be
licensed and qualified on any vehicle or equipment on which he or she will conduct driver testing. The qualifying official’s signature on the OF 346 verifies that the proper
training has been accurately annotated on the individual’s DA Form 348, and that the individual has been qualified on the equipment through written and performance testing.
c. Instructions for completing the manual OF 346 are contained in figure 6–1. Units operating under the ULLS will use the automated form (instructions for completing the
automated form are contained in the End Users Manual for Unit Level Logistics System). All other units will continue using the manual OF 346. d. The OF 346 will be stamped
or marked legibly on the front with the words, ―ARMY STANDARD,‖ ―ARMY LEARNER,‖ ―ARMY INCIDENTAL,‖ or ―ARMY LIMITED,‖ to denote the type of permit
issued. This stamp will be placed over the title of the form so that it does not interfere with the information contained in the blocks. The information can be typed or written,
but must be in black ink. Codes used on the OF 346 are the same as those for the DA Form 348.
EVAL METH:
Look for a memorandum of agreement with the unit providing the drivers training support. The agreement should specify exactly what the organization is to provide to the
supported unit to including training, testing, and licensing. Ensure all operators are properly trained and licensed.

0.00              AC AF AM AS AT BN        DE FS                   SB SF TO UA
Is a DA Form 348 and DA Form 348–1 (if necessary) maintained on every person in the unit who operates a vehicle or equipment owned or leased by the U.S. Army?
 [AR 600-55, para 4-1b2]
REFERENCE TEXT
Driver or Operator Training Program
4–1. Documentation and waivers

                                                                                          76
a. Unless otherwise stated, the provisions of this chapter apply to both military and civilian operators of tactical and nontactical vehicles and equipment. b. All training for vehicles
and equipment which require licensing under this regulation will be documented on a DA Form 348 prior to issuing an OF 346 (see app E and local policies for training topics).
Sample forms and instructions for completing the manual DA Form 348 and 348–1 (Equipment Operators Qualification Record—Continuation Sheet) are contained in figure 4–1.
Units operating under the Unit Level Logistics System (ULLS) will use the automated form (instructions for completing the automated form are contained in the End Users Manual
for ULLS). All other units will continue using the manual DA Form 348. (1) The DA Form 348 (Equipment Operator’s Qualification Record (Except Aircraft)) and DA Form 348–1
provide a means for recording the complete history of an individual’s qualification and previous driving and equipment operating experience. (2) A DA Form 348 and DA Form 348–
1 (if necessary) will be maintained on every person who operates a vehicle or equipment owned or leased by the U.S. Army. The DA Form 348 and DA Form 348–1 will be
withdrawn from the Military Personnel Records Jacket maintained on military vehicle drivers and equipment operators, and from official personnel folders (OPFs) maintained on
U.S. Government civilian employees. The DA Form 348 and DA Form 348–1 will be forwarded to the supervisor who controls the unit or organization vehicle or equipment
operation. The individual’s DA Form 348 and DA Form 348–1 will be presented upon application for renewal of an OF 346. (3) DA Form 348 and DA Form 348–1 are permanent
records and will not be destroyed or remade. Reproductions of DA Form 348 or 348–1 are not authorized for official purposes. All entries will be in black ink or typed unless
otherwise stated. Rubber stamps may be used providing they fit within the space or block. Erasures, correction fluid (white-out), and correction tape will not be used to make
corrections. Ink or typed corrections will be made by drawing one line through the incorrect entry and reentering the correct entry on the next open line in that section. (4) DA Form
348 will be initiated when the individual is first examined, either at the reception center, unit, or installation motor pool or equipment pool before issuing an OF 346. (5) The DA
Form 348 will be reviewed annually for— (a) Safety awards. (b) Expiration of permits. (c) Accidents and moving traffic violations. (d) Remedial, required, or refresher training. (e)
Reexamination. (f) License suspension. (6) The individual (designated by the commander) who conducts the review will sign and date in section III of the DA Form 348 if all
required entries are present and correct. Procedures for incorrect or missing entries are covered below. (7) When individuals are transferred or released from regular driver or
operator duties, the designated records reviewer will ensure all required information has been accurately posted to the DA Form 348, to include the following: (a) Information on
official qualifications. (b) Background and experience. (c) Examination findings. (d) Performance record. (e) Driver or operator awards. (f) All chargeable moving traffic violations
while operating a military or privately owned vehicle. (g) Suspension or revocation of State or host nation driving privileges. (h) Accident history. (8) When sections of the DA Form
348 are to be continued, a DA Form 348–1 (Continuation Sheet) will be initiated and attached to the original DA Form 348. DA Form 348–1 is prepared in the same manner as the
DA Form 348. (9) If a soldier reports in from another unit with incorrect or illegible entries on his or her DA Form 348 or 348–1, the gaining unit will correct the entries as follows: (a)
Verifiable entries. Some incomplete or illegible data may be verified by reviewing other documents or contacting the losing unit. For example, if section III states that the driver
received winter driving training, but the entry is not dated or not initialed, the soldier may have a training certificate to verify the date that he or she received the training. For these
types of errors, the gaining unit may add the missing information or line through the illegible entry and rewrite the entry on the next line, and initial next to the correction. (b) Non–
verifiable entries. Incorrect, incomplete, or illegible information which cannot be verified will be lined through and initialed by the gaining unit. A soldier will not receive credit for
nonverifiable entries on the driving record. In order to receive credit, the soldier must be retested or retrained. (10) The computer–generated DA Form 348 and OF 346 are
authorized replacements for the manual versions of the forms. After information is put into ULLS, there is no requirement for the unit to maintain or retain DA Form 348s. Return
the manual form to the individual for the soldier’s personal records. c. Installation commanders (MUSARC commanders or ARNG State or territory adjutant generals) may waive
the training and testing requirements for nontactical vehicles with a GVWR of less than 10,000 pounds, provided the driver has a valid State or host nation driver’s license
(however, the requirement to have an OF 346 cannot be waived per paras 2–3 and 2–4). This waiver does not apply to military or civilian operators of emergency vehicles (police
vehicles, ambulances, fire trucks, crash-rescue vehicles), buses designed to transport over 12 passengers, motorcycles, moped, ATVs, tactical vehicles, or whose duties require
transporting hazardous materials.
EVAL METH:
Review unit records to ensure all appropriate individual driver’s or equipment operators have a current DA Form 348 and DA Form 348–1 (if necessary).


G-PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
QUESTION
2.00             AC AF AM AS AT BN        DE FS        OS          SB SF TO UA
Has a hazard assessment (Survey) been completed to determine if hazards are present, or are likely to be present, which necessitate the use of personal protective equipment
(PPE)? [29 CFR 1910.132(d)(1)&(2); DA Pam 385-30, para 2-12 ]
REFERENCE TEXT
29 CFR 1910.132(d)(1) The employer shall assess the workplace to determine if hazards are present, or are likely to be present, which necessitate the use of personal protective
equipment (PPE). If such hazards are present, or likely to be present, the employer shall: 1910.132(d)(1)(i) Select, and have each affected employee use, the types of PPE that
will protect the affected employee from the hazards identified in the hazard assessment; 1910.132(d)(1)(ii) Communicate selection decisions to each affected employee; and,
1910.132(d)(1)(iii) Select PPE that properly fits each affected employee. Note: Non-mandatory Appendix B contains an example of procedures that would comply with the
requirement for a hazard assessment. 1910.132(d)(2) The employer shall verify that the required workplace hazard assessment has been performed through a written certification
                                                                                            77
that identifies the workplace evaluated; the person certifying that the evaluation has been performed; the date(s) of the hazard assessment; and, which identifies the document as
a certification of hazard assessment. DA Pam 385-30, 2–12. Job hazard analysis. Another technique developed and highly recommended by OSHA is the job hazard analysis
(JHA). a. The JHA analyzes individual tasks to increase the knowledge of hazards in the workplace and focuses on integration of accepted safety and health principles and
practices into a particular operation. It focuses on hazards before they occur and the relationship between the worker, the task, the tools, and the work environment. b. The
analysis results in a detailed written procedure that can be used for safely completing a particular job. The JHA is the process. The completed JHA form is a product of that
process. c. The analysis examines each basic step of a job to identify potential hazards and to determine the safest way to do the job. d. The terms "job" and "task" are commonly
used interchangeably to mean a specific work assignment, such as "operating a grinder," "using a pressurized water extinguisher," or "changing a flat tire." JHAs are not suitable
for jobs defined too broadly (for example, "overhauling an engine") or too narrowly (for example, "positioning car jack"). e. Four basic stages in conducting a JHA are— (1)
Selecting the job to be analyzed. (2) Breaking the job down into a sequence of steps, this is very similar to a task analysis. (3) Identifying potential hazards. (4) Determining
preventive measures to overcome these hazards. f. Unlike the PHA, the JHA does not consider the risk associated with the hazards identified. g. A JHA should be done for all
jobs. However, resources, time, and other practical constraints limit analyzing all jobs. For these reasons, it is usually necessary to identify which jobs have the greater need to be
analyzed. Even if planned to analyze all jobs, prioritizing their order ensures that the most critical jobs are examined first. In assigning a priority for analysis of jobs, consider the
following factors: (1) Jobs where accidents occur frequently. (2) Jobs where accidents occur infrequently but result in disabling injuries. (3) The consequences of an accident,
hazardous condition, or exposure to harmful substance are potentially severe. (4) Newly established jobs where hazards may not be evident or anticipated. (5) Modified jobs where
changes in job procedures may have introduced new hazards. (6) Infrequently performed jobs and non-routine jobs.
EVAL METH:
Check for the completed hazard assessment to include noise survey, job analysis, MSDS review, and air sampling (when applicable).

3.00             AC AF AM AS AT BN          DE FS       OS           SB SF TO UA
Has the employer determined the types of PPE necessary to protect the affected employee from the hazards identified in the hazard assessment? [29 CFR 1910.132(d)(1)(i) ]
REFERENCE TEXT
1910.132(d) Hazard assessment and equipment selection. 1910.132(d)(1) The employer shall assess the workplace to determine if hazards are present, or are likely to be
present, which necessitate the use of personal protective equipment (PPE). If such hazards are present, or likely to be present, the employer shall: 1910.132(d)(1)(i) Select, and
have each affected employee use, the types of PPE that will protect the affected employee from the hazards identified in the hazard assessment; 1910.132(d)(1)(ii)
Communicate selection decisions to each affected employee; and, 1910.132(d)(1)(iii) Select PPE that properly fits each affected employee. Note: Non-mandatory Appendix B
contains an example of procedures that would comply with the requirement for a hazard assessment. 1910.132(d)(2) The employer shall verify that the required workplace
hazard assessment has been performed through a written certification that identifies the workplace evaluated; the person certifying that the evaluation has been performed; the
date(s) of the hazard assessment; and, which identifies the document as a certification of hazard assessment.
EVAL METH:
Check to see if affected employees have been designated to receive appropriate PPE. Check to see if an inventory of all identified PPE is on hand and in stock.


                                                                 AVN LIFE SPT SYSTEMS
A-COMMAND FACTORS
NOT APPLICABLE

B-SOPs, PROCEDURES, FORMS, and FILES
NOT APPLICABLE

C-MAINTENANCE, REPAIR, and EQUIPMENT INSPECTIONS
NOT APPLICABLE

D-ALSE SUPPLY MANAGEMENT
                                                                                           78
NOT APPLICABLE

E-REPAIR and STORAGE FACILITIES
NOT APPLICABLE

F-TRAINING
NOT APPLICABLE

                                                                    AVIATION MEDICINE
A-COMMAND FACTORS
QUESTION
2.00                AC AF       AS AT BN         DE          OS           SB SF TO UA
In units without an authorized or assigned flight surgeon, does the local medical treatment facility (MTF) Commander, and/or the Regional Medical Command Surgeon (ACOM,
USARC or State Surgeon, ARNG) provide personnel and equipment to ensure implementation of the Aviation Medicine Program at the local level? [AR 40-3, para 3-2d-e, 3-2j-l;
DA Pam 385-90,para 1-4p; AR 616-110, para 12b]
REFERENCE TEXT
AR 40-3, 3-2. Responsibilities. d. Regional Medical Command (RMC) commanders will— (1) Ensure implementation of the AVMED Program. (2) Assign a residency-trained
specialist in aerospace medicine as RMC Chief, AVMED. When a specialist is not available, an experienced flight surgeon (FS) will be temporarily assigned until a specialist is
made available. e. The RMC Chief, AVMED will oversee the RMC AVMED Program and act as the RMC advisor for aeromedical policies and issues such as FS deployments,
aeromedical evacuation policy, and regional review and disposition of flight physicals. 3-2. j. The installation medical authority (MTF commander) of installations hosting both
Active Army and Reserve Component (RC) aviation assets will: (1) Establish, supervise, administer, and support the AVMED Program. (2) Appoint a senior installation FS or
aeromedical physician assistant as Chief, AVMED. (3) Ensure that the AVMED Program is included in the MTF’s specific organizational performance improvement (PI) structure. k.
The chief of AVMED will oversee the installation AVMED Program and coordinate the efforts of the aviation medicine team consisting of aviation psychology, dentistry, and
optometry. l. Unit-level FS responsibilities are described in paragraphs 3–5 and 3–6. DA Pam 385-90, 1-4. Functions. p. Flight surgeon. The flight surgeon assists and advises
the command in all aviation medical matters. In remote areas where a flight surgeon is not assigned or readily available, local support will be provided by the servicing medical
department activity (MEDDAC) to best accomplish these duties. The flight surgeon should: (1) Maintain liaison within the command to implement the aviation medicine program.
(2) Take part in, and observe, flight operations to monitor the interactions of crewmembers, aircraft, and environment. The flight surgeon exerts maximum effort in observing the
flying ability and characteristics of each assigned aviator at least annually. (3) Serve as a member of aircraft accident investigations board, when directed. (4) Serve as a member
of flight evaluation boards, when directed. (5) Ensure that the medical portion of the pre-accident plan is adequate. (6) Monitor the physical and mental health of aviation
personnel, including alcohol, tobacco, dietary supplements, and self-medication problems (See AR 40–8). (7) Advise the commander on crew-endurance issues. (8) Maintain
aviation medical records on flight personnel, assist the unit in providing annual occupational health and safety screening for non-crewmember personnel, and ensure that DA Form
4186 (Medical Recommendation for Flying Duty) prepared on flight personnel is accurate and complete prior to being sent to the unit commander for approval. (9) Monitor the
survival and physiological training of aviation crewmembers and provide medical support in accordance with applicable Army regulations. (10) Medically clear crewmembers for
further flight duty after aircraft accidents in accordance with applicable Army regulations. (11) Make recommendations to the Commander, USACRC, for improvement of human
factors compatibility, crashworthiness, aviation life-support equipment, and survival features of aircraft. (12) Take part in aviation safety meetings to educate aviation crewmembers
on the aeromedical aspects of flight. (13) Monitor the aviation life support equipment (ALSE) program. (14) Assist in, and advise on, the hearing and occupational vision program.
(15) Ensure command consideration of preventive and occupational medicine aspects of all plans, operations, training, and security missions. AR 616-110, 12. Utilization. b.
Other duties will not jeopardize the primary aviation medicine effort. Flight surgeons should not be utilized in other medical activities when fulltime application to aviation medicine
is required to meet local aviation medicine requirements. (This is not an exemption for all flight surgeons from other medical activities.)
EVAL METH:
Check to see if aviation medicine program requirements are being met for units/facilities without an assigned flight surgeon. Verify that each one of the (15) Flight Surgeon
responsibilities listed in DA Pam 385-90,paragraph 1-4p is being satisfied. At least 70% of the requirements listed in DA Pam 385-90 paragraph 1-4p must be satisfied to receive
                                                                                          79
a SAT for this question. Although not mandatory, check to see if there is an existing Memorandum of Understanding/Agreement between supported aviation unit and installation
medical treatment facility describing Flight Surgeon assistance. MOUs/MOAs reduce confusion and allow situation awareness / understanding between the two organizations.

8.00               AC AF       AS AT BN       DE          OS           SB SF TO UA
Do Individual Flight Record Folders (or ATS Controller Records) contain the required DA Form 4186 (medical clearance for flying or medical restriction from flying), and are they
completed correctly? [AR 40-501, para 6-11d]
REFERENCE TEXT
AR 40-501, 6-11. Issuing DA Form 4186. d. Each item of the DA Form 4186 will be completed as directed by the Commander, USAAMC. (See ATB, DA Form 4186.) Three
copies of the DA Form 4186 will be completed. Copy 1 is placed in the outpatient medical record. Copy 2 is forwarded to the examinee’s unit commander who signs and
forwards it to the flight operations officer for inclusion in the flight records (AR 95–1 and FM 3-04.300). Copy 3 is given to the examinee.
EVAL METH:
Check IFRFs for assigned crew members. Verify that all required DA Forms 4186 are maintained in the IFRF and that all blocks are filled out appropriately. Check for current year
Medical Examination DA Form 4186 and all other current year ups and downs.

9.00               AC AF       AS AT BN         DE         OS          SB SF TO UA
Do individual Flight Records contain applicable medical waiver approval letters, and are the waivers in the acceptable abbreviated format? [AR 40-501, para 6-10g; FM 3-04.300,
para 6-15]
REFERENCE TEXT
AR 40-501, 6-10. Disposition and review of FDMEs g. Disposal of documentation. Waiver and suspension recommendation and approval letters will be filed in the individual
health record and flight record. When available, the AERO Abbreviated Waiver Letter shall be utilized for the individual flight record folder (IFRF) for Health Insurance Portability
and Accountability Act (HIPAA) compliance of protected health information. FM 3-04.300, Medical Documents. 6-15. Recent guidance for the protection of health information
was published under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). This act requires the safeguard and security of medical information. The retention of medical
waivers with personal health information in the IFRF is no longer acceptable. An abbreviated waiver memorandum summarizing the medical waiver, periods of retention, and
actions recommended by the medical authority should be filed instead. This memorandum can be obtained from the Flight Surgeon.
EVAL METH:
Check IFRF for applicable waiver approval letters. Check to ensure IFRF waiver documentation is not in violation of HIPAA. IFRF waiver approval memorandums are obtained
from the Flight Surgeon/AERO. Recommend maintaining a current waivers roster. NOTE: Crewmembers with missing waivers granted prior to 2003 require the supporting Flight
Surgeon or Aeromedical Physician Assistant (APA) to verify the waiver authority dates in AERO. Then the supporting Flight Surgeon or APA can create a memorandum for record
in the current abbreviated waivers format verifying the waiver and a copy of this memo will be posted to the medical section of the individual flight record folders (IFRF). Waivers
granted after 2003 can be obtained through AERO, and then posted to the IFRF.

10.00            AC AF       AS AT BN        DE            OS            SB SF TO UA
Are one calendar month extensions granted for flight physicals prior to the expiration date of the current physical? [AR 40-501, para 6-11i ]
REFERENCE TEXT
AR 40-501, 6-11. Issuing DA Form 4186. i. The validity period of the current FDME/FDHS (see para 6-8) may be extended for a period of 1 calendar month beyond the birth
month on the DA Form 4186. After expiration of this extension, the aircrew member or ATC must complete the FDME/FDHS and be medically qualified or be— (1) Administratively
restricted from flying duties if no aeromedical DQ exists and be considered for a non–medical DQ and FEB (AR 600–105). (2) Medically restricted from flying duties if an
aeromedical DQ exists. In some cases, temporary flying duties may be recommended on DA Form 4186. (See also f, above, and para 6–12 through 6–20.)
EVAL METH:
Check extensions for correct dates. Ensure extensions are granted before the end of the birth month. Any extensions requested and granted in the month after the birth month are
not valid. The effective date of the extension is the day it was requested. Ensure that extensions granted under the 120 day rule are correctly documented per the 20 October
2005 Surgeon General’s policy letter concerning Operational Aeromedical Administration.

11.00              AC AF     AS AT BN         DE         OS          SB SF TO UA
Are crewmembers or ATC personnel performing aviation duties with expired physicals or one calendar month extensions? [ AR 95-1, para 2-1b; AR 40-501, para 6-11i; AR 600-
105, para 6-1c(2); AR 600-106, para 2-7c(2); FM3-04.300, para 6-32 ]
REFERENCE TEXT

                                                                                         80
AR 95-1, 2-1. Personnel authorized to fly Army aircraft. b. All Army aviators who are in aviation service per AR 600-105 must meet the annual physical requirements of AR 40-
501 regardless of assignment. AR 40-501, 6-11. Issuing DA Form 4186. i. The validity period of the current FDME/FDHS (see para 6-8) may be extended for a period of 1
calendar month beyond the birth month on the DA Form 4186. After expiration of this extension, the aircrew member or ATC must complete the FDME/FDHS and be medically
qualified or be— (1) Administratively restricted from flying duties if no aeromedical DQ exists and be considered for a non–medical DQ and FEB (AR 600–105). (2) Medically
restricted from flying duties if an aeromedical DQ exists. In some cases, temporary flying duties may be recommended on DA Form 4186. (See also f, above, and paras 6-12
through 6-20.) AR 600-105, 6-1. Standards. c. Reasons for an FEB to convene. (2) Failure to maintain medical certification. All officers, regardless of component or whether or
not assigned to operational flying duty assignments must maintain medical certification for flying duty through timely physical examinations (AR 40–501). If the certification expires,
the officer is unfit until medically requalified or a temporary medical extension is provided. Aviation service is suspended effective the day following the last day of his or her birth
month. In cases where temporary medical extension has been provided, aviation service is suspended on the first day following the last day of the extension. The immediate
commander will temporarily suspend the officer from flying duty. AR 600-106, 2-7. Instructions for issuing and terminating flying status orders. c. Flying status will be
terminated at the times or under the conditions shown below. (2). Soldiers who have not had a current valid medical examination as stated in AR 40–501 will be automatically
suspended from flying status. The suspension will be effective on the date their medical examination expires. Commanders will notify the servicing Finance and Accounting Office
when nonrated Army aviation personnel have been suspended from flying status. FM 3-04.300, FLIGHT PHYSICALS. 6-32. Individuals who do not have a current flight physical,
or a 1-calendar month extension to complete their annual medical examination documented on DA Form 4186, will be suspended from flying status until medical clearance is
given. Commanders will notify the servicing finance and accounting office when personnel are suspended from flight duties.
EVAL METH:
Look for expired FDMEs in the Health Records and in AERO. Use the DA Form 2408-12 print out (CAFRS/ALLS AE) from Flight Operations to determine if crewmembers
performed flight duties while not medically qualified. Finding one expired physical or extension constitutes an unsatisfactory rating.

22.00              AC         AS       BN       DE         OS            SB SF      UA
Does the unit’s aeromedical continuation training comply with the following references? [AR 95-1, para 4-13, 8-1g; DA Pam 385-90, para 1-4p(9),(11)-(13);TC 3-04.93, para 1-10;
TC 1-600, para 3-18]
REFERENCE TEXT
AR 95-1, 4-13. Aeromedical training. Flight crewmembers will receive aeromedical and low pressure/high altitude training per TC 1–210 and FM 3–04.301(now TC 3-04.93
[sic]). 8-1. Aviation Life Support System general. g. Flight surgeons and aeromedical advisors are responsible for— (1) Physiological training of aircrew personnel. (2)
Medical aspects of survival training of aircrew personnel. (3) Monitoring the fitting and use of ALSE by aircrew personnel. DA Pam 385-90, 1-4. Functions. p. Flight surgeon.
The flight surgeon assists and advises the command in all aviation medical matters. In remote areas where a flight surgeon is not assigned or readily available, local support will
be provided by the servicing medical department activity (MEDDAC) to best accomplish these duties. The flight surgeon should: (9) Monitor the survival and physiological training
of aviation crewmembers and provide medical support in accordance with applicable Army regulations. (11) Make recommendations to the Commander, USACRC, for
improvement of human factors compatibility, crashworthiness, aviation life-support equipment, and survival features of aircraft. (12) Take part in aviation safety meetings to
educate aviation crewmembers on the aeromedical aspects of flight. (13) Monitor the aviation life support equipment (ALSE) program. TC 3-04.93, CONTINUATION TRAINING.
1-10. The requirement for continuation training applies to all Army crewmembers in operational flying positions. The POI must be conducted once a year. The following subjects
provide the minimum training necessary for the unit to reach adequate safety and efficiency in an aviation environment: altitude physiology, spatial disorientation (SD), aviation
protective equipment, stress, fatigue and exogenous factors.

TC 1-600, para 3-18
•        Aeromedical factors (AR 40-8 and FM 3-04.301). Topics in this subject area are—
•        Flight restrictions due to exogenous factors.
•        Stress.
•        Fatigue.


EVAL METH:
Check to ensure appropriate aeromedical continuation training is conducted in the organization by verifying sign-in rosters, training schedules, lesson plans, memorandums for
record, IATFs and SOPs. Check to ensure that the unit has an effective make up training program.

B-CLINICAL DUTIES
                                                                                          81
NOT APPLICABLE



                                                                 PETROLEUM READINESS
A-TRAINING PROGRAM
NOT APPLICABLE

B- ACCOUNTABILITY
NOT APPLICABLE

C-EQUIPMENT
NOT APPLICABLE

D-QUALITY SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM
NOT APPLICABLE

E-PACKAGED POL PRODUCTS
QUESTION
1.00         AC AF       AS      BN CO DE FS                        SB SF      UA
Has the commander/contractor designated in writing an individual to manage package petroleum? [AR 710-2, chap 2-37l(1)]
REFERENCE TEXT
2-37l. Commanders ensure packaged petroleum is managed properly as follows: (1) Designate an individual in writing to manage packaged petroleum.
EVAL METH:
Inspect records for memorandum assigning an individual to manage package petroleum. Evaluator will ensure individuals assigned to manage the program are trained. To
receive a SAT, unit/facility/contractor must present written orders signed by current unit/facility commander or contractor assigning a responsible individual to manage packaged
petroleum

3.00            AC AF       AS     BN CO DE FS                    SB SF        UA
Has a bench stock list been prepared for packaged POL products to support the requirements of the unit? [AR 710-2, para 2-24a, b, e, e (1) & f ; DA Pam 710-2-2, para
23-2e(1), Table 23-1]
REFERENCE TEXT
2–24. Bench stocks. a. Bench stocks are low cost, high use, consumable Class 2, 3 (packaged), 4 and 9 (less components) items used by maintenance personnel at an
unpredictable rate. Bench stocks consist of common hardware, resistors, transistors, capacitors, wire, tubing, hose, ropes, webbing, thread, welding rods, sandpaper, gasket
materiel, sheet metal, seals, oils, grease and repair kits. Only small arms repair parts coded CIIC ―U‖ are authorized for bench stock. Controlled items will be inventoried in
accordance with table 2–2, paragraph i. b. Bench stocks are authorized for all maintenance activities. Approval of the bench stock list by the maintenance officer is required
semiannually (annually for AMC maintenance depots). For MSTs and CRTs, listings prepared for shop stock per paragraph 2-23l above will include bench stock items. This
stock is not subject to the demand supported criteria in paragraph 2–23. NOTE: The Hazardous Material Inventory List may be used as long as the all the required data element of
the bench stock list are included. e. Bench stock lists and bench stock replenishment tags will be reviewed semiannually (annually for AMC depots). Essential elements of data
are listed below. (1) Bench stock list. (a) Unit or activity. (b) UIC. (c) Prepared by. (d) Approved by. (e) NSN. (f) Item description. (g) Quantity. (h) Unit of issue. (i) Date. (j) Location.

                                                                                              82
f. Bench stock for aviation peculiar items should be provided segregated storage (bin dividers), by manufacturer, contract, lot number, source and date packed, when physical
capabilities exist. DA Pam 710-2-2e, (1) Bench stock list. Prepare on a memorandum or plain bondpaper. The subject is ―Bench Stock List.‖ Include the date prepared,
unit/activity, and UIC. List the stock number, unit of issue, item description, stockage quantity, and location of each bench stock item. The person preparing the list (normally the
shop officer) signs it and sends it to the unit commander or installation maintenance officer for approval and signature. Essential data elements of the bench stock list are shown in
the table 23–1.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will review the 2 latest (current and the one prior) bench stock lists for correct and approval procedures. To receive a SAT, the bench stock list must contain the required
items and be approved and signed.

5.00            AC AF      AS       BN CO DE FS                       SB SF         UA
Does the activity have access to the online Quality Status List (QSL) or written procedures to utilize another activities' copy? [AR 710-2, appendix C, para C-4b(3);
DA Pam 710-2-1, para 12-27]
REFERENCE TEXT
C-4b. (3) All products identified for shelf life update testing. These results will be reported to USAPC before submitting any samples to designated labs. Activities are required to
maintain Standing Operating Procedures (SOP) to ensure proper package petroleum management. Products must be checked against the DOD Quality Status List (QSL) during
required inspections. (https://headquarters.dla.mil/j-3/shelflife/) Products with expired shelf life that are not listed on the QSL should be reported to USAPC before submitting
samples to a designated laboratory. When products are identified for shelf life update, those products will not be used until the laboratory analysis indicates the product meets use
limits. USAPC Product Deficiency Investigation (PDI) messages, which identify deficient items, will be kept on file for 1 year from date of release. New receipts of products will be
screened for items reported in these messages and, if received, will be reported to USAPC. DA Pam 710-2-1, 12-27. c. Rotation of stocks will ensure that the oldest package
products are issued/used first. When expired products are found in storage, personnel should use DA Form 5832–R (Packaged Petroleum, Oils, and Lubrications Submission Log)
to report the NSN, contract number, lot/batch number, size of container, and quantity on hand to the installation petroleum manager/next higher supply level for consolidation. They
should have in their possession, a copy of the Quality Status Listing (QSL). The QSL is a periodically updated listing of products that have been tested and the condition code.
Information obtained from the QSL will be used to determine further actions to be taken regarding outdated products. Items of concern that are not found in the QSL should be
reported to USAPC, ATTN: Ms. Joy Shingles, joy.shingles@dla.mil, 703-767-0654, DSN 427-0654 for sampling, testing, and disposition instructions. A sample of the DA Form
5832–R is provided in figure 12–12. DA Form 5832–R is authorized for local reproduction on 81⁄2- by 11-inch paper. A copy for reproduction purposes is located at the back of this
issue.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will verify access to the current QSL. To receive a SAT, packaged POL products manager will demonstrate access to the online QSL list and the ability to determine
proper extension of shelf life products.


F-SAFETY
QUESTION
2.00             AC AF        AS     BN CO DE FS                     SB SF       UA
Is required protective clothing and equipment used during refueling operations? [FM 10-67-1, page 2-24, table 2-9, page 2-25; 29 CFR 1910.132(a)]
REFERENCE TEXT
Pg 2-24. Personnel must wear protective clothing when handling fuels. It is the command's responsibility to ensure that all protective clothing required by the MSDS is provided
to the aviation fuel handler. Clothing includes field ware, goggles, hearing protection, gloves, and boots. Each is discussed in Table 2-9 page 2-25. CONTRACTOR:
http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owalink.query_links?src_doc_type=STANDARDS&src_unique_file=1910_0132&src_anchor_name=1910.132(a) Application.
Protective equipment, including personal protective equipment for eyes, face, head, and extremities, protective clothing, respiratory devices, and protective shields and barriers,
shall be provided, used, and maintained in a sanitary and reliable condition wherever it is necessary by reason of hazards of processes or environment, chemical hazards,
radiological hazards, or mechanical irritants encountered in a manner capable of causing injury or impairment in the function of any part of the body through absorption, inhalation
or physical contact.
EVAL METH:
Observe operations to determine if adequate protective equipment is available and used. Review SOP to determine unit requirements. To receive a SAT, POL personnel will
utilize required PPE during all POL operations.


                                                                                         83
3.00            AC AF         AS     BN CO DE FS                   SB SF       UA
Is explosion-proof electrical equipment used where flammable vapors are present? [FM 10-67-1, table 2-1, page 2-2; NFPA 407, A-3-7]
REFERENCE TEXT
Pg 2-2. Use only authorized tools, equipment, and clothing. Use explosion proof lights and flashlights. CONTRACTOR: NFPA 407, A-3.7 Use only authorized tools, equipment,
and clothing. Use explosion proof lights and flashlights.
EVAL METH:
Ensure equipment/tools used by POL personnel are explosion-proof. To receive a SAT, unit/facility/contractor must have explosion proof flashlights.

8.00              AC AF      AS     BN CO DE FS                    SB SF        UA
Has a fire-fighting plan or emergency procedures been developed for refuel operations? [FM 10-67-1, page 2-14; PWS, section 1 and 2]
REFERENCE TEXT
Pg 2-14. To fight and extinguish petroleum fires effectively requires a good plan. This plan may be very simple or complex. No matter what, it should cover in detail all possible
fire problems. It should also cover fire fighting resources, to include fire departments and engineer fire fighting teams (where available). CONTRACTOR: PWS Section 1 & 2.
Have emergency procedures been developed for refuel operations? To fight and extinguish petroleum fires effectively requires a good training and procedures. The procedures
may be very simple or complex. No matter what, the procedure should cover in detail all possible fire problems in and around aircraft serviced by the contractor. The procedures
should identify fire-fighting resources, to include the supporting fire department.
EVAL METH:
Evaluator will first review the fire fighting plan or emergency plans. To receive a SAT, a fire fighting plan or emergency procedures must have been developed for refuel operations
(Cold/Hot Refueling, Defueling, Recirculation and Transfer). POL personnel must be thoroughly familiar with all aspects of the emergency plan and know what actions to take if an
incident occurs while refueling an aircraft.

9.00         AC AF    AS     BN CO DE FS                      SB SF       UA
Are ―NO SMOKING WITHIN 50 FEET‖ signs posted at all petroleum storage and handling areas? [FM 10-67-1, page 2-2, table 2-1; NFPA 407, 4-1.3 & 4.3.11.1]
REFERENCE TEXT
Pg 2-2, Table 2-1. Post NO SMOKING WITHIN 50 FEET signs where they can be seen. CONTRACTOR: NFPA 407, 4-1.3. No Smoking Signs. Entrances to fueling areas shall
be posted with ―no smoking‖ signs. (4.3.11.1) A ―no smoking‖ sign shall be posted prominently in the cab of every aircraft.
EVAL METH:
Visually inspect site for required signs. To receive a SAT, signs must be posted at all petroleum storage and handling areas.

10.00          AC AF        AS       BN CO DE FS                    SB SF         UA
Are properly maintained fire extinguishers (minimum 20 B-C) available for refueling operations? [FM 10-67-1, page 2-2, table 2-1, 15-2; ATA 2-4(6)
NFPA 407 para 4.3.9-4.3.9.4]
REFERENCE TEXT
Pg 2-2. Table 2-1. Place fire extinguishers and other fire fighting equipment within easy reach but where it will be safe from a fire. Pg15-2. ● Fire extinguishers. Extinguishers are
not components of the FARE system. Providing fire extinguishers is a command responsibility. Three fire extinguishers are required for each FARE system used in aircraft
refueling-- one to be within reach of the pump operator and one for use at each nozzle. ATA 2-4. Fuel Storage Facility Requirements- (6) Fire Extinguishers With Inspection Tags.
Fire extinguishers with inspection tags must be positioned in accordance with applicablesafety requirements. (4.3.9) Fire Extinguishers for Aircraft Fuel Servicing Vehicles or
Carts. NFPA 407, 4.3.9.1 Each aircraft fuel servicing tank vehicle shall have two listed fire extinguishers, each having a rating of at least 20-B:C with one extinguisher mounted
on each side of the vehicle. 4.3.9.2. One listed extinguisher having a rating of at least 20-B:C shall be installed on each hydrant fuel servicing vehicle or cart. (4.3.9.3)
Extinguishers shall be readily accessible from the ground. The area of the paneling or tank adjacent to or immediately behind the extinguisher(s) on fueling vehicles or carts shall
be painted with a contrasting color. 4.3.9.4. Extinguishers shall be kept clear of elements such as ice and snow. Extinguishers located in enclosed compartments shall be readily
accessible, and their location shall be marked clearly in letters at least 50 mm (2 in.) high.
EVAL METH:
Visually inspect fire extinguishers for availability and serviceability. To receive a SAT, fire extinguishers must be available, serviceable and properly maintained.

G-FACILITIES
NOT APPLICABLE
                                                                                          84
H-AIRCRAFT REFUELING
NOT APPLICABLE

                                             TRAINING & COMMAND PROGRAMS
A-METL DEVELOPMENT/TRAINING PLANS
Leaders are encouraged to utilize DTMS as well as the Army Training Network (ATN) as sources for METL development. Go to https://atn.army.mil then click products,
click training management, click Aviation to view METLs.

NOT APPLICABLE

B-LONG/SHORT RANGE TRAINING PLANNING
NOT APPLICABLE

C-TRAINING MANAGEMENT
NOT APPLICABLE

D-PERSONNEL RECOVERY
NOT APPLICABLE

E-FLYING HOUR PROGRAM
NOT APPLICABLE

F-OPERATIONAL SUPPORT AIRLIFT
NOT APPLICABLE




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posted:9/19/2011
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