Institutional Innovation Circular XX by liaoqinmei

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									                                                                                                          JISC Circular 07/08
                                                                              http://www.jisc.ac.uk/fundingopportunities.aspx

JISC Circular 07/08: Full Text
JISC Institutional Innovation Programme: Call for Projects
22 May 2008


Sent To:                  Heads of Higher Education Institutions funded by HEFCE and
                          HEFCW
                          Heads of Further Education Institutions in England which teach
                          higher education to more than 400 FTEs
Of Interest To:           Pro Vice Chancellors for (e)Learning and (e)Research
                          Directors of Information Services and Systems
                          Directors of Library Services
                          Heads of Estates
                          Academic Registrars and Secretaries
                          Human Resources Managers
                          Learning Resource Managers, Librarians and Archivists
                          Principal Investigators in Research Teams
                          Learning Technologists
                          Heads of e-Learning and ILT Managers


Introduction
                                                            1
     1.     The Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) invites institutions to submit funding proposals for
            projects to undertake work in the following areas under its Institutional Innovation programme.
Call       Description                                              Funds

                                                                    Total funds: £400,000
           Synthesis, project support, and support for
I          benefits realisation activities (see Appendix B          One project
           for the details)
                                                                    Up to 30 months‟ duration

           Projects to develop exemplar technology and              Total funds: £6,000,000
           practice solutions to large-scale institutional
           problems (in the areas of institutional ICT              Twenty projects
II
           concern expanded in the briefing paper at                £200,000 - £300,000 available per project
           Appendix A and summarised in detail at
           Appendix C)                                              Eighteen months‟ duration

     2.     The deadline for receipt of proposals in response to this call is 12:00 noon on 17 July 2008.
     3.     Funding is available for projects starting from September 2008 for up to 30 months for the synthesis
            and support project (subject to confirmation of the final year of funding after 18 months) and 18
            months for large-scale exemplar projects. The synthesis and support project must complete by 31
            March 2011 and large-scale exemplars must complete by 31 March 2010.
     4.     JISC will provide an online Question and Answer (Q&A) surgery and maintain a list of Frequently
            Asked Questions to enable potential bidders to ask questions of JISC Executive staff, and to provide
            further information about the background to the call, its objectives and the bidding process. Potential
            bidders are invited to submit any questions at the online surgery, which will be available at
            http://institutional.jiscinvolve.org/ between 2 and 6 June 2008.




1
    Further information on JISC is available at: http://www.jisc.ac.uk


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Eligibility
    5.   Proposals may be submitted by Higher Education (HE) Institutions funded by HEFCE or HEFCW.
         FE institutions in England that teach HE to more than 400 FTEs are also eligible to bid provided
         proposals demonstrate work that supports the HE in FE agenda.
    6.   Bids involving Welsh institutions should address one or more of the priorities outlined in „One
                2
         Wales‟ , the Welsh Assembly Government's progressive agenda for Wales. Specifically, proposals
         are welcomed that seek to
                  address maximisation of the economic, social and cultural impact of universities on learners
                   and on the wider community;
                  broaden the range of learning opportunities;
                  respond to the needs of students and employers, and tackle poverty and disadvantage;
                  widen participation in higher education;
                  encourage collaboration with other educational institutions to widen opportunities;
                  respond to the needs of Welsh medium/bilingual learners.
    7.   Proposals may be from single institutions or consortia. Partnership arrangements may be developed
         outside the sector (for example with research council sites, publishers, commercial suppliers), but
         the lead partner must meet the criteria outlined above. Funds can only be allocated through the lead
         partner.
    8.   FE and HE institutions in Northern Ireland and Scotland are not eligible to bid but may be involved
         as partners in proposals led by HE institutions funded by HEFCE or HEFCW or FE institutions which
         meet the criteria outlined above.


Background
    9.   JISC supports higher and further education by providing strategic guidance, advice and
         opportunities to use Information and Communications Technology (ICT) to support research,
         teaching, learning and administration. JISC is funded by all the UK post-16 and higher education
         funding councils.
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    10. JISC‟s Strategy 2007-2009 sets out how its work will support the changing needs of institutions in
        meeting wider national priorities and the challenges of technological advance. In particular, JISC‟s
        fourth strategic aim promotes, “the development, uptake and effective use of ICT within institutions
        and in support of their management”.
    11. For many years JISC has been working with institutions to support their needs and help them
        innovate through services, programmes and other activities. The institutional context is of vital
        importance for the outputs that JISC develops at a national level, or for a specific education /
        research requirement, in order that their benefits can be fully realised by the wider sector. In this
        respect, JISC‟s aim is to support both the strategic direction of institutions within a context of
        pervasive ICT, and assist them in effectively utilising technology to improve the effectiveness,
        efficiency and quality of their core processes – namely education and research – and their
        supporting administrative processes (including those dedicated to student support activities).
    12. In the current technical climate, there is an increasing use of coordinated and centralised ICT
        services. Through the Institutional Innovation programme, JISC intends to build on its core services,
        programmes and other activities to continue to deliver considerable value to institutions by
        addressing their key areas of ICT concern (see the supporting briefing paper, available at Appendix
        A).




2
  One Wales: A progressive agenda for the government of Wales
http://new.wales.gov.uk/about/strategy/strategypublications/strategypubs/onewales/?lang=en
3
  JISC Strategy 2007-2009 http://www.jisc.ac.uk/strategy0709


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The Institutional Innovation Programme
   13. The Institutional Innovation programme represents a £13.08m investment (over four years) aimed at
       supporting existing institutional strategies by providing solutions to institution-wide problems, based
       upon proven practices, technologies, standards and services. The solutions will act as exemplars to
       other institutions by demonstrating innovation and good practice, and building knowledge and
       experience, which can be shared across institutions.
   14. In this context, the problems are typically cross-departmental and cross-domain in nature (i.e. they
       are manifest across the traditional domain areas of teaching, learning and research), reflecting areas
       of ICT concern that affect people, processes and the use of technology across an institution (or
       institutions, in a cross-institutional partnership).
   15. For the purposes of this call:
              i.    Exploration includes activities with a remit to investigate, examine and explore possibilities,
                    such as prototypes and pilots.
              ii.   Prototyping demonstrates the applicability of a concept „outside the lab‟ and should
                    constitute something that external users (within a community) can trial even if they are not
                    production-ready and/or can only cope with small-scale implementations. The prototype
                    should be something that is able to adequately demonstrate that it is worthwhile to move
                    towards the larger scale piloting with a broad institutional user community;
              iii. Piloting tests and evaluates the design, performance and potential use of technologies and
                   practices that have been explored in earlier stages of the project. A pilot is not necessarily
                   designed to be for long-term use or benefit to the institution or community hosting it, the aim
                   is to gather lessons on its use and evaluate it in a live environment with real users. The
                   outputs from this activity may feed back into further iterations of prototype activity within the
                   project lifecycle, provide decision-making information on whether to initiate development
                   activity to create an appropriate service, infrastructure, standard or application, or to provide
                   source material for advice and guidance to the community.
              iv. Exemplar projects are considered to be those that develop a solution to a well-recognised
                  institutional problem. They must be able to be disseminated to the wider sector as an
                  example of current best practice in the application of existing technology. This call is not
                  simply seeking proposals to develop proof-of-concept demonstrators. Projects will be
                  expected to support existing institutional strategic commitments and develop systems
                  planning and integration solutions that extend, enhance, and/or enrich institutional
                  capabilities, and do so through the application of service oriented and open standards based
                  approaches. The issues addressed by the projects, and the context in which they operate,
                  must be relevant outside of the originating institution(s), and the solution(s) must be of
                  interest and transferable to the wider sector.
                    Projects must not just investigate but instead implement technology, processes / practices,
                    and standards that address their institutions‟ problem(s). It is key that the project aligns with
                    relevant institutional strategies and provides long term sustainable benefit to the
                    institution(s).
              v.    Benefits realisation refers to the validation, transfer to non-native institutional contexts, and
                    building upon of outputs developed by innovation projects in order to embed them in their
                    intended (and other) communities, thereby helping to ensure that they are useful, usable
                    and used by users. Benefits realisation activities may be designed to realise benefits within
                    the original target stakeholder group (though outside the originating institution) of the
                    innovation project to which they are „anchored‟, or they may intend to affect change in
                    another stakeholder community entirely (because the outputs and benefits are seen as
                    directly relevant, applicable, and transferable to a different context). NB Benefits realisation
                    activities should supplement, and not replace or negate the need for, the originating
                    project‟s own „local‟ benefits realisation activities.




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    16. The programme began with a call in the April 2007 Circular 01/07 for large-scale (£250,000 -
        £300,000) exemplar projects that addressed key areas of institutional ICT concern such as
        institution-wide systems integration (including with emergent technologies), the alignment of
        technology with institutional strategies, e-administration, security and access management, and
        environmentally sustainable ICT. This resulted in the funding of the following first round of projects:
                                                                5
              i.     Low Carbon ICT (University of Oxford) which aims to reduce the University of Oxford‟s
                     carbon footprint that results from the operation of its ICT infrastructure. Facilities will be
                     created and rolled out across departments and colleges which enable end-users, research
                     projects, and system administrators to turn computers off when not needed, and
                     automatically back on when they are required. Virtualisation services will also be developed
                     to help reduce the total number of CPUs necessary to run the University services, hence
                     saving power for running costs and reducing the number of physical machines required to
                     be purchased;.
                                                                                     6
              ii.    Location Independent Working (University of Coventry) which is developing an existing
                     scheme operating within the University‟s wholly-owned commercial company (CUE Ltd.) to
                     make it suitable for a wider range of staff across the institution. The project aims to align the
                     cultural change necessary at individual, departmental and institutional levels with the
                     application of tried and tested technologies to develop a production-ready quality e-working
                     scheme for staff;
              iii.   FLAME – Federated Local Access Management Environment (London School of
                                   7
                     Economics) will install production-scale services for institutional Devolved Authority
                     Management and Attribute Release Policy control, and a facility for ad-hoc Virtual
                     Organisation Management. These services will be supported by an Enterprise Directory
                     (being implemented by the London School of Economics (LSE) independently of this
                     project) and be integrated with a number of key target applications (including VLE and
                     Institutional Repository);
                                                                                                                8
              iv.    EdSpace – An Educationally Focussed Repository (University of Southampton) aims
                     to be a central part of the institution‟s educational infrastructure as envisaged in its recently
                     implemented e-Learning Strategy, which focuses on enabling student-centred research-led
                     learning, inclusivity and employability. It will be a social site allowing staff and students to
                     share resources, providing metadata, tagging, and semantic mark-up of stored items. A
                     range of local and external tools will access the repository using services interfaces. Users
                     will be allowed to annotate items according to an educational ontology or according to other
                     metadata schemas, to set the access policies which will apply to items, and to create and
                     access versions of items;
              v.     ITS 4 SEA - Integrating Thin-client Systems for Secure E-Assessment (University of
                                9
                     Bradford) aims to deliver effective and efficient summative e-assessment in a flexible,
                     secure, and accessible way to learners. The project will use thin client (Sun Ray) technology
                     linked with smart card identification to implement a new, flexible, personalisable and
                     scalable system for summative e-assessment. This system will be developed to have secure
                     integration with other key institutional systems (e.g. student records, module registration,
                     and examination scheduling), deliver standard network services and aspects of formative
                     assessment when not in use for summative purposes, provide a personal assessment
                     experience to learners, and be more accessible for disabled students.
    17. Each of these projects, which began in the Autumn of 2007 and will complete in March 2009, aims to
        provide exemplar resources that can show how the impact of technology in its particular area of ICT
        concern can benefit stakeholders within any institution with similar requirements, from academic,



4
  Institutional Exemplars Round 1 call
http://jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/capital/circular0107/appendix_g_0107_institutional_exemplars_call_final.doc
5
  Low Carbon ICT project website http://wiki.oucs.ox.ac.uk/ltg-public/Low_Carbon_ICT_Project
6
  Location Independent Working project website http://e-learning.coventry.ac.uk/LIW/
7
  FLAME project website https://gabriel.lse.ac.uk/twiki/bin/view/Projects/Flame/JiscWebInfopage
8
  EdSpace project website http://www.ecs.soton.ac.uk/research/projects/EdSpace
9
  ITS 4 SEA project website http://www.brad.ac.uk/lss/jisc/


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          administrative management, and student perspectives. Further information (including links to project
                                                                                                10
          web pages and workplans) can be found on the JISC Institutional Exemplars web page .
     18. This call represents a second round of funding for large-scale exemplar projects to address
         problems in further areas of institutional ICT concern (Call II), alongside funding for a single project
         to provide programme-level synthesis, project support, and support for a community of small
                                      11
         benefits realisation projects ).


Context
     19. Institutional innovation projects are aimed at supporting existing institutional strategies by providing
         solutions to institution-wide problems, based upon proven practices, technologies, standards and
         services (see the supporting briefing paper at Appendix A and the detail of Call II for institutional
         exemplar projects at Appendix C for further information on institutional problem areas). These
         projects therefore require the active support of senior leadership within institutions (e.g. Head of
         Department, Registrar, or Pro-Vice Chancellor) in order to ensure that institutional issues are being
         successfully addressed, and that the project maintains relevance to institutional strategies.
     20. The call focuses on institution-wide problem areas that have been identified in consultation since
                                                                                                  12
         2007 with a range of professional organisations that support the sector, such as UCISA ,
                   13        14     15     16                17
         SCONUL , AHUA , AUA , ALT and AoC NILTA , and informed by initiatives such as the
         Leadership Foundation, HEA e-Learning Benchmarking and Pathfinder projects, and the
         experiences of the Scottish Funding Council e-Learning Transformation projects, as well as the first
         round of Institutional Exemplar projects funded by JISC under Circular 01/07.
     21. JISC recognises that, like institutions, its activities have sometimes tended to be constrained by
         programme themes and departmental boundaries. However, there is a need to address these
         whole-institution problem areas from a perspective that crosses the programme themes – and
                                                                                   18
         department domains – of JISC‟s traditional focus (see Figure 1, below) to allow institutions to
         follow their own strategic drivers.




10
   Institutional Exemplars web page http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/programme_exemplars
11
   JISC anticipates issuing a call for benefits realisation projects in September 2008, with activities commencing from
January 2009. That phase of the programme is designed to build upon and embed the outputs of both the Round 1
Institutional Exemplar projects funded under Circular 01/07, the institutional exemplar projects funded under Call II in this
circular, and future Institutional Innovation projects covering areas such as work-based learning and employer
engagement (also anticipated to be called for in September 2008, commencing in January 2009).
12
   Universities and Colleges Information Systems Association http://www.ucisa.ac.uk/
13
   Society of College, National and University Libraries http://www.sconul.ac.uk/
14
   Association of Heads of University Administration http://www.ahua.ac.uk/
15
   Association of University Administrators http://www.aua.ac.uk/
16
   Association for Learning Technology http://www.alt.ac.uk/
17
   Association of Colleges National Information and Learning Technologies Association http://www.aocnilta.co.uk/
18
   For information on JISC‟s core themes of work, see http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/themes


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                                Figure 1 – The areas of activity in which JISC is involved


Programme Scope
     22. The intended outcomes from the Institutional Innovation programme include:
                  Improvements to the efficiency, effectiveness and quality of educational and administrative
                   processes within the institution(s) related to key areas of institutional ICT concern, outlined
                   in the briefing paper available at Appendix A;
                  Institutionally-sustainable technological solutions to problems in key areas of ICT concern
                   (see the briefing paper at Appendix A), that are aligned to relevant institutional strategies
                   and combine the open standards based and service oriented approaches of the e-
                                                             19
                   Framework for Education and Research ;
                  Enhanced community networks, working with regional and national, sector-wide
                   organisations (see programme team for details) that will encourage institutions to share
                   practice in key areas of institutional ICT concern;
                  Improved leadership to the sector in the role that technology can play in developing
                   effective institutional strategies that address key areas of ICT concern and align ICT with
                   education, research and administrative policies;
                  Enhanced capacity, knowledge and skills within the institution(s) and, for the wider sector,
                   access to strategic advice, demonstrators and detailed guidance on how to use ICT
                   effectively in key areas of institutional ICT concern.



19
   See http://www.e-framework.org/ for details of the international e-Framework initiative and
http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/programme_eframework for details of the JISC e-Framework programme.


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   23. In addition, the projects will enable JISC to:
                   Gain knowledge and experience of key areas of institutional ICT concern from which
                    informed decisions on future technical innovation projects can be made;
                   Provide guidance to the sector on „good practice‟ models for using technology to deliver
                    institution-wide, cross-domain improvements in effectiveness and efficiency that can be
                    used at departmental, institutional, regional or national levels.
   24. The range of desired outputs from each strand of projects (i.e. under Call I and Call II) is outlined in
       the relevant Deliverables sections (see Appendices B and C).
   25. This circular invites proposals for
              i.    Call I. A single synthesis and support project, which will also support an anticipated
                    community of small benefits realisation projects;
              ii.   Call II. Large-scale institutional exemplar projects in the following key areas of institutional
                    ICT concern:
                            a. Support for learners, teachers and researchers using emergent personal
                               technologies and social software;
                            b. Improvements to institutions‟ environmental sustainability through green
                               computing;
                            c.   Effective planning for and use of future learning spaces and other estates assets,
                                 making the most appropriate use of ICT;
                            d. e-Administration.
   26. Further information on the scope of benefits realisation activities anticipated under the September
       2008 Institutional Innovation circular is given in the detail of Call I (see Appendix B). Further
       information on the areas of ICT concern, and the guiding principles that should underpin innovation
       activities in this programme, can be found in the Key areas of Institutional Concern section of a
       revised Institutional Innovation briefing paper (available at Appendix A) and the Terms of Reference
       and Deliverables sections of Call II (see Appendix C).


Evaluation Criteria
   27. Proposals will be evaluated according to criteria in the table included at Appendix D.


Structure of Proposals
   28. The content of the proposal should reflect the evaluation criteria as set out in Appendix D. To assist
       in the assessment of all proposals against a common baseline, proposals should be structured as
       follows:
              i.    Cover Sheet – all proposals must include a completed cover sheet (see Appendix G). The
                    completed cover sheet will not count towards the page limit.
              ii.   Freedom of Information (FOI ) Act Tick List – all proposals must include a FOI Withheld
                    Information Form, indicating which sections of the bid you would like JISC to consider
                    withholding in response to a freedom of information request or if your bid is successful and
                    your project proposal is made available on JISC‟s website. This can be found in Appendix H
                    of this document. The FOI form will not count towards the page limit.
              iii. Appropriateness and Fit to Programme Objectives and Overall Value to the JISC
                   Community – this section should demonstrate how the bid addresses the issues and
                   demands outlined in the call, and shows innovation as appropriate; and the extent to which
                   the project outcomes will be of overall value to the JISC community. Within their proposal,
                   bidders should:
                            Clearly articulate the institutional business case for the project and alignment with
                             relevant institutional strategies;


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                            Demonstrate that the project will build on an activity with existing institutional
                             strategic commitment, and take it further. Specifically, proposals should provide
                             evidence that their institution(s) is/are committed to, and can do, what‟s being
                             proposed. It may be that the activity is already taking place in a limited way, but
                             that JISC funding would enable it to be taken further and/or made more relevant to
                             other institutions in the wider sector;
                            Provide lists of practice, standards, technologies, etc. that are ready to use, and
                             JISC Services and Innovation programme outputs that are intended to be
                             incorporated into the context of what the project is proposing to do.
               iv. Quality of Proposal and Robustness of Workplan – a description of the intended project
                   plan, timetable and deliverables, project management arrangements, risks, IPR position,
                   and sustainability issues. Recruitment should be properly addressed in the bid. Do not
                   underestimate the amount of time it takes to set up and establish a project and undertake
                   any necessary staff recruitment.
               v.   Engagement with the Community – a description of how project stakeholders and
                    practitioners (if appropriate) will be engaged throughout the project and an overview of the
                    dissemination and evaluation mechanisms that are envisaged for the project. This should
                    also address mechanisms by which the project proposes to engage with other Institutional
                    Innovation projects, and the synthesis and support project (for example, maintenance of
                    online platforms which can be accessed and harvested, availability of project personnel to
                    partake in online and face-to-face community activities). Any stakeholder mapping and/or
                    user needs analysis will strengthen this section of the bid. Proposals should also ensure
                    there is scope for working in partnership with JISC in dissemination and evaluation activities,
                    and in making available the outputs of the project beyond the JISC funding period. Further
                    guidance on JISC‟s expectations with regard to stakeholder engagement, evaluation and
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                    dissemination can be found in Section III of JISC‟s Project Management Guidelines .
               vi. Budget – a summary of the proposed budget, which in broad outline identifies how funds
                   will be spent over the life of the project. The budget should be broken down across financial
                   years (April –March) or parts thereof and should include itemised staff costs, any equipment
                   and consumables, travel and subsistence, dissemination, evaluation, and any other direct
                   costs required. All costs must be justified. Transparent Approach to Costing (TRAC)
                   methodology must be used to calculate costs in bids from UK HE institutions. An Example
                   Budget and guidance on the budgetary terms used can be found in Appendix E to this
                   document. Bidders should provide a summary of the qualitative, and any quantitative,
                   benefits the lead institution and any project partners as a whole expect to receive from the
                   project in order to inform the funding to be requested from JISC and the costs being borne
                   by the host institution and any project partners. Institutional contributions should be
                   determined by taking into account the benefits to the lead institution and any project
                   partners.
               vii. Previous Experience of the Project Team – names and brief career details of staff
                    expected to contribute to / be seconded to the project, including qualifications and
                    experience in the area of work proposed, linking the expertise to the roles required within
                    the project, and evidence of any projects of similar nature successfully completed. Clearly
                    indicate when posts will need to be advertised. Do not underestimate the problems in
                    recruiting suitable staff to work on the project. Staff with suitable qualifications in areas
                    where the JISC is interested can be in short supply or expensive. You should provide
                    contingency plans in the event that you experience problems with recruitment.
               viii. Supporting Letter(s) – a copy of the letter(s) of support from a senior representative of the
                     institution and any project partners. The supporting letter(s) will not count towards the page
                     limit and should NOT be sent under separate cover. The address to include on letters
                     should be JISC, Northavon House, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol, BS16 1QD. It is not
                     necessary to address the letter to a particular contact within the JISC Executive.




20
     JISC’s Project Management Guidelines http://www.jisc.ac.uk/proj_manguide


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Risk Assessment
     29. All projects have an element of risk. Even in the best-planned projects there are uncertainties, and
         unexpected events can occur. A risk can be defined as:
               “The threat or possibility that an action or event will adversely or beneficially affect the ability to
               achieve objectives.”
     30. A risk analysis when putting together a bid will help you predict the risks that could prevent a project
         from delivering on time or even failing. It will also help you to manage the risks should they occur.
         Consideration should be given not only to threats that could lead to failure to deliver objectives (as
         has already happened) but also to consider opportunities (constructive events) which if exploited
         could improve the way of achieving objectives.
     31. A risk analysis addresses the following questions:
                   What could possibly happen?
                   What is the likelihood of it happening?
                   How will it affect the project?
                   What can be done about it?
     32. Further guidance on Risk Assessments can be found in Section III, paragraph 7 of the Project
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         Management Guidelines. JISC infoNet also hosts an InfoKit on Risk Management . It explains what
         risks are, how to do a risk analysis, and how to manage risks during a project.


Costing and Pricing a Bid
     33. JISC development projects are funded in UK higher education institutions on the basis of full
         economic costs. Bids from these institutions should therefore be constructed on a full economic cost
         (fEC) basis using the TRAC methodology. An example budget for bidders to use can be found in
         Appendix E.
     34. Other institutions submitting bids should use their usual costing and pricing practices but all costs
         should be clear and transparent, clarifying the number of days each individual working on the activity
         will provide, in order to assist the evaluators in determining the value for money of the proposal.
     35. The bid should indicate the contribution to the project being sought from JISC and the intended
         contribution from the lead institution and any project partners. The funding levels outlined in this call
         are the maximum that JISC will provide towards the total cost of a project; institutional contributions
         are additional. Where a bid involves partners from outside UK HE, such as English FE or a
         commercial company, the partners should cost their activities using current costing practice in their
         college or organisation and clearly identify partner contributions.
     36. When assessing proposals, JISC will take into consideration the reasonableness of the total cost of
         the project and the institutional contributions. It is important to JISC that HE institutions are costing
         proposals accurately and seeking the appropriate level of support from us, so that they are not over-
         committed, and hence are ensuring the long-term availability of their activities. However, JISC also
         needs to ensure consistency of treatment, and that it is using its funding effectively across all
         proposals.
     37. Through the funding provided to projects there will clearly be sector-wide benefits. However, there
         may also be benefits to the lead institution and any project partners (e.g. prestige/kudos, academic
         synergy, and financial benefits) in delivering the individual projects. Bidders should provide a
         summary of the qualitative and quantitative benefits the lead institution and any project partners as a
         whole expect to receive from the project. JISC expects these benefits to be taken into account when
         considering the funding requested from JISC. The nature of institutional contributions should be
         clearly identified (e.g. whether they are direct or indirect contributions or a mixture of both) by
         providing a breakdown using the example table provided in Appendix E. JISC reserves the right to
         ask additional questions about the budget prior to agreeing any funding for a project.


21
     JISC infoKit on Risk Management http://www.jiscinfonet.ac.uk/InfoKits/risk-management


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     38. Further guidance on fEC for JISC-funded research and development projects can be found at:
         http://www.jisc.ac.uk/fundingopportunities/bidguide/full_economic_costing.aspx
           For more information about TRAC, see the HEFCE web site at: http://www.hefce.ac.uk/finance/costing/.
           The consolidated TRAC Guidance can be found at http://www.jcpsg.ac.uk/guidance/.


Freedom of Information
     39. JISC is subject to the Freedom of Information (FOI) Act 2000. Therefore potential bidders should be
         aware that information submitted by them to JISC during this tender process, and throughout the life
         of any project subsequently funded, may be disclosed upon receipt of a valid request.
     40. JISC will not disclose any information received during this tender process whilst the evaluation of the
         bids received is still underway. The evaluation process is still deemed to be active until such time as
         all grant letters to successful projects have been sent out.
     41. It is JISC policy to make the content of any bid funded by JISC through this call publicly available via
         the JISC web site shortly after funding has been awarded. Unsuccessful bids will be destroyed one
         month after the lead institution has been notified that their bid was not successful. However, it
         should be noted that the contents of unsuccessful bids may be disclosed should JISC receive a
         relevant FOI request prior to destruction taking place.


Terms and Conditions of Grant
     42. JISC will oversee and monitor the progress of projects. All projects will be expected to follow JISC‟s
         Generic Terms and Conditions of Grant. A copy of this is attached at Appendix F to this document. It
         is the bidders‟ responsibility to read this.
                                                                                          22
     43. All projects will be managed following JISC project management guidance . These guidelines may
         also be of use to bidders when putting together a project proposal.
     44. It is intended that the deliverables created as part of this programme will, as appropriate, be
         deployed by JISC as part of a long-term strategy for providing access to community resources, and
         where this is possible, arrangements for archiving of deliverables will be set in place. However,
         wherever possible, projects will be encouraged to set in place mechanisms to ensure the continued
         availability and currency of deliverables after funding has ended. In the majority of cases JISC will
         not be able to commit to the long-term delivery or maintenance of project outputs after the end of the
         programme, though guidance will be given about any opportunities for continuation funding and
         embedding within institutions.


Intellectual Property Rights
     45. As a general rule, JISC does not seek to retain IPR in the project deliverables created as part of its
         programmes. However, funding is always made available on the condition that project outputs are
         made available, free at the point of use, to the UK HE and FE community in perpetuity, and that
         these may be disseminated widely in partnership with JISC. Where JISC is funding the creation of a
         national service for the community, there may be a need for HEFCE, on behalf of JISC‟s funding
         partners, to retain ownership of certain rights in order to maintain flexibility of future provision and
         availability of the service.
     46. For outputs, such as reports or model strategies, a non-exclusive licence allowing JISC or its
         representatives to utilise, archive and disseminate the work will be required.


Open Access
     47. JISC supports unrestricted access to the published output of publicly-funded research and wishes to
         encourage open access to research outputs to ensure that the fruits of UK research are made more
         widely available. JISC firmly believes in the value of repositories as a means of improving access to


22
     JISC project management guidelines http://www.jisc.ac.uk/proj_manguide


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           the results of publicly-funded research and is investing significantly in this area. In future, JISC
           expects that the full text of all published research papers and conference proceedings arising from
           JISC-funded work should be deposited in an open access institutional repository, or if that is not
                                  23
           available, The Depot or a subject repository. Deposit should include biographical metadata relating
           to such articles, and should be completed within six months of the publication date of the paper.
           Further details are provided in JISC‟s Terms of Conditions of Grant (see Appendix F).


Submitting a Bid
     48. A guide to bidding for JISC projects can be found at: http://www.jisc.ac.uk/bidguide
     49. The deadline for receipt of submissions is 12:00 noon on 17 July 2008. Late proposals will NOT be
         accepted. It is the responsibility of the bidder to ensure that the proposal has arrived by the deadline
         stated. The JISC Executive will strictly adhere to this policy. There will be no appeals process for
         late bids. In light of this, it is recommended that bidders plan to submit proposals several days
         before the deadline in case of any technical difficulties or other extenuating circumstances.
     50. Proposals should NOT exceed ten single-sides of A4 pages and should be typeset in Arial or a
         similar font at 10-point size. All key information as outlined in the guidance on structure of proposals
         MUST be included within the ten-page limit unless otherwise indicated. Any bids exceeding the
         ten-page limit for key information will be rejected by the Executive prior to the evaluation
         stage.
     51. Proposals MUST:
                   Include a completed cover sheet (see Appendix G);
                   Include a completed FOI Withheld Information Form (see Appendix H);
                   Be accompanied by a letter(s) of support from an authorised senior manager at the lead
                    institution and from any partner institutions.
     52. An electronic copy of the proposal should be sent in PDF format by this deadline. This is an
         electronic-only submission process, therefore all documentation (including letters of support) must
         be submitted in PDF format, as a single file and in a zipped folder if the size of the file exceeds
         10Mb (note: any files exceeding 10Mb are likely to be returned by the mail server).
     53. Bidders must ensure their proposals have paragraph and section numbers in case of any queries or
         FOI requests. No additional security settings should be activated for PDFs to allow JISC to redact
         information if necessary prior to any release under FOI.
     54. All proposals must complete the FOI Withheld Information Form (see Appendix H) indicating those
         sections or paragraphs of your proposal which you believe should be exempt from disclosure under
         the Freedom of Information Act. It should be noted that whilst JISC will actively consider withholding
         any of the information indicated within this appendix, it is ultimately JISC‟s decision (as the holder of
         the information) and JISC may not be able to uphold such decisions in all cases. JISC will consult
         with the lead institution prior to the release of any information listed in the FOI Withheld Information
         Form.
     55. The types of information which may be considered exempt from disclosure include (but may not
         necessarily be limited to):
                   Information, which if disclosed, would materially damage the commercial interests of the
                    institution or its partners;
                   Information, which if disclosed, would break the principles of the Data Protection Act 1998.
     56. Bidders are encouraged to consult with their institutional FOI officer for further information if
         required. Failure to fill in or submit this information will be construed as consent for disclosure and/or
         publication on JISC‟s website should your bid be successful.
     57. Bids in response to this call for projects should be sent to JOS-CIRCULAR@JISC.AC.UK
     58. All bids should include the name of the lead institution in the subject line of the email. It is the
         responsibility of the bidder to ensure that the bid is sent to the correct email address. Bidders will

23
     The Depot http:/depot.edina.ac.uk


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         receive an automatic confirmation of receipt of any proposal sent to the relevant email address. The
         email address should not be used for general enquiries.
   59. Bidders submitting more than one bid in response to this call must submit these in separate
       messages to the relevant email address(es).
   60. If no automatic confirmation is received, it is the responsibility of the bidder to contact JISC within
       one day of submitting the bid to confirm whether the proposal has been received. In case of any
       dispute about the submission of proposals, it is the responsibility of the bidder to provide evidence
       that the proposal was emailed to the correct address prior to the deadline.


Evaluation Process
   61. A selection panel will be established to review the bids received. JISC‟s procedure for evaluating
       bids can be found at: http://www.jisc.ac.uk/bideval
   62. JISC will endeavour to notify successful bidders by 22 August 2008. Projects should commence
       from September 2008. The synthesis and support project must complete by 31 March 2011, and the
       large-scale exemplars must complete by 31 March 2010.
   63. JISC will expect to work with the selected projects to agree the workplan and to ensure that the
       project budget is appropriate and suitably profiled. It may be necessary to negotiate some aspects of
       the project objectives and content with the project teams in the interest of maximising the expected
       benefits of the programme as a whole. In particular, the synthesis and support project is
       strategically important to the success of the institutional Innovation programme as a whole and it is
       essential that the successful bidder works closely with JISC on a detailed workplan post-funding,
       and that the project is flexible enough to accommodate requirements that emerge as the programme
       develops. All projects must complete a detailed workplan within one month of the project starting.
   64. Notwithstanding the weightings of the evaluation criteria, proposals that fail badly on any one
       criterion may be rejected, and proposals showing exceptional strength in one or more areas with
       serious weaknesses in others may be funded. In making awards under this call, JISC will take into
       account the need for an appropriate, varied and affordable portfolio of projects and partners. It is not,
       therefore, necessarily the case that the projects with the highest raw scores will be those funded in
       all instances.
   65. JISC reserves the right not to commission the full amount of funding outlined in this call, and to issue
       a subsequent call to address any remaining work.


Checklist for Bid Submission
   66. When submitting your bid, we recommend you check the following points:
              i.    Have you completed the cover sheet from the relevant Appendix G?
              ii.   Have you paragraph- and section-numbered your proposal?
              iii. Have you completed the FOI Withheld Information Form (see Appendix H)?
              iv. Have you followed the bid format outlined?
              v.    Are you clear about the evaluation criteria on which your bid will be judged?
              vi. Have you looked at the Example Budget and guidance (Appendix E) to help you present
                  your costings?
              vii. Have you provided a summary of the qualitative and quantitative benefits the lead institution
                   and any project partners as a whole expect to receive from the project and clarified the
                   nature of the institutional contributions?
              viii. Have you read JISC‟s Generic Terms and Conditions of Grant (see Appendix F)?
              ix. Have you kept within the page limit for the main body of the proposal?
              x.    Have you included letters of support from the lead site and each project partner?
              xi. Is your bid in a single file and PDF format (including letters of support) and in a zipped folder
                  if the size of the file exceeds 10Mb with no additional security settings switched on?


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              xii. Are you aware of the email address to which you need to submit your bid and the need to
                   include the name of the lead institution in the subject line of the email?
              xiii. Are you aware of the deadline for submitting bids? (12:00 noon, 17 July 2008). Late bids
                    will not be accepted.


Further Information
   67. This call is supported by a briefing paper, available at Appendix A.
   68. All general enquiries regarding this appendix should be sent to Andy Dyson (email
       a.dyson@jisc.ac.uk).
   69. Any enquiries regarding the proposal submission process should be sent to Georgia Slade (email
       g.slade@jisc.ac.uk).
   70. JISC will provide an online Question and Answer (Q&A) surgery and maintain a list of Frequently
       Asked Questions to enable potential bidders to ask questions of JISC Executive staff, and to provide
       further information about the background to the call, its objectives and the bidding process. Potential
       bidders are invited to submit any questions at the online surgery, which will be available at
       http://institutional.jiscinvolve.org/ between 2 and 6 June 2008.


Appendices
Appendix A:        Institutional Innovation Briefing Paper
Appendix B:        Call I – Synthesis, project support, and support for benefits realisation
Appendix C:        Call II – Large-Scale Institutional Exemplars Projects
Appendix D:        Evaluation Criteria
Appendix E:        Example Budget for Tenders submitted by UK HEIs
Appendix F:        JISC’s Generic Terms and Conditions of Grant
Appendix G:        Cover Sheet for Bids
Appendix H:        FOI Withheld Information Form


NB: All appendices should be read in conjunction with the main body of JISC Circular 07/08 (this document).


JISC Executive
May 2008




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Appendix A
Institutional Innovation Briefing Paper


Supporting Information for Bidders
     A1. This briefing paper provides more detailed definitions of the „key areas of institutional ICT concern‟
         referred to throughout the circular.
     A2. It also outlines a range of current JISC activities, guiding principles and relevant technological
         approaches which should be considered as useful background material by bidders preparing
         proposals in response to either call.


Key areas of Institutional ICT Concern
     A3. The large-scale institutional exemplar projects (Call II) will work on solutions to institutional problems
         drawn from one or more of the following areas (i.e. proposals are not expected to respond to all the
         points outlined below, but should clearly articulate where and how their project would address
         relevant issues):
                                                                                           24
              i.    Support for learners, teachers and researchers using emergent               personal technologies and
                    social software;
              ii.   Improvements to institutions‟ environmental sustainability through green computing;
              iii. Effective planning for and use of future learning spaces and other estates assets, making
                   the most appropriate use of ICT and taking account of environmental sustainability factors;
              iv. e-Administration.


i) Support for learners, teachers and researchers using emergent personal technologies and social software
     A4. The growth of social software (personal blogs, Facebook, Flickr, and the like) and user-owned
         technologies (PDAs, mobile phones, iPods, smart phones, etc.), together with the familiarity that
         many users (students and staff alike) now have with self-service types of web based applications,
         has lead to new demands being placed on institutions to find ways to accommodate these emerging
         practices alongside their existing systems and established processes. NB Such considerations are
         also key to the third area of ICT concern covered by this briefing paper – that of effective planning
         for and use of future learning spaces and other estates assets, see paragraphs 13 to 15 below)
     A5. The introduction of these new technologies, and new user behaviours and expectations, is forcing
         institutions to ask questions as to whether, where, should and how they can be integrated and
         accommodated with their existing systems and practices, and also the extent to which such systems
         are already integrated and whether service oriented approaches (SOA) and the e-Framework (see
         the section on the e-Framework, later in this briefing paper) have a part to play in addressing the
         attendant issues and solving problems.
     A6. Questions are raised for the institutions around the ownership, control and responsibility for this
                                                                                    25
         opening up of data and systems in this way, where the “locus of control” now lies and whether,
         once located, this locus moves (and in which directions and why), and the implications of this for
         institutions‟ statutory responsibilities (such as Data Protection and accessibility). There are also


24
  See Next Generation, Emergent Technologies – Web 2.0 and Social Software in the Guiding Principles and
Approaches to be Employed section for a working definition of “emergent technologies” for the purposes of the
Institutional Innovation programme.
25
   The term Locus of Control has been borrowed from psychology theory, where it is used to describe where individuals
place control for events in their lives (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Locus_of_control). In this context it is used to
describe where control of, and responsibility for, an end-to-end service or activity (such as access to institutional data, or
personal learning) lies on a continuum from institutionally-controlled systems to user-owned and supplied technologies
and applications, and how this is placed to balance “control” (of data; of services; or workflow) against “reach” (in terms of
providing a rich experience for a diverse and dispersed user-base – i.e. providing access to institutional systems to users
„on their own terms‟ in order to improve service quality and indeed, where possible, efficiency and effectiveness).


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          questions about the possibility of the existence of a “single source of truth” and whether, given the
          growth in user-contributed data of all sorts, such a thing is possible – and if so, how this will be
          decided and by what processes data may be verified or graded as it flows from user to institution
          and back again.
     A7. JISC has been active in this area, through e-Learning projects demonstrating integration of user-
                                                                             26
         owned technology with institutionally-owned educational systems , the cross-domain pilots and
                                                                                    27
         demonstrators funded under the Users and Innovation (U&I) programme , and the more recent
                                                                 28
         Institutional Responses to Emergent Technology pilots under the e-Administration programme – all
         of which have sought to investigate the individual‟s and institutional aspects of emergent next-
         generation technologies from different perspectives and on different scales.
     A8. It is clear from this work, and from the interest shown by national membership organisations and
         their published lists of „Top Concerns‟, that there is considerable interest in the area of emergent
         technology integration. However, as yet it would appear that few institutions have made
         comprehensive efforts to bring these technologies into the mainstream; the driving forces in this area
         mainly coming from learning technologists and e-learning evangelists, and early adopters in
         research support.


ii) Improvements to institutions’ environmental sustainability through green computing
     A9. Universities and colleges are major users of ICT, and have opportunities to lower the environmental
         impact of that part of their activities. This encompasses not just the electricity consumed and the
         carbon produced by the use of the ICT, but the contribution that technology can make to more
         efficient use of the estate in reducing travel and improving productivity and in the environmental
         impact of the procurement and disposal of equipment (and so the factors to consider in relation to
         environmental sustainability are clearly also key to the third area of ICT concern covered by this
         briefing paper – that of effective planning for and use of future learning spaces and other estates
         assets, see paragraphs A13 to A15 below).
     A10. The importance of taking a holistic approach to environmental sustainability and the total
          environmental cost of ownership, and reducing the negative environmental impacts of education,
          research and institutional administration is fast becoming a key differentiator within the sector (and
          also rates highly in national membership organisations‟ published lists of „Top Concerns‟).
     A11. The JISC-funded Managing environmentally sustainable ICT in Further and Higher Education
                             29
          (SusteIT) project has found that sustainability is not yet embedded in ICT decision making and
          makes recommendations as to the desirability of bringing together functions such as Estates and
          energy managers with the ICT management to allow a holistic view to be taken of the true cost of
          the ICT activities of institutions. The Institutional Exemplar projects funded under the first round of
                                                                                                               30
          this programme are focusing on specific areas such as support for location independent working ,
                                                                                31
          energy saving through wake-on-LAN control of desktop computers and e-assessment delivered on
                                32
          thin client machines – indicating that in some areas this process has already begun.
     A12. For some institutions, sustainable development is incorporated into their strategies or mission.
          However, all institutions should consider how their proposals might make use of energy efficient
          technologies when supporting large-scale institutional initiatives. Projects should look for
          opportunities to share good practice and support the development of good practice where none



26
  JISC e-Learning Programme user-owned technology demonstrator strand
http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/programme_elearning_capital/el_tsle.aspx
27
   JISC Users and Innovation: Personalising Technologies programme
http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/programme_users_and_innovation.aspx
28
   Circular 01/08 Institutional responses to emergent technologies
http://www.jisc.ac.uk/fundingopportunities/funding_calls/2008/02/circular0108.aspx
29
   SusteIT http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/programme_jos/susteit.aspx
30
   Location Independent Working project page
http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/programme_exemplars/Project_LIW.aspx
31
   Low-Carbon ICT project page http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/programme_exemplars/Project_LCICT.aspx
32
   ITS 4 SEA project website http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/programme_exemplars/Project_ITS4SEA.aspx


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          exists, and support more sustainable behaviour (such as low-environmental impact ways of working
          through virtual organisations, online collaborative environments, and changing work patterns, etc.).


iii) Effective planning for and use of future learning spaces and other estates assets
                                                                                                  st
     A13. The 2006 JISC publication Designing Spaces for Effective Learning (A guide to 21 century learning
                        33
          space design) identified that increasing investment in estate and learning technologies, combined
          with the need for more cost-effective space utilisation, is making it increasingly important for senior
          managers and decision-makers to keep abreast of new thinking about the design of technology-rich
          learning spaces. Many institutions are investing in large estates projects and there is a need for
          guidance to ensure they are appropriately designed to meet future expectations.
     A14. An institution‟s estates portfolio extends beyond just its traditional teaching and learning
          environment, to include libraries, student accommodation, and staff office space, for example.
          Institutions are striving to ensure that new physical spaces are designed and built, and existing ones
          re-fitted, to meet the current and anticipated future needs of all their stakeholders and services,
          taking account of a range of issues relating to technology, environmental and social factors, such as
                  changing ways in which libraries are accessed and incorporated into the innovative and
                   emergent usage patterns – the availability of electronic resources and remote access;
                  the growth in use of mobile devices, increased expectation of delivery through user-owned
                   devices, and higher levels of student computer ownership;
                  responses to flexible working needs – ubiquitous wireless networking, plentiful laptop
                   charging points, touch-down and hot-desking areas, etc;
                  intelligent buildings – that is, buildings that are equipped to be easier to manage and that
                   perhaps take note of usage patterns or timetable information to manage the servicing and
                   heating and maintenance of physical spaces.
                                                                       34
     A15. The Association of University Directors of Estates (AUDE) is already active in the area of
                                                                                                        35
          environmentally responsible development, as the interest in the Green Gown Awards 2008 is
          testament to. The awards are organised by the Higher Education Environmental Performance
                                36
          Improvement (HEEPI) project in collaboration with the AUDE, the British University Finance
                                     37                                                                      38
          Directors Group (BUFDG) , the Environmental Association for Universities and Colleges (EAUC) ,
                                39
          Universities UK (UUK) and other sector associations in recognition of innovative actions in
          categories covering sustainable construction, energy and water efficiency, and student residences
          (along with those covering courses, social responsibility, student initiatives, continuous improvement
          and overall awards for colleges and smaller Institutions).


iv) e-Administration
     A16. e-Administration can be defined as the managed approach to the coordination and effective control
                                                                              40
          of business processes and the electronic information they create . As such, it has two fundamental
          objectives: to increase the efficiency, effectiveness and quality of administrative processes within
          institutions, and to lessen the administrative burden faced by all staff whilst achieving this – thereby
          allowing them to make a greater contribution to their institution‟s core business (of education and
          research). Some of the issues related to effective e-administration development and deployment –
          impacting both on the central administration of the institution, and also on individual teachers,
          researchers and learners – are outlined below:

33
   Designing Spaces for Effective Learning http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/publications/learningspaces.pdf
34
   AUDE http://www.aude.ac.uk
35
   Green Gown Awards 2008 http://www.aude.ac.uk/news/greengown08
36
   HEEPI project http://www.heepi.org.uk
37
   BUFDG http://www.bufdg.ac.uk
38
   EAUC http://www.eauc.org.uk
39
   UUK http://www.universitiesuk.ac.uk/
40
   See http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/themes/eadministration for more information on the JISC e-Administration
innovation programme.


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               i.    Internal drivers – for example, expansion in terms of institution size and complexity,
                     scarcity of resources, and data quality. Resourcing has become a key issue in relation to
                     realising the full benefits from (and meeting expectations of) investments in technology.
                     Sustainable business models need to take account of two key issues: the total (staff – and
                     now also environmental) cost of deployment and realising benefits, and an appreciation of
                     overall value delivered as a result of the technological change. Institutions‟ expectations of
                     efficiency, effectiveness and quality improvements will require additional resources
                     (especially people) to deliver these, in a climate where there are pressures on institutions to
                     make reductions in that area. The value of ICT investments is not commonly understood by
                     institutions and they are often not seeing, or at least not recognising, savings in related
                     areas that reflect the significant deployment of resources in pursuit of their strategic goals.
                     Carefully targeted technology interventions to support administration processes may
                     address „pain points‟ and relieve burdens that free up staff time to devote to their core
                     education business functions (i.e. education and research) and engage more high-value or
                     „mission driving‟ activities;
               ii.   External drivers. Institutions can be unsure how best to respond to external factors which
                     impact on their core business of education and research (for example, the impact of the EU
                                                              41
                     initiatives, such as the Bologna process ). Institutions’ processes also need to demonstrate
                     greater corporate awareness of, and compliance with, financial audit and legislation on
                     (amongst others) freedom of information, data protection, intellectual property rights,
                     copyright, and security, as well as wider „ethical‟ issues in the field of information
                     governance (all of which need to become integrated within institutional strategies). An
                     integrated strategic approach to these drivers is needed, as are integrated administrative
                     systems which can help support appropriate change management processes and
                     compliance procedures;
               iii. Data and information management, recognising that a key requirement for effective
                    administration systems is the so-called single source of „truth‟, i.e. of complete, reliable,
                    consistent and auditable information and data. Institutions need to manage the level and
                    relevance of, and identify and grade the value of, the plethora of data that modern systems
                    generate to arrive at the single „complete‟ set – prioritising the influx to ensure that high-
                    value data is not lost and that decision-making can occur on the foundation of secure
                    verified and valuable information. The ways in which data is handled, processed and used
                    (and the methods of data filtering and grading that occur) will depend significantly on its
                    ultimate requirement, and upon the sources and processes in a data supply chain (some of
                    which may include user-owned technologies, providing user-generated data);
               iv. Workflow (related to Data and information management, above) – the process of creation,
                   management, movement, storage and disposal of the internal information created by an
                   institution during the course of its routine business. What are the different approaches to
                   managing, reviewing and improving workflow design within institutions?
               v.    System standardisation and flexibility – i.e. the drive for common processes and
                     standard systems vs the culture of academic and departmental flexibility; central
                     administration vs devolved departmental administration and the impact on organisational
                     structure and culture. Linkages between institutional systems across departments were
                     explored by the JISC-funded Measuring and Understanding the Systems Integration
                                                  42
                     Challenge (MUSIC) study which identified that institutional approaches were largely ad-
                     hoc, with many developing plans for a more strategic approach. What approaches are being
                     taken to ensure a strategic and institutional solution to successful systems integration? How
                     are different sized institutions tackling this common systems challenge?
               vi. Change management, skills, roles and ways of working. e-Administration introduces
                   new systems, processes and ways of working and is one of the technology investments that
                   has the capacity to require considerable change management attention in order to maximise
                   the realisation of intended benefits to individuals‟ practices as well as institutional processes.
                   What is the impact on individuals, on groups and on the institution as a whole in dealing with



41
     See http://www.dfes.gov.uk/bologna/ for more information on the Bologna process.
42
     MUSIC http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/programme_jos/project_music.aspx


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                   these new functions, processes, techniques and systems? What new methodologies will be
                   required to manage workflows within the institution?
              vii. Emergent user-supplied technologies, personalisation and the locus of control.
                   Institutions face increasing demands and expectations for self-service processes and
                   personalised services. Alongside this there is a widening availability of and access to user-
                   owned and supplied emergent technologies and social software applications that support
                   interactivity and personalisation. Does personalisation introduce better end user
                   experience, or just more complex processes that are difficult to manage and integrate with
                   back-end institutional systems – particularly as institutions begin to put in place mechanisms
                   and policies to support emerging practices which rely on the integration of emergent
                   technologies with institutional systems to support some administrative processes (such as
                   calendaring, SMS text messaging alerts for newsflashes of room-changes, etc.)? NB This
                   area is covered more explicitly under (i) Support for learners, teachers and researchers
                   using emergent personal technologies and social software, above;
                   Security and the management of access to resources. As the role of central
                   departments (such as the Library) change in response to digital developments, there is an
                   emerging need for institutions to curate a wide and diverse range of resources and manage
                   remote and distributed access to them. This requires arrangements to support appropriate
                   levels of security and identity profiles, including access for potential external research and
                   teaching partnerships. This in turn involves the need for policies and strategies to be
                   developed that determine what access conditions should be applied and for service
                   integration to be supported. For example, resources need to be made available to specific
                   departments and their research system(s) or virtual learning environment(s).
                   There will be requirements to support processes that ensure resources are kept and
                   managed across the institution, and to ensure that identities to support access and use
                   across the institution are also managed. Amongst other things, resources might be part of
                   an examination process (e.g. dissertations) or part of a research review (e.g. an article /
                   conference paper). Therefore it is important that these administrative functions are
                   supported seamlessly with existing and newly emerging library functions;
              viii. Shared services, can be seen as the convergence and streamlining of the (parts of) the
                    sector‟s functions to ensure that quality services are delivered more effectively and
                    efficiently, in potentially more environmentally sustainable ways, and with potential for
                    economies of scale and synergies through multi function working (such as the linking of
                    human resources (HR) and Finance functions). Such services can be delivered wholly within
                    an organisation or can be delivered by another organisation or through joint working.
                   Shared services do not necessarily mean outsourcing, although this is an option. There are
                   many other models, ranging from one institution providing a service for another, to
                   institutions grouping together to form a joint venture company to provide a service for all the
                   participants (with possible benefits to the provider institution(s)‟ business and community
                                                  43
                   engagement (BCE) activities ) and services orchestrated and provided at regional or
                   national levels. Shared services may also mean something more than sharing the totality of
                   major systems, and may be more usefully considered in terms of sharing of functions, rather
                   than applications, in line with service oriented approaches and the e-Framework (see the e-
                   Framework section, later in this briefing paper) It is important to ensure that the business
                   models and approaches to sharing are appropriate to the education sector, and that the
                   cultural impact of shared services implementation is properly considered.
                   A shared services strategy may be pursued in tandem with a convergence policy facilitated
                   by institution-wide systems integration, and can be achieved in a variety of ways: by
                   exploiting intra-institutional expertise; and/or through collaboration between other
                   educational institutions or commercial partners outside of the organisation.
                   Candidate services may include access to researcher-focused resources and learning
                   management systems, as well as support services. Projects should consider existing, as
                   well as proposing new, instances of shared or centralised service provision or brokering,
                   including the use of JISC Services where appropriate. JISC has been developing the

43
   Further information JISC‟s BCE programme can be found at
http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/themes/business_community_engagement


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                    concept of shared services and shared infrastructure since the late 1990s and, in particular,
                    as part of the Information Environment. Using JISC services in this manner is likely to entail
                                                                                   44
                    some engagement with the Information Environment standards . A number of shared
                    infrastructure services have been developed and might be relevant to projects, and these
                    are listed in the Relevant programme outputs and services section of this briefing paper.


Guiding Principles and Approaches to be Employed
     A17. Bidders should consider the following guiding principles and approaches when demonstrating how
          their proposed solution will contribute to improving the efficiency, effectiveness and quality of
          education, research and administrative processes through the use of ICT.


Alignment of institutional strategy and policy development with the technologies that support educational
processes
     A18. Proposals should demonstrate that not only are project goals in alignment with institutional
          strategies, but also that the project team is „plugged in‟ to the senior management in the institution(s)
          and is able to draw on significant and active support in the development of solutions that deliver
          institutional benefits (which, in turn, will be of relevance to the wider sector). Some of the issues
          pertaining to ICT support of institutional strategy development, transformation and the management
          of culture change within institutions are outlined below.
              i.    Strategic understanding of ICT, and senior management buy-in. The level of
                    understanding of ICT at a senior strategic level in institutions is sometimes detached from
                    practical implementations and their implications, slowing down projects aimed at integrating
                    systems and the change management processes they entail. This can also adversely affect
                    the quality of information governance in some institutions (and ICT projects often present
                    the highest levels of reputational, financial and operational risk). Improved interaction
                    between institutional senior management and those responsible for delivering improvements
                    through the application of technology can lead to a better understanding and interpretation
                    of institutional ICT concerns by ICT development teams; and a greater awareness in senior
                    management of the role technology can play.
              ii.   Sharing good practice. Senior managers in institutions are aware of the high amount of
                    risk commonly associated with their investment in large-scale ICT projects and there is a
                    need across the sector for good business intelligence with which to develop integrated
                    strategies, make sensible risk assessments, and make funding decisions in respect of future
                    ICT planning.
                    There are many sources of good practice which can be shared in order to build a collective
                    knowledge base in key areas. Institutions should be encouraged to exploit opportunities to
                    collaborate in a spirit of cooperative competition; to talk to each other and share experience
                    about the effective deployment and integration of large-scale ICT systems. In addition, a
                    focus on improving „business intelligence‟ through the application of knowledge
                    management and data warehousing techniques, and information sharing between
                    institutions, may enhance a national picture and facilitate greater understanding of ICT for
                    planning purposes.
                                                                                                                  45
                    The 1997 Dearing Report from the National Committee of Enquiry into Higher Education
                                                                                       46
                    and the JISC ASSIST project on the cost of networked learning highlighted the need for
                    institutions to foster the development of „hybrid managers‟ – i.e. technology-aware people
                    who know how to run institutions. Information and ICT services are generally not at the top
                    table in institutional management, which can affect their ability to make a strategic input.
                    Sharing good practice between ICT and non-technical managers, and promoting key issues
                    amongst the stakeholder communities, can help to align business and technology interests
                    in ways that lead to better integrated strategic thinking and planning processes.

44
   JISC Information Environment standards http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/distributed-systems/jisc-ie/arch/standards/
45
   Dearing Report http://www.leeds.ac.uk/educol/ncihe/
46
   JISC ASSIST Cost of Networked Learning project
http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/programme_jcalt/jcalt_human.aspx


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              iii. Cultural change. The integration of institutional systems will require traditional system
                   „owners‟ to change their role in order to deliver a component of an overall institutional
                   system / service to stakeholders, and end-users‟ expectations and experiences also need to
                   be taken into account to minimise the risk of developing technologically manageable, yet
                   practically unusable, integrated systems. The human / cultural side of this change, and the
                   design of appropriate procedures and processes, needs to be supported as much as
                   technical frameworks.
     A19. However, whilst bidders need to be able to demonstrate that their proposal is aligned to institutional
          strategies and processes, and builds on existing or planned work in the areas of systems or
          information integration (and, if appropriate, indicate where activities may align with the development
                                      47
          of enterprise architectures ), as exemplars, projects funded under this call should focus on benefits
          to institutional processes and to education and research practices broadly (i.e. those not restricted to
          a unique local need that would otherwise fail to resonate with the wider sector).


User and Stakeholder Engagement
     A20. User involvement has been identified by the Standish Group as the single highest factor in software
                                                             48
          projects that deliver on time and within budget. Institutional Exemplar projects should apply
          development models and methodologies designed to increase the level of user and stakeholder
          engagement across institutions, thereby integrating the innovative development of technology with
          corresponding innovations in practices and processes. The aim is to ensure that technology is used
          effectively and efficiently in the support of user and institutional goals.
                                                                                                                    49
     A21. The JISC Users and Innovation (U&I) programme, for example, is piloting a development model
          that prioritises the needs of users in the implementation of technology and practice. Its approach
          takes elements from established software development methodologies, particularly Participatory
          Design and Rapid Application Development, to facilitate greater collaboration between users,
          stakeholders and developers. The U&I model is also being further extended to pilot approaches to
          engagement with wide-ranging stakeholder groups as part of the programme‟s benefits realisation
          phase, to support the take-up and improve the applicability and transferability of project outputs
          beyond originating host institutions.
     A22. Institutional Exemplars should demonstrate the role technologies that support educational processes
          can play in the development of institutional strategy and policy, for example, the revision of current
          technical structures to support alternative practices and workflows resulting from different pedagogic
          models, the revised management of the RAE, curation and preservation of digital assets, and the
          shifting balance between institutional and user-owned technologies. Also migration strategies for
          key institutional systems (e.g. Virtual Learning Environments to Technology-Enhanced Learning
                         50
          Environments );


Next Generation, Emergent Technologies – Web 2.0 and Social Software
     A23. It is recognised that contemporary large-scale institutional systems may need to take account of the
          prevalence of user-owned or supplied emergent technologies and demands for personalisation.

47
   Institutional strategies can be supported through the development of „Enterprise Architectures‟ that describe how core
education business processes operate and help an institution align its functions and processes with its ICT development
and deployment – joining up previously disparate areas of technology and practice in pursuit of business goals. See the
Office for Government Commerce website at http://www.ogc.gov.uk/delivery_lifecycle_enterprise_architectures.asp, the
Open Group‟s Architecture Framework (TOGAF) at http://www.opengroup.org/togaf and
http://www.opengroup.org/architecture), and the JISC Enterprise Architectures Group Pilot website at
http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/programme_elearning_capital/enterprise_architectures.aspx
48
   The Standish Group CHAOS Report www.standishgroup.com/sample_research/chaos_1994_1.php
49
   The Users and Innovation programme development model is described in the briefing paper that accompanies the July
2007 U&I Call (Circular 02/07 Appendix F
http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/funding/2007/07/circular0207appendixf.doc)
50
   Technology Enhanced Learning Environment (TELE) describes any setting where technology is used to enhance the
learner‟s experience and may encompass physical learning spaces, assistive and immersive learning environments
(including the use of mobile and gaming technologies), institutional learning environments, and user-owned technologies
that deliver personalised experiences.


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     A24. For the purposes of this the Institutional Innovation programme, such emergent or next generation
                                                                                                                51
          technologies and applications are defined as those which are synonymous with the terms Web 2.0
          and social software, and ubiquitous or pervasive computing through the use of diverse delivery
          platforms (such as those available to mobile devices). That is, devices and applications which
          require institutional data sources and administrative processes to be opened up and made available
          for consumption and integration in order to provide end-to-end services tailored to alleviating staff
          and students‟ administrative burdens.
                                                                                                                       52
     A25. For guidance, the following series of characteristics can be said to identify these technologies :
              i.    The web as a platform. This allows an application to be delivered and used through a web
                    browser; examples may include tools such as online word processors or spreadsheets;
              ii.   Things that think. For example, embedding computers into the education or research
                    environment through the use of commonplace mobile and/or entertainment devices, rather
                    than requiring interaction with distinct computing objects – enabling people to interact with
                    the technology naturally and casually wherever they are;
              iii. An architecture of participation. i.e. the system has been designed to encourage and
                   support users in contributing to common goals. An example is the application of wiki
                   software being used for the generation of collaborative documents;
              iv. Data consumption and remixing from other sources, particularly user-generated data.
                  Often these are referred to as mash-ups, where content can be sourced from third parties
                  via an Application Programming Interface (API). There are currently a plethora of mash-ups
                  to be found on the web, utilising for example, local directory listings, web-based mapping
                  software, and photographic libraries to generate reviews of events or places;
              v.    A rich, interactive, user-friendly interface, where the needs and perspective of the
                    individual user are a priority;
              vi. Elements of social networking. Whilst not necessarily a requisite, the social elements of
                  these technologies are important in facilitating engagement and generating user data.
     A26. Emergent technologies have sometimes been referred to as „disruptive technologies‟ because of
          their tendency to disrupt the status quo during early introduction. However, where end user
          demands are incorporated into the requirements for institutional systems, thereby working to support
          any shift in the „locus of control‟ between institution and individual, such technologies (and their
          attendant changes in practice) can be harnessed to improve end-to-end systems and the services
          they provide.
     A27. However, such often lack the robust service-level agreement approach required by institutions in
          order for them to be incorporated into any end-to-end service they deliver to their end users. There
          may be opportunities to pursue „business grade‟ licensing for such products (guaranteeing reliability,
          availability and security of data) so that they may be accommodated when considering integration
          approaches for institutional systems.
     A28. Conversely though, there may be occasions where a tolerance for lower levels of „robustness‟ is
          required in order for institutions to take full advantage of widespread use of new technology and
          practices already embraced by their end user communities. A flexible framework approach to the
          exposure of institutional elements in ways that can be exploited by (or „mashed-up‟ with) user-owned
          technologies (such as access to institutional resources for user-supplied e-portfolio platforms or
          personalised environments) may provide an appropriate level of integration at the fringes of
          institutional boundaries. Widespread cross-institutional use, as a major plank of an exemplar
          project, however, requires that risks with respect to reliance upon emergent technologies are
          properly quantified and mitigating actions planned for.
     A29. There is often a gap between institutional and individuals‟ expectations of pervasive computing and
          personalisation. These need to become better aligned so that institutionally-hosted, third-party
          supplied and user-owned technologies are better integrated (and in a scalable way) to support

51
   See http://www.oreillynet.com/pub/a/oreilly/tim/news/2005/09/30/what-is-web-20.html for a summary of O‟Reilly‟s Web
2.0 design patterns (i.e. “the long tail”, “data as the next Intel Inside”, “users add value”, “network effects by default”, “some
rights reserved”, “the perpetual Beta”, “cooperate, don‟t control”, and “software above the level of a single device”).
52
   For further background information on Web 2.0 and social software in education, see the JISC Web 2.0 briefing paper
at http://www.jisc.org.uk/publications/publications/web2socialsoftwarev1.aspx


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          overall, end-to-end educational processes and new ways of working. There is an increasing
          demand for the personalised delivery of services (by the user, not just for the user – the latter often
          focusing predominantly on institutional / provider convenience as much as, or more than, end-user /
                           53
          consumer need) . In addition, core institutional systems are coming under increasing pressure to
          expose aspects of their interfaces and accommodate integration with user-owned technologies that
          can enhance and enrich the services available to roaming users, thereby supporting flexible ways of
          working remotely and across institutional boundaries (for learning, teaching, research collaboration
          and resource acquisition, etc.).


Systems Integration
     A30. The JISC-funded MUSIC study described both a range of integration approaches and some of the
          barriers and drivers to further progress. Some institutions are integrating best-of-breed applications
          in-house, others are investing in proprietary Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems, or
          developing (or at least aspiring to) Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) solutions that provide a
                                                                            54
          robust framework for integration across enterprise architectures at different scales (multi-
          institutional partnerships, discipline-based networks, overseas alliances, etc.). The study also
          reported that “new pressures are emerging for information systems to support a wide range of
          interactions which extend across the formal; boundaries of the institution [emphasis added] and this
          constitutes a new stage in the systems integration challenge”. Some institutions may be deploying a
          range of approaches to integration.
     A31. JISC encourages service oriented approaches to systems institution-wide integration, such as
          amongst Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs), Management Information Systems (MIS), Library
          Management Systems (LMS), Content Management Systems (CMS), e-Portfolios and digital
          repositories, and accommodation of institutionally-provided, shared and user-owned/supplied
          technologies and services emergent personal technologies and social software; to improve
          information workflows, teaching and learning practices, and encourage management and re-use of
          digital assets.
     A32. Projects should consider appropriate integration with national shared services, such as the national
          content delivery infrastructure or „Information Environment‟, and the shared infrastructure services
          mentioned in the Relevant Programme Outputs and Services section below.
     A33. In the current political climate, institutions are being forced to consider how they can operate in a
          more business-like manner. „Super convergence‟ refers to the practice some institutions are
          considering to converge both their systems and their services to make efficiency gains, and improve
          the effectiveness and quality of their education and research processes.


Software Quality Assurance
     A34. The appropriate level of software quality or „robustness‟ can be considered as being related to the
          stage of development that the tool in question has reached in the project lifecycle. For example:
                  Proof of concept or early-stage development of the technologies „in the lab‟, potentially
                   concentrating on paper pilots;
                  Thereafter, pilot prototypes demonstrating applicability „outside the lab‟ should constitute
                   something that external users can play with even if they are not production-ready and/or can
                   only cope with small-scale implementations. At this stage, the tool should be something that
                   is able adequately to demonstrate that it is worthwhile to move towards the final stage;
                   namely

53
   See JISC report Personalisation in Presentation Services http://www.jisc.ac.uk/uploaded_documents/jp-study-15.pdf for
further information.
54
   Institutional strategies can be supported through the development of „Enterprise Architectures‟ that describe how core
education business processes operate and help an institution align its functions and processes with its ICT development
and deployment – joining up previously disparate areas of technology and practice in pursuit of business goals. See the
Office for Government Commerce website at http://www.ogc.gov.uk/delivery_lifecycle_enterprise_architectures.asp, the
Open Group’s Architecture Framework (TOGAF) at http://www.opengroup.org/togaf and
http://www.opengroup.org/architecture), and the JISC Enterprise Architectures Group Pilot website at
http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/programme_elearning_capital/enterprise_architectures.aspx


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                  Production service (full implementation) is where the tool starts looking toward the business
                   models needed for longer term sustainability and wider take-up.
     A35. Whilst the final outputs from large-scale institutional exemplar projects should aspire to „production
          service‟ quality, in order that their real in-service applicability can be demonstrated within an
          institution (and with potential for use in other institutions), it is anticipated that intermediate tools may
          be developed to lower standards of quality assurance, as appropriate. The cost of, and process
          proposed for undertaking, the development developing software outputs up to a „production-service‟
          quality for release should be clearly identified in the project proposal.


Software Outputs
     A36. It is expected that software outputs will normally be licensed as open-source unless a case is made
          to the contrary and accepted by the evaluation panel. Applicants should make clear the licence
          under which software outputs will be released, mechanisms that will be put in place for community
          contribution (users and developers) throughout the project, and the sustainability plan for the
          software beyond the period of project funding. Applicants should consult with JISC's open source
                                                 55                                                       56
          software advisory service OSS Watch and the Open Middleware Infrastructure Institute UK on
          matters relating to open source software development. Applicants should refer to JISC's Policy on
                                                                   57
          Open Source Software for JISC Projects and Services .
     A37. To be able to re-use the software it must be of a certain quality and maturity. For example, it must
          have supporting information, FAQ, installation guides, test data etc. to help others use it. In addition
          to the advice from the OSS Watch and OMII-UK, elements that contribute to software quality and
          project maturity are outlined in the Software Quality Assurance (QA) and Open Source Maturity
                                                    58
          Model (OSMM) Development guidelines. Projects will be expected to follow the recommendations
          from these sources of guidance.


Open Standards
     A38. Open standards should be used wherever possible, and any deviation from these should be justified
          in the proposal and any alternative interface specifications should be designed with re-use by others
          in mind. The JISC recognises that emergent technologies lack the maturity of standards of some
          existing technologies. Interoperability and data transfer are key to the provision of next generation
          technologies for education and research, and projects are expected to work with JISC to address
          these issues.
                                                                                  59
     A39. Relevant standards can be found in the JISC Standards Catalogue . Bidders may also find
                                                               60
          information on the Information Environments standards useful when preparing a proposal.
     A40. Bidders must also ensure that they request adequate funding for any additional costs that may be
          incurred by adopting a standards-based approach. Projects should demonstrate sound risk
          management with regard to the adoption of standards for immature emergent technologies and refer
          to appropriate sources of expertise.


e-Framework
                                                            61
     A41. The e-Framework for Education and Research is an international initiative, established by JISC
          and Australia‟s Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR, formerly
          the Department of Education, Science and Training (DEST)) and now also supported by the New

55
   OSS Watch http://www.oss-watch.ac.uk/
56
   OMII-UK http://www.omii.ac.uk/
57
   Open Source Policy http://www.jisc.ac.uk/fundingopportunities/open_source_policy
58
   Software Quality Assurance (QA) and Open Source Maturity Model (OSMM) Development guidelines:
http://www.jisc.ac.uk/uploaded_documents/SQA_OSMM_09.06.doc
59
   JISC Standards Catalogue : http://standards.jisc.ac.uk
60
   JISC Information Environnent technical standards http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/distributed-systems/jisc-ie/arch/standards/
61
   See http://www.e-framework.org/ form details of the international e-Framework initiative and
http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/programme_eframework for details of the JISC e-Framework programme.


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          Zealand Ministry of Education (NZ MoE) and The Netherlands‟ SURF Foundation (SURF), to
          explore the potential benefits of applying a service-oriented approach to the provision of ICT
          infrastructure for education and research, and where successful to support its broader adoption by
          institutions and their suppliers
     A42. To achieve its principle aim – to facilitate technical interoperability within and across education and
          research through improved strategic planning and implementation processes – the International e-
          Framework has defined and articulated an evolving service oriented model, where details of how the
          service components work are documented within a knowledge base using a common, agreed upon
          vocabulary. An outline of how to develop and document the technical components (Service Usage
          Models (SUMs), Service Genres, Service Expressions) and how to design, implement and deploy
          applications and systems that are built using the components, are also modelled and documented.
          The e-Framework is, however, silent about how the service on the network will be made available
          and does not prescribe how the services should manifest, rather services are described so that
          consumers make use of them.
     A43. The e-Framework is designed to provide a means by which institutions can ensure that the
          components of their ICT systems (library, MIS, VLE, etc.) interoperate, and that their development is
          driven by strategic need rather than by purely technical considerations or short term expediency.
          The benefits of such a service oriented approach are potentially significant in terms of better value
          for money when purchasing or developing ICT systems, and the increased ability of institutions to
          plan effectively and adapt or change their systems to meet changing priorities. JISC‟s engagement
          with the ICT industry, through the e-Framework initiative, provides a platform through which
          institutional needs for pragmatic solutions to real system integration can be explored.
     A44. JISC recognises that there cannot be one system, or one model or processes, which fits all
          institutions. However there is value in mapping the plurality of approaches and determining where
          commonalities exist and can be exploited. Maps of process and function domains provide material
          which can be used by institutions to explain to software developers and JISC where their pain points
          are in the context of business processes, and hence where the application of ICT may alleviate
                                         62
          burdens and innovate practice . They may also help institutions and JISC to identify, clarify and
          validate emerging problem spaces and investigate pragmatic approaches to working with vendors
          that have established a strong presence in institutional infrastructures. Projects could provide useful
                                                                                                        63
          information to feed into these activities, and also benefit from the knowledge gained to date .
     A45. The e-Framework informs all JISC Programmes seeking to ensure that their outputs, both in the
          form of knowledge and software:
                  Can be built on by following the progress of programmes and projects so that they become
                   cumulative (encouraging the use of open standards and modular component software and
                   services);
                  Form a basis for stakeholders and developers to collaboratively develop practices and
                   processes integrally with the supporting ICT (through the development of domain maps,
                   good practice and process models);
                  Can be discovered and successfully adopted by any institution that wishes to benefit from
                   the vast information and/or services available (through institutional and developer use, and
                   project contribution to, the e-Framework Website).
     A46. All project bids should consider carefully how they relate to the e-Framework agenda, making it clear
          in their bids where they do so. Projects should make an allowance of two person days per year to
          contribute to the e-Framework as part of their project plan. Further information and guidance about
                                                                                                           64
          how projects can engage with the e-Framework can be found on the JISC e-Framework web site .



62
   For more information on domain maps, see the briefing paper at
http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/capital/e-framework_domain_process_and_service_models_briefing.pdf
63
   See http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/elearning_framework/refmodelssept05.aspx for an overview of the
JISC‟s reference modelling and domain mapping activities, and
http://www.jisc.ac.uk/fundingopportunities/funding_calls/2007/04/highleveldomainmap.aspx for details of JOS‟ work
synthesising sources from past domain mapping work.
64
   Guidance for Projects Engagement with e-Framework
http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/programme_eframework/engagement


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                                                                                                                     65
     A47. Institutional strategies can also be supported through the development of „enterprise architectures‟
          that describe how core education business processes operate. They could help an institution align
          its functions and processes with its ICT development and deployment – joining up previously
          disparate areas of technology and practice in pursuit of business goals, and potentially engaging
          more effectively with technology suppliers, JISC services, and the outcomes of JISC development
          programmes.


Relevant Programme Outputs and Services
JISC Services
                                                                   66
     A48. Bidders should be aware of the range of JISC services that may be relevant to provide advice,
          guidance or support dependant upon the proposal being submitted.


Shared Infrastructure Services
                                                                                                   67
     A49. JISC has been developing the concept of shared services and shared infrastructure             since the late
          1990s and, in particular, as part of the Information Environment.
     A50. A number of shared services have been developed and are relevant to projects (some specifically to
          repository-orientated projects). For example:
                                                                  68
              i.    Information Environment Service Registry , a central machine-readable registry of
                    information environment services and collections;
                                                                                      69
              ii.   a pilot Information Environment Metadata Schema Registry , which provides a registry
                    of metadata application profiles based on Dublin Core and IEEELOM to support
                    interoperability across the information environment;
                                                           70
              iii. UK Access Management Federation , which provides a single solution to access online
                   resources and services for education and research;
                                              71
              iv. Sherpa Romeo database , a publisher copyright and self-archiving site that provides
                  summaries of permissions that are normally given as part of each publisher's copyright
                  transfer agreement;
                            72
              v.    Jorum , a free online repository service for learning materials for use by teaching and
                    support staff in UK further and higher education institutions, allowing them to collect and
                    share learning and teaching materials. Jorum is helping to build a community for the
                    sharing, reuse and repurposing of learning and teaching materials, and stands as a national
                    statement of the importance of creating interoperable, sustainable materials. Where projects
                    produce learning materials, case studies and staff development materials as part of their
                    deliverables, these must be deposited in Jorum, and bidders should familiarise themselves
                                                                 73
                    with the guidance for depositing institutions . Jorum is moving to an Open Access model;



65
   Further information on Enterprise Architectures can be found under the Office for Government Commerce website at
http://www.ogc.gov.uk/delivery_lifecycle_enterprise_architectures.asp. See also the Open Group‟s Architecture
Framework (TOGAF) at http://www.opengroup.org/togaf and http://www.opengroup.org/architecture. Information on
JISC‟s Enterprise Architectures Group Pilot projects can be found at
http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/programme_elearning_capital/enterprise_architectures.aspx
66
   Further information on JISC Services can be found at: http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/services, and the Regional
Support Centres at http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/services/as_rsc.aspx
67
   JISC Shared Infrastructure Services web page
http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/programme_rep_pres/shared_services.aspx
68
   JISC Information Environment Service Registry http://iesr.ac.uk/
69
   Information Environment metadata Schema Registry http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/projects/iemsr/
70
   UK Access Management Federation http://www.ukfederation.org.uk/
71
   Sherpa Romeo http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo.php
72
   Jorum www.jorum.ac.uk
73
   This and other information for bidders on Jorum is available at http://www.jisc.ac.uk/proj_jorumbackground.html.


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                            74
              vi. EThOs , the UK e-theses online service, which aims to enable learners, researchers and
                  other end-users to search a UK Database of Theses and to access, from the desktop, the
                  full text, in secure format, of electronically stored theses;
                                 75
              vii. The Depot , which contains full-text post-print research papers, with associated metadata
                   and subject classification. The Depot offers a catch-all solution for the deposit of research
                   papers, since not all institutions and subject communities have a dedicated repository;
                                        76
              viii. OpenDOAR registry , an authoritative directory of academic open access repositories.




74
   EThOS project http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/programme_digital_repositories/project_ethos.aspx
75
   The Depot http://depot.edina.ac.uk/
76
   OpenDOAR http://www.opendoar.org/


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Appendix B
Call I – Synthesis, Project Support, and Support for Benefits Realisation Activities


Call     Description                                           Funds

                                                               Total funds: £400,000
         Synthesis, project support, and support for
I                                                              One project
         benefits realisation activities
                                                               Up to 30 months‟ duration


Introduction
    B1. This document contains information relating to the call for the Synthesis, Project Support, and
        Support for Benefits Realisation Activities project contained in JISC Circular 07/08. This document
        should be read in conjunction with the main document of the circular and alongside Appendix C of
        that circular: Call II – Large-Scale Institutional Exemplar Projects.


General Expectations
    71. Projects are expected to allocate at least ten person-days per year and related expenses to engage
        in programme-level activities. In particular, all projects are expected to:
                    be aware of, and where appropriate, work closely with other related JISC-funded projects;
                    engage with other Institutional Innovation projects (by telephone, online and/or face-to-face)
                     through activities facilitated by the JISC programme team and facilitate engagement
                     between projects in the context of work to surface key messages and lessons learnt across
                     projects and their areas of interest, and provide support to individual projects and project
                     clusters in the key areas of ICT concern;
                    engage with benefits realisation activities (anticipated to commence January 2009), where
                     „anchored‟ in the relevant area of ICT concern and expecting to build upon project‟s
                     outputs;
                    Attend relevant groups and other appropriate meetings.
         The JISC programme team will provide guidance to funded projects on which meetings and other
         projects (outside of those referenced in this circular) are likely to be relevant.
    72. Proposals need not necessarily come only from single institutions – consortia of partners are also
        eligible to bid (providing the lead partner meets the circular‟s eligibility requirements, as set out in the
        Eligibility section of the main circular document).
    73. Proposals must also demonstrate how they plan to sustain the technology, systems, processes or
        community developed in the course of the project for a minimum of 12 months after the end of
        project funding.


Terms of Reference
    B2. The following areas of knowledge, skills, experience and other qualities are required within the
        project team;
              i.     An understanding of JISC and the role of the Institutional Innovation programme innovation
                     work;
              ii.    An understanding of main challenges faced in bringing about institutional level change;
              iii.   Experience of successfully working in collaboration with others to achieve shared
                     understanding and ownership of a complex piece of work;
              iv.    Strong written and spoken communication skills, including the ability to express complex
                     issues clearly, and summarise appropriately.


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   B3. Proposals should identify which personnel within their team will perform the following roles:
              i.    Synthesist. i.e. someone capable of using personal knowledge and experience to provide
                    summary documents reflecting outcomes, positions, progress, lessons, etc. in a particular
                    field of work. They should have excellent communication skills, with a coherent and
                    accessible writing style;
              ii.   Editor. i.e. someone capable of reducing, harmonising and adjusting provided text or copy
                    to a specified length and audience requirements whilst retaining key messages and
                    information;
              iii. Web technologist. i.e. someone working to a brief and within style guides, capable of
                   producing web based products such as online conferences, subsidiary web sites, blogs,
                   wikis, etc. (necessary because of the online delivery component of this project);
              iv. Catalyst. i.e someone capable of working with a with a wide range of projects of a varying
                  nature with the aim of exchanging information as necessary to enhance the impact or reach
                  of project activities, identify complimentary opportunities for cross-working, and assist in
                  maximising the value of and potential benefit to be derived from, project outputs;
              v.    Facilitator. i.e. someone with the capability to design and deliver online and face-to-face
                    workshops with distinct objectives that may contribute to wider programme activities,
                    including evaluation and reflection. They should be able to stimulate debate and discussion,
                    in a style that encourages participation;
              vi. Education journalist / blogger. i.e .someone with the capability to work with the JISC
                  communications team. They should have first hand experience of disseminating information
                  to the programme‟s target audiences (including institutional senior management, and heads
                  of services), a thorough understanding of dissemination processes and a range of
                  communications channels, along with excellent communication skills. (including the ability to
                  write concisely and accurately in a journalistic style that will suit blogs and other similar
                  media, as well as be suitable for publication in traditional print-based publications).
   B4. In particular this project should provide the following services to Institutional Innovation projects and
       the JISC programme team:
              i.    Synthesis;
              ii.   Project support;
              iii. Support for a benefits realisation community.
   B5. The project should synthesise the outputs and learning from, and support, the five institutional
       exemplar projects funded under Round 1 of the programme (from Circular 01/07; projects run
       Autumn 2007 – March 2009), the 20 „Round 2‟ projects to be funded under Call II of this circular, and
       around ten large-scale work-based learning and employer engagement projects (anticipated to be
       funded under a future Institutional Innovation circular in September 2008 and commencing in
       January 2009). In addition this project will support a community of around 20 small-scale benefits
       realisation projects (also anticipated to be funded under a September 2008 circular and commencing
       in January 2009) whose remit will be to build upon, and validate and transfer the outputs from,
       Institutional Exemplar projects from all rounds of the programme.
   B6. Total funds of up to £400,000 are available for this 30 month project. Funding of up to £275,000 is
       available in the first instance for the period September 2008 - March 2010. It is expected that the
       project will continue until March 2011. However, JISC will review the need for ongoing funding of up
       to £150,000 for the final year (i.e. April 2010 – March 2011) before confirming this.
   B7. Bidders are therefore advised to propose two costed phases of work: one that focuses on synthesis
       and support for the first two rounds of exemplar projects and the anticipated large-scale work-based
       learning and employer engagement projects, and benefits realisation activities, up until March 2010,
       and another that would extend synthesis, support and community facilitation services for a further
       twelve months to cover anticipated future programme activities in a similar vein.
   B8. These aspects of the project requirements are expanded upon below.




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Synthesis
     B9. JISC recognises that synthesis is an important element in the consolidation and dissemination of
         varied project outputs and the knowledge and experience (the „learning‟) contained within a
         programme. Aside from the collation of appropriate materials, the outputs of synthesis contribute to
         helping gather good practice evidence, providing materials for dissemination and benefits
         realisation, informing future planning discussions, and working to support programme-level
         evaluation activities.
     B10. Synthesis can be achieved through a wide range of activities and could include face-to-face or
                                              77
          online meetings, „un-conferences‟ , workshops, telephone interviews, etc. and will often need to be
          informed by additional investigative work, carried out by the synthesis and support project itself, in
          order to place the synthesis in a particular context – i.e. the outputs of, and learning from,
          Institutional Innovation projects may in themselves be combined with other materials and outputs
          across the JISC. Bidders will therefore need to ensure that they will be able to gain sufficient
          understanding of JISC programmes that may benefit from the outputs of, and learning from,
          Institutional Innovation projects, and programmes in related areas whose outputs and learning may
          be relevant to feed into the Institutional Innovation projects themselves.
     B11. As well as providing the JISC programme team and Institutional Innovation working group with an
          ongoing collation and analysis of outputs, findings and learning from the projects, synthesing
          activities should also support the Institutional Innovation projects themselves by helping to build links
          between them in areas of common interest, and supporting the forging and exploiting of links with
          other, related JISC programme activity (in conjunction with the programme team). The synthesis
          should in addition contribute to formative evaluation of the programme, providing evidence of
          benefits, potential impact and stakeholder value for harvesting by the programme‟s summative
          evaluators (anticipated to be appointed in the Autumn of 2008).
     B12. NB Synthesis in this context should not be confused with the production of a particular synthesis
          output (such as a publication). Synthesising (the distilling, examining, abstracting and extracting
          process) should yield a raw product in itself that is suitable for developing in a number of ways, for a
          number of audiences, each receiving timely messages tailored to their particular circumstances for
          maximum impact. However, the synthesis and support project would also be expected to assist in
          the development of suitable synthesis outputs / communications products, and an indicative list of
          some of these is given in the Deliverables section below.


Project support
     B13. Whilst there is an ongoing role for this project to provide support for projects throughout their
          lifecycle and facilitate join-up, it is anticipated that activity will increase as projects start delivering
          their outputs, and when new rounds of institutional exemplar and benefits realisation projects begin
          (i.e. in September 2008 and in January 2009).
     B14. Bidders are reminded that whilst the Institutional Innovation programme currently consists of five
          large-scale exemplar projects, that around twenty will be funded under Call II of this circular, around
          ten more (focusing on work-based learning and employer engagement) are anticipated to be funded
          under a forthcoming circular to be issued in September 2008, as will around twenty small-scale
          benefits realisation projects. Proposals for the support project should therefore take account of
          appropriate „rules of engagement‟ to achieve its aims which may differ between rounds of exemplar
          funding (since the forthcoming projects will have been made fully aware by the information contained
          within this circular as to the expectations and requirements to be placed upon them of engagement
          with each other in clusters, and with the support and benefits realisation projects – whereas the first
          round of projects will not have had such notice and will be entering their final six-month phase as the
          new exemplars and the synthesis and support project kick off in the Autumn of 2008). Bidders are
          advised to take account of this in their assessment of project risks and mitigating actions.




77
  See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unconference and http://www.openspaceworld.com/brief_history.htm for an
explanation of un-conferencing and open space technology techniques.


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Support for a benefits realisation community
   B15. The benefits realisation projects will build upon and transfer the outputs from each round of
        institutional exemplar projects in order to embed them in their intended (and other) communities,
        thereby helping to ensure that they are useful, usable and used by users. This synthesis and
        support project will support the benefits realisation projects and help develop a community or
        network of such projects, clustered in similar areas of ICT concern and „anchored‟ to an exemplar
        project.
   B16. This project will support the foundation of the benefits realisation community through (with the JISC
        programme team) design and organisation of, and facilitation at, appropriate face-to-face and online
        events and activities. The phasing of the programme may mean that benefits realisation projects
        may commence at different times, depending on the delivery schedule of the exemplar project(s) to
        which they are „anchored‟. This project should perform an online facilitation role that will maintain
        activity as appropriate to the programme and project needs – supporting the synthesising of learning
        and exemplar project outputs, and dissemination through partners to a wider stakeholder audience
        to fully realise the benefits and capitalise on the outcomes. Bidders should reflect these levels of
        activity in their budget and timetable outline.
   B17. This project should outline strategies for encouraging and maintaining active participation in the
        benefits realisation community over the course of the programme, and propose plans for
        sustainability post-funding to continue to support the widening and deepening of the impact of
        exemplar projects funded under the Institutional Innovation programme.
   B18. The September 2008 circular will contain more detail on the terms of reference for these benefits
        realisation projects, and the successful bidder for this synthesis and support project will need to work
        closely with the JISC programme team to develop an appropriate workplan to accommodate this
        phase of the programme. The following activities are expected to be covered by upcoming
        institutional innovation benefits realisation projects:
              i.    Capacity building. The main aims of this type of benefits realisation activity is to raise
                    awareness and share knowledge of large-scale exemplar projects funded through the
                    Institutional Innovation programme at practitioner, technical support and managerial levels
                    so that more people and new institutions are able to undertake similar endeavours learning
                    from the experiences of exemplar project teams and originating institutions. This can be
                    achieved through collaborative workshops and activities that will increase skills/knowledge
                    of participants across the wider sector.
                    Projects engaging in activities under this category will look to embed and support the uptake
                    of successful project products or provide “training type activities” in an innovative area to the
                    wider sector. This can be achieved through face-to-face or online activities, and if
                    appropriate these should be aligned with JISC-orchestrated programme level activities, or
                    those organised by the Institutional Innovation programme support project or particular
                    originating Institutional Exemplar projects themselves These activities may also attempt to
                    widen the reach of benefits realisation on a regional or national basis by engaging with a
                    wide range of stakeholder organisations (such as JISC Advisory Services and Regional
                    Support Centres (RSCs), national membership associations, HE Academy Subject Centres,
                    Centres of Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETLs), etc.) with appropriate „reach‟,
                    profile and credibility in their constituent communities to validate, transfer and disseminate
                    the project outputs.
                    Anticipated outputs would include one or more successful interventions with reusable
                    supporting materials such as “wrapped” products (e.g. “how to do x in your y”, etc.),user
                    guidelines, technical documentation, etc.
              ii.   Increased uptake. The main aim here is to get more institutions successfully using the
                    outputs from earlier institutional exemplar projects. The institutions that do so may be within
                    the original target group for the originating project (i.e. they may have already been
                    identified as potentially interested stakeholders, or may have directly similar requirements
                    and have been identified as a potential audience for the outputs), or they may consider
                    using the original outputs in a new or novel way (i.e. transferring the learning but – crucially
                    – adapting it for adoption so that it works in a new context, not envisaged by the originating
                    project team).


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                   To achieve this, the activities will need to:
                                provide freely accessible "wrapped" products;
                                provide tools, guidelines, technical support, etc.;
                                support understanding and awareness of product benefits to institutions.
                   Activities should provide an opportunity for the supported transfer of originating project
                   outputs to other institutions. This activity should supplement the originating project‟s existing
                   benefits realisation plans.


Deliverables
     B19. Synthesis activities will include, but are not limited to:
              i.   development of an appropriate online collaborative space (i.e. making use of existing online
                                                 78
                   tools, software and activities ) through which to present ongoing synthesis, harvested from
                   projects‟ own information sources, and provide access to the raw data collected from the
                   projects during the project;
               i. synthesising the outputs and the learning outcomes from projects across the Institutional
                  Innovation programme, including the distilling, examining, abstracting and extracting of data
                  in a raw form that will allow development of a range of activities and action both within the
                  programme and external to it;
               ii. working closely with the JISC programme team to ensure that raw data is available in an
                   accessible form to allow easy extraction and use for evaluation and dissemination;
              iii. providing the JISC programme team with synthesis updates of exemplar project progress
                   and activity of note, to be delivered via a mutually agreed mechanism;
              iv. maintaining a regularly updated online synthesis of project activity (through an appropriate
                  online collaborative space), informed by harvesting of existing resources maintained by
                  Institutional Exemplar project teams and made available to the JISC programme team,
                  supplemented with telephone, email, ands face-to-face contact with project teams when and
                  where appropriate;
               v. advising on the potential uses of the synthesis material, including dissemination
                  opportunities, intended messages and form of communication;
              vi. development of some synthesis outputs / communications products. These might include:
                            a. tools, guides, strategies for adoption and support mechanisms to promote
                               additional up-take beyond original project plans, i.e. wrapping project outputs to
                               create a user guide for replicating the undertaking in a different context;
                            b. collation of scenarios, case studies, narratives, video clips, etc. to support
                               institutional cultural development;
                            c.     position papers (for further discussion or consultation);
                            d. summary reports (based on a range of materials) that may contribute to wider
                               programme level benefits realisation outputs;
                            e. briefing papers aimed at specific audiences.
     B20. Project support activities will include, but are not limited to:
              i.   use of the online space to provide a platform for project community-building activities,
                   facilitated online workshops and discussions, etc. in order to support the projects and
                   strengthen the linkages between activities in clusters based on similar areas of ICT concern;


78
  Bidders are encouraged to minimise the allocation of project team resources to the development of an
online platform and instead concentrate on delivering a suitable service using (though perhaps „mashing-up‟)
existing appropriate applications so as to focus the value of support project activity and outputs on the
requirements set out in the Terms of reference section.


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              ii.   ensuring effective communication and knowledge exchange between projects within the
                    programme and with other JISC programmes, to support the JISC programme team in
                    communicating with projects and with other stakeholders;
              iii. facilitating face-to-face and online activities (both synchronous and asynchronous) including
                   seminars and discussions with project teams to stimulate debate and discussion. Bidders
                   should provide evidence of both their capability in facilitation (and experience of mediating
                   disparate groups using a range of tools) and of their knowledge in education and technology
                   in the context of large-scale institutional change projects;
              iv. determining any additional support needs for the projects that can be met by the
                  programme;
              v.    identifying areas of collaboration with other programmes and wider JISC activities that could
                    enhance the project and programme level success.
   B21. Support for benefits realisation community activities will include, but are not limited to:
              i.    appropriate enhancements to the project synthesis and support online platform to support
                    community collaboration activities between benefits realisation projects and their exemplar
                    „anchor‟ projects;
              ii.   design and delivery of online and face-to-face activities to facilitate the development of an
                    Institutional Innovation benefits realisation community.


Funding Available
   B22. Funding of £400,000 is available for one project for up to 30 months, commencing from September
        2008 and completing no later than 31 March 2011.




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Appendix C
Call II – Large-Scale Institutional Exemplar Projects

Call      Description                                        Funds

          Projects to develop exemplar technology and        Total funds: £6,000,000
          practice solutions to large-scale institutional    Twenty projects
II        problems (in the areas of institutional ICT
          concern expanded in the briefing paper at          £200,000 - £300,000 available per project
          Appendix A)                                        Eighteen months‟ duration




Introduction
     C1. This document contains information relating to the call for the Institutional Exemplar projects
         contained in JISC Circular 07/08. This document should be read in conjunction with the main
         document of the circular.


General Expectations
     74. Projects are expected to allocate at least ten person-days per year and related expenses to engage
         in programme-level activities. In particular, all projects are expected to:
                  be aware of, and where appropriate, work closely with other related JISC-funded projects;
                  engage with other Institutional Innovation projects through activities facilitated by the JISC
                   programme team and the synthesis and support project (to be funded under Call I of this
                   circular);
                  engage as required (by telephone, online and/or face-to-face) with the synthesis and
                   support project itself, in the context of its work to surface key messages and lessons learnt
                   across projects and their areas of interest, and provide support to individual projects and
                   project clusters in the key areas of ICT concern;
                  engage with benefits realisation activities (anticipated to commence January 2009), where
                   „anchored‟ in the relevant area of ICT concern and expecting to build upon project‟s
                   outputs;
                  engage with the relevant of the Centres of Excellence in Institutional Innovation in areas of
                  Make available appropriate senior management representatives from the lead institution to
                   fully engage with other projects;
                  Attend relevant groups and other appropriate meetings.
          The JISC programme team will provide guidance to funded projects on which meetings and other
          projects (outside of those referenced in this circular) are likely to be relevant.
     75. Proposals need not necessarily come only from single institutions – established, cross-institutional
         partnerships (with a formal legal arrangement / consortium agreement, history of joint-working or
         shared delivery of services) could also provide an appropriate testing ground for these projects.
     76. Proposals must demonstrate significant leadership from one or more senior manager(s) within each
         involved institution – including availability to participate in some programme level activities, for
         example online or face-to-face meeting(s).
     77. Proposals must concentrate on the administration and integration of institutional systems, and the
         development of institutional culture and practice. To that end funding will not be provided to offset
         the costs of large-scale technical infrastructure deployment, though significant infrastructure costs
         (for instance, in respect of capital outlay for Estates projects under the Effective planning for and use
         of future learning spaces and other estates assets area of Call II) could be considered under



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         „institutional contributions‟ to such a project. Projects are expected to focus on how systems can be
         developed applied and run in real institutional context in support of their strategic aims.
   78. Proposals must also demonstrate how they plan to sustain the technology, systems or processes for
       the minimum of 12 months after the end of project funding.


Terms of Reference
   C2. The projects sought under this circular will be expected to maximise institutional support by
       promoting joined-up inter-departmental teams to address institutional strategic goals.
   C3. JISC is keen to engage with and support senior institutional leadership in addressing their strategic
       problems and promoting solutions to the wider sector, and to this end, these projects will be
       promoted as exemplars of good practice and the effective application of technology to improve
       educational processes. Projects must therefore also show how they can be taken forward as
       exemplar solutions, providing benefits to the wider sector.
   C4. Projects must build upon on-going and existing activities and institutional commitments, and
       proposals should show how JISC funding will facilitate additional join-up across domain areas, and
       enable or accelerate the adoption of open standards based and service oriented approaches.
       Activities may include (but are not limited to) one or more of the following areas (summarised below,
       and expanded upon in the Key areas of Institutional ICT Concern section of the briefing paper at
       Appendix A). NB Proposals are not expected to cover all the points listed below, but should clearly
       articulate where and how their project would address relevant issues under these areas
              i.    Support for learners, teachers and researchers using emergent personal technologies
                    and social software from an institutional and organisational perspective;
              ii.   Improvements to institutions’ environmental sustainability through green computing.
                    Development of institutional culture and practice to enhance the take-up and embedding of
                    sustainable approaches and energy efficient technologies in institutions;
              iii. Effective planning for and use of future learning spaces and other estates assets,
                   making the most appropriate use of ICT and taking account of environmental sustainability
                   factors;
              iv. e-Administration. Institution-wide, cross-departmental, implementations of administration
                  systems to improve the support of teaching, learning and research, with due consideration
                  of issues of security and the management of access to resources.
   C5. In addition, projects should be underpinned by the guiding principles and approaches to be
       employed outlined in the briefing paper at Appendix A.
   C6. Bidders are reminded that, if successful and funded, benefits realisation projects based on their
       projects‟ stated project aims and output delivery timetable may commence from January 2009
       (depending on delivery schedules) and so should accommodate appropriate engagement with these
       projects (to help them extend and transfer the benefits to the wider sector) in their workplan,
       augmenting their own initial benefits realisation activities. Some interactions may be mediated, and
       centrally-orchestrated activities provide, by the synthesis and support project (to be funded under
       Call I of this circular).


Deliverables
   C7. Call II Institutional Exemplar projects are expected to deliver:
              i.    Real in-service exemplar(s) of institution-wide systems addressing key areas of ICT
                    concern, as outlined in the briefing paper available at Appendix A
              ii.   Exemplar(s) of JISC-funded models, Services and/or innovation programme outputs being
                    used to deliver value to institutions (see the Relevant Programme Outputs and Services
                    section in the supporting briefing paper, available at Appendix A);
              iii. Exemplar(s) of successful technology-assisted change in practices and processes across
                   departmental boundaries;




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               iv. A regularly updated blog or wiki to report on project progress and lessons learnt to the JISC
                   programme team, the synthesis and support project (funded under Call I), large-scale
                   projects focusing on work-based learning and employer engagement (anticipated to be
                   funded under a future Institutional Innovation circular in September 2008 and commencing
                   in January 2009), and small-scale benefits realisation projects (also anticipated to be
                   funded from a September 2008 Circular and commencing in January 2009) in addition to
                   the formal reporting requirements under the terms and conditions of grant;
               v.    Feedback on the implementation of institution-wide systems using service-oriented
                     approaches (see the Guiding Principles and Approaches to be Employed section of the
                     briefing paper at Appendix A), including the effectiveness, and further refinement and
                     development, of e-Framework domain maps and service models;
               vi. Dissemination material to be shared with the wider sector, forming the basis of good
                   practice advice and guidance on technology interventions that address key areas of ICT
                   concern.
     C8. In addition, the following outputs are expected from projects addressing particular areas of ICT
         concern. A single project is not expected to deliver all of these outputs, however proposals should
         consider whether and where they are able to combine initiatives in order to provide exemplar(s) (and
         contribute to best practice advice) across a number of cross-institutional areas – thereby maximising
         the impact and benefit to their institution(s) and to the wider sector:
               i.    Exemplar(s) of good institutional practices that support learners, teachers and
                     researchers using emergent personal technologies and social software. Projects
                     under this area should help increase understanding of the issues surrounding the support
                     for the emergent technologies of Web 2.0 software and mobile devices from an institutional
                     and organisational perspective – thereby helping institutions manage their responses to the
                     challenges that can arise, particularly in the context of staff and students‟ demand for
                     flexible access to their institutions‟ functions and services. It is anticipated that project
                     outputs will help to build capacity in the wider sector and share good practices of emergent
                     technology integration that benefit both institutions, their staff and their students. Bidders
                     should demonstrate how their proposal aligns with, supports, or will help develop
                     institutional policies on emergent technology integration.
                     Bidders will need to consider areas of work that seek to develop mechanisms, policies,
                     frameworks, architectures and structures whose aim is to enable institutions to overcome
                     the technical, organisational, cultural, historical or practical barriers to effective and
                     sustainable integration of emergent technologies with institutional systems.
                     Exemplar projects are expected to explore the potential to exploit existing software tools, or
                     to deploy them following a minimal amount of additional development and prototyping, so as
                     to maximise the time available for implementation within their institution(s). However, as
                     users of emergent technologies have come to expect rapid and agile development in
                     response to changing user need and emerging practices, projects addressing this area of
                     ICT concern will also be expected to maintain a development capability that will allow rapid
                     response to user feedback and deployment of subsequent updates during the project
                     lifecycle;
               ii.   Exemplar(s) of technology and practice interventions that improve institutions’
                     environmental sustainability through green computing. Projects under this area should
                     support institutional embedding of aspects of sustainable development in the adoption of
                     energy-efficient technologies, management of institutional estates, and/or design and
                     delivery of the curriculum that reflects institutional approaches to sustainable development.
                     In addition to adopting sustainable „means‟, projects may explicitly provide technical and/or
                     administrative support for education for sustainable development activities that aim to
                     deliver against an environmental sustainability strategic objective as their „end‟ goal,
                     potentially in support of an institutional commitment to business and community
                     engagement; potentially in partnership with other organisations, such as the Higher
                                           79
                     Education Academy . These might include the development of pedagogy, curricula and
                     extra-curricula activities that enable and encourage learners to develop the citizenship

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     Higher Education Academy Education for Sustainable Development http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/sustainability.htm


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                   values, skills and knowledge that will help them to contribute to sustainable development in
                   society;
              iii. Exemplar(s) of effective institutional planning for and use of future learning spaces
                   and other estates assets, making the most appropriate use of ICT and taking account of
                   environmental sustainability factors. Whilst the design and effective use of physical spaces
                   may play a part in projects proposed under the first (i.e. „emergent technologies‟) and
                   second (i.e. green ICT) areas of ICT concern, since many institutions are making
                   substantial investments to their Estates portfolios it is vital that exemplar guidance is
                   available to the sector in this area which takes account of user behaviour, ICT and the green
                   agenda.
                   Projects may focus on specific aspects of the design and use of physical spaces, and form
                   part of a much larger strategic institutional investment. However deliverables and the
                   learning from the project should be transferable to other institutional context and bidders are
                   advised to consider issues with sector-wide resonance (such as trends of behaviour, users‟
                   expectations of ICT and living / working / studying environments, environmental
                   responsibilities, financial considerations, etc) in their proposals.
              iv. Exemplar(s) of institution-wide administration systems that improve the support of
                                         80
                  teaching and learning , and research. Projects should demonstrate improvements to the
                  effectiveness, efficiency and quality of institutional processes and systems,.
                   Projects may provide exemplar integration across key institutional systems (such as finance,
                   estates, student records, library management, human resources, timetabling, virtual learning
                   environments, research support systems, customer relationship management systems),
                   integration of institutional systems with user-supplied emergent personal technologies (see
                   also under the first area of ICT concern),cross-institution application of identity management
                   to facilitate wide, secure access to institutional and national resources, effective data
                   management of the „single source of truth‟ in a complex environment – possibly
                   accommodating user-generated data, improved workflows in key institutional processes,
                   and/or the provision / consumption of shared services.


Funding Available
     C9. Funding of between £200,000 and £300,000 per project is available for 20 projects over 18 months
         commencing from September 2008 and completing no later than 31 March 2010.




80
  For information, JISC is intending to release a circular under the Institutional Innovation programme in September
2008 that focuses on e-Learning e-Administration issues surrounding work-based learning and employer engagement;.
Bidders with an interest in this area are therefore advised to consider that forthcoming circular as being of potentially
more relevance.


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Appendix D
Evaluation Criteria


  Evaluation Criteria                Questions Evaluators will be Considering
  Appropriateness and Fit to         Is the proposal in scope? If it isn‟t, you should score the bid poorly under
  Programme Objectives               this criteria and NOT recommend the bid for funding.
  and Overall Value to JISC
                                     Is the proposal a good idea?
  Community
                                     Does the bid clearly articulate its intentions?
  The extent to which the
  proposal addresses the             Does the proposal demonstrate that the project outputs meet a need
  issues and demands                 and will result in benefits to the community?
  outlined in the call, and
  shows innovation as                If appropriate, is the bid technologically innovative and sound?
  appropriate; the extent to         Is there evidence that the proposal has been developed in the context of
  which the project outcomes         institutional learning, research and/or information management
  will be of overall value to the    strategies to ensure that project outputs can be embedded and
  community.                         sustained beyond the JISC funding period?
  (25%)                              Where appropriate, does the bid propose to take a service-oriented
                                     approach and adopt open standards to ensure that developments can
                                     be more easily taken up and reused elsewhere, and indicate the intent
                                     to work with the e-Framework?
                                     If appropriate, does the bid discuss sustainability beyond project
                                     funding?
  Evaluation Criteria                Questions Evaluators will be Considering
  Quality of Proposal and            Are there clear deliverables?
  Robustness of Workplan
                                     Is the intellectual property rights (IPR) position clear and appropriate
  The quality of the proposal        with regard to project outputs?
  will be assessed on the
                                     Is the methodology for meeting the deliverables sound and achievable?
  basis of the deliverables
  identified, and the evidence       Is there active engagement throughout the project to ensure a
  provided of how these will         sustainable and embedded end-product, where applicable?
  be achieved, including an
                                     Is the workplan robust in terms of project management arrangements?
  assessment of the risks.
  (25%)                              How will the success of the project be measured?
                                     Does the bid include a well-thought-through initial assessment of risks,
                                     which considers the project‟s failure to deliver, and predictable
                                     consequences that are not necessarily positive?
  Engagement with the                Does the bid propose engagement with project stakeholders and
  Community                          practitioners (if appropriate) throughout the life of the project?
  The degree to which the            Is a stakeholder mapping and/or user needs analysis provided?
  proposal demonstrates an
                                     Does the bid propose an appropriate dissemination approach?
  openness and willingness to
  work with and share findings       Does it have an appropriate evaluation approach, e.g. talking to
  with the JISC community            stakeholders?
  and to work in partnership
                                     Does the bid demonstrate willingness to work in partnership with JISC in
  with JISC in forward
                                     the dissemination and evaluation activities and to make available
  planning, dissemination and
  evaluation, and to continue        outputs beyond the funding period?
  to make available the
  findings beyond the project



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     period.
     (20%)
     Value for Money                   When considering value for money, evaluators will refer to their
                                       assessment under the above evaluation criteria and compare this with
     The value of the expected
                                       the cost requested from JISC.
     project outcomes, vis-à-vis
     the level of funding              Does the bid discuss the quantitative and qualitative benefits to the
     requested, institutional          project partners of undertaking the work?
     contributions; taking into
                                       Given the benefits, are the institutional contributions appropriate?
     account the level of
     innovation, chance of
     success and relevance to
     the target communities.
     (15%)
     Previous experience of            Does the bid demonstrate a realistic understanding of the scale of the
     the project team                  task, both in terms of technical and management issues?
     Evidence of the project           Does the bid demonstrate previous successful delivery and
     team's understanding of the       management of projects?
     technical and/or
                                       Does the bid link the expertise of the team with the roles to be
     management issues
                                       undertaken and the staffing budget?
     involved, and of its ability to
     manage and deliver a              If the bid is from a consortium:
     successful project, for
                                          i.    have the partners provided evidence of their commitment in the
     example through work done
                                                form of supporting letters?
     to date in the area or in
                     81
     related fields.                      ii.   have the partners demonstrated how the work aligns with their
     (15%)                                      objectives and priorities?
                                          iii. is it clear what the role of each partner is and how the actual or
                                               planned management structure, governance, decision-making
                                               and funding arrangements will function?




81
   In the case of consortium proposals, the strength of the consortium will be considered as part of the project team
criteria. This refers to evidence of the commitment shown by the consortium partners to the consortium and the
proposed project, and the degree to which the work proposed is aligned with institutional strategies and is shown to be
embedded within the mainstream of the consortium and with the collaborative partners‟ priorities. Bidders may wish to
produce evidence such as partnership agreements, strategic plans, working papers etc. These may be included as
appendices to the proposal and need not be counted within the ten-page limit.



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Appendix E
Example Budget for Tenders Submitted by UK HEIs82

Directly Incurred                                  Apr 2008 – Mar 2009           Apr 2009 – Mar 2010          TOTAL £
Staff
Post, Grade, No. Hours & % FTE                     £                             £                            £

Etc.                                               £                             £                            £

Etc.                                               £                             £                            £

Total Directly Incurred Staff (A)                  £                             £                            £

Non-Staff                                          April 08 – March 09           April 09 – March 10          TOTAL £
Travel and expenses                                £                             £                            £

Hardware/software                                  £                             £                            £

Dissemination                                      £                             £                            £

Evaluation                                         £                             £                            £

Other                                              £                             £                            £

Total Directly Incurred Non-Staff (B)              £                             £                            £

Directly Incurred Total (A+B=C) (C)                £                             £                            £

Directly Allocated                                 April 08 – March 09           April 09 – March 10          TOTAL £
Staff                                              £                             £                            £

Estates                                            £                             £                            £

Other                                              £                             £                            £

Directly Allocated Total (D)                       £                             £                            £

Indirect Costs (E)                                 £                             £                            £

Total Project Cost (C+D+E)                         £                             £                            £

Amount Requested from JISC                         £                             £                            £

Institutional Contributions                        £                             £                            £


Percentage Contributions over the                  JISC                          Partners                     Total
life of the project                                X%                            X%                           100%




82
     See overleaf for an explanation of the terms directly incurred, directly allocated and indirect costs.


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Explanation of Terms
   E1. All applications from UK HE institutions for development funding from JISC should be costed on the
       basis of full economic costs (fEC). fEC is the total cost of a project. All applications should be costed
       on financial years April – March NOT academic years August – July.
   E2. Projects should be costed using the TRAC Research indirect and estates charge-out rates, and
       TRAC fEC methods for Research. If a project is not classified as Research under annual TRAC the
       Research charge-out rates should still be used. However, there is no need to amend the
       denominator or the numerator of the charge-out rate calculations to try to incorporate these projects.
   E3. Further guidance on fEC for JISC-funded research and development projects can be found at:
       http://www.jisc.ac.uk/fundingopportunities/bidguide/full_economic_costing.aspx


Cost Headings
Directly Incurred
   E4. These are costs that are explicitly identifiable as part of the project, are charged at cash value
       actually spent and can be supported by an audit record. They include:
              i.    Staff. Payroll costs requested for staff, full- or part-time, who will work on the project and
                    whose time can be supported by a full audit trail during the life of the project. Academic-
                    related staff who lead or work directly on a project should be classified as „researchers‟
                    when costing the project and should be allocated indirect/estates costs. They should be
                    included in the annual TRAC time allocation collection exercises when those are carried out,
                    and their time on projects should be included in the denominator of the indirect and estates
                    charge-out rate calculations when they are next calculated.
                    Unless a member of staff will be spending 100% of their time on a project, all estimates of
                    time on a project should be made in numbers of hours or days, for each year of the project.
                    This should then be converted to a FTE for use in calculating the indirect and estate costs
                    charges;
              ii.   Travel and Expenses. Funds for travel and subsistence for use by staff who work on the
                    project where these are required by the nature of the work. This should include attendance
                    at programme meetings (up to two per year) and other relevant meetings dependent upon
                    the project/programme;
              iii. Equipment. The cost of individual items of hardware or software dedicated to the project,
                   including VAT, e.g. a computer for a newly recruited member of staff for the project;
              iv. Dissemination. The cost of any dissemination activities proposed for the project;
              v.    Evaluation. The cost of any formative or summative evaluation activities proposed for the
                    project;
              vi. Other Costs. Costs of other items dedicated to the project, including consumables,
                  recruitment and advertising costs for staff directly employed on the project.


Directly Allocated
   E5. These are the costs of resources used by a project, which are shared by other activities. They are
       charged to projects on the basis of estimates rather than actual costs and do not represent actual
       costs on a project-by-project basis. They include:
              i.    Staff. Proposals will need to show the costs of any principal investigators/project directors
                    and any co-investigators/co-directors if their time charged to the project is based on
                    estimates rather than actual costs. This may also include the costs of technical and clerical
                    staff, and if a project is buying a small amount of one or more of a person‟s time;
              ii.   Estates. These costs may include building and premises costs, basic services and utilities,
                    and any equipment maintenance or operational costs not already included under other cost
                    headings;




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              iii. Other Directly Allocated. These costs may include, for example, access to institutional
                   research facilities such as equipment and IT systems.


Indirect Costs
   E6. These include non-specific costs charged across all projects based on estimates that are not
       otherwise included as Directly Allocated costs. They include the costs of administration, such as
       personnel, finance, library and some departmental services.
   E7. NB: Budgets should clarify the FTEs used to calculate the indirect and estates charges, and indicate
       which staff have been included.


Indexation
   E8. Costings for subsequent years should factor in inflationary increases for salaries and other costs. All
       costings should be inclusive of any VAT applicable.


Project Partners
   E9. Funding for project partners, e.g. staff time, should be clearly identified in the proposal under the
       relevant heading. Resources to be provided by project partners, whether cash or in-kind
       contributions, should also be clearly identified in the proposal.


Justification of Costs
   E10. All costs associated with the project must be fully justified.


Virement
   E11. Directly Incurred Costs can be vired within the overall Directly Incurred budget heading, however,
        Directly Allocated and Indirect Costs cannot (they do not vary from the estimates made on project
        application).




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Appendix F
Generic Terms and Conditions of Funding

Preamble
   F1. JISC funds a wide variety of projects on behalf of its funding bodies. These projects include
       consultancies and supporting studies where the main deliverable is a report, and projects where the
       deliverables include products or services as well as reports. These generic terms and conditions
       apply to all projects and define the responsibilities of the lead institution and its project partners.


Adherence to Project Management Guidelines
   F2. The institution and its partners must adhere to the Project Management Guidelines available
       electronically at http://www.jisc.ac.uk/fundingopportunities/proj_manguide.aspx. The Guidelines
       provide initial advice on project planning, project management, the relationships between JISC
       programmes and projects, evaluation, and dissemination. The Guidelines will be updated from time
       to time, and the lead institution will be notified of any major changes. It is the responsibility of the
       lead institution to inform its project partners accordingly.


Submission of Agreed Deliverables
   F3. The institution and its partners must supply all deliverables specified in the agreed project proposal.
       The schedule for submitting deliverables must be included in the Project Plan and agreed with the
       JISC Executive. Any changes to this schedule must be agreed in writing with the JISC Executive.
   F4. Project deliverables are subject to approval by the JISC Executive, and the framework for approval
       is outlined in the Project Management Guidelines.
   F5. Project deliverables will be deposited in the appropriate JISC data centre or managed repository,
       where appropriate.


Core Project Document Set
   F6. The lead institution must also supply a core set of documents to indicate how the project work will be
       planned and implemented, to report on progress, and to inform future auditing and evaluation. It is
       the responsibility of the lead institution to agree these documents with its project partners prior to
       submission.
   F7. The core project documents are listed below and further information about each document is
       provided in the Project Management Guidelines.
   F8. Core project documents are subject to approval by the JISC Executive, and the framework for
       approval is outlined in the Project Management Guidelines.
   F9. Core project documents will be deposited in the JISC records management system and/or project
       information management system so they are accessible to the JISC Executive.


                Core Project Document                                              Timing
Project Plan (including an Evaluation Plan, QA Plan,        Within 1 month of start date
Dissemination Plan, and Exit/Sustainability Plan)
Project web page on JISC web site (including copy           Within 1 month of start date
of accepted Project Plan)
Project web site at lead institution                        Within 3 months of start date
Consortium Agreement (for projects involving more           Within 3 months of start date
than one institution)



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Progress Reports (including financial statement)           Default 2 per year; schedule to be agreed with
                                                           Programme Manager for projects of less than 12
                                                           months
Technical and supporting documentation (for                Timing to be agreed with Programme Manager
projects creating technical deliverables)
Final Report                                               Draft version 1 month before project end date; final
                                                           version at project end date
Completion Report, including financial statement           Project end date


Intellectual Property Rights
   F10. The ownership of intellectual property rights made, discovered, or created during the period of
        project funding will be indicated in the funding circular/ITT and in the letter of grant.
   F11. The institution and its partners must ensure that deliverables do not in any way infringe copyright or
        other intellectual property rights of any third party. For content creation projects, copyright and other
        intellectual property rights should be cleared before digitisation begins or cleared in stages as a
        managed part of the creation process. Rights need to be cleared for networked delivery of these
        resources in learning, teaching and research. It is a matter for the institution and its partners to
        ensure that their rights are adequately protected.


Jorum Deposit for Learning Resources
   F12. Jorum provides a long-term solution for hosting and delivering any project outputs that are learning
        materials, case studies, teaching materials and staff development materials. Jorum is available as a
        national service for deposit and access to such materials and JISC strongly encourages its use by
        JISC-funded projects. Where IPR and other conditions permit this, the use of Jorum will be
        mandated. Further guidance will be indicated in the funding circular/ITT and in the letter of grant.


Charging
   F13. Funding is made available on the condition that the institution and its partners shall make available
        deliverables developed by the project free of charge to the teaching, learning, and research
        communities during the period of funding, except for a handling and/or usage charge with must be
        agreed in writing with the JISC Executive.


Programme Meetings and Events
   F14. Programme meetings and other events are organised by JISC to brief project staff and share
        knowledge. Two major programme meetings are held per year, and attendance at programme
        meetings is mandatory. Projects should allocate staff time to participate in programme activities,
        and the Project Management Guidelines provide guidance on days per year to allow. The project will
        be provided with a schedule of meeting dates.
   F15. Projects should also allocate time to liaise with the Programme Manager on a regular basis, and
        institutions should provide access to the Programme Manager at any reasonable time.


Dissemination
   F16. The institution and its partners must commit to disseminating and sharing learning from the project
        throughout the community. The institution and its partners must develop a Dissemination Plan as
        part of the overall Project Plan and report on dissemination activities in Progress Reports and the
        Completion Report. Further information about dissemination is available in the Project Management
        Guidelines.




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Project Web Site
   F17. The institution and its partners must create a web page or web site to explain the project aims and
        objectives and to disseminate information about project activities and results. The Project
        Management Guidelines give guidance on the scope, content, and design of web sites.
   F18. Where appropriate, project deliverables and core project documents may be posted on the project
        web site. As the project web site is primarily a dissemination vehicle, deliverables and documents
        posted are considered to be copies, and the masters will be deposited in the appropriate JISC
        repository.
   F19. The lead institution or one of its partners must agree to host the web site on their server for a
        minimum of 3 years after the end of the project and to assist JISC in archiving it subsequently.


Publicity
   F20. In any publicity material or public presentation about the project it is essential to include an indication
        that the project was made possible by funding from JISC. Projects and services must adhere to JISC
        PR Guidelines and to any additional advice established by the JISC Communications and Marketing
        team in due course. The current JISC Communication and Marketing Toolkit can be found at
        http://www.jisc.ac.uk/aboutus/marketing_toolkit.aspx.


Open Access
   F21. JISC supports unrestricted access to the published output of publicly-funded research and wishes to
        encourage open access to research outputs to ensure that the fruits of UK research are made more
        widely available.
   F22. JISC firmly believes in the value of repositories as a means of improving access to the results of
        publicly-funded research and is investing significantly in this area. As part of this, JISC is funding
        „The Depot‟; a repository which can host research outputs should institutions not have a repository in
        which to deposit (http://depot.edina.ac.uk). A national support project is also available to help
        institutions develop repositories and share practice
        (http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/programme_rep_pres/reps_support.aspx).
   F23. JISC expects that the full text of all published research papers and conference proceedings arising
        from JISC-funded work should be deposited in an open access institutional repository, or if that is
        not available, „The Depot‟ or a subject repository. Deposit should include bibliographical metadata
        relating to such articles, and should be completed within six months of the publication date of the
        paper.
   F24. Which version of the article should be deposited depends upon publishers‟ agreements with their
        authors but JISC mandates that articles should be made available through publishers that adopt the
        RoMEO "green" approach as a minimum (for further information see
        http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeoinfo.html#colours). Authors should go to another journal if the journal
        chosen does not adopt the RoMEO "green" conditions.
   F25. JISC mandates the deposit of the native version (Word, PPT, etc.), with PDF as well if wanted, but
        certainly with a format from which usable xml can in principle be derived (not PDF).


Evaluation
   F26. JISC undertakes evaluation of its development projects and programmes to ensure that knowledge
        and results are shared with the wider community and to improve the development programme itself.
        Projects are required to participate in programme evaluation activities organised by JISC.
   F27. The institution and its partners are also required to undertake evaluation of their work. The
        institution and its partners must develop an Evaluation Plan as part of the overall Project Plan and
        report on evaluation results in Progress Reports and the Final Report. Further information about
        evaluation is available in the Project Management Guidelines.



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Exit/Sustainability Plan
   F28. Funding is for a limited term as set out in the letter of grant. The institution and its partners must
        develop an Exit/Sustainability Plan as part of the overall Project Plan to document the planning
        needed to get the best value from the work that has been funded. This will include an assessment
        of what should happen to deliverables and options for sustainability after funding ceases. Where the
        institution and its partners wish to exploit deliverables on a commercial basis after funding ceases,
        they should submit a business plan with economic models that demonstrate how the product or
        service will be self-sustaining. Further information about exit/sustainability is available in the Project
        Management Guidelines.


Adherence to Standards
   F29. The institution and its partners must use the technical standards stipulated by JISC and where
        unstipulated open standards wherever possible, Any deviation should be justified in the proposal
        and any alternative be designed with re-use by others in mind. Ease of interoperability between
        systems is key to the provision of next generation technologies for education and research, and
        projects are expected to work with JISC to address this issue. It is the responsibility of the lead
        institution to inform its project partners accordingly. Relevant standards can be founded in the JISC
        Standards Catalogue http://standards.jisc.ac.uk/.


Quality Assurance
   F30. The institution and its partners must put in place appropriate formal quality assurance procedures to
        ensure that deliverables are fit for purpose and comply with specifications, JISC guidelines on
        standards and best practice, and accessibility legislation. Projects must develop a QA Plan as part
        of the overall Project Plan describing the QA procedures they will put in place and supply evidence
        of compliance when deliverables are submitted. Further information about QA is available in the
        Project Management Guidelines.


Payment Schedule
   F31. The schedule of payments will be indicated in the letter of grant. If more than one institution is
        involved in a project or service, payments will be made to the lead institution. It is the responsibility
        of the lead institution to disburse the funds to its project partners.
   F32. Payment is conditional upon satisfactory progress with milestones and deliverables. The institution
        and its partners must supply deliverables and core project documents on schedule or subsequent
        payments may be withheld.
   F33. At the end of the project, any unspent funds should be returned to JISC unless a formal agreement
        is reached with the JISC Executive about how these funds may be spent to further support the work
        of the project.
   F34. For financial audit, the procedures of the lead or fund-holding institution will apply. In general, JISC
        does not intend to send financial auditors to projects. However, there remains the possibility that
        JISC's auditors may wish to audit projects. Project fund holders are required to make themselves
        available for a visit by members of the JISC Executive or nominees on reasonable notice.


Staff Development
   F35. Funding is for a limited term as set out in the letter of grant. Near the end of the project funding,
        institutions should inform project staff about career development opportunities. These might include
        information about job vacancies within the institution or opportunities for training and career
        guidance.




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Compliance with UK and EU Legislation
   F36. The institution and its partners must comply with any UK or EU legislation or any international Treaty
        obligations currently in force or introduced during the timescale of the project that has implications
        for the conduct of projects or the deliverables/documents they supply. JISC will endeavour to inform
        the lead institution of relevant legislation and supply guidance for compliance. It is the responsibility
        of the lead institution to inform its project partners accordingly. Further advice and guidance is
        available from the JISC Legal Information Service
        (http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/services/as_jisclegal.aspx), email: jlis@strath.ac.uk, Tel: 0141 548
        4939.


Accessibility
   F37. In line with Government legislation and social inclusion initiatives, JISC is committed to providing
        resources that are accessible to a diverse range of users. In order to achieve this JISC advise that
        all resources including the project web site meet good practice standards and guidelines pertaining
        to the media in which they are produced, for example HTML resources should be produced to W3C
        html 4.01 strict (http://www.w3.org/TR/1999/REC-html401-19991224/) and use W3C WAI guidelines
        to double A conformance (http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG1AA-Conformance). Further advice and
        guidance is available from the JISC TechDis Service (http://www.techdis.ac.uk), e-mail:
        helpdesk@techdis.ac.uk, Tel: 01904 754 530.


Data Protection
   F38. The institution and its partners must accept responsibility as the data controller or Joint Data
        Controllers as defined by the Data Protection Act 1998 („the Act‟) for the personal data collected and
        processed as a result of this project. Neither HEFCE nor the funding bodies accept responsibility for
        any breaches of the Act which occur due to the actions of project staff or agents directed by them.
   F39. HEFCE is the recognised data controller for JISC. In line with the requirements of the Data
        Protection Act 1998, the institution and its partners hereby grant HEFCE permission to hold the
        names, job titles, and work contact details of project staff to enable administration of the programme
        that the project is part of and to keep project staff up to date with information pertinent to it.
   F40. The institution and its partners also grant HEFCE permission to hold these contact details as part of
        the main JISC Contacts Database. They will be used to contact staff or send them information from
        other JISC sources relating to forthcoming events or initiatives which may be of interest.
   F41. This information would be made available to the JISC Executive, staff within the Regional Support
        Centres and staff within other JISC-funded services and initiatives only for the purposes described
        above. This data will be held until such time as the institution instructs HEFCE otherwise or for the
        lifetime of HEFCE.
   F42. Any institution which prefers that project details were not held as part of the JISC Contacts
        Database, or would like any further information about how this data will be processed, should
        contact the JISC Executive.


Freedom of Information
   F43. The institution and its partners should be aware that educational institutions are listed as public
        authorities under Schedule 1 of the Freedom of Information Act 2000 („the Act‟). The information
        created by project staff during the course of the project and as described in their original bid is
        therefore covered by the provisions of the Act.
   F44. Neither HEFCE nor the funding bodies accept any responsibility for the project‟s compliance with the
        Act for information held by the project staff. This is deemed to be the responsibility of their host
        institution(s).
   F45. HEFCE will comply with the terms of the Act for information relating to the project or programme of
        which it is part that is held by the JISC Executive. Project staff should therefore be aware that any
        contracts, information or communications in written form (including email) which are sent to the JISC


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                                                                                                JISC Circular 07/08
                                                                    http://www.jisc.ac.uk/fundingopportunities.aspx

         Executive (including the Programme Manager) may be made available to the public on receipt of a
         valid request and unless covered by one of the classes of exempt information listed in Part 2 of the
         Act.

JISC Executive
May 2008




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                                                                                                   JISC Circular 07/08
                                                                       http://www.jisc.ac.uk/fundingopportunities.aspx

Appendix G
Proposal Cover Sheet


Cover Sheet for Proposals
(All sections must be completed)

                                                    Institutional Innovation Programme

Name of Area Bidding/Submitting Interest For (tick one):

 Call I:      Synthesis, project support and support for benefits realisation activities

 Call II:     Large-Scale Institutional Exemplars


Name of Lead Institution:
Name of Proposed Project:

Name(s) of Project Partner(s):
Full Contact Details for Primary Contact:


Name:
Position:
Email:
Address:


Tel:
Fax:
Length of Project:
Project Start Date:                                     Project End Date:

Total Funding Requested from JISC:
Funding Broken Down over Financial Years (April - March):
       Apr 2008 – Mar 2009                 Apr 2009 – Mar 2010                 April 2010 – Mar 2011



Total Institutional Contributions:
Outline Project Description




I have looked at the example FOI form at Appendix H and included an                   YES             NO
FOI form in the attached bid (Tick Box)
I have read the Circular and associated Terms and Conditions of                       YES             NO
Grant at Appendix F (Tick Box)




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                                                                                               JISC Circular 07/08
                                                                   http://www.jisc.ac.uk/fundingopportunities.aspx

Appendix H
FOI Withheld Information Form

We would like JISC to consider withholding the following sections or paragraphs from disclosure, should the
contents of this proposal be requested under the Freedom of Information Act, or if we are successful in our
bid for funding and our project proposal is made available on JISC‟s website.
We acknowledge that the FOI Withheld Information Form is of indicative value only and that JISC may
nevertheless be obliged to disclose this information in accordance with the requirements of the Act. We
acknowledge that the final decision on disclosure rests with JISC.


Section / Paragraph No.              Relevant exemption from     Justification
                                     disclosure under FOI




Please see http://www.ico.gov.uk for further information on the Freedom of Information Act and the
exemptions to disclosure it contains.


Example:
Section / Paragraph No.              Relevant exemption from     Justification
                                     disclosure under FOI
2.4                                  s.43 Commercial Interests   Contains detailed description
                                                                 of our proposed system
                                                                 design which would damage
                                                                 our commercial interests if
                                                                 disclosed, by making this
                                                                 information available to
                                                                 competitors.




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