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					  WAR IN THE AIR

Red Baron Dog fighting Reel
http://www.cinemablend.com/ne
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Red Baron Effects Reel
       WAR IN THE AIR

•Airplanes were seen as expensive luxury items
for Canada to have
•When WWI broke out, Canada did not have
airplanes (or pilots). The RCAF did not exist until
1924
        WAR IN THE AIR

•However, many young Canadians became
pilots (in 1918, 40% of the British air force were
Canadians)
•Being a pilot was better than fighting in the
trenches.




(Pilots received better meals, pay, uniforms and
warm beds. Luxuries that soldiers fighting in the
trenches did not have.)
       WAR IN THE AIR

•4 out of the top 7 leading ACES (pilots who
shot down more than 5 enemy planes) in the
Royal Air Force were Canadians
•Many Canadians went to Britain to join the
Royal Flying Corps, and were among the best
pilots there
       WAR IN THE AIR

•During the war, Germany had 400 planes,
while Britain had a mere 112
•The meetings between Canadian and
German planes (Fokker-which had guns that
timed their firing so bullets did not hit the
                                   propellers) were
                                   often deadly




•These battles were known as dogfights
       WAR IN THE AIR

•Pilots would tailgate enemy planes so that
they could not fire at their other men. Being
shot down usually meant death.
       WAR IN THE AIR

•Pilots were not allowed to use parachutes
because if they did, they might want to bail out
of their planes. Officers ordered pilots to save
the planes before themselves.
       WAR IN THE AIR

•The average lifespan of a pilot was about 3
weeks. Pilots often referred to their planes as
“flying coffins”
        WAR IN THE AIR
•One of the most famous Canadian pilots was Billy
Bishop. Bishop shot down 72 enemy planes




        •Throughout the war, Canadians
           were responsible for shooting down
           483 enemy aircraft
        WAR IN THE AIR
•One of the most famous Canadian pilots greatest
                                   The was Billy
Bishop. Bishop shot down 72 enemy planes
                                   opponent from
                                    the German
                                    side was the
                                    “Red Baron”.
                                    He shot down
                                    80 planes. He
                                    was killed by
                                    Canadian
        •Throughout the war, Canadians Roy
                                    Brown in
           were responsible for shooting down April
           483 enemy aircraft       of 1918.
A zeppelin is a large balloon with a metal frame.
They were filled with hydrogen to make them float.
Some had platforms on the top from which guns
could shoot at airplanes overhead.

Germany first used zeppelins or airships on
observation missions and bombing raids.
Eventually, both sides used zeppelins.
WAR AT SEA
Play video: War at Sea

Video: “War at Sea”
•It was very important to Britain (as an island nation) to
have a good navy (and Germany knew this)
    Play video: War at Sea


•When the war began, Canada had only 2 navy
cruisers (the H.M.S. Niobe and the H.M.S. Rainbow)




•Canada did little to fight at sea, however, by the end
of the war, Canada had over 100 ships
•Canada’s main role at sea was to transport troops,
food and ammunition to Europe
   Play video: War at Sea
•Although the United States send goods to Europe,
they remained neutral for most of the war
•Britain tried to stop ships from transporting goods to
Germany and visa versa, as a result a sea war broke
out. Both sides tried to cut off supplies, which was
even more pertinent for Britain since it is an island
The Germans used submarines (U-boats) to
attack British ships.

In 1917, unrestricted warfare took over the seas.
German boats would sink any allied or neutral
ship that they observed approaching Britain
The British started
sending ships
together in clusters
called convoys. This
enabled them to
reduce the number
of ships that were
sunk by Germany’s
boats.
Video: “Hertiage Moment”
http://www.histori.ca/minutes/minute.do?id=10203
On December 6, 1917 a
French ship called the
Mont Blanc set sail from
Halifax loaded with
benzene and acid. At
8:00am, a Norwegian ship,
the Imo also set sail. As
the two ships sailed along,
the Mont Blanc sailed right
across the Imo’s bow. The
two ships rammed each
other and blew up.
The explosion destroyed Halifax, was heard all over the
province and was felt in Sydney (320 km away). The
explosion resulted in a large fire and a destructive tidal
wave. More than 2,000 people were killed.
The Mont Blanc
was completely
destroyed. The
only remnants of
the ship were part
of an anchor, and
this 1,140 lb canon
which was hurled
2.35 miles from the
ship.
DVD: Canada, A People’s History

        Ordeal by Fire

       “City of Sorrow”

				
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posted:9/16/2011
language:English
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