The 22nd Annual Regional Phosphate Conference Sustaining Success

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					The 22nd Annual Regional
 Phosphate Conference
  “Sustaining Success”
       The 22nd Annual
Regional Phosphate Conference

       Sustaining Success




  Wednesday & Thursday October 10 & 11, 2007
    The Lakeland Center, Lakeland, Florida

                  Sponsored by:

  Society for Mining, Metallurgy, & Exploration (SME)
  Florida Institute of Phosphate Research (FIPR)
  American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE)
  American Institute of Professional Geologists (AIPG)
  Association of Fertilizer & Phosphate Chemists (AFPC)
  REFRESHMENT SPONSORS

              PLATINUM
       ArrMaz Custom Chemicals
    Central Maintenance & Welding
           CF Industries, Inc.
  COMANCO Environmental Corporation
    Metalcraft Services of Tampa, Inc.
         Mosaic Fertilizer, LLC
         Motion Industries, Inc.

                 GOLD
        Ardaman & Associates, Inc.
      Chemical Lime of Alabama, Inc.
      DCR Engineering Services, Inc.
Environmental Consulting & Technology, Inc.
           GIW Industries, Inc.
            Koch-Glitsch, LP
       Layne Christensen Company
               Moretrench
       PhosChem Supply Company
           TestAmerica Tampa

                SILVER
         Pickett & Associates, Inc.

               BRONZE
           Aleff Group, Inc.
 American Compliance Technologies, Inc.
       Arroyo Process Equipment
FRIATEC-Rheinhütte Pumps & Valves, LLC
              Shaw E & I
   2007 PHOSPHATE CONFERENCE COMMITTEE

CONFERENCE CHAIRPERSON.......................................................................... DAVID GOSSETT
                                                                                                                 CF INDUSTRIES
ASSISTANT CONFERENCE CHAIRPERSON.............................................................. GARY BLITCH
                                                                                                                 CF INDUSTRIES
GENERAL SESSION CHAIRPERSON................................................................ JOHN GARLANGER
                                                                                              ARDAMAN & ASSOCIATES, INC.
TECHNICAL SESSION CHAIRPERSON................................................................ JEFF BERISWILL
                                                                        DUNKELBERGER ENGINEERING & TESTING, INC.
ENVIRONMENTAL CHAIRPERSON.............................................................. ELIZABETH FOELLER
                                                                                                                       MOSAIC
CHEMICAL PROCESSING CHAIRPERSON.............................................................. DENNIS SISCO
                                                                                                                       MOSAIC
MINING AND MINERAL PROCESSING CHAIRPERSON...................................... ANDREA WILLIAMS
                                                                                                                       MOSAIC
RECLAMATION CHAIRPERSON....................................................................... KEVIN CLARIDGE
                                                           FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
GEOLOGY/MINE PLANNING CHAIRPERSON...................................................... WINK WINKLER
                                                                                                      E.R. JAHNA INDUSTRIES
ANALYTICAL/REGULATORY CHAIRPERSON..................................................... SANFORD SIEGEL
                                                                                                                 CF INDUSTRIES
REGISTRATION, EXHIBITS & ARRANGEMENTS........................................................ ANNA DUNN
                                                                                                          SHANNON MEDLEY
                                                                         FLORIDA INSTITUTE OF PHOSPHATE RESEARCH
                                                                                                                 TODD PARKER
                                                                                               ARRMAZ CUSTOM CHEMICALS
FINANCE.......................................................................................................... TERRY LAMY
                                                                                                                 CF INDUSTRIES
PUBLICITY.......................................................................................... MARY ELLEN MURPHY
                                                                         FLORIDA INSTITUTE OF PHOSPHATE RESEARCH
SPONSORSHIP SLIDES.................................................................................... MARIE WILMOT
                                                                         FLORIDA INSTITUTE OF PHOSPHATE RESEARCH
MAILING LIST........................................................................................... STEFAN KATZARAS
                                                                                                                 CF INDUSTRIES
PROFESSIONAL ENGINEER REGISTRATION....................................................... JEFF BERISWILL
                                                                        DUNKELBERGER ENGINEERING & TESTING, INC.
AUDIOVISUAL.................................................................................................... JON HARRIS
                                                                                                              AARON MEDLEY
                                                                         FLORIDA INSTITUTE OF PHOSPHATE RESEARCH
                                                                                                           CHRIS ANDERSON
                                                                                                                 CF INDUSTRIES
                                                                                                           ROBERT ANDREW
                                                                                              HUDSON PUMP & EQUIPMENT
PROGRAM/GRAPHICS......................................................................................... KATE HIMEL
                                                                         FLORIDA INSTITUTE OF PHOSPHATE RESEARCH
PAST CONFERENCE CHAIR........................................................................... RICHARD BISHOP
                                                                                                          HARRISON WESTERN
SME REPRESENTATIVE..................................................................................... GARY BLITCH
                                                                                                                 CF INDUSTRIES
AIPG REPRESENTATIVE................................................................................ WINK WINKLER
                                                                                                      E.R. JAHNA INDUSTRIES
AICHE REPRESENTATIVE................................................................................. DENNIS SISCO
                                                                                                                       MOSAIC
AFPC REPRESENTATIVE........................................................................... MARLENE PARRISH
                                                                                                                       MOSAIC
FIPR REPRESENTATIVE..................................................................................... BRIAN BIRKY
                                                                         FLORIDA INSTITUTE OF PHOSPHATE RESEARCH
     REGIONAL PHOSPHATE CONFERENCE
                 ORIGIN

This Conference began formulation in 1985 at a Florida Institute of Phosphate
Research (FIPR) technical advisory committee meeting. Industry experts and
scientists were trying to decide how to get information about FIPR’s research
findings out to the phosphate community and others. Ron Wiegel - then an
advisory committee member and later, a FIPR Board of Directors member -
suggested a conference like the American Institute of Mining Engineers (AIME*)
puts on in the iron and copper mining regions.

Ron then took the idea to the local AIME chapter where David Raden, a retired
executive with Estech, Inc., enthusiastically supported it and stepped in as
general chairman of the first Regional Phosphate Conference. Ron Wiegel,
with IMC, became the first technical session chairman and Colin Campbell, with
IMC, the first special session chairman. Mike Zellars of Zellars-Williams took
care of all the arrangements and really pushed the conference, according to
Ron.

Together, in conjunction with FIPR and its mining director Bob Akins, they
created a conference to share information about the business, technology and
environmental impact of phosphate mining. AIME and FIPR pooled resources,
rented the Lakeland Civic Center and put on the first conference in the spring of
1986. It quickly became self-supporting, attracting hundreds of participants from
throughout the country and even a few from other parts of the world.

It is the only conference in the nation that focuses on phosphate mining and is
unique because it is held in conjunction with the American Institute of Chemical
Engineers (AIChE) and the American Institute of Professional Geologists
(AIPG). In 2001, the AFPC (Association of Fertilizer and Phosphate Chemists)
also joined the conference.

The goal of this conference is to include everyone involved in the phosphate
mining and chemical processes. We hope you enjoy the presentations you’ll
hear this year.
                                  The 2007 Phosphate Conference Committee

* In 1995 AIME became known as SME (Society for Mining, Metallurgy, & Exploration)
            HERO OF THE INDUSTRY AWARDS
                SME/AIME*                 AIPG                       AIChE               AFPC**

2006 21st       Ronald Hartung            Wink Winkler               Miguel DeJesus      John Jernigan

2005 20th       Jim Sampson               Bob Goodrich               Ron Delavan         Don Jernstrom

2004 19th       Edmund Finch              None                       Chris Earl          David Averitt

2003 18th       Glenn Gruber              None                       Dick Fett           Harold Falls

2002 17th       John Garlanger            John Maddry                Frank Buzzanca      Ken Parks

2001 16th       George Weinman            None                       Craig Pflaum        Charles Thornton

2000 15th       John Paugh                John R. Walter             Dave Leyshon

1999 14th       Roy Duval                 Henry Lamb                 Randy Charlot

1998 13th       Lee Thurner               Leonard Burnett            Regis Stana

1997 12th       Tom Leto                  Jon Courtney               William Cook

1996 11th       Ron Wiegel                Eric Norman                Don Clark

1995 10th       Maywood Chesson           Walter Schmidt             Frank Arroyo, Sr.

1994 9th        Clint Hollingsworth       Lonnie Engel               Gerald Rubin

1993 8th        Selwyn Presnel            Don Crissinger             Gordon Palm

1992 7th        Fred Myers                Tom Scott                  Edward Newburg

1991 6th        Dan Lynch                 Rick Powers                Les Bromwell

1990 5th        Richard Hunter            Richard Fountain           Jim Williams

1989 4th        A.L. Holmes               Tom Patterson              Don Chamberlain

1988 3rd        Don Morrow                John Paugh                 Arthur Hansen

1987 2nd        Colin Campbell            James Cathcart             Ray Garcia

1986 1st        Dave Raden - General Chairman

* AIME – 1986-1995 SME – 1995-current
** AFPC joined the conference as a sponsor in 2001 and presented its first Hero award
                 2007 Regional Phosphate Conference



                  CONFERENCE DAY ONE

                Wednesday, October 10, 2007
           Registration and Exhibitor Hall open at 8:00 a.m.
      Registration continues through 9:00 a.m. Thursday morning




           9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. General Session

                      Conference Chairperson:
                     David Gossett, CF Industries

                  General Session Chairperson:
             John Garlanger, Ardaman & Associates, Inc.


     Florida Phosphate: Sustaining Success

This year’s Conference will look at how Florida will sustain the
industrial, technical, economic and environmental success it has
had in mining and processing its phosphate reserves. How does
the industry attract and retain quality people? What is the current
economic status of the industry? How does ethanol production
and the energy debate impact the industry? Permitting and
environmental compliance - what are the challenges and
solutions? These and other topics will be considered as a panel
addresses the 2007 Conference theme - Florida Phosphate:
Sustaining Success.

Panelists:
Al Mulhall, PCS, on Industry Economics
Jay Levenstein, FL Department of Agriculture, on Ethanol/Biofuels
David Townsend, Mosaic, on Permitting/Environmental Issues
Joe Tedesco, University of Florida Department of Civil Engineering, on
Attracting/Retaining People




Page 10                                               October 10 and 11
                    2007 Regional Phosphate Conference




                11:30 a.m. - 12:00 noon Break
              (Please visit the Exhibitor Booths)



                    12:00 noon - 1:30 p.m. Lunch
                            Keynote Speaker:
                          Dr. Jack Rechcigl,
                            University of Florida
         Center Director of Gulf Coast Research & Education Center
                    Professor of Soil and Water Science



         1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. Concurrent Sessions

                  Technical Session Chairperson:
       Jeff Beriswill, Dunkelberger Engineering and Testing, Inc.

                GEOLOGY / MINE PLANNING
       Session Chairperson: Wink Winkler, E.R. Jahna Industries
                       ENVIRONMENTAL
            Session Chairperson: Elizabeth Foeller, Mosaic




            4:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. Evening Social




October 10 and 11                                                    Page 11
                    2007 Regional Phosphate Conference



                    CONFERENCE DAY TWO
                     Thursday, October 11, 2007
                 Registration open from 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.
                       Exhibitor Hall opens at 8:00 a.m.



          9:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon Concurrent Sessions

                     Technical Session Chairperson:
          Jeff Beriswill, Dunkelberger Engineering and Testing, Inc.


              Mining and Mineral Processing
               Session Chairperson: Andrea Williams, Mosaic

                      CHEMICAL PROCESSING
                Session Chairperson: Dennis Sisco, Mosaic

                   12:00 noon - 1:30 p.m. Lunch
                       Hero of the Industry Awards
                        SME, AIChE, AIPG, AFPC



           1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. Concurrent Sessions

                           RECLAMATION
                Session Chairperson: Kevin Claridge, FDEP
                   Analytical / Regulatory
             Session Chairperson: Sanford Siegel, CF Industries

              At the session break, from 2:40 p.m. to 3:20 p.m.,
            there will be EXHIBITOR DOOR PRIZE drawings in the
               General Session Room. Must be present to win!


             4:30 p.m. - GRAND PRIZE DRAWINGS


Page 12                                                    October 10 and 11
                  Wednesday
                October 10, 2007


Afternoon Technical Program
                1:30 p.m.—4:30 p.m.
•   Conference technical sessions run concurrently

•   At the session break, remember to visit the Exhibitor Booths


      4:30 p.m.—6:30 p.m. Evening Social
                   2007 Regional Phosphate Conference



               GEOLOGY / MINE PLANNING

          Chairperson: Wink Winkler, E.R. Jahna Industries

                    Wednesday, October 10, 2007
                         1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
The Geology / Mine Planning Session for this year’s Conference includes a
variety of topics on Florida geology. Phosphate rock production and utilization
of uranium associated with phosphate rock will be addressed with up-to-date
overviews. A proposed depositional model for the Cypresshead Formation, the
primary source of construction sand in Florida, will be described. The potential
for mining discarded tailings and lower zone matrix will be discussed as well. A
lively discussion of these diverse geologic topics, and their impact on the
phosphate, aggregate and energy industries in Florida and beyond, is
anticipated.

     Abstracts for these presentations are found on pages 18 and 19.


1:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Kendall Fountain - Plum Creek Timber
The Stratigraphic and Sedimentalogical Significance of the Cypresshead
Formation: Insights into Pliocene Deposition and Reworking on the
Florida Platform

2:05 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Stephen M. Jasinski - U.S. Geological Survey
Phosphate Rock Reserves in the United States


2:40 p.m. - 3:20 p.m. Break

3:20 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Dr. Guerry McClellan - University of Florida
Uranium in Phosphate Rock: Reviewed and Revisited

3:55 p.m. - 4:25p.m.
William C. Warneke - Mineral Consultant
Potential Sources of Phosphate Rock in Central Florida

4:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. Evening Social



Page 16                                                      October 10 and 11
                    2007 Regional Phosphate Conference



                          ENVIRONMENTAL

               Chairperson: Elizabeth Foeller, Mosaic

                    Wednesday, October 10, 2007
                          1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Following the theme of this year’s Phosphate Conference, the Environmental
Technical Session will focus on presentation topics that further “Sustain Our
Success” for the future. From new reclamation techniques to Environmental
Management Systems (EMS), the industry is focused on how regulatory agen-
cies are impacting our business at a local, state, and federal level. Our industry
also is focused on reducing environmental liabilities, utilizing new technologies
to reduce or minimize the risk of our process water from the concentrates facili-
ties. Please don’t miss this opportunity to learn more about the environmental
issues that impact our industry and our ability to be successful in the future.

     Abstracts for these presentations are found on pages 22 and 23.


1:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Jim Voyles - Mosaic
An Industry Perspective of the EPA’s Mineral Processing Issues



2:05 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
Tom Myers - Mosaic
New Techniques in Reclamation and Overview of the Peace River
Cumulative Impact Study

2:40 p.m. - 3:20 p.m. Break

3:20 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Jim Bays - CH2MHILL
Biological Treatment of Process Water: Technology Overview

3:55 p.m. - 4:25 p.m.
David Cibik - Malcolm Pirnie
An Environmental Management System and Sustainability

4:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. Evening Social



October 10 and 11                                                        Page 17
                    2007 Regional Phosphate Conference



     GEOLOGY / MINE PLANNING ABSTRACTS
Kendall Fountain - Plum Creek Timber - The Stratigraphic and Sedimenta-
logical Significance of the Cypresshead Formation: Insights into Pliocene
Deposition and Reworking on the Florida Platform
The Cypresshead Formation, Florida’s most important source of fine aggregate
construction sand, has long been a subject of controversy within the context of
Late Miocene through Pliocene siliciclastic transport and deposition on the Flor-
ida Platform. Prior to studies performed over the last decade, poor temporal
control and limited outcrops resulted in a variety of opinions on the timing, de-
positional environment, regional correlation, and stratigraphic significance of the
unit. This presentation seeks to address each of these topics in light of recent
observations, proposing a model for the Cypresshead as a Pliocene nearshore
marine, multi-deposit unit possessing significant correlation relationships with
other Pliocene strata on the Florida peninsula. As part of this model, evidence
supporting an early Late Pliocene (Piacenzian) age (3.6-2.7 Ma) for the Cy-
presshead in central Florida is presented, along with the potential correlation of
the Cypresshead, in part, to the down-dip SS2 siliciclastics of Cunningham et
al. (2003), and the possible time transgressive character of the unit. This age
estimate for the Cypresshead Formation correlates well with the most recent
early Late Pliocene (3.4-2.7 Ma) age estimates for the Citronelle Formation
(Otvos, 1998) in the panhandle of Florida, a unit long considered to be time
equivalent to the Cypresshead siliciclastics of the peninsula.


Stephen M. Jasinski - U.S. Geological Survey - Phosphate Rock Reserves
in the United States
Phosphate rock deposits are the only source of bioavailable phosphorus, which
is essential to the agricultural sector worldwide. Phosphorus, together with ni-
trogen and potassium, are the primary nutrients necessary for plant and animal
nutrition. The use of phosphate in fertilizers accounts for about 90% of annual
P2O5 consumption worldwide, therefore phosphate rock demand is tied to
growth of the agricultural sector. The United States is the leading producer of
phosphate fertilizers in the world and until recently, the world’s leading producer
of phosphate rock. Florida has been the dominant phosphate rock-producing
state for more than a century owing to its abundant, easily mined, high-quality
resources. However, this situation likely will change over the next 25 years as
mining gradually depletes reserves in Florida and land use and permitting is-
sues threaten the development of new mines. Mine production capacity in
other states cannot be increased much above the current rates of production
with current technology to compensate for the projected decline in phosphate
rock supply. As reserves decline in quantity and quality, fertilizer producers in
Florida may have import phosphate rock to supplant their own rock sources to
maintain production rates.



Page 18                                                        October 10 and 11
                    2007 Regional Phosphate Conference



     GEOLOGY / MINE PLANNING ABSTRACTS
Dr. Guerry McClellan - University of Florida - Uranium in Phosphate Rock:
Reviewed and Revisited
Uranium commonly occurs in sedimentary phosphate rocks at concentrations
many times the normal crustal abundance. This allowed the recovery from wet
process phosphoric acid by solvent extraction to be economically advantageous
when the price of "yellow cake" was favorable during the 1960s and 1970s.
During the post-Three Mile Island era, the demand for uranium plummeted and
production facilities were shut down. Renewed interest in nuclear power in the
past decade and immediate future has caused a sharp upturn in the spot price
of yellow cake. Data on the uranium content of various sedimentary phosphate
deposits globally, nationally, and regionally show a wide range of variation.
This variation is due to geologic factors including depositional environment and
post-depositional alteration, both laterally and vertically. Florida Leach Zone
ores may contain more than 1000 ppm uranium while materials from the South
Florida deposits may contain less than 50 ppm. The inverse relationship
between the price of yellow cake and the economic "break-even" concentration
for recovering uranium makes forecasting the future of this by-product very
speculative.


William C. Warneke - Mineral Consultant - Potential Sources of Phosphate
Rock in Central Florida
This presentation describes several potential sources of phosphate rock which
are not currently being mined. Previously discarded tailings sand has a
significant potential with thousands of acres containing millions of tons of feed
with recoverable 70%+ BPL concentrate. The Lower Matrix Zone has potential
with grades of 60 to 65% BPL. Dolomite and mining depth could pose
problems for Lower Matrix Zone mining. Many millions of tons of high-grade
concentrate may also be recovered from feed lost to clay settling areas.
Phosphate pebble with dolomite is currently being discarded due to high MgO.
MgO can be lowered to about 1% by attrition scrubbing or leaching with pond
water. We must begin to stress to the citizens and politicians how vital the
Florida phosphate industry is to our domestic agricultural production. One or
more of these alternative sources of phosphate rock should be incorporated into
production, or in a relatively few years our nation will be importing most of our
phosphate rock from Morocco, Tunisia, Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Russia, and
probably Iraq.




October 10 and 11                                                        Page 19
Layne Christensen Company

             2985 Old Medulla Road, Lakeland, FL 33811

 Pump Sales and Service – Goulds Authorized Service Center for sales,
    manufacturing and repair. Pump rehabilitation facility. 24 Hour
    Field Service Crews.

 Full Service – Machine Shop and Fabrication Facility to service industry.
      Certified Welding to ASME and AWS.

 Quality – In-House AWS/CWI weld inspection, Liquid Penetrant and
    Magnetic Particle Testing in compliance with ASNT SNT-TC-1A

 ASME/NBIC – Certified Pressure Vessel Facility with U & R Code Stamps.

863-666-2433 - Fax 863-665-2196 - Email 1079@laynechristensen.com
TECHNOLOGY DRIVEN™ LIME PRODUCTS AND SERVICE
         High Calcium and High Magnesium Oxides
             Calcium Magnesium Oxide Blends
      High Calcium Calcium Hydroxide (Hydrated Lime)
                 High Calcium Lime Slurry
               Portable Lime Slaking Systems
                     Technical Support

         Phosphate Industry Applications
        Pond Water Treatment (pH adjustment)
                  Acid Gas (SO2) Control
         Ball Mill Additive for Corrosion Control
              Phosphatic Clay Stabilization

      4720 Cleveland Heights Boulevard Suite 203
                 Lakeland, Florida 33813
              863-644-9010 fax 863-644-9030
           john.thompson@chemicallime.com
            elizabeth.hart@chemicallime.com
                    2007 Regional Phosphate Conference



               ENVIRONMENTAL ABSTRACTS

Jim Voyles - Mosaic - An Industry Perspective of the EPA’s Mineral
Processing Issues
Mr. Voyles will discuss several legal environmental challenges facing the phos-
phate industry today.

Tom Myers - Mosaic - New Techniques in Reclamation and Overview of
the Peace River Cumulative Impact Study
Mr. Myers’ presentation begins with a review of new techniques Mosaic is im-
plementing to reclaim mined lands. Species relocation programs for gopher
tortoises, scrub jays, and burrowing owls are among the most critical, including
the use of topsoil to create successful habitats for the species relocations. Tom
also will describe the new techniques that both FIPR and Mosaic have devel-
oped to improve direct seeding using native seeds to achieve a more diverse
and balanced habitat in reclaimed areas. In presenting the Peace River Cumu-
lative Impact Study, Mr. Myers will describe the results and management goals
of this plan and the phosphate industry’s role in achieving these management
plan goals.




Page 22                                                      October 10 and 11
                    2007 Regional Phosphate Conference



                ENVIRONMENTAL ABSTRACTS

Jim Bays - CH2MHILL - Biological Treatment of Process Water:
Technology Overview
Natural treatment systems (e.g., wetlands, ponds, and land application
systems) are used commonly as a low-energy, low-maintenance and largely
passive alternative for management of all types of industrial wastewaters.
Recently, Mosaic Company (Mosaic) initiated an investigation into the feasibility
of using natural treatment systems as an alternative strategy for managing
gypstack process water to achieve NPDES discharge criteria. The investigation
concluded that a number of biological, physical and chemical processes could
be used for treating single-stage limed process wastewaters. They include
microbial transformation, chemical precipitation, biological alkalization and
acidulation, physical sedimentation, nutrient uptake, and volume reduction. A
sequence of managed biogeochemical and biological alkalization steps offers
the potential of achieving pH ranges sufficient to support precipitation of struvite
for removal of phosphorus and ammonia. Conceptually, these include an
application of acid mine drainage technologies, followed by a sequence of
engineered shallow ponds dominated by periphyton for pH adjustment (i.e.,
“algal alkalization”), a sedimentation pond for managed struvite precipitation,
culminating in a flow-through marsh for pH reduction and blending with other
dilution flows. The natural treatment system concept offers the potential for cost
reduction, nutrient removal, and creation of net environmental benefits. This
presentation will describe the fundamental process, conceptual configuration,
and process feasibility.

David Cibik - Malcolm Pirnie - An Environmental Management System and
Sustainability
An environmental management system (EMS) will be explained with a vision
towards sustainability. An overview of a basic EMS will be given along with
helpful hints, pitfalls to avoid, example implementation costs and secrets to
success.




October 10 and 11                                                          Page 23
   MORETRENCH
         …since 1931.

   Done Safely
    Done Right
   Done On Time
Stack Closures
Dike Maintenance, Earthwork &
  Excavation Services
Process Water Evap Systems
Emergency Response Services
Drain Installations
Process Piping and Repairs
Mining Site Services
Code Welding & Fabrication
Concrete Structures
Cutoff & Containment Systems
Relief Wells, Grouting, &
  Soil Stabilization


…with Minimal interruption
   of Plant AND Mining
       Operations.
                    Thursday
                 October 11, 2007
       Registration open from 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.
             Exhibitor Hall opens at 8:00 a.m.


    Morning Technical Program
               9:00 a.m.—12:00 noon
•   Conference technical sessions run concurrently

•   At the session break, remember to visit the Exhibitor Booths




          12:00 noon—1:30 p.m. Lunch

           Hero of the Industry Awards
            SME, AIChE, AIPG, AFPC
                   2007 Regional Phosphate Conference



          MINING AND MINERAL PROCESSING

              Chairperson: Andrea Williams, Mosaic

                     Thursday, October 11, 2007
                       9:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon

In this session, we will focus on opportunities to optimize our equipment and
processes.     This will allow us to reduce costs (e.g. power), improve
maintenance reliability and be successful in a continually changing
marketplace.



     Abstracts for these presentations are found on pages 28 and 29.


9:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.
Glen Oswald and Mike Elliott - Mosaic
 Design, Operating, and Mechanical Factors to Consider in Size
Separation Processes


9:35 a.m. – 10:05 a.m.
Vito Saputo - Dallas 1 Rehabilitation Solutions
and Kent Weisenberg - Inspar Robotic Remediation
Remote Structural Fast Cure Polymer Pipe Lining & Infrastructure
Rehabilitation


10:10 a.m. – 10:50 a.m. Break


10:50 a.m. – 11:20 a.m.
Dr. Daniel Tao - University of Kentucky
Pilot Scale Testing of Deep Cone Thickener Process for Phosphatic Clay
Disposal

11:25 a.m. – 11:55 a.m.
Graeme Addie - GIW Industries
A Tool for Calculating Slurry Pipe Friction and Achieving Significant
Energy Savings



Page 26                                                   October 10 and 11
                    2007 Regional Phosphate Conference



                    CHEMICAL PROCESSING

                 Chairperson: Dennis Sisco, Mosaic

                      Thursday, October 11, 2007
                        9:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon

This year’s Chemical Processing Session will focus on a variety of subjects,
including the renewed interest in once again recovering uranium from wet
process phosphoric acid, the ethanol process and impacts on Central Florida,
and an update on gypsum uses and applications with the “Stack Free”
project. The four presentations within the session will address topics relevant to
the issues facing chemical processing of Florida phosphate.

     Abstracts for these presentations are found on pages 30 and 31.


9:00 a.m. - 9:30 a.m.
Brian Frame - Nukem, Inc.
Nuclear Fuel Market Fundamentals and Current Uranium Supply/Demand
Projections


9:35 a.m. – 10:05 a.m.
Joe Guida and Doug Royster - PegasusTSI, Inc.
and Regis Stana - R Squared S, Inc.
Uranium Recovery from Wet Process Phosphoric Acid – Take 3



10:10 a.m. – 10:50 a.m. Break


10:50 a.m. – 11:20 a.m.
Dr. Bradley Krone - US Envirofuels, LLC
Development of Ethanol Production in Florida


11:25 a.m. – 11:55 a.m.
Dr. Julian Hilton - Aleff Group, Florida and UK and Dr. Brian Birky - Public &
Environmental Health, FIPR
Legacy or Liability? The Future of Phosphogypsum, with an Update on
the “Stack Free by ’53?” Project


October 10 and 11                                                        Page 27
                    2007 Regional Phosphate Conference



  MINING & MINERAL PROCESSING ABSTRACTS
Glen Oswald and Mike Elliott - Mosaic - Design, Operating, and
Mechanical Factors to Consider in Size Separation Processes
Classification is a common process operation in the phosphate industry. Unfor-
tunately, some plant engineers have not had formal training in the basics of this
process. This presentation focuses on three important areas a plant engineer
needs to learn about the design and operation of size separation equipment:
initial design considerations, operational concerns and maintenance concerns.

Vito Saputo - Dallas 1 Rehabilitation Solutions and Kent Weisenberg –
Inspar Robotic Remediation - Remote Structural Fast Cure Polymer Pipe
Lining & Infrastructure Rehabilitation
Aging pipeline infrastructure and the phosphate industry’s inability to evaluate
and inspect it has left many engineers and plant managers looking for solutions.
Pipeline integrity management has had a low priority until recently. As a result,
serious issues have been passed to the current generation of managers to
solve. Responding to heightened awareness of the significant environmental,
safety and economic consequences of corrosion and erosion of pipelines, the
phosphate industry has finally begun to look for answers. The good news is
that private companies have addressed the issue with some innovative and cost
-effective solutions. Pipeline corrosion and failure is an environmental safety
issue, an economic issue and a job retention issue. Companies find it less ex-
pensive to outsource overseas than to maintain facilities in the United States.
Even though there has been a great breakthrough in the chemical engineering
of adhesives and coating materials to extend and repair pipelines, there has not
been a practical way to apply these materials to pipelines while in service. It
has only been in recent years that a remote relining system has been devel-
oped to offer the phosphate industry an effective way of delivering these new
hybrid polymer materials.

Dr. Daniel Tao - University of Kentucky - Pilot Scale Testing of Deep Cone
Thickener Process for Phosphatic Clay Disposal
Waste clay disposal represents one of the most challenging problems for the
phosphate industry. Because of their colloidal nature and ultrafine size, the
phosphatic clays are very stable in water suspensions and settle extremely
slowly. It takes several years for waste clay slurry to thicken from about 3% to
30% solids by gravity settling. The paste thickening process is believed to be
more efficient and cost-effective than using impoundments for the disposal of
phosphatic clay tailings. This presentation describes the results obtained from
a pilot-scale study of the deep cone thickening (DCT) process performed at
Mosaic’s South Fort Meade Mine. A thickener 1.5 m in diameter and 4.5 m high
was employed to investigate the effects of key operating parameters, including
feed rate, sand addition rate, flocculant dosage, bed depth, etc.


Page 28                                                      October 10 and 11
                    2007 Regional Phosphate Conference



  MINING & MINERAL PROCESSING ABSTRACTS
The field testing successfully demonstrated the simultaneous production of an
underflow paste product and a clear overflow water stream. Typical overflow
water recovery and underflow solids recovery were more than 88% and 98%,
respectively, with a residence time of as low as 2 hours. The highest clay con-
tent and total solids content in the paste were more than 25% and 35%, respec-
tively, with a clay/sand ratio of 2:1.

Graeme Addie - GIW Industries, Inc. - A Tool for Calculating Slurry Pipe
Friction and Achieving Significant Energy Savings
Under the sponsorship of grants from FIPR, the staff of the GIW Hydraulic Lab
have carried out tests and established models for the various types of matrices,
tails, transfer matrix, sand-clay mix, and clay slurries. These models are avail-
able in an easy-to-use Excel spreadsheet for use by mine planners and engi-
neers. The authors in this paper describe the results of their work, how the
models are used to design stable operating pipelines, and how significant
pumping energy savings could be achieved.




October 10 and 11                                                        Page 29
                    2007 Regional Phosphate Conference



          CHEMICAL PROCESSING ABSTRACTS

Brian Frame - Nukem, Inc. - Nuclear Fuel Market Fundamentals and
Current Uranium Supply/Demand Projections
The speaker will review the nuclear fuel cycle, provide a historical account of
uranium supply and demand, and discuss current trends in uranium supply and
demand projections.


Joe Guida and Doug Royster - PegasusTSI, Inc.
and Regis Stana – R Squared S, Inc.
Uranium Recovery from Wet Process Phosphoric Acid-Take 3
It has been more than 15 years since the last uranium extraction facility was
shut down in central Florida. With the current market price of uranium reaching
levels exceeding $100 per pound, there is renewed interest in this process and
several producers are again considering constructing facilities for extracting this
mineral from wet process phosphoric acid. This paper is intended to provide an
historical perspective on past practices and operating experience. It discusses
current economic drivers, gives an overview of past technology, and discusses
the potential challenges facing producers.


Dr. Bradley Krone - US Envirofuels, LLC
Development of Ethanol Production in Florida
The state of Florida represents a potential 1 billion gallon per year ethanol mar-
ket. This presentation will discuss the various feedstock platforms for ethanol
production, the issues related to fossil fuels and biomass for ethanol plant en-
ergy sources, and an overview of the Port Sutton ethanol plant project at Port of
Tampa.


Dr. Julian Hilton - Aleff Group, Florida/UK, and Dr. Brian Birky - Public &
Environmental Health, FIPR - Legacy or Liability? The Future of
Phosphogypsum, with an Update on the “Stack Free by ’53?” Project
For commercial, technical and regulatory reasons, the challenges that now face
the phosphate industry are convergent in the phosphogypsum (PG) issue. The
PG dilemma is increasingly acute as demand for animal protein and renewable
energy intensifies, leading to a marked escalation in PG production. World-
wide, PG management practice varies widely - stored in stacks, discharged to
the environment, or used, notably in agriculture, road-building and construction.
Especially in Florida, the end-of-life closure liability, including the remediation
and disposal of vast quantities of process wastewater, has already imposed a
significant burden on the state, its industry and environment.



Page 30                                                        October 10 and 11
                    2007 Regional Phosphate Conference



         CHEMICAL PROCESSING ABSTRACTS

A beneficial, commercially appropriate use for PG, based on objective data,
best available practices, and sensitivity to stakeholder concerns, must be a
more appropriate outcome. To a large extent, the world currently follows the
U.S. EPA position that much of this PG is not suitable for human use as judged
on the basis of risk to health from exposure to trace amounts of naturally occur-
ring radioactive materials (NORM). Is this a correct assessment? Extensive
FIPR-funded and international research, and recent evidence from Spain, indi-
cates that a beneficial, commercially acceptable outcome is possible. But there
are also real challenges to be faced.




                                           Over 40 years
                                           servicing the
                                         phosphate mining
                                             industry.

                    Your local source for
                lubricants, bucket rigging,
        wire rope, slurry pumps, trommel screens,
  gearing, lubrication/hydraulic systems, and service

        (863) 425-3058 Phone (863) 425-2683 Fax



October 10 and 11                                                        Page 31
                    Thursday
                 October 11, 2007

Afternoon Technical Program

                1:30 p.m.—4:30 p.m.
•   Conference technical sessions run concurrently

•   At the session break, 2:40 p.m. to 3:20 p.m., there will be
    EXHIBITOR DOOR PRIZE drawings in the General Session
                room; Must be present to win!


          4:30 pm Grand Prize Drawing
          in the General Session Room!
              Must be present to win!
                     2007 Regional Phosphate Conference



                             RECLAMATION

                  Chairperson: Kevin Claridge, FDEP

                       Thursday, October 11, 2007
                          1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Post-phosphate mining land use includes housing developments, shopping
malls, industrial sites, power plants, agriculture, roads, landfills, and recreational
and natural areas. The transition from the classic moonscape or a reclaimed
landscape to another land use involves numerous stakeholders, often including
the phosphate industry, private landowners, environmental organizations, and
several layers of government oversight. This session will present a few
examples of the latest science, art, and process that a mined land parcel goes
through to reach a new land use.




     Abstracts for these presentations are found on pages 36 and 37.

1:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Michelle Harmeling - Florida DEP, BOMR
Upper Peace River Saddle Creek Restoration Project

2:05 p.m. – 2:35 p.m.
Caroline Eckert - Alafia River State Park
Alafia River State Park – A New Beginning

2:40 p.m. – 3:20 p.m. Break
***Exhibitor Door Prizes in General Session Room***
             (must be present to win!)

3:20 p.m. – 3:50 p.m.
Terry Atchley - Clear Springs Land Company
Clear Springs Land Development


3:55 p.m. – 4:25 p.m.
John Kiefer - BCI Engineers and Scientists
Advancing the Science of Florida Stream Reclamation



Page 34                                                          October 10 and 11
                    2007 Regional Phosphate Conference



                ANALYTICAL / REGULATORY

            Chairperson: Sanford Siegel, CF Industries

                      Thursday, October 11, 2007
                         1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

To a producer, “Sustaining Success” means lower production costs, without
impacting the quality of services and products to the customer, while continuing
to make a profit. The laboratory, which is generally seen as an overhead ex-
pense, has the daunting task of maintaining product quality relative to increased
customer expectations. This session will present the various perspectives of
achieving the goals of the producer and customer for a continued successful
and profitable relationship. The regulatory aspects of a manufacturing site have
evolved over the past thirty years from limits and monitoring of emissions from
production, to challenges on long-term land use, energy balances, carbon bal-
ances, and water balances. One session will highlight a successful solution
based on the involvement and participation of stakeholders to formulate solu-
tions that allowed all parties to achieve their goals.

     Abstracts for these presentations are found on pages 40 and 41.

1:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Ron Brunk - CF Industries
Ecosystem Improvement through Gyp Stack Permitting

2:05 p.m. – 2:35 p.m.
Edward Linde - SGS North America
Laboratory Upsourcing

2:40 p.m. – 3:20 p.m. Break
***Exhibitor Door Prizes in General Session Room***
             (must be present to win!)

3:20 p.m. – 3:50 p.m.
J. H. Falls - CF Industries
What is a Quality Result from a Phosphate Laboratory, How Is It Main-
tained, and What Is It Worth to the Producer?

3:55 p.m. – 4:25 p.m.
Fergus Keenan - Thermo Fisher Scientific
Advances in Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy
for Multi-element Analysis in Challenging Matrices


October 10 and 11                                                        Page 35
                    2007 Regional Phosphate Conference



                 RECLAMATION ABSTRACTS

Michelle Harmeling - Florida DEP - BOMR Upper Peace River Saddle
Creek Restoration Project
The Saddle Creek Sub-Basin is the northernmost tributary basin of the Peace
River Watershed and is one of the most heavily impacted watersheds due to
pre-1975 mining and urbanization. Restoration of the Saddle Creek-Upper
Peace River watershed, within the Tenoroc Fish Management Area (TFMA) and
adjacent properties, is an ambitious project that was initiated by the Florida De-
partment of Environmental Protection's (FDEP) Bureau of Mine Reclamation
(BMR) and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FFWCC) in
1995. The TFMA was chosen as the site of this project because of its strategic
core location within the upper Saddle Creek basin, its largely unreclaimed na-
ture, and the fact that it is state-owned. The goal of the project is to restore
some of the ecological and hydrological functions of the upper portion of the
Peace River watershed. This unique project is a combination of the FFWCC
habitat restoration and fisheries programs and the FDEP BMR Integrated Habi-
tat Network land management program, complemented by wetland mitigation
funding.


Caroline Eckert - Alafia River State Park - Alafia River State Park - A New
Beginning
In December 1996 through a generous donation by Cytec Brewster Mines, the
Alafia River State Park was born. Alafia offers some of Florida's best recrea-
tional opportunities. The park consists of approximately 6,300 acres of rolling
hills, beautiful lakes and an abundance of wildlife viewing. The park now offers
some of the best off road mountain bike trails in the state of Florida from the
easier trails of Sand Pine and River Loop to the most extreme of Gatorback with
its 50 foot drops-not for the average biker. The eighteen miles of bike trails are
built upon the once mined areas that never were reclaimed or restored. Bikers
have come from all over the U.S. to try these famed trails. The park also offers
some of the best equestrian trails; all being carriage accessible, twenty miles of
the most breathtaking views are along this trail system. Reclamation of open pit
mining leads to a rolling topography not typically found in southwest Florida. It
also leaves many beautiful lakes and small flowing streams leading between
lakes. The trails vary from shaded oak hammocks, pine flatwoods to open prai-
rie-type fields. A variety of wildlife may be seen throughout the park. Birding at
Alafia River has also become quite popular. Thirty spacious campsites are of-
fered, with some having a spectacular view of the Lonesome Lake. Several
hiking trails are located throughout the park. One trail for the adventurous
hiker, named the Old Agrico Pit Trail, is located in the main picnic area where
the spoil or overburden piles were left, and has been naturally restored.



Page 36                                                       October 10 and 11
                    2007 Regional Phosphate Conference



                 RECLAMATION ABSTRACTS

Terry Atchley - Clear Springs Land Company - Clear Springs Land
Development
Clear Springs passed numerous key milestones as the process of developing of
its 18,000-acre former mine land property unfolds. Planning continues via the
Optional Sector Plan approach which combines the benefits of the development
of regional impact (DRI) process—including strong community and government
coordination—with the benefits of the long-range comprehensive plan process
to identify and manage the impacts of growth. Underlying the entire process is
an economic development strategy which aims to encourage new jobs, more
opportunities in education and the development of a well-rounded community
including schools, residences, businesses, parklands and industry. Early in
2007 the centerpiece of a new university-style campus was set when Clear
Springs donated $12 million to Polk Community College. With the state provid-
ing matching funds, PCC’s Corporate College at Clear Springs will provide
workforce training programs to local residents who wish to train for better jobs
or who simply want to better their advancement in current positions. The cen-
tral Clear Springs vision remains strong: community-based planning with a
strong economic development foundation allows us to put former mine lands to
use for a better future for everyone in and around Bartow.


John Kiefer - BCI Engineers and Scientists - Advancing the Science of
Florida Stream Reclamation
Left alone, natural weather patterns can take about 20 years to create complex
channel forms within newly reclaimed valleys. CF Industries and BCI have pio-
neered a new approach for constructing complex stream channels at Florida
phosphate mines, reducing the time for channel formation to a matter of weeks.
The approach, at its most basic level, uses a prescribed water discharge to
hydraulically carve a meandering stream within a reclaimed valley. Other fac-
tors necessary for its success will be discussed. The results of this method and
other potential construction methods are increasingly predictable based on sci-
entific advances in the field of fluvial geomorphology. FIPR is currently funding
related research concerning the fluvial geomorphology of peninsular Florida
streams (also conducted by BCI in collaboration with stream experts at UF and
USF). This body of research is aimed at increasing the predictability and sus-
tainability of stream restoration designs. The approach and anticipated benefits
of the research will be discussed.




October 10 and 11                                                        Page 37
                    2007 Regional Phosphate Conference



      ANALYTICAL/REGULATORY ABSTRACTS

Ron Brunk - CF Industries - Ecosystem Improvement through Gyp Stack
Permitting
CF Industries initiated one of the first Ecosystem Management (Team) Permit-
ting processes for the expansion of the CFI Plant City Gypsum Stack. This
involved simultaneously applying for a multitude of permits, in a process that
involved not only the permit agencies, but numerous other interested groups
such as the Hillsborough River Greenways Task Force, the West Coast Re-
gional Water Supply Authority, the Sierra Club, the Audubon Society, Manasota
88, local citizens, and local city governments. A key to the success of the ap-
proval of the project was an innovative mitigation proposal in which CFI would
immediately begin the conversion of bahia grass pasture to native dominated
habitat to create a greenway corridor, and begin the mitigation for wetland im-
pacts for all three phases of the expansion. This was all to occur during the
construction and utilization of the first phase. We are currently in the 12th year
of the planned 10-year mitigation process, having expended the budgeted $5
million. What progress has been made, and what is planned for the future?



Edward Linde - SGS North America, Inc. - Laboratory Upsourcing
On the basis of its extensive experience and network in many sectors and many
parts of the world, SGS has developed a new, advanced model of outsourcing:
SGS Upsourcing. By combining outsourcing with upgrading, SGS Upsourcing
enables you to maximize your operational efficiency while minimizing your oper-
ating costs. Whatever market you’re in, we work closely with you in a partner-
ship that adds value by improving your performance and increasing your profit-
ability. Outsourcing is often associated with difficult matters such as reorgani-
zations, lay-offs, social issues, and the transfer of production and jobs to other
countries. In contrast, SGS Upsourcing focuses on partnership, mutual benefit,
respect for the interests of all stakeholders, growth, and – above all – care.
SGS’s extensive experience means that we have the knowledge and expertise
necessary to improve your organization’s performance. When you choose to
work with SGS, you choose a business partner that gets involved and stays
involved. By partnering with SGS, you can cut your costs, maximize the effi-
ciency of your core processes and minimize risk for both you and your custom-
ers.




Page 40                                                       October 10 and 11
                     2007 Regional Phosphate Conference



       ANALYTICAL/REGULATORY ABSTRACTS

J. H. Falls - CF Industries - What is a Quality Result from a Phosphate
Laboratory, How Is It Maintained, and What Is It Worth to the Producer?
A phosphate laboratory must maintain a quality analysis for operation control.
The presentation will cover how to increase workload and reduce cost of opera-
tion while maintaining quality data. The laboratory is considered to be overhead
in the bottom line, but is beneficial to the overall operation. A well operated
phosphate laboratory is vital to the company in sustaining success in the opera-
tion.



Fergus Keenan - Thermo Fisher Scientific, Inc. - Advances in Inductively
Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy for Multi-element
Analysis in Challenging Matrices.
The development of high resolution echelle spectrometers in the last 15 years
has led to the introduction of ICP-OES systems capable of simultaneous multi-
element measurement in complex matrices with complete wavelength coverage
and a wide linear range. The latest state of the art in ICP-OES will be dis-
cussed. Fertilizers are used to provide major plant nutrients (N, P, and K), sec-
ondary plant nutrients (Ca, S, and Mg), and micronutrients such as B, Mn, Fe,
Cu, Zn, Mo, and Se. Accurate determination of the composition of fertilizers is
essential. An insufficient application of a fertilizer can result in poor crop yield,
and an excessive application can result in environmental damage such as eu-
trophication by dissolved phosphates and nitrates entering water courses or
land contamination from non-nutrient elements within the fertilizers. ICP-OES
offers cost-effective analysis of fertilizers because of its multi-element capabili-
ties. Complex torch designs and sparging systems have been employed in the
past to determine nitrogen by ICP spectroscopy, but these additions to ICP in-
strumentation are costly and prolong analysis time. This presentation reviews a
method for simultaneous analysis of all the plant nutrition elements, including
nitrogen, as well as potential harmful elements (As, Cd, and Cr) in fertilizers
using ICP spectroscopy without expensive modifications to the instrument and a
compromise in detection limits and stability.




October 10 and 11                                                           Page 41
       2007 EXHIBITORS
                  Agru America, Inc.
      American Compliance Technologies, Inc.
             ArrMaz Custom Chemicals
             Arroyo Process Equipment
             BCI Engineers & Scientists
                  Carlson Software
       COMANCO Environmental Corporation
          Dallas 1 Rehabilitation Solutions
           DCR Engineering Services, Inc.
                  E CO Consultants
     Engineering & Inspections Unlimited, Inc.
                Florida Analytical, Inc.
         Florida Engineering & Design, Inc.
      Florida Institute of Phosphate Research
    FRIATEC - Rheinhütte Pumps & Valves, LLC
                   Frischkorn, Inc.
                 GIW Industries, Inc.
                    Godwin Pumps
               Golder Associates, Inc.
     Haines City Fire Extinguisher Service, Inc.
             James Construction Group
         Metalcraft Services of Tampa, Inc.
      Metso Minerals - Slurry & Dredge Pumps
                      Moretrench
                Motion Industries, Inc.
                   PegasusTSI, Inc.
                   PENN PRO, Inc.
          Phoslab Environmental Services
              Pickett & Associates, Inc.
         Safety Training & Consulting, Inc.
               SGS North America, Inc.
                      Shaw E & I
        Sherba Analytical Lab Products, Inc.
            Siemens Water Technologies
   Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration
             Solares Florida Corporation
            Thermo Fisher Scientific, Inc.
                Tyson Bolt and Supply
            URS Corporation—Southern
Valve & Controls (A Division of Power & Pumps, Inc.)
                  Thank You!

   Our sincere thanks to the companies
   that have supported the Regional
   Phosphate Conference as exhibitors
   or sponsors for a decade or more. We
   certainly appreciate your help in
   making the conference a success.

American Compliance Technologies, Inc.
      ArrMaz Custom Chemicals
      BCI Engineers & Scientists
 COMANCO Environmental Corporation
         GIW Industries, Inc.
        Florida Analytical, Inc.
          (Formerly P.E. LaMoreaux & Associates, Inc.)

                          Mosaic
       (Continuing the tradition of Cargill and IMC support)

       Pickett & Associates, Inc.
          SGS North America
        Help make the
Regional Phosphate Conference
     a continued success!

Plan your participation now for
     the 2008 Conference!

    For more information,
      contact any of the
Conference Committee Members
  (listed in the front of this program).



23rd Annual Regional Phosphate
      Conference Theme:

 “Florida Phosphate & Mining-
    The Foreseeable Future
         and Beyond”

     October 8 and 9, 2008
     The Lakeland Center
      Lakeland, Florida
NOTES

				
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