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Chronological Narrative

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									        Fifth Grade
    Writing Assessments
             Writing Process
         Chronological Narrative
    Informational Writing (Summary)
            Persuasive Writing
Literature Response (Compare / Contrast)

                                       Ware County
                                        2005-2006
 Assessment dates for 2005 -2006 school year

 First assessment – Week of September 19 – 23
      Report due Wednesday September 28

Second assessment – Week of November 14 – 18
      Report due Tuesday November 22

  Third assessment – Week of February 6 – 10
      Report due Wednesday February 15

   Fourth Assessment – Week of May 8 – 12
        Report due Wednesday May 17
                                      Individual Writing Assessment Scoring Sheet
Name ________________________________________________          School __________________________________________

Kindergarten Assessment                                                                        Date    Average
September                                   Statement of Information
November                                    Descriptive Paragraph
February                                    Simple Directions
May                                         Opinion / Point of View

First Grade Assessment                                                                         Date    Average
September                                   Simple Directions
November                                    Statement of Information
February                                    Descriptive Paragraph
May                                         Opinion / Point of View

Second Grade Assessment                                                                        Date    Average
September                                   Statement of Information
November                                    Letter Writing
February                                    Simple Directions
May                                         Opinion / Point of View

Third Grade Assessment                                                                         Date    Average
September                                   Descriptive Paragraph
November                                    Chronological Narrative
February                                    Compare / Contrast
May                                         Persuasive Paragraph

Fourth Grade Assessment                                                                        Date    Average
September                                   Chronological Narrative
November                                    Summary
February                                    Compare / Contrast
May                                         Opinion / Point of View

Fifth Grade Assessment                                                                         Date    Average
September                                   Chronological Narrative
November                                    Informational Writing (Summary)
February                                    Persuasive Writing
May                                         Literature Response ( Compare / contrast)
                         Instructions for Individual Writing Folders
1. Each student will have an individual writing folder.

2. Each folder will contain the following information in this order:
          Individual Writing Assessment Scoring Sheet (overview of all grades)
          Individual Writing Assessment Summary Scoring sheet for each grade level
          The four writing assessments completed that year:
                      September
                      November
                      February
                      May
          For each assessment the following should be attached
                    the final draft
                    graphic organizer
                    first draft
                    rubric

3. Make sure all information is filled out on each form.

4. The first two final “published” copies in 3 rd grade will be done in manuscript. The last two final “published”
copies will be in cursive writing.

5. All the final “published” copies for 4th and 5th grade will be completed in cursive writing.
                    Calendar Schedule

               Writing Standards Assessments
                        Fifth Grade

Month             Writing Assessment

September   Chronological Narrative

November    Informational Writing (Summary)

February    Persuasive Writing

May         Literature Response (Compare and Contrast)
                                              General Procedures
                                                Grades 3 – 5
   Students should have at least 2 or 3 experiences with each type of writing prior to the benchmark assessment.

1. Students will receive the matching rubric when assessment is introduced.

2. Students are to work independently without student/teacher assistance.

3. All parts of the assessment will be given in school.

4. Scores may be used for marking period average.

5. Examples included in the assessments are for teachers’ use only. Do not use these with the students.

6. Students may use writing tools for independent revising/ editing. (dictionary, thesaurus, ect)

7. Samples should be hand-written unless an IEP indicates otherwise.

8. All student work samples should be placed in a personal folder.

9. Grade level teams should meet to assess strengths and weaknesses of assessment results.
                                            Fifth Grade
Individual Writing Assessment Summary Scoring Sheet


Name ____________________________           School _____________________
Teacher __________________________


                      Assessments                                 Date     Average
           September – Chronological Narrative
           November – Informational Writing (Summary)
           February – Persuasive Writing
           May – Literature Response (Compare and Contrast)


Comments ____________________________________________
          ____________________________________________
           ____________________________________________
           ____________________________________________
            Prioritizing and Mapping Course Map


              Year-Long Course Map                          Fifth Grade Writing Assessment




                            September       → October        November      → December   → January   February      → March      → April   May
            August→
                            Assessment      Informational    Assessment    Persuasive               Assessment    Literature             Assessment
            Chronological
                            Week of         Writing          Week of       Writing                  Week of       Response               Week of
            Narrative
                            Sept. 19 – 23   (Summary)        Nov. 14-18                             Feb. 6 -10    (Compare &             May 8 – 12
                                                                                                                  Contrast)

                            Reports Due                      Reports Due                            Reports Due                          Reports Due
                            Sept. 28                         Nov. 22                                Feb. 15                              May 17




Some            Sept.         Oct.            Nov.             Dec.          Jan.       Feb.        Mar.          Apr.           May       June
Timeline        Aug.          Sept.           Oct.             Nov.          Dec.       Jan.        Feb.          Mar.           Apr.      May
Specified




            Fdsdfg
            Sdfg
            Dfg
            Df
            g
                                                                        Topics from Standard/Strands
                                       (Note: ELA/RLA: Topics are Genre/Literary Elements or Reading/Writing Strategies)
                   Standard/Strand: ELA5W1 The student produces writing that establishes an appropriate organizational structure, sets a context and engages the
                   reader, maintains a coherent focus throughout, and signals a satisfying closure. ELA5W2 The student demonstrates competence in a variety of
                   genres. ELA5W4 The student consistently uses a writing process to develop, revise, and evaluate writing.




         (1)TOPIC: Narrative                                                                                 (2)TOPIC: Narrative Cont.


Objective/Performance Indictors/Elements:                                                           Objective/Performance Indictors/Elements:
                               ELA5W1 Elements                                                                                     ELA5W1 Elements Cont.
a. Selects a focus, an organizational structure, and a point of view based on                        d. Uses appropriate structures to ensure coherence (e.g., transition elements).
purpose, genre expectations, audience, length, and format requirements.                                                                    ELA5W2
b. Writes text of a length appropriate to address the topic or tell the story.                       a. Engages the reader by establishing a context, creating a point of view, and
c. Uses traditional structures for conveying information (e.g., chronological                       otherwise developing reader interest.
order, cause and effect, similarity and difference, and posing and answering a                       b. Establishes a plot, point of view, setting, and conflict, and/or the significance
question).                                                                                              of events.
                                                                                                     c. Creates an organized structure.




                                                                             (3) TOPIC: Narrative

                                                                     Objective/Performance Indictors/Elements:
                                                                                             ELA5W2 Cont.
                                                                     d. Includes sensory details and concrete language to develop
                                                                     plot and character.
                                                                     e. Excludes extraneous details and inconsistencies.
                                                                                 Topic Map Worksheet
                                                                     f. Develops complex characters through actions describing the
                                                                         motivation of characters and character conversation.
                                                         Topics from Standard/Strands
                  (Note: ELA/RLA: Topics are Genre/Literary Elements or Reading/Writing Strategies)
   Standard/Strand: ELA5W4 The student consistently uses a writing process to develop, revise, and evaluate writing.



                                                                                        (5)TOPIC: Narrative Cont.
        (4)TOPIC: Narrative Cont.

                                                                                 Objective/Performance Indictors/Elements:
                                                                                                           ELA5W4 Elements
Objective/Performance Indictors/Elements:                                        a. Plans and drafts independently and resourcefully.
                         ELA5W2 Elements Cont.                                   b. Revises manuscripts to improve the meaning and focus of
g. Uses a range of appropriate narrative strategies such as flashback,
                                                                                 writing by adding, deleting, consolidating, clarifying, and
foreshadowing, dialogue, tension, or suspense.
                                                                                 rearranging words or sentences.
h. Provides a sense of closure to the writing.
                                                                                 c. Edits to correct in spelling, punctuation, ect.
i. Lifts the level of language using appropriate strategies
    including word choice.
                                                                 Topic Map Worksheet
                                                              Topics from Standard/Strands
                     (Note: ELA/RLA: Topics are Genre/Literary Elements or Reading/Writing Strategies)
       Standard/Strand: ELA5W2 The student produces informational writing. ELA5W3 The student uses research and technology to
       support writing.




                                                                                                (2)TOPIC: Informational Writing
        (1)TOPIC: Informational Writing

Objective/Performance Indictors/Elements:                                              Objective/Performance Indictors/Elements:
                                                                                                                 ELA5W2 Elements Cont.
                         Elements
                                                                                       d. Includes appropriate facts and details.
a. Engages the reader by establishing a context, creating a speaker’s voice, and
                                                                                       e. Excludes extraneous details and inappropriate information.
other wise developing reader interest.
                                                                                       f. uses a range of appropriate strategies, such as providing facts and details,
b. Develops a controlling idea that conveys a perspective on a subject.
                                                                                       describing or analyzing the subject, and narrating a relevant anecdote.
c. Creates an organizing structure appropriate to a specific purpose, audience,
                                                                                       g. Draws from more than one source of information such as speakers,
         and context.
                                                                                                books, newspapers, and online material.




                 (3) TOPIC: Informational Writing                                          (4)TOPIC: Informational Writing

          Objective/Performance Indictors/Elements:                                Objective/Performance Indictors/Elements:
                              ELA5W2 Elements Cont.                                                                ELA5W3 Elements
          h. Provides a sense of closure to the writing.                           a. Acknowledges information from sources.
          i. Lifts the level of language using appropriate strategies              b. Uses organizational features of printed text (e.g., citations, end notes,
          including word choice.                                                   bibliographic references ) to locate relevant information.
                                                                                   c. Uses various reference materials (e.g., dictionary, thesaurus, encyclopedia,
                                                                                            electronic information) as aids to writing.
                                                      Topic Map Worksheet
                                                   Topics from Standard/Strands
             (Note: ELA/RLA: Topics are Genre/Literary Elements or Reading/Writing Strategies)
Standard/Strand:




       (5) TOPIC: Informational Writing                                    (6) TOPIC: Informational Writing


 Objective/Performance Indictors/Elements:                           Objective/Performance Indictors/Elements:
                  ELA5W3 Elements Cont.                                                ELA5W3 Elements Cont.
 d. Uses the features of text (e.g., index, table of contents,       f. Creates simple documents by using electronic means and
 guide words, alphabetical/numerical order) to obtain and            employing organizational features ( e.g., passwords, entry
 organize information and thoughts.                                  and pull-down menus, word searches, thesaurus, spell
 e. Demonstrates basic keyboarding skills and familiarity with       check).
 computer terminology (e.g., software, memory, disk drive,           g. Uses a thesaurus to identify alternative word choices and
 hard drive).                                                        meanings.
                                                        Topic Map Worksheet
                                                     Topics from Standard/Strands
             (Note: ELA/RLA: Topics are Genre/Literary Elements or Reading/Writing Strategies)
Standard/Strand: ELA5W2 The student produces a persuasive essay.




        (1) TOPIC: Persuasive Essay                                           (2) TOPIC: Persuasive Writing


 Objective/Performance Indictors/Elements:                             Objective/Performance Indictors/Elements:
                       ELA5W2 Elements                                                     ELA5W2 Elements Cont.
 a. Engages the reader by establishing a context, creating a           e. Addresses reader concerns.
 speaker’s voice, and otherwise developing reader interest.            f. Excludes extraneous details and inappropriate information.
 b. States a clear position in support of a proposal.                  g. Provides a sense of closure to the writing.
 c. Supports a position with relevant evidence.                        h. Raises the level of language using appropriate strategies
 d. Creates an organizing structure appropriate to a specific          (word choice).
 purpose, audience, and context.
                                                       Topic Map Worksheet
                                                    Topics from Standard/Strands
             (Note: ELA/RLA: Topics are Genre/Literary Elements or Reading/Writing Strategies)
Standard/Strand: ELA5W2 The student produces a response to literature.




                                                                             (2) TOPIC: Literature Response
       (1) TOPIC: Literature Response


                                                                      Objective/Performance Indictors/Elements:
Objective/Performance Indictors/Elements:                                                   ELA5W2 Elements Cont.
                       ELA5W2 Elements
                                                                      d. Develops interpretations that exhibit careful reading and
a. Engages the reader by establishing a context, creating a
                                                                      demonstrate an understanding of the literary work.
speaker’s voice, and otherwise developing reader interest.
                                                                      e. Excludes extraneous details and inappropriate information.
b. Advances a judgment that is interpretive, evaluative, or
                                                                      f. Provides a sense of closure of the writing.
reflective.
                                                                      g. Raises the level of language using appropriate strategies (word
c. Supports judgments through references to the text, other
                                                                      choice)
works, authors, or non-print media, or references to personal
knowledge.
   Content Map of Unit            Topic: Writing Process                                      Grade: Fifth



Key Learning :                            Unit Essential Questions:                            Optional
The student will develop the              How do I become a better                       Instructional Tools:
skills necessary to become a              writer?
better writer.                                                                    Internet
                                                                                  Overhead projector




Concept: Five Steps in         Concept:                        Concept:                      Concept:
the Writing Process


Lesson Essential               Lesson Essential                Lesson Essential              Lesson Essential
Questions:                     Questions:                      Questions:                    Questions:

What are the 5 steps in the
writing process?




Vocabulary: prewriting,        Vocabulary:                     Vocabulary:                   Vocabulary:
draft, revising, editing,
publishing


Additional Information:


Grade level:          fifth          Participants:
                Created by: Janna Jones


      Essential Question :
                                What is the writing process?

    Activating Strategies: Who likes pizza? What ingredients in the pizza do you like? Why must the pizza makers assemble the
 (Learners Mentally Active) ingredients in the same order each time? What happens if the pizza makers skip a step or mix the steps up?
                            Possible answers: The pizza doesn’t taste good if the ingredients are put together in the wrong order. The
                            same goes for good writing. We must put our stories together in the same way if we want them to be written
                            well. There is a process or steps we can use every time we write to ensure that our stories are written well.
Acceleration/Previewing: Prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, publishing
          (Key Vocabulary)
     Teaching Strategies: Have students take out a sheet of paper to take notes.
        (Collaborative Pairs; Make transparencies of the writing process posters.
Distributed Guided Practice; On the overhead, go through the five parts. After each part, ask if there are any questions.
  Distributed Summarizing;
        Graphic Organizers) 1. Prewriting – Gathering Ideas

                                        Prewriting is the time when we think about what to write. This is when we decide what to say and
                                how to say it. One way to decide what to write about is to make a list of possible topics, which is called
                                brainstorming.

                                2. Drafting – Writing the paper

                                        Drafting is the step where we actually write the paper. Now we present the ideas from prewriting
                                and develop them in detail. This is one of the most important parts of the writing process. This is your
                                practice copy so try to get all your ideas down on paper. During this step do not worry too much about
                                making mistakes. You will correct them in the next two steps.
                                3. Revising – Improving your paper
                                        This is the step where we look back on our original drafts and make changes that strengthen the
                                paper. We are looking at the structure of the paper. Ask the questions: Is my paper organized? Are my
                                ideas clear? Will others understand what I’ve written? Have I used the most appropriate words to illustrate
                                my ideas?
                                    4. Editing – Polishing the paper

                                            Editing is the part of the writing process where we check for mistakes in grammar and punctuation.
                                    Ask the questions: Did I use complete sentences? Do I have the proper punctuation (commas, periods,
                                    quotation marks, apostrophes) in each sentences? Have I spelled all words correctly? Did I begin each
                                    sentence with a capital letter and indent each paragraph?

                                    5. Publishing – Sharing the paper

                                              The last step in the writing process is sharing a completed paper with others. Once the paper has
                                    been developed and polished through the previous four steps, it is time to copy your final copy. Write or
                                    type it so that it is neat and legible.
                                     You will want to display the five steps of the writing process in the classroom and refer to them each time
                                    you teach a writing lesson.

                                    Have the students create writing folders or notebooks to keep up with their writing and information sheets.



Distributed Guided Practice/ Pass out the worksheets. Read the directions and ask: What is the first step in the writing process? What
     Summarizing Prompts: comes next? Review all five steps.
    (Prompts Designed to Initiate
            Periodic Practice or
                  Summarizing)



    Summarizing Strategies: Ticket Out the Door – Students write at least one of the steps in the writing process.
        (Learners Summarize &
      Answer Essential Question)
                                   Worksheet




Name_________________________                     Date ___________________________




                                Writing Process

What are the five steps in the writing process?

1.    _____________________

2.    _____________________

3.    _____________________

4.    _____________________

5.    _____________________
   Content Map of Unit             Topic: Narrative Writing                                    Grade: 5



Key Learning: Structured                  Unit Essential Questions:                              Optional
Writing                                                                                    Instructional Tools:
                                          How do I write for a specific
                                          purpose?




Concept: Narrative              Concept: Narrative              Concept: Assessment of        Concept:
Practice Lesson 1               Practice Lesson 2               Narrative Writing


Lesson Essential                Lesson Essential                Lesson Essential              Lesson Essential
Questions:                      Questions:                      Questions:                    Questions:
How do I write a                How do I write a                How do I write a
chronological narrative?        chronological narrative?        chronological narrative?




Vocabulary: writing process,    Vocabulary: writing process,    Vocabulary: writing           Vocabulary:
transitions words, flashback,   transition words, flashbacks,   process
foreshadowing, dialogue,        foreshadowing, dialogue,
tension                         tension

Additional Information: Have the students use the writing process posters exhibited in the classroom.


Grade level:          fifth              Participants:
       Practice lesson 1
               Created By: Janna Jones

      Essential Question: How do I write a chronological narrative?
    Activating Strategies: Read and discuss stories that are examples of narratives. Engage students in highlighting or responding
  (Learners Mentally Active) to the text that emphasize details in setting, tension between characters, and private thoughts.
Acceleration/Previewing: Chronological Narrative, writing process, transitional words and phrases,
           (Key Vocabulary)
     Teaching Strategies: 1. Tell the students when writing a chronological narrative, you are, in effect, telling a story of a real or
        (Collaborative Pairs; imaginary event. The key here is logical sequence of the sections of the story. It is important to include
Distributed Guided Practice; many details to make the experience come alive for the reader.
  Distributed Summarizing;
        Graphic Organizers) 2. To help you plan the important information to share in this narrative, construct answers to these
                              questions: who, what, where, when, why, and how.

                                 3. In addition, to help your readers follow the “flow” of your story, use transitional words and phrases.
                                 Write the following words on a chart and post them in the room for future use.
                                 After           earlier       meanwhile             slowly           all at once             slowly
                                 Eventually      next           soon                  before            finally                suddenly
                                 During          later          quickly               then              not so long ago

                                  4. Review the writing process and explain to the class that we will use it each time we write. Inform
                                 the class they will write a chronological narrative using the writing process, a story map and a Q-A-D
                                 graphic organizer to help keep their stories structured.
                                 Make a transparency of the sample story and the graphic organizers. Share the completed chart and
                                 story with the class using the overhead projector. Next, pass out the Chronological Narrative Scoring
                                 rubric and go over it with the class.

                                  5. Writing Prompt: Think of a time in your life that was important and memorable. Tell about what
                                 happened and why it was important and memorable. Remind the class that this is the prewriting stage of
                                 the writing process. On the overhead, thinking aloud, complete the sequential order chart with the most
                                 important events in chronological order. Have the student think of an important and memorable time in
                                 their life. Pass out the sequential order organizers, and have the students list the most important events
                                in the order that they happened. Write your memory on a transparency of the Q-A-D organizer. Answer
                                the questions and fill in the details about your memorable moment. Explain to the students how you
                                only write phrases, not whole sentences. Now hand out the Q-A-D sheets to the class and have them
                                complete the chart for their important and memorable moment. Have collaborative pairs share the
                                information on their charts to ensure it is completed.

                                6. Next you should complete a story map for your memorable moment to demonstrate to the class how
                                it should be done. Explain the heading as you complete your story map. Now, have the students
                                complete their story maps, and once again have collaborative pairs check to make sure each box is filled
                                in.

                                7. Now, it’s time to write the draft, the next step in the writing process. Remind the students that during
                                this step we write our story based on the information on our graphic organizers. Model writing a
                                narrative on the overhead. Think aloud as you write. While you are writing you will need to demonstrate
                                appropriate narrative strategies (ELA5W2 d, f, g i). After you model this, have the students write their
                                own narrative based on their graphic organizers.

                                8. When they are finished, refer back to your narrative. Model how to revise and edit an essay. Ask the
                                class to come up with three questions to help you further revise your paper. Tell them the questions may
                                ask about a point that’s not clear, or ask about some detail you left out. Write down these questions and
                                think aloud about how you might answer those questions in the revision process. Then have the
                                collaborative pairs switch papers, read each others narrative, and write down three questions to help
                                their peer develop their narrative further. After they finish each student revises and edits their draft,
                                paying close attention to the questions that were raised.

                                9. The final step is publishing. You may want to conference with the students before they complete this
                                step. They will rewrite their narrative in their best cursive handwriting or type it. When the narratives
                                are completed, they maybe shared.

     Distributed Guided Students write a chronological narrative.
               Practice/
  Summarizing Prompts:
(Prompts Designed to Initiate
        Periodic Practice or
              Summarizing)
Practice Lesson 2
                      Created by:      Janna Jones

          Essential Question: How do I write a chronological narrative?
     Activating Strategies: Read and discuss stories that are examples of narratives. Engage students in highlighting or responding
  (Learners Mentally Active) to the text that emphasize details in setting, tension between characters, and private thoughts.

Acceleration/Previewing: Chronological Narrative, writing process, transitional words and phrases,
                    (Key Vocabulary)
       Teaching Strategies: During this lesson use the models and transparencies you made for practice lesson number one.
        (Collaborative Pairs; 1. Remind the students when writing a chronological narrative, you are, in effect, telling a story of a real
Distributed Guided Practice; or imaginary event. The key here is logical sequence of the sections of the story. It is important to
  Distributed Summarizing; include many details to make the experience come alive for the reader.
        Graphic Organizers)
                              2. To help you plan the important information to share in this narrative, construct answers to these
                              questions: who, what, where, when, why, and how.

                                        3. Review the writing process and remind the students to use transitional words and phrases.
                                       After     meanwhile slowly            all at once     slowly       Eventually      next
                                       soon      before        finally      suddenly        During         later       quickly
                                       then      earlier                 not so long ago

                                        4. Review the writing process and explain to the class that we will use it each time we write. Inform the
                                       class they will write a chronological narrative using the writing process, a story map and a Q-A-D
                                       graphic organizer to help keep their stories structured.
                                        Share the model charts and story with the class using the overhead projector. Next, pass out the
                                       Chronological Narrative Scoring rubric and go over it with the class.

                                        5. Writing Prompt: Everyone is afraid sometimes. Tell about what happened the time you were afraid of
                                       something. Remind the class that this is the prewriting stage of the writing process. On the overhead,
                                       thinking aloud, complete the sequential order chart with the most important events in chronological
                                       order. Have the student think of a time when they were afraid. Encourage them to think about what
                                       happened in logical order. Pass out the sequential order organizers, and have the students list the most
                                       important events in the order that they happened. Thinking aloud, write about the time you were afraid
                                         on a transparency of the Q-A-D organizer. Answer the questions and fill in the details about the time you
                                         were afraid. Explain to the students how you only write phrases, not whole sentences. Now hand out the
                                         Q-A-D sheets to the class and have them complete the chart with details about the time they were afraid.
                                         Have collaborative pairs share the information on their charts to ensure it is completed.

                                         6. Next you should complete a story map for the time you were afraid to demonstrate to the class how it
                                         should be done. Explain the headings as you complete your story map. Now, have the students complete
                                         their story maps, and once again have collaborative pairs check to make sure each box is filled in.

                                         7. Now, it’s time to write the draft, the next step in the writing process. Remind the students that during
                                         this step we write our story based on the information on our graphic organizers. Model writing a
                                         narrative on the overhead. Think aloud as you write. While you are writing you will need to demonstrate
                                         appropriate narrative strategies (ELA5W2 d, f, g i). After you model this, have the students write their
                                         own narrative based on their graphic organizers.

                                         8. When they are finished, refer back to your narrative. Model how to revise and edit an essay. Ask the
                                         class to come up with three questions to help you further revise your paper. Tell them the questions may
                                         ask about a point that’s not clear, or ask about some detail you left out. Write down these questions and
                                         think aloud about how you might answer those questions in the revision process. Then have the
                                         collaborative pairs switch papers, read each others narrative, and write down three questions to help their
                                         peer develop their narrative further. After they finish each student revises and edits their draft, paying
                                         close attention to the questions that were raised.
                                         9. The final step is publishing. You may want to conference with the students before they complete this
                                         step. They will rewrite their narrative in their best handwriting or type it. When the narratives are
                                         completed , they maybe shared.

    Distributed Guided Practice/ The students will write a chronological narrative.
         Summarizing Prompts:
(Prompts Designed to Initiate Periodic
           Practice or Summarizing)
         Summarizing Strategies: Have the students answer the essential question.
            (Learners Summarize &
          Answer Essential Question)
SEQUENTIAL ORDER
SEQUENTIAL ORDER
 arrive at Ball Park and unload the truck




      found our seats in the stands




        our batter hit a home run




         everyone reaching for it




             I caught it!
                   Story Map


                 My Setting


                                   OTHER IMPORTANT
TIME             LOCATION              DETAILS




             My Main Characters

  Name:                 Name:
  Details:              Details:



  Quotes:                Quotes:
                           Story Map




                           My Setting




                                                    OTHER IMPORTANT
   TIME                 LOCATION                        DETAILS


                                                    weather was hot
last summer            the baseball
                       park
                                                    sun was shinning
an afternoon
in June                                             not a cloud in the
                                                    sky




                    My Main Characters

       Name: Me                   Name: Dad
       Details: likes going       Details: loves    baseball
       to baseball game               wears buttons and hat
       with dad                       likes going to game
       don’t like to carry            with me
       things
       Quotes:                    Quotes:
        “I don’t want to              “it’s always good
      carry the glove.”                to be prepared”
               Q -   A   -    D

         Question    Answer       Details
Who?



When?



Where?



What?



How?



Why?
                    Q -         A        -         D

         Question                     Answer                      Details
Who?                      Me                           Hates to carry thing
                          Dad                          Loves being a fan
When?                     Last summer                  Afternoon in June, hot,
                                                       Sunny, no clouds

Where?                    Ball park                    Hundreds of people
                                                       cheering/yelling, eating
                                                       hotdogs/ cotton candy
What?                     Caught a home run ball       Everyone trying to reach out
                                                       for the ball

How?                      Had my glove                 Stuck out my glove…. ball fell in


Why?                      Dad made me bring it         “It’s always good to be
                                                       prepared.”
                                             SAMPLE WRITING
                                         CHRONOLOGICAL NARRATIVE



                                           It’s Good To Be Prepared

                  Last summer, my dad and I went to a baseball game that I will never forget! It was
a     hot afternoon in June. The sun was shining, and there wasn’t a cloud in the sky. Dad loves
baseball, and so do I. He thinks it’s important to be a fan. So we were all dressed up in our ball
caps and our team T-shirts. Dad unloaded the truck. We had a pennant and some signs. Dad handed
me my baseball glove. “Take your glove,” he said. I            frowned. I don’t like to carry things,
and I didn’t want to take my glove. However, I took it          anyway.
      Then we went into the ballpark. We found our               seats in the stands. Hundred of
people were at the game. The crowd was cheering                   and yelling. People were eating hot
dogs and cotton candy. During the game, there were                 lots of strikeouts and a few hits.
Nothing too exciting was happening. Suddenly, our                   batter hit a home run. The ball
sailed through the air, right towards us. “It’s Mine,               screamed the man behind me. The
next thing I knew, people were reaching all over me.                 Everybody was trying to catch
the ball. “I’ve got it!” someone yelled. I stuck out my glove,       too.
      When the crowd finally stepped back, I stared at my             glove. I could not believe it.
There it was. The baseball was in my glove! “I caught it! I            caught it!” I shouted. I looked
over at my dad, and he just smiled. Later, when the game was          over, I thanked my dad for
making me take my baseball glove. He smiled again and said,” It’s always good to be prepared.”
                  Chronological Narrative (Grade 3-5)
                           Scoring Rubric

Task
                      4 points Each                  3 Point Each                2 Points Each                   1 Point Each
Component
                     Develops an interesting                                     Develops an accurate         Develops an inaccurate or
                                                  Develops an interesting
                      and creative beginning                                   beginning but it does not       inappropriate beginning
     Opening         that captures and holds
                                                  beginning that captures
                                                                                  capture the reader’s        that does not capture the
                                                   the reader’s interest
                       the reader’s interest                                              interest                 reader’s interest
                          Includes enough                                            Includes enough
                                                    Includes information
                            information but                                    information related to the
                                                   related to the topic but                                   Includes little information
   Information                   ONLY
                                                   may not have enough
                                                                                    topic but also has
                                                                                                                 related to the topic
                    Information related to the                                   information that is not
                                                         information
                              chosen topic                                         related to the topic
                     Thoroughly and logically      Logically develops the
                                                                               May have some illogical         Sequencing is illogical,
                      develops the narrative      narrative chronologically
                                                                               sequencing of narrative.       does not use sequencing
   Organization      chronologically through         through the use of
                                                                               Sequencing words may             words or uses them
                        the use of various         appropriate transition
                                                                                  be inappropriate.                  incorrectly
                           transition words                 words
                           Thoroughly and
                                                  Accurately tells the story   Tells the story in the first   Does not write the story in
    Viewpoint        accurately tells the story
                                                     in the first person        person inconsistently              the first person
                         in the first person
                      Develops a conclusion                                     Develops a conclusion
                       which thoroughly and        Develops a conclusion       which brings the narrative      Attempt a conclusion but
   Conclusion            logically bring the      which logically brings the       to a close but not         it does not bring story to a
                       narrative to a natural       narrative to a close         naturally (may seem                     close
                                 close                                               inappropriate)
                         All sentences are        Sentences are complete         Most sentences are           Few or no sentences are
                      complete using correct        but contain errors in      complete but may contain         complete with many
Grammar/Mechanics      capitals spelling and       capitalization, spelling,    errors in capitalization,      errors in capitalization,
                              punctuation             and punctuation          spelling, and punctuation      spelling, and punctuation
CHRONOLOGICAL
  NARRATIVE
    Assessment
  (150 WORDS)

    GRADE 5




LISTEN AND WRITE
                                    INSTRUCTIONS
                                   TO THE TEACHER
                               CHRONOLOGICAL NARRATIVE
                                    LISTEN / WRITE
DAY 1
  1. Read the story, The Day I Tore My Shorts to the class.
  2. After listening, the students should think of an embarrassing moment in their life.
  3. Pass out the rubric and go over it.
  4. Using the graphic organizer, students will fill in details about their own embarrassing time.
  5. Using the graphic organizer, students will write a rough draft of about 150 words
Time: one hour

Day 2
  1. Students will revise and edit the rough copy. Be sure to refer to the rubric. (They may use the
     dictionary, thesaurus, ect)
  2. After making revisions, write the final copy using pen.
  3. Students will proofread final copy for mistakes.
Time: one hour
                                INSTRUCTION
                              TO THE STUDENTS
                          CHRONOLOGICAL NARRATIVE
DAY 1

Today you will be writing a chronological narrative about an embarrassing moment.
  1. Listen as your teacher reads the selection, The Day I Tore My Shorts.
  2. Think of an embarrassing moment in your life.
  3. Using the graphic organizer, fill in details about this time
  4. Using the graphic organizer, write a rough draft of about 150 words. Refer to the attached
     rubric.

DAY 2

  1. Revise and edit your rough copy. Be sure to refer to the rubric. (You may use the dictionary,
     thesauri, ect)
  2. Write your final copy using pen
  3. Proofread your final copy for mistakes.
                            The day I tore my shorts
                         Book written by Lorraine Wilson
                         Book illustrated by Marrie Allen

   When I got out of bed this morning, it was hot. It was too hot to wear my
jeans to school.

Mom gave me a pair of shorts that I wore last summer.

They looked small. “I think these shorts have grown smaller.” I said.

I pulled them on. When I pulled in my tummy, I could zip up the zipper.
Mom had to button the top button.

They felt a bit tight.

In school, I built a tower with the blocks.

I bent down to pick up a block, and my shorts tore.

Oh no!! What would I do? I put my hands over tears.
I showed John and Isaac. They laughed. I laughed too.

I showed the teacher. She laughed.

“Oh Peter,” she said. “I don’t think you can stay at school in those short.”

I said,” If you call my mom, she would bring my jeans to school.”

The teacher went to telephone my mom.

I swat against the wall and no one could see where I had torn my shorts.

Mom brought my jeans to school, and I put them on.

Mom said, “After school tonight we’ll go and buy a new pair of shorts for
you. I’ll buy a bigger pair this year.
               Q -   A   -    D

         Question    Answer       Details
Who?



When?



Where?



What?



How?



Why?
                                    WRITING SAMPLE
                                CHRONOLOGICAL NATTATIVE
                                       GRADE 5

       Do you remember a day that makes you cringe? I do! It was the most embarrassing day! It
happened on Halloween Day when I was in fourth grade.
       It was finally time for us to put away our work and start to get into our costumes. I was a huge
pumpkin. My cloth body that I had made myself was filled with many orange balloons. My friends
had to help because my hands and arms were inside the costume. After I was filled, the green cloth
mask that looked like my stem was placed over my head. I was ready.
       Soon our class began walking down the stairs to form a parade outside of our school for
parents and friends. All at once, I missed a step, lost my balance and fell down the steps.
Fortunately, because of my padding, I was not hurt. However, I could not get up. My covered hands
and arms were of no use to me or my friends who tried to help. Finally, I found a way to get back up
by rolling down the stairs on my side while everyone on the staircase roared with laughter.
       The parade went well. It was a beautiful autumn day and there were lots of people. My
costume must have been quite a hit because I could see people pointing at me and smiling! Once
back in our rooms, I noticed kids snickering when I went by. I did not think too much about it until I
went in the bathroom to look in the mirror.
       What a sight I was! Practically all my balloons had popped when I tried to right
myself on the stairs. My once beautiful costume was covered with dirt from the
stairs, and I had a long run in each leg of my bright green tights. I looked liked
the “Worst Dressed Poster Child”! When Halloween rolled around this year, I
brought a simple costume with no balloons
Teacher’s Name ________________________ Assessment: Chronological Narrative
School: _______________________ Grade: 5th Grade Month: September
 Student Name Opening Information Organization            Viewpoint      Conclusion   Mechanics   Average
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
Average Scores
Student’s Name ______________________             Teacher’s Name ________________________ Chronological Narrative
School ______________________
Task
Component             4 points                 3 points                    2 points                   1 point                   Total
Opening               Develops an              Develops an                 Develops an accurate       Develops an
                      interesting and          interesting beginning       beginning but it does      inaccurate beginning
                      creative beginning       that captures the           not capture the            that does not capture
                      that captures and        reader’s interest.          reader’s interest.         the reader’s interest.
                      holds the reader’s
                      interest.
Information           Includes enough          Includes information        Includes enough            Includes little
                      information but          related to the topic but    information related to     information related to
                      ONLY information         may not have enough         the topic, but also        the topic.
                      related to the chosen    information.                information not
                      topic.                                               related to topic.
Organization          Thoroughly and           Logically develops          May have some              Sequencing is
                      logically develops the   the narrative               illogical sequencing       illogical, does not use
                      narrative                chronologically             of narrative.              sequencing words or
                      chronologically          through the used of         Sequencing words           uses them incorrectly.
                      through the use of       appropriate transition      may be inappropriate.
                      various transition       words.
                      words.
Viewpoint             Thoroughly and           Accurately tells the        Tells the story in the     Does not write in the
                      accurately tells the     story in the first          first person               first person.
                      story in the first       person.                     inconsistently.
                      person.
Conclusion            Develops a               Develops a                  Develops a                 Attempts a
                      conclusion which         conclusion which            conclusion which           conclusion, but it does
                      thoroughly and           logically brings the        brings the narrative to    not bring the story to
                      logically brings the     narrative to a natural      a close but not            a close.
                      narrative to a natural   close.                      naturally.
                      close.
Mechanics             All sentences are        Sentences are               Most sentences are         Few, if any, sentences
                      complete using           complete, but contain       complete but contains      are completed with
                      correct capitals and     errors in capitals and      errors in capitals and     many errors in
                      punctuation.             punctuation.                punctuation.               capitals and
                                                                                                      punctuation.
Developmental Stage                            Stage 1 __________         Stage 2 __________         Stage 3 __________
                                               Stage 4 __________         Stage 5 __________         Stage 6 __________
Principal's Name: _________________
School: ___________________
Grade: 5th Grade
Writing Assessment: Chronological Narrative
Month:


   Task Components            Average Score
Opening
Information
Organization
Viewpoint
Conclusion
Mechanics
Average for all components
The following developmental stage scoring guideline for the Georgia Writing Assessment should be taken into
consideration when scoring the rubric for each writing assessment.


                                          Stage 1 - The Emerging Writer
     Writing sample produced by the students at this stage exhibit most or all of the following
characteristics:
    Little or on evidence of topic development, organization, and/or detail.
    Little awareness of the audience of the writing task.
    Errors in surface features that prevent the reader from understanding the writer’s message.


                                            Stage 2 - The Developing Writer
       Writing samples produced by students at this stage exhibit most or all of the following characteristics:
      A topic that is beginning to be developed.
      The beginning or an organizational plan.
      Limited awareness of the audience and / or the task.
      Simple words choice and simple sentence patterns.
      Errors in surface features that interfere with communication.


                                              Stage 3 - The Focusing Writer
       Writing samples produced by students at this stage exhibit most or all of the following characteristics:
      A clear topic although development of the topic is incomplete.
      An apparent plan with loosely organized ideas.
      A sense of audience and / or task.
      Minimal variety of vocabulary and of sentence patterns.
      Errors in surface features that interrupted the flow of communication.
                                      Stage 4 - The Experimenting Writer
    Writing samples produced by students at this stage exhibit most or all of the following characteristics:
   A clear and developed topic although the development many be uneven.
   A clear plan with a beginning, middle, and end. The beginning and / or ending may be clumsy.
   Evidence of writing for an audience.
   Evidence of experimentation with language and sentence patterns.
   Word combinations and word choice may be novel.
   Errors in surface features that may interrupt the flow of communication.

                                         Stage 5 - The Engaging Writer
    Writing samples produced by students at this stage exhibit most or all of the following characteristics:
   A topic that is well developed.
   A plan with a clear beginning, middles, and end. Organization that sustains the writer’s purpose.
   Audience awareness techniques that engage the reader.
   Effective use of varied language and sentence patterns.
   Errors in surface features that do not interfere with the reader’s understand of the writer’s message.


                                          State 6 - The Extending Writer
    Writing samples produced by students at this stage exhibit most or all of the following characteristics:
   A topic that is fully elaborated with rich details.
   Organization that sustains the writer’s purpose and moves the reader through the piece.
   Audience awareness techniques that engage and sustain the reader’s interest.
   Effective use of varied sentence patters.
   Creative and novel language.
   Errors in surface features that do not interfere with the reader’s understanding of the writer’s message.

								
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