ABRAHAM by stariya

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									                             ABRAHAM THE PATRIARCH
P.389 - §4 The Melchizedek who lived on Urantia during the time of Abraham was locally known as Prince of
Salem because he presided over a small colony of truth seekers residing at a place called Salem. He volunteered
to incarnate in the likeness of mortal flesh and did so with the approval of the Melchizedek receivers of the
planet, who feared that the light of life would become extinguished during that period of increasing spiritual
darkness. And he did foster the truth of his day and safely pass it on to Abraham and his associates.
P.491 - §13 Every quarantined or isolated world has a Vorondadek Son acting as an observer. He does not
participate in planetary administration except when ordered by the Constellation Father to intervene in the
affairs of the nations. Actually it is this Most High observer who "rules in the kingdoms of men." Urantia is one
of the isolated worlds of Norlatiadek, and a Vorondadek observer has been stationed on the planet ever since the
Caligastia betrayal. When Machiventa Melchizedek ministered in semimaterial form on Urantia, he paid
respectful homage to the Most High observer then on duty, as it is written, "And Melchizedek, king of Salem,
was the priest of the Most High." Melchizedek revealed the relations of this Most High observer to Abraham
when he said, "And blessed be the Most High, who has delivered your enemies into your hand."
P.514 - §6 14. Machiventa Melchizedek, the only Son of this order to bestow himself upon the Urantia races.
While still numbered as a Melchizedek, he has become "forever a minister of the Most Highs," eternally
assuming the assignment of service as a mortal ascender, having sojourned on Urantia in the likeness of mortal
flesh at Salem in the days of Abraham. This Melchizedek has latterly been proclaimed vicegerent Planetary
Prince of Urantia with headquarters on Jerusem and authority to act in behalf of Michael, who is actually the
Planetary Prince of the world whereon he experienced his terminal bestowal in human form. Notwithstanding
this, Urantia is still supervised by successive resident governors general, members of the four and twenty
counselors.
P.584 - §2 Your world has been visited by four orders of sonship: Caligastia, the Planetary Prince; Adam and
Eve of the Material Sons of God; Machiventa Melchizedek, the "sage of Salem" in the days of Abraham; and
Christ Michael, who came as the Paradise bestowal Son. How much more effective and beautiful it would have
been had Michael, the supreme ruler of the universe of Nebadon, been welcomed to your world by a loyal and
efficient Planetary Prince and a devoted and successful Material Son, both of whom could have done so much
to enhance the lifework and mission of the bestowal Son! But not all worlds have been so unfortunate as
Urantia, neither has the mission of the Planetary Adams always been so difficult or so hazardous. When they are
successful, they contribute to the development of a great people, continuing as the visible heads of planetary
affairs even far into the age when such a world is settled in light and life.
P.753 - §1 The power of the fallen Prince to disturb human affairs was enormously curtailed by the mortal
incarnation of Machiventa Melchizedek in the days of Abraham; and subsequently, during the life of Michael in
the flesh, this traitorous Prince was finally shorn of all authority on Urantia.
P.838 - §2 Jewish tradition became crystallized about Moses, and because he endeavored to trace the lineage of
Abraham back to Adam, the Jews assumed that Adam was the first of all mankind. Yahweh was the creator, and
since Adam was supposed to be the first man, he must have made the world just prior to making Adam. And
then the tradition of Adam's six days got woven into the story, with the result that almost a thousand years after
Moses' sojourn on earth the tradition of creation in six days was written out and subsequently credited to him.
P.853 - §0 been severed. From the distant days of the arrival of the corporeal staff of the Planetary Prince, down
through the times of Van and Amadon to the arrival of Adam and Eve, physical representatives of the universe
government had been stationed on the planet. But with the Adamic default this regime, extending over a period
of more than four hundred and fifty thousand years, came to an end. In the spiritual spheres, angelic helpers
continued to struggle in conjunction with the Thought Adjusters, both working heroically for the salvage of the
individual; but no comprehensive plan for far-reaching world welfare was promulgated to the mortals of earth
until the arrival of Machiventa Melchizedek, in the times of Abraham, who, with the power, patience, and
authority of a Son of God, did lay the foundations for the further uplift and spiritual rehabilitation of unfortunate
Urantia.
P.857 - §8 The records of such long-lived individuals are also due to the confusion of months and years as time
periods. This may also be observed in the Biblical genealogy of Abraham and in the early records of the
Chinese. The confusion of
P.874 - §8 Almost five thousand years later, as the Hebrew priests in Babylonian captivity sought to trace the
Jewish people back to Adam, they found great difficulty in piecing the story together; and it occurred to one of
them to abandon the effort, to let the whole world drown in its wickedness at the time of Noah's flood, and thus
to be in a better position to trace Abraham right back to one of the three surviving sons of Noah.
P.918 - §4 Superior groups, when isolated, always reverted to consanguineous mating. The Nodites for over one
hundred and fifty thousand years were one of the great in-marriage groups. The later-day in-marriage mores
were tremendously influenced by the traditions of the violet race, in which, at first, matings were, perforce,
between brother and sister. And brother and sister marriages were common in early Egypt, Syria, Mesopotamia,
and throughout the lands once occupied by the Andites. The Egyptians long practiced brother and sister
marriages in an effort to keep the royal blood pure, a custom which persisted even longer in Persia. Among the
Mesopotamians, before the days of Abraham, cousin marriages were obligatory; cousins had prior marriage
rights to cousins. Abraham himself married his half sister, but such unions were not allowed under the later
mores of the Jews.
P.981 - §5 The spectacle of Abraham constrained to sacrifice his son Isaac, while shocking to civilized
susceptibilities, was not a new or strange idea to the men of those days. It was long a prevalent practice for
fathers, at times of great emotional stress, to sacrifice their first-born sons. Many peoples have a tradition
analogous to this story, for there once existed a world-wide and profound belief that it was necessary to offer a
human sacrifice when anything extraordinary or unusual happened.
P.1016 - §3 With the passing of a decade, Melchizedek organized his schools at Salem, patterning them on the
olden system which had been developed by the early Sethite priests of the second Eden. Even the idea of a
tithing system, which was introduced by his later convert Abraham, was also derived from the lingering
traditions of the methods of the ancient Sethites.
P.1016 - §5 The symbol of the three concentric circles, which Melchizedek adopted as the insignia of his
bestowal, a majority of the people interpreted as standing for the three kingdoms of men, angels, and God. And
they were allowed to continue in that belief; very few of his followers ever knew that these three circles were
emblematic of the infinity, eternity, and universality of the Paradise Trinity of divine maintenance and
direction; even Abraham rather regarded this symbol as standing for the three Most Highs of Edentia, as he had
been instructed that the three Most Highs functioned as one. To the extent that Melchizedek taught the Trinity
concept symbolized in his insignia, he usually associated it with the three Vorondadek rulers of the constellation
of Norlatiadek.
P.1017 - §2 And thus did Melchizedek prepare the way and set the monotheistic stage of world tendency for the
bestowal of an actual Paradise Son of the one God, whom he so vividly portrayed as the Father of all, and
whom he represented to Abraham as a God who would accept man on the simple terms of personal faith. And
Michael, when he appeared on earth, confirmed all that Melchizedek had taught concerning the Paradise Father.
P.1017 - §7 And that was the whole of the creed of the Salem colony. But even such a short and simple
declaration of faith was altogether too much and too advanced for the men of those days. They simply could not
grasp the idea of getting divine favor for nothing--by faith. They were too deeply confirmed in the belief that
man was born under forfeit to the gods. Too long and too earnestly had they sacrificed and made gifts to the
priests to be able to comprehend the good news that salvation, divine favor, was a free gift to all who would
believe in the Melchizedek covenant. But Abraham did believe halfheartedly, and even that was "counted for
righteousness."
P.1018 - §3 While no sacrifices were permitted within the colony, Melchizedek well knew how difficult it is to
suddenly uproot long-established customs and accordingly had wisely offered these people the substitute of a
sacrament of bread and wine for the older sacrifice of flesh and blood. It is of record, "Melchizedek, king of
Salem, brought forth bread and wine." But even this cautious innovation was not altogether successful; the
various tribes all maintained auxiliary centers on the outskirts of Salem where they offered sacrifices and burnt
offerings. Even Abraham resorted to this barbarous practice after his victory over Chedorlaomer; he simply did
not feel quite at ease until he had offered a conventional sacrifice. And Melchizedek never did succeed in fully
eradicating this proclivity to sacrifice from the religious practices of his followers, even of Abraham.
P.1018 - §5 Melchizedek taught elementary revealed truth at Salem for ninety-four years, and during this time
Abraham attended the Salem school three different times. He finally became a convert to the Salem teachings,
becoming one of Melchizedek's most brilliant pupils and chief supporters.
5. THE SELECTION OF ABRAHAM - P.1018
P.1018 - §6 Although it may be an error to speak of "chosen people," it is not a mistake to refer to Abraham as a
chosen individual. Melchizedek did lay upon Abraham the responsibility of keeping alive the truth of one God
as distinguished from the prevailing belief in plural deities.
P.1018 - §7 The choice of Palestine as the site for Machiventa's activities was in part predicated upon the desire
to establish contact with some human family embodying the potentials of leadership. At the time of the
incarnation of Melchizedek there were many families on earth just as well prepared to receive the doctrine of
Salem as was that of Abraham. There were equally endowed families among the red men, the yellow men, and
the descendants of the Andites to the west and north. But, again, none of these localities were so favorably
situated for Michael's subsequent appearance on earth as was the eastern shore of the Mediterranean Sea. The
Melchizedek mission in Palestine and the subsequent appearance of Michael among the Hebrew people were in
no small measure determined by geography, by the fact that Palestine was centrally located with reference to the
then existent trade, travel, and civilization of the world.
P.1018 - §8 For some time the Melchizedek receivers had been observing the ancestors of Abraham, and they
confidently expected offspring in a certain generation who would be characterized by intelligence, initiative,
sagacity, and sincerity. The children of Terah, the father of Abraham, in every way met these expectations. It
was this possibility of contact with these versatile children of Terah that had considerable to do with the
appearance of Machiventa at Salem, rather than in Egypt, China, India, or among the northern tribes.
P.1019 - §2 A few weeks after the death of Abraham's father, Terah, Melchizedek sent one of his students,
Jaram the Hittite, to extend this invitation to both Abraham and Nahor: "Come to Salem, where you shall hear
our teachings of the truth of the eternal Creator, and in the enlightened offspring of you two brothers shall all
the world be blessed." Now Nahor had not wholly accepted the Melchizedek gospel; he remained behind and
built up a strong city-state which bore his name; but Lot, Abraham's nephew, decided to go with his uncle to
Salem.
P.1019 - §3 Upon arriving at Salem, Abraham and Lot chose a hilly fastness near the city where they could
defend themselves against the many surprise attacks of northern raiders. At this time the Hittites, Assyrians,
Philistines, and other groups were constantly raiding the tribes of central and southern Palestine. From their
stronghold in the hills Abraham and Lot made frequent pilgrimages to Salem.
P.1019 - §4 Not long after they had established themselves near Salem, Abraham and Lot journeyed to the
valley of the Nile to obtain food supplies as there was then a drought in Palestine. During his brief sojourn in
Egypt Abraham found a distant relative on the Egyptian throne, and he served as the commander of two very
successful military expeditions for this king. During the latter part of his sojourn on the Nile he and his wife,
Sarah, lived at court, and when leaving Egypt, he was given a share of the spoils of his military campaigns.
P.1019 - §5 It required great determination for Abraham to forego the honors of the Egyptian court and return to
the more spiritual work sponsored by Machiventa. But Melchizedek was revered even in Egypt, and when the
full story was laid before Pharaoh, he strongly urged Abraham to return to the execution of his vows to the
cause of Salem.
P.1019 - §6 Abraham had kingly ambitions, and on the way back from Egypt he laid before Lot his plan to
subdue all Canaan and bring its people under the rule of Salem. Lot was more bent on business; so, after a later
disagreement, he went to Sodom to engage in trade and animal husbandry. Lot liked neither a military nor a
herder's life.
P.1019 - §7 Upon returning with his family to Salem, Abraham began to mature his military projects. He was
soon recognized as the civil ruler of the Salem territory and had confederated under his leadership seven near-
by tribes. Indeed, it was with great difficulty that Melchizedek restrained Abraham, who was fired with a zeal to
go forth and round up the neighboring tribes with the sword that they might thus more quickly be brought to a
knowledge of the Salem truths.
P.1019 - §8 Melchizedek maintained peaceful relations with all the surrounding tribes; he was not militaristic
and was never attacked by any of the armies as they moved back and forth. He was entirely willing that
Abraham should formulate a defensive policy for Salem such as was subsequently put into effect, but he would
not
P.1020 - §0 approve of his pupil's ambitious schemes for conquest; so there occurred a friendly severance of
relationship, Abraham going over to Hebron to establish his military capital.
P.1020 - §1 Abraham, because of his close connection with the illustrious Melchizedek, possessed great
advantage over the surrounding petty kings; they all revered Melchizedek and unduly feared Abraham.
Abraham knew of this fear and only awaited an opportune occasion to attack his neighbors, and this excuse
came when some of these rulers presumed to raid the property of his nephew Lot, who dwelt in Sodom. Upon
hearing of this, Abraham, at the head of his seven confederated tribes, moved on the enemy. His own bodyguard
of 318 officered the army, numbering more than 4,000, which struck at this time.
P.1020 - §2 When Melchizedek heard of Abraham's declaration of war, he went forth to dissuade him but only
caught up with his former disciple as he returned victorious from the battle. Abraham insisted that the God of
Salem had given him victory over his enemies and persisted in giving a tenth of his spoils to the Salem treasury.
The other ninety per cent he removed to his capital at Hebron.
P.1020 - §3 After this battle of Siddim, Abraham became leader of a second confederation of eleven tribes and
not only paid tithes to Melchizedek but saw to it that all others in that vicinity did the same. His diplomatic
dealings with the king of Sodom, together with the fear in which he was so generally held, resulted in the king
of Sodom and others joining the Hebron military confederation; Abraham was really well on the way to
establishing a powerful state in Palestine.
6. MELCHIZEDEK'S COVENANT WITH ABRAHAM - P.1020
P.1020 - §4 Abraham envisaged the conquest of all Canaan. His determination was only weakened by the fact
that Melchizedek would not sanction the undertaking. But Abraham had about decided to embark upon the
enterprise when the thought that he had no son to succeed him as ruler of this proposed kingdom began to worry
him. He arranged another conference with Melchizedek; and it was in the course of this interview that the priest
of Salem, the visible Son of God, persuaded Abraham to abandon his scheme of material conquest and temporal
rule in favor of the spiritual concept of the kingdom of heaven.
P.1020 - §5 Melchizedek explained to Abraham the futility of contending with the Amorite confederation but
made it equally clear that these backward clans were certainly committing suicide by their foolish practices so
that in a few generations they would be so weakened that the descendants of Abraham, meanwhile greatly
increased, could easily overcome them.
P.1020 - §6 And Melchizedek made a formal covenant with Abraham at Salem. Said he to Abraham: "Look
now up to the heavens and number the stars if you are able; so numerous shall your seed be." And Abraham
believed Melchizedek, "and it was counted to him for righteousness." And then Melchizedek told Abraham the
story of the future occupation of Canaan by his offspring after their sojourn in Egypt.
P.1020 - §7 This covenant of Melchizedek with Abraham represents the great Urantian agreement between
divinity and humanity whereby God agrees to do everything; man only agrees to believe God's promises and
follow his instructions. Heretofore it had been believed that salvation could be secured only by works--
sacrifices and offerings; now, Melchizedek again brought to Urantia the good
P.1021 - §1 It was not long after the establishment of this covenant that Isaac, the son of Abraham, was born in
accordance with the promise of Melchizedek. After the birth of Isaac, Abraham took a very solemn attitude
toward his covenant with Melchizedek, going over to Salem to have it stated in writing. It was at this public and
formal acceptance of the covenant that he changed his name from Abram to Abraham.
P.1021 - §2 Most of the Salem believers had practiced circumcision, though it had never been made obligatory
by Melchizedek. Now Abraham had always so opposed circumcision that on this occasion he decided to
solemnize the event by formally accepting this rite in token of the ratification of the Salem covenant.
P.1021 - §4 Upon the consummation of the solemn covenant, the reconciliation between Abraham and
Melchizedek was complete. Abraham again assumed the civil and military leadership of the Salem colony,
which at its height carried over one hundred thousand regular tithe payers on the rolls of the Melchizedek
brotherhood. Abraham greatly improved the Salem temple and provided new tents for the entire school. He not
only extended the tithing system but also instituted many improved methods of conducting the business of the
school, besides contributing greatly to the better handling of the department of missionary propaganda. He also
did much to effect improvement of the herds and the reorganization of the Salem dairying projects. Abraham
was a shrewd and efficient business man, a wealthy man for his day; he was not overly pious, but he was
thoroughly sincere, and he did believe in Machiventa Melchizedek.
P.1022 - §4 It was a great trial for Abraham when Melchizedek so suddenly disappeared. Although he had fully
warned his followers that he must sometime go as he had come, they were not reconciled to the loss of their
wonderful leader. The great organization built up at Salem nearly disappeared, though the traditions of these
days were what Moses built upon when he led the Hebrew slaves out of Egypt.
P.1022 - §5 The loss of Melchizedek produced a sadness in the heart of Abraham that he never fully overcame.
Hebron he had abandoned when he gave up the ambition of building a material kingdom; and now, upon the
loss of his associate in the building of the spiritual kingdom, he departed from Salem, going south to live near
his interests at Gerar.
P.1022 - §6 Abraham became fearful and timid immediately after the disappearance of Melchizedek. He
withheld his identity upon arrival at Gerar, so that Abimelech appropriated his wife. (Shortly after his marriage
to Sarah, Abraham one night had overheard a plot to murder him in order to get his brilliant wife. This dread
became a terror to the otherwise brave and daring leader; all his life he feared
P.1023 - §1 But Abraham was not long to be deterred in his mission as the successor of Melchizedek. Soon he
made converts among the Philistines and of Abimelech's people, made a treaty with them, and, in turn, became
contaminated with many of their superstitions, particularly with their practice of sacrificing first-born sons.
Thus did Abraham again become a great leader in Palestine. He was held in reverence by all groups and
honored by all kings. He was the spiritual leader of all the surrounding tribes, and his influence continued for
some time after his death. During the closing years of his life he once more returned to Hebron, the scene of his
earlier activities and the place where he had worked in association with Melchizedek. Abraham's last act was to
send trusty servants to the city of his brother, Nahor, on the border of Mesopotamia, to secure a woman of his
own people as a wife for his son Isaac. It had long been the custom of Abraham's people to marry their cousins.
And Abraham died confident in that faith in God which he had learned from Melchizedek in the vanished
schools of Salem.
P.1023 - §2 It was hard for the next generation to comprehend the story of Melchizedek; within five hundred
years many regarded the whole narrative as a myth. Isaac held fairly well to the teachings of his father and
nourished the gospel of the Salem colony, but it was harder for Jacob to grasp the significance of these
traditions. Joseph was a firm believer in Melchizedek and was, largely because of this, regarded by his brothers
as a dreamer. Joseph's honor in Egypt was chiefly due to the memory of his great-grandfather Abraham. Joseph
was offered military command of the Egyptian armies, but being such a firm believer in the traditions of
Melchizedek and the later teachings of Abraham and Isaac, he elected to serve as a civil administrator, believing
that he could thus better labor for the advancement of the kingdom of heaven.
P.1023 - §4 What the Old Testament records describe as conversations between Abraham and God were in
reality conferences between Abraham and Melchizedek. Later scribes regarded the term Melchizedek as
synonymous with God. The record of so many contacts of Abraham and Sarah with "the angel of the Lord"
refers to their numerous visits with Melchizedek.
P.1023 - §5 The Hebrew narratives of Isaac, Jacob, and Joseph are far more reliable than those about Abraham,
although they also contain many diversions from the facts, alterations made intentionally and unintentionally at
the time of the compilation of these records by the Hebrew priests during the Babylonian captivity. Keturah was
not a wife of Abraham; like Hagar, she was merely a concubine. All of Abraham's property went to Isaac, the
son of Sarah, the status wife. Abraham was not so old as the records indicate, and his wife was much younger.
These ages were deliberately altered in order to provide for the subsequent alleged miraculous birth of Isaac.
P.1024 - §0 people of God; and hence they carefully edited all their records for the purpose of raising Abraham
and their other national leaders high up above all other persons, not excepting Melchizedek himself. The
Hebrew scribes therefore destroyed every record of these momentous times which they could find, preserving
only the narrative of the meeting of Abraham and Melchizedek after the battle of Siddim, which they deemed
reflected great honor upon Abraham.
P.1024 - §5 Machiventa Melchizedek continued to take a great interest in the affairs of the descendants of those
men who had believed in his teachings when he was in the flesh. But the progeny of Abraham through Isaac as
intermarried with the Kenites were the only line which long continued to nourish any clear concept of the Salem
teachings.
P.1027 - §1 The early teachers of the Salem religion penetrated to the remotest tribes of Africa and Eurasia,
ever preaching Machiventa's gospel of man's faith and trust in the one universal God as the only price of
obtaining divine favor. Melchizedek's covenant with Abraham was the pattern for all the early propaganda that
went out from Salem and other centers. Urantia has never had more enthusiastic and aggressive missionaries of
any religion than these noble men and women who carried the teachings of Melchizedek over the entire Eastern
Hemisphere. These missionaries were recruited from many peoples and races, and they largely spread their
teachings through the medium of native converts. They established training centers in different parts of the
world where they taught the natives the Salem religion and then commissioned these pupils to function as
teachers among their own people.
P.1035 - §5 At Benares Gautama founded his school, and it was during its second year that a pupil, Bautan,
imparted to his teacher the traditions of the Salem missionaries about the Melchizedek covenant with Abraham;
and while Siddhartha did not have a very clear concept of the Universal Father, he took an advanced stand on
salvation through faith--simple belief. He so declared himself before his followers and began sending his
students out in groups of sixty to proclaim to the people of India "the glad tidings of free salvation; that all men,
high and low, can attain bliss by faith in righteousness and justice."
P.1046 - §1 Egypt was intellectual and moral but not overly spiritual. In six thousand years only four great
prophets arose among the Egyptians. Amenemope they followed for a season; Okhban they murdered; Ikhnaton
they accepted but halfheartedly for one short generation; Moses they rejected. Again was it political rather than
religious circumstances that made it easy for Abraham and, later on, for Joseph to exert great influence
throughout Egypt in behalf of the Salem teachings of one God. But when the Salem missionaries first entered
Egypt, they encountered this highly ethical culture of evolution blended with the modified moral standards of
Mesopotamian immigrants. These early Nile valley teachers were the first to proclaim conscience as the
mandate of God, the voice of Deity.
P.1051 - §1 Here and there throughout Arabia were families and clans that held on to the hazy idea of the one
God. Such groups treasured the traditions of Melchizedek, Abraham, Moses, and Zoroaster. There were
numerous centers that might have responded to the Jesusonian gospel, but the Christian missionaries of the
desert lands were an austere and unyielding group in contrast with the compromisers and innovators who
functioned as missionaries in the Mediterranean countries. Had the followers of Jesus taken more seriously his
injunction to "go into all the world and preach the gospel," and had they been more gracious in that preaching,
less stringent in collateral social requirements of their own devising, then many lands would gladly have
received the simple gospel of the carpenter's son, Arabia among them.
P.1052 - §3 The Salem religion persisted among the Kenites in Palestine as their creed, and this religion as it
was later adopted by the Hebrews was influenced, first, by Egyptian moral teachings; later, by Babylonian
theologic thought; and lastly, by Iranian conceptions of good and evil. Factually the Hebrew religion is
predicated upon the covenant between Abraham and Machiventa Melchizedek, evolutionally it is the outgrowth
of many unique situational circumstances, but culturally it has borrowed freely from the religion, morality, and
philosophy of the entire Levant. It is through the Hebrew religion that much of the morality and religious
thought of Egypt, Mesopotamia, and Iran was transmitted to the Occidental peoples.
P.1053 - §2 2. El Elyon. For centuries after Melchizedek's sojourn at Salem his doctrine of Deity persisted in
various versions but was generally connoted by the term El Elyon, the Most High God of heaven. Many
Semites, including the immediate descendants of Abraham, at various times worshiped both Yahweh and El
Elyon.
P.1055 - §1 It was only after the days of Machiventa Melchizedek and Abraham that certain tribes of Semites,
because of their peculiar religious beliefs, were called the children of Israel and later on Hebrews, Jews, and the
"chosen people." Abraham was not the racial father of all the Hebrews; he was not even the progenitor of all the
Bedouin Semites who were held captive in Egypt. True, his offspring, coming up out of Egypt, did form the
nucleus of the later Jewish people, but the vast majority of the men and women who became incorporated into
the clans of Israel had never sojourned in Egypt. They were merely fellow nomads who chose to follow the
leadership of Moses as the children of Abraham and their Semite associates from Egypt journeyed through
northern Arabia.
P.1058 - §1 Many of the advances which Moses made over and above the religion of the Egyptians and the
surrounding Levantine tribes were due to the Kenite traditions of the time of Melchizedek. Without the teaching
of Machiventa to Abraham and his contemporaries, the Hebrews would have come out of Egypt in hopeless
darkness. Moses and his father-in-law, Jethro, gathered up the residue of the traditions of the days of
Melchizedek, and these teachings, joined to the learning of the Egyptians, guided Moses in the creation of the
improved religion and ritual of the Israelites. Moses was an organizer; he selected the best in the religion and
mores of Egypt and Palestine and, associating these practices with the traditions of the Melchizedek teachings,
organized the Hebrew ceremonial system of worship.
P.1059 - §1 When Moses turned over the command of the Hebrews to Joshua, he had already gathered up
thousands of the collateral descendants of Abraham, Nahor, Lot, and other of the related tribes and had whipped
them into a self-sustaining and partially self-regulating nation of pastoral warriors.
P.1063 - §1 But the great contribution which Samuel made to the development of the concept of Deity was his
ringing pronouncement that Yahweh was changeless, forever the same embodiment of unerring perfection and
divinity. In these times Yahweh was conceived to be a fitful God of jealous whims, always regretting that he
had done thus and so; but now, for the first time since the Hebrews sallied forth from Egypt, they heard these
startling words, "The Strength of Israel will not lie nor repent, for he is not a man, that he should repent."
Stability in dealing with Divinity was proclaimed. Samuel reiterated the Melchizedek covenant with Abraham
and declared that the Lord God of Israel was the source of all truth, stability, and constancy. Always had the
Hebrews looked upon their God as a man, a superman, an exalted spirit of unknown origin; but now they heard
the onetime spirit of Horeb exalted as an unchanging God of creator perfection. Samuel was aiding the evolving
God concept to ascend to heights above the changing state of men's minds and the vicissitudes of mortal
existence. Under his teaching, the God of the Hebrews was beginning the ascent from an idea on the order of
the tribal gods to the ideal of an all-powerful and changeless Creator and Supervisor of all creation.
P.1200 - §4 The activities of Adjusters in your local universe are directed by the Personalized Adjuster of
Michael of Nebadon, that very Monitor who guided him step by step when he lived his human life in the flesh
of Joshua ben Joseph. Faithful to his trust was this extraordinary Adjuster, and wisely did this valiant Monitor
direct the human nature, ever guiding the mortal mind of the Paradise Son in the choosing of the path of the
Father's perfect will. This Adjuster had previously served with Machiventa Melchizedek in the days of
Abraham and had engaged in tremendous exploits both previous to this indwelling and between these bestowal
experiences.
P.1340 - §1 The scribes, the Pharisees, and the priesthood held the Jews in a terrible bondage of ritualism and
legalism, a bondage far more real than that of the Roman political rule. The Jews of Jesus' time were not only
held in subjugation to the law but were equally bound by the slavish demands of the traditions, which involved
and invaded every domain of personal and social life. These minute regulations of conduct pursued and
dominated every loyal Jew, and it is not strange that they promptly rejected one of their number who presumed
to ignore their sacred traditions, and who dared to flout their long-honored regulations of social conduct. They
could hardly regard with favor the teachings of one who did not hesitate to clash with dogmas which they
regarded as having been ordained by Father Abraham himself. Moses had given them their law and they would
not compromise.
P.1344 - §4 Joseph, the human father of Jesus (Joshua ben Joseph), was a Hebrew of the Hebrews, albeit he
carried many non-Jewish racial strains which had been added to his ancestral tree from time to time by the
female lines of his progenitors. The ancestry of the father of Jesus went back to the days of Abraham and
through this venerable patriarch to the earlier lines of inheritance leading to the Sumerians and Nodites and,
through the southern tribes of the ancient blue man, to Andon and Fonta. David and Solomon were not in the
direct line of Joseph's ancestry, neither did Joseph's lineage go directly back to Adam. Joseph's immediate
ancestors were mechanics--builders, carpenters, masons, and smiths. Joseph himself was a carpenter and later a
contractor. His family belonged to a long and illustrious line of the nobility of the common people, accentuated
ever and anon by the appearance of unusual individuals who had distinguished themselves in connection with
the evolution of religion on Urantia.
P.1353 - §11 The oath which he swore to Abraham our father,
P.1387 - §2 This hill, a little more than one hundred years previously, had been the "high place of Baal," and
now it was the site of the tomb of Simeon, a reputed holy man of Israel. From the summit of this hill of Simeon,
Jesus looked out over Nazareth and the surrounding country. He would gaze upon Megiddo and recall the story
of the Egyptian army winning its first great victory in Asia; and how, later on, another such army defeated the
Judean king Josiah. Not far away he could look upon Taanach, where Deborah and Barak defeated Sisera. In the
distance he could view the hills of Dothan, where he had been taught Joseph's brethren sold him into Egyptian
slavery. He then would shift his gaze over to Ebal and Gerizim and recount to himself the traditions of
Abraham, Jacob, and Abimelech. And thus he recalled and turned over in his mind the historic and traditional
events of his father Joseph's people.
P.1399 - §2 Jesus did much thinking as they journeyed through Samaria, particularly at Bethel and when
drinking from Jacob's well. He and his brother discussed the traditions of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. He did
much to prepare James for what he was about to witness at Jerusalem, thus seeking to lessen the shock such as
he himself had experienced on his first visit to the temple. But James was not so sensitive to some of these
sights. He commented on the perfunctory and heartless manner in which some of the priests performed their
duties but on the whole greatly enjoyed his sojourn at Jerusalem.
P.1432 - §4 By the fourth hour after landing they were settled near the eastern end of the long and broad
avenue, one hundred feet wide and five miles long, which stretched on out to the western limits of this city of
one million people. After the first survey of the city's chief attractions--university (museum), library, the royal
mausoleum of Alexander, the palace, temple of Neptune, theater, and gymnasium--Gonod addressed himself to
business while Jesus and Ganid went to the library, the greatest in the world. Here were assembled nearly a
million manuscripts from all the civilized world: Greece, Rome, Palestine, Parthia, India, China, and even
Japan. In this library Ganid saw the largest collection of Indian literature in all the world; and they spent some
time here each day throughout their stay in Alexandria. Jesus told Ganid about the translation of the Hebrew
scriptures into Greek at this place. And they discussed again and again all the religions of the world, Jesus
endeavoring to point out to this young mind the truth in each, always adding: "But Yahweh is the God
developed from the revelations of Melchizedek and the covenant of Abraham. The Jews were the offspring of
Abraham and subsequently occupied the very land wherein Melchizedek had lived and taught, and from which
he sent teachers to all the world; and their religion eventually portrayed a clearer recognition of the Lord God of
Israel as the Universal Father in heaven than any other world religion."
P.1440 - §2 At Syracuse they spent a full week. The notable event of their stop here was the rehabilitation of
Ezra, the backslidden Jew, who kept the tavern where Jesus and his companions stopped. Ezra was charmed by
Jesus' approach and asked him to help him come back to the faith of Israel. He expressed his hopelessness by
saying, "I want to be a true son of Abraham, but I cannot find God." Said Jesus: "If you truly want to find God,
that desire is in itself evidence that you have already found him. Your trouble is not that you cannot find God,
for the Father has already found you; your trouble is simply that you do not know God. Have you not read in the
Prophet Jeremiah, `You shall seek me and find me when you shall search for me with all your heart'? And
again, does not this same prophet say: `And I will give you a heart to know me, that I am the Lord, and you
shall belong to my people, and I will be your God'? And have you not also read in the Scriptures where it says:
`He looks down upon men, and if any will say: I have sinned and perverted that which was right, and it profited
me not, then will God deliver that man's soul from darkness, and he shall see the light'?" And Ezra found God
and to the satisfaction of his soul. Later, this Jew, in association with a well-to-do Greek proselyte, built the first
Christian church in Syracuse.
P.1481 - §4 Jesus was much interested in the early history of Ur, the birthplace of Abraham, and he was equally
fascinated with the ruins and traditions of Susa, so much so that Gonod and Ganid extended their stay in these
parts three weeks in order to afford Jesus more time to conduct his investigations and also to provide the better
opportunity to persuade him to go back to India with them.
P.1502 - §0 of Abraham so longed for the "consolation of Israel" or more ardently anticipated "the restoration of
the kingdom." Never in all Jewish history could John's message, "the kingdom of heaven is at hand," have made
such a deep and universal appeal as at the very time he so mysteriously appeared on the bank of this southern
crossing of the Jordan.
P.1502 - §5 John was a heroic but tactless preacher. One day when he was preaching and baptizing on the west
bank of the Jordan, a group of Pharisees and a number of Sadducees came forward and presented themselves for
baptism. Before leading them down into the water, John, addressing them as a group said: "Who warned you to
flee, as vipers before the fire, from the wrath to come? I will baptize you, but I warn you to bring forth fruit
worthy of sincere repentance if you would receive the remission of your sins. Tell me not that Abraham is your
father. I declare that God is able of these twelve stones here before you to raise up worthy children for
Abraham. And even now is the ax laid to the very roots of the trees. Every tree that brings not forth good fruit is
destined to be cut down and cast into the fire." (The twelve stones to which he referred were the reputed
memorial stones set up by Joshua to commemorate the crossing of the "twelve tribes" at this very point when
they first entered the promised land.)
P.1509 - §3 The Jews entertained many ideas about the expected deliverer, and each of these different schools
of Messianic teaching was able to point to statements in the Hebrew scriptures as proof of their contentions. In a
general way, the Jews regarded their national history as beginning with Abraham and culminating in the
Messiah and the new age of the kingdom of God. In earlier times they had envisaged this deliverer as "the
servant of the Lord," then as "the Son of Man," while latterly some even went so far as to refer to the Messiah
as the "Son of God." But no matter whether he was called the "seed of Abraham" or "the son of David," all were
agreed that he was to be the Messiah, the "anointed one." Thus did the concept evolve from the "servant of the
Lord" to the "son of David," "Son of Man," and "Son of God."
P.1568 - §5 "The new kingdom which my Father is about to set up in the hearts of his earth children is to be an
everlasting dominion. There shall be no end of this rule of my Father in the hearts of those who desire to do his
divine will. I declare to you that my Father is not the God of Jew or gentile. Many shall come from the east and
from the west to sit down with us in the Father's kingdom, while many of the children of Abraham will refuse to
enter this new brotherhood of the rule of the Father's spirit in the hearts of the children of men.
P.1597 - §3 After considerable discussion of the heavenly Father's character, Jesus paused to say: "You, Jacob,
being a father of many, know well the truth of my words." And Jacob said: "But, Master, who told you I was the
father of six children? How did you know this about me?" And the Master replied: "Suffice it to say that the
Father and the Son know all things, for indeed they see all. Loving your children as a father on earth, you must
now accept as a reality the love of the heavenly Father for you--not just for all the children of Abraham, but for
you, your individual soul."
P.1598 - §5 2. The Most High. This concept of the Father in heaven was proclaimed by Melchizedek to
Abraham and was carried far from Salem by those who subsequently believed in this enlarged and expanded
idea of Deity. Abraham and his brother left Ur because of the establishment of sun worship, and they became
believers in Melchizedek's teaching of El Elyon--the Most High God. Theirs was a composite concept of God,
consisting in a blending of their older Mesopotamian ideas and the Most High doctrine.
P.1599 - §1 Never before had the apostles been so shocked as they were upon hearing this recounting of the
growth of the concept of God in the Jewish minds of previous generations; they were too bewildered to ask
questions. As they sat before Jesus in silence, the Master continued: "And you would have known these truths
had you read the Scriptures. Have you not read in Samuel where it says: `And the anger of the Lord was kindled
against Israel, so much so that he moved David against them, saying, go number Israel and Judah'? And this
was not strange because in the days of Samuel the children of Abraham really believed that Yahweh created
both good and evil. But when a later writer narrated these events, subsequent to the enlargement of the Jewish
concept of the nature of God, he did not dare attribute evil to Yahweh; therefore he said: `And Satan stood up
against Israel and provoked David to number Israel.' Cannot you discern that such records in the Scriptures
clearly show how the concept of the nature of God continued to grow from one generation to another?
P.1662 - §4 "My son, you do not comprehend the meaning of adversity or the mission of suffering. Have you
not read that masterpiece of Semitic literature--the Scripture story of the afflictions of Job? Do you not recall
how this wonderful parable begins with the recital of the material prosperity of the Lord's servant? You well
remember that Job was blessed with children, wealth, dignity, position, health, and everything else which men
value in this temporal life. According to the time-honored teachings of the children of Abraham such material
prosperity was all-sufficient evidence of divine favor. But such material possessions and such temporal
prosperity do not indicate God's favor. My Father in heaven loves the poor just as much as the rich; he is no
respecter of persons.
P.1665 - §4 The last week of the sojourn at Bethsaida the Jerusalem spies became much divided in their attitude
toward Jesus and his teachings. Three of these Pharisees were tremendously impressed by what they had seen
and heard. Meanwhile, at Jerusalem, Abraham, a young and influential member of the Sanhedrin, publicly
espoused the teachings of Jesus and was baptized in the pool
P.1666 - §4 The new Jerusalem convert, Abraham the Pharisee, gave all of his worldly goods to the apostolic
treasury, and this contribution did much to make possible the immediate sending forth of the one hundred newly
trained evangelists. Andrew had already announced the closing of the encampment, and everybody prepared
either to go home or else to follow the evangelists into Galilee.
P.1672 - §5 The religious leaders at Jerusalem were becoming well-nigh frantic as a result of the recent
conversion of young Abraham and by the desertion of the three spies who had been baptized by Peter, and who
were now out with the evangelists on this second preaching tour of Galilee. The Jewish leaders were
increasingly blinded by fear and prejudice, while their hearts were hardened by the continued rejection of the
appealing truths of the gospel of the kingdom. When men shut off the appeal to the spirit that dwells within
them, there is little that can be done to modify their attitude.
P.1682 - §5 "Salvation is the gift of the Father and is revealed by his Sons. Acceptance by faith on your part
makes you a partaker of the divine nature, a son or a daughter of God. By faith you are justified; by faith are
you saved; and by this same faith are you eternally advanced in the way of progressive and divine perfection.
By faith was Abraham justified and made aware of salvation by the
P.1685 - §4 The ruler of the synagogue then took his place before the ark, or chest, containing the sacred
writings and began the recitation of the nineteen prayer eulogies, or benedictions. But on this occasion it was
desirable to shorten the service in order that the distinguished guest might have more time for his discourse;
accordingly, only the first and last of the benedictions were recited. The first was: "Blessed is the Lord our God,
and the God of our fathers, the God of Abraham, and the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob; the great, the
mighty, and the terrible God, who shows mercy and kindness, who creates all things, who remembers the
gracious promises to the fathers and brings a savior to their children's children for his own name's sake, in love.
O King, helper, savior, and shield! Blessed are you, O Yahweh, the shield of Abraham."
P.1688 - §1 By March 10 all of the preaching and teaching groups had forgathered at Bethsaida. Thursday night
and Friday many of them went out to fish, while on the Sabbath day they attended the synagogue to hear an
aged Jew of Damascus discourse on the glory of father Abraham. Jesus spent most of this Sabbath day alone in
the hills. That Saturday night the Master talked for more than an hour to the assembled groups on "The mission
of adversity and the spiritual value of disappointment." This was a memorable occasion, and his hearers never
forgot the lesson he imparted.
P.1732 - §3 But watch, lest any of you look with disdain upon the children of Abraham because they have fallen
on these evil days of traditional barrenness. Our forefathers gave themselves up to the persistent and passionate
search for God, and they found him as no other whole race of men have ever known him since the times of
Adam, who knew much of this as he was himself a Son of God. My Father has not failed to mark the long and
untiring struggle of Israel, ever since the days of Moses, to find God and to know God. For weary generations
the Jews have not ceased to toil, sweat, groan, travail, and endure the sufferings and experience the sorrows of a
misunderstood and despised people, all in order that they might come a little nearer the discovery of the truth
about God. And, notwithstanding all the failures and falterings of Israel, our fathers progressively, from Moses
to the times of Amos and Hosea, did reveal increasingly to the whole world an ever clearer and more truthful
picture of the eternal God. And so was the way prepared for the still greater revelation of the Father which you
have been called to share.
P.1735 - §4 The next day, as Jesus taught his apostles, commenting on the cure of the daughter of the Syrian
woman, he said: "And so it has been all the way along; you see for yourselves how the gentiles are able to
exercise saving faith in the teachings of the gospel of the kingdom of heaven. Verily, verily, I tell you that the
Father's kingdom shall be taken by the gentiles if the children of Abraham are not minded to show faith enough
to enter therein."
P.1750 - §5 "We may not yet proclaim openly that the Son of Man is the Son of God, but it has been revealed to
you; wherefore do I speak boldly to you concerning these mysteries. Though I stand before you in this physical
presence, I came forth from God the Father. Before Abraham was, I am. I did come forth from the Father into
this world as you have known me, and I declare to you that I must presently leave this world and return to the
work of my Father."
P.1767 - §3 And then went Jesus over to Abila, where Nathaniel and his associates labored. Nathaniel was
much bothered by some of Jesus' pronouncements which seemed to detract from the authority of the recognized
Hebrew scriptures. Accordingly, on this night, after the usual period of questions and answers, Nathaniel took
Jesus away from the others and asked: "Master, could you trust me to know the truth about the Scriptures? I
observe that you teach us only a portion of the sacred writings--the best as I view it--and I infer that you reject
the teachings of the rabbis to the effect that the words of the law are the very words of God, having been with
God in heaven even before the times of Abraham and Moses. What is the truth about the Scriptures?" When
Jesus heard the question of his bewildered apostle, he answered:
P.1767 - §4 "Nathaniel, you have rightly judged; I do not regard the Scriptures as do the rabbis. I will talk with
you about this matter on condition that you do not relate these things to your brethren, who are not all prepared
to receive this teaching. The words of the law of Moses and the teachings of the Scriptures were not in existence
before Abraham. Only in recent times have the Scriptures been gathered together as we now have them. While
they contain the best of the higher thoughts and longings of the Jewish people, they also contain much that is far
from being representative of the character and teachings of the Father in heaven; wherefore must I choose from
among the better teachings those truths which are to be gleaned for the gospel of the kingdom.
P.1786 - §4 8. He constantly talks about God as an ever-present associate in all that he does. He goes about
doing good, for God seems to be in him. He makes the most astounding assertions about himself and his
mission on earth, statements which would be absurd if he were not divine. He once declared, "Before Abraham
was, I am." He has definitely claimed divinity; he professes to be in partnership with God. He well-nigh
exhausts the possibilities of language in the reiteration of his claims of intimate association with the heavenly
Father. He even dares to assert that he and the Father are one. He says that any one who has seen him has seen
the Father. And he says and does all these tremendous things with such childlike naturalness. He alludes to his
association with the Father in the same manner that he refers to his association with us. He seems to be so sure
about God and speaks of these relations in such a matter-of-fact way.
P.1796 - §4 "If my words abide in you and you are minded to do the will of my Father, then are you truly my
disciples. You shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free. I know how you will answer me: We are
the children of Abraham, and we are in bondage to none; how then shall we be made free? Even so, I do not
speak of outward subjection to another's rule; I refer to the liberties of the soul. Verily, verily, I say to you,
everyone who commits sin is the bond-servant of sin. And you know that the bondservant is not likely to abide
forever in the master's house. You also know that the son does remain in his father's house. If, therefore, the Son
shall make you free, shall make you sons, you shall be free indeed.
P.1796 - §5 "I know that you are Abraham's seed, yet your leaders seek to kill me because my word has not
been allowed to have its transforming influence in their hearts. Their souls are sealed by prejudice and blinded
by the pride of revenge. I declare to you the truth which the eternal Father shows me, while these deluded
teachers seek to do the things which they have learned only from their temporal fathers. And when you reply
that Abraham is your father, then do I tell you that, if you were the children of Abraham, you would do the
works of Abraham. Some of you believe my teaching, but others seek to destroy me because I have told you the
truth which I received from God. But Abraham did not so treat the truth of God. I perceive that some among
you are determined
P.1797 - §2 "Verily, verily, I say to you who believe the gospel that, if a man will keep this word of truth alive
in his heart, he shall never taste death. And now just at my side a scribe says this statement proves that I have a
devil, seeing that Abraham is dead, also the prophets. And he asks: `Are you so much greater than Abraham and
the prophets that you dare to stand here and say that whoso keeps your word shall not taste death? Who do you
claim to be that you dare to utter such blasphemies?' And I say to all such that, if I glorify myself, my glory is as
nothing. But it is the Father who shall glorify me, even the same Father whom you call God. But you have
failed to know this your God and my Father, and I have come to bring you together; to show you how to
become truly the sons of God. Though you know not the Father, I truly know him. Even Abraham rejoiced to
see my day, and by faith he saw it and was glad."
P.1797 - §3 When the unbelieving Jews and the agents of the Sanhedrin who had gathered about by this time
heard these words, they raised a tumult, shouting: "You are not fifty years of age, and yet you talk about seeing
Abraham; you are a child of the devil!" Jesus was unable to continue the discourse. He only said as he departed,
"Verily, verily, I say to you, before Abraham was, I am." Many of the unbelievers rushed forth for stones to cast
at him, and the agents of the Sanhedrin sought to place him under arrest, but the Master quickly made his way
through the temple corridors and escaped to a secret meeting place near Bethany where Martha, Mary, and
Lazarus awaited him.
P.1828 - §6 "You have been taught that only the children of Abraham will be saved; that only the gentiles of
adoption can hope for salvation. Some of you have reasoned that, since the Scriptures record that only Caleb
and Joshua from among all the hosts that went out of Egypt lived to enter the promised land, only a
comparatively few of those who seek the kingdom of heaven shall find entrance thereto.
P.1829 - §2 "But fear not; every one who sincerely desires to find eternal life by entrance into the kingdom of
God shall certainly find such everlasting salvation. But you who refuse this salvation will some day see the
prophets of the seed of Abraham sit down with the believers of the gentile nations in this glorified kingdom to
partake of the bread of life and to refresh themselves with the water thereof. And they who shall thus take the
kingdom in spiritual power and by the persistent assaults of living faith will come from the north and the south
and from the east and the west. And, behold, many who are first will be last, and those who are last will many
times be first."
P.1836 - §2 When the unfriendly ruler had thus spoken, Jesus returned to the speaker's platform and said: "Why
play the part of hypocrites? Does not every one of you, on the Sabbath, loose his ox from the stall and lead him
forth for watering? If such a service is permissible on the Sabbath day, should not this woman, a daughter of
Abraham who has been bound down by evil these eighteen years, be loosed from this bondage and led forth to
partake of the waters of liberty and life, even on this Sabbath day?" And as the woman continued to glorify
God, his critic was put to shame, and the congregation rejoiced with her that she had been healed.
P.1855 - §0 beggar named Lazarus, who lay at this rich man's gate, covered with sores and desiring to be fed
with the crumbs which fell from the rich man's table; yes, even the dogs came and licked his sores. And it came
to pass that the beggar died and was carried away by the angels to rest in Abraham's bosom. And then,
presently, this rich man also died and was buried with great pomp and regal splendor. When the rich man
departed from this world, he waked up in Hades, and finding himself in torment, he lifted up his eyes and
beheld Abraham afar off and Lazarus in his bosom. And then Dives cried aloud: `Father Abraham, have mercy
on me and send over Lazarus that he may dip the tip of his finger in water to cool my tongue, for I am in great
anguish because of my punishment.' And then Abraham replied: `My son, you should remember that in your
lifetime you enjoyed the good things while Lazarus in like manner suffered the evil. But now all this is changed,
seeing that Lazarus is comforted while you are tormented. And besides, between us and you there is a great gulf
so that we cannot go to you, neither can you come over to us.' Then said Dives to Abraham: `I pray you send
Lazarus back to my father's house, inasmuch as I have five brothers, that he may so testify as to prevent my
brothers from coming to this place of torment.' But Abraham said: `My son, they have Moses and the prophets;
let them hear them.' And then answered Dives: `No, No, Father Abraham! but if one go to them from the dead,
they will repent.' And then said Abraham: `If they hear not Moses and the prophets, neither will they be
persuaded even if one were to rise from the dead.'"
P.1874 - §1 They went at once to the home of Zaccheus, and those who lived in Jericho were much surprised
that Jesus would consent to abide with the chief publican. Even while the Master and his apostles lingered with
Zaccheus before the door of his house, one of the Jericho Pharisees, standing near by, said: "You see how this
man has gone to lodge with a sinner, an apostate son of Abraham who is an extortioner and a robber of his own
people." And when Jesus heard this, he looked down at Zaccheus and smiled. Then Zaccheus stood upon a stool
and said: "Men of Jericho, hear me! I may be a publican and a sinner, but the great Teacher has come to abide in
my house; and before he goes in, I tell you that I am going to bestow one half of all my goods upon the poor,
and beginning tomorrow, if I have wrongfully exacted aught from any man, I will restore fourfold. I am going
to seek salvation with all my heart and learn to do righteousness in the sight of God."
P.1874 - §2 When Zaccheus had ceased speaking, Jesus said: "Today has salvation come to this home, and you
have become indeed a son of Abraham." And turning to the crowd assembled about them, Jesus said: "And
marvel not at what I say nor take offense at what we do, for I have all along declared that the Son of Man has
come to seek and to save that which is lost."
P.1876 - §0 spiritual rule of his people, he would have accepted such a kingdom of men's souls and would have
reigned over such a dominion of human hearts. Notwithstanding that they reject my spiritual rule over them, I
will return again to receive from others such a kingdom of spirit as is now denied me. You will see the Son of
Man rejected now, but in another age that which the children of Abraham now reject will be received and
exalted.
P.1900 - §2 Jesus knew, and so did the people, that these Sadducees were not sincere in asking this question
because it was not likely that such a case would really occur; and besides, this practice of the brothers of a dead
man seeking to beget children for him was practically a dead letter at this time among the Jews. Nevertheless,
Jesus condescended to reply to their mischievous question. He said: "You all do err in asking such questions
because you know neither the Scriptures nor the living power of God. You know that the sons of this world can
marry and are given in marriage, but you do not seem to understand that they who are accounted worthy to
attain the worlds to come, through the resurrection of the righteous, neither marry nor are given in marriage.
Those who experience the resurrection from the dead are more like the angels of heaven, and they never die.
These resurrected ones are eternally the sons of God; they are the children of light resurrected into the progress
of eternal life. And even your Father Moses understood this, for, in connection with his experiences at the
burning bush, he heard the Father say, `I am the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob.' And
so, along with Moses, do I declare that my Father is not the God of the dead but of the living. In him you all do
live, reproduce, and possess your mortal existence."
P.1900 - §4 Jesus appealed only to Moses in his encounter with the Sadducees because this religio-political sect
acknowledged the validity of only the five so-called Books of Moses; they did not allow that the teachings of
the prophets were admissible as a basis of doctrinal dogmas. The Master in his answer, though positively
affirming the fact of the survival of mortal creatures by the technique of the resurrection, did not in any sense
speak approvingly of the Pharisaic beliefs in the resurrection of the literal human body. The point Jesus wished
to emphasize was: That the Father had said, "I am the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob," not I was their God.
P.1902 - §0 in the Psalm which you accredit to David, he himself, speaking in the spirit, says, `The Lord said to
my lord, sit on my right hand until I make your enemies the footstool of your feet.' If David calls him Lord, how
then can he be his son?" Although the rulers, the scribes, and the chief priests made no reply to this question,
they likewise refrained from asking him any more questions in an effort to entangle him. They never answered
this question which Jesus put to them, but after the Master's death they attempted to escape the difficulty by
changing the interpretation of this Psalm so as to make it refer to Abraham instead of the Messiah. Others
sought to escape the dilemma by disallowing that David was the author of this so-called Messianic Psalm.
P.1902 - §4 "My Father sent me to this world to reveal his loving-kindness to the children of men, but those to
whom I first came have refused to receive me. True, indeed, many of you have believed my gospel for
yourselves, but the children of Abraham and their leaders are about to reject me, and in so doing they will reject
Him who sent me. I have freely proclaimed the gospel of salvation to this people; I have told them of sonship
with joy, liberty, and life more abundant in the spirit. My Father has done many wonderful works among these
fear-ridden sons of men. But truly did the Prophet Isaiah refer to this people when he wrote: `Lord, who has
believed our teachings? And to whom has the Lord been revealed?' Truly have the leaders of my people
deliberately blinded their eyes that they see not,
P.1906 - §2 "As long as there is a chance that the Jews will turn to my Father and seek salvation, the God of
Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob will keep his hands of mercy outstretched toward you; but when you have once
filled up your cup of impenitence, and when once you have finally rejected my Father's mercy, this nation will
be left to its own counsels, and it shall speedily come to an inglorious end. This people was called to become
the light of the world, to show forth the spiritual glory of a God-knowing race, but you have so far departed
from the fulfillment of your divine privileges that your leaders are about to commit the supreme folly of all the
ages in that they are on the verge of finally rejecting the gift of God to all men and for all ages--the revelation of
the love of the Father in heaven for all his creatures on earth.
P.1908 - §7 "O Jerusalem and the children of Abraham, you who have stoned the prophets and killed the
teachers that were sent to you, even now would I gather your children together as a hen gathers her chickens
under her wings, but you will not!
P.1910 - §1 From this time on the Jews were left to finish their brief and short lease of national life wholly in
accordance with their purely human status among the nations of Urantia. Israel had repudiated the Son of the
God who made a covenant with Abraham, and the plan to make the children of Abraham the light-bearers of
truth to the world had been shattered. The divine covenant had been abrogated, and the end of the Hebrew
nation drew on apace.
P.1956 - §2 Jesus now went over to Simon Zelotes, who stood up and listened to this admonition: "You are a
true son of Abraham, but what a time I have had trying to make you a son of this heavenly kingdom. I love you
and so do all of your brethren. I know that you love me, Simon, and that you also love the kingdom, but you are
still set on making this kingdom come according to your liking. I know full well that you will eventually grasp
the spiritual nature and meaning of my gospel, and that you will do valiant work in its proclamation, but I am
distressed about what may happen to you when I depart. I would rejoice to know that you would not falter; I
would be made happy if I could know that, after I go to the Father, you would not cease to be my apostle, and
that you would acceptably deport yourself as an ambassador of the heavenly kingdom."
P.896 - §7 These descendants of Andon were dispersed through most of the mountainous regions of central and
southeastern Europe. They were often reinforced by arrivals from Asia Minor, which region they occupied in
considerable strength. The ancient Hittites stemmed directly from the Andonite stock; their pale skins and broad
heads were typical of that race. This strain was carried in Abraham's ancestry and contributed much to the
characteristic facial appearance of his later Jewish descendants who, while having a culture and religion derived
from the Andites, spoke a very different language. Their tongue was distinctly Andonite.
P.1019 - §1 Terah and his whole family were halfhearted converts to the Salem religion, which had been
preached in Chaldea; they learned of Melchizedek through the preaching of Ovid, a Phoenician teacher who
proclaimed the Salem doctrines in Ur. They left Ur intending to go directly through to Salem, but Nahor,
Abraham's brother, not having seen Melchizedek, was lukewarm and persuaded them to tarry at Haran. And it
was a long time after they arrived in Palestine before they were willing to destroy all of the household gods they
had brought with them; they were slow to give up the many gods of Mesopotamia for the one God of Salem.
P.1019 - §2 A few weeks after the death of Abraham's father, Terah, Melchizedek sent one of his students,
Jaram the Hittite, to extend this invitation to both Abraham and Nahor: "Come to Salem, where you shall hear
our teachings of the truth of the eternal Creator, and in the enlightened offspring of you two brothers shall all
the world be blessed." Now Nahor had not wholly accepted the Melchizedek gospel; he remained behind and
built up a strong city-state which bore his name; but Lot, Abraham's nephew, decided to go with his uncle to
Salem.
P.1020 - §2 When Melchizedek heard of Abraham's declaration of war, he went forth to dissuade him but only
caught up with his former disciple as he returned victorious from the battle. Abraham insisted that the God of
Salem had given him victory over his enemies and persisted in giving a tenth of his spoils to the Salem treasury.
The other ninety per cent he removed to his capital at Hebron.
P.1022 - §3 It was shortly after the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah that Machiventa decided to end his
emergency bestowal on Urantia. Melchizedek's decision to terminate his sojourn in the flesh was influenced by
numerous conditions, chief of which was the growing tendency of the surrounding tribes, and even of his
immediate associates, to regard him as a demigod, to look upon him as a supernatural being, which indeed he
was; but they were beginning to reverence him unduly and with a highly superstitious fear. In addition to these
reasons, Melchizedek wanted to leave the scene of his earthly activities a sufficient length of time before
Abraham's death to insure that the truth of the one and only God would become strongly established in the
minds of his followers. Accordingly Machiventa retired one night to his tent at Salem, having said good night to
his human companions, and when they went to call him in the morning, he was not there, for his fellows had
taken him.
P.1023 - §1 But Abraham was not long to be deterred in his mission as the successor of Melchizedek. Soon he
made converts among the Philistines and of Abimelech's people, made a treaty with them, and, in turn, became
contaminated with many of their superstitions, particularly with their practice of sacrificing first-born sons.
Thus did Abraham again become a great leader in Palestine. He was held in reverence by all groups and
honored by all kings. He was the spiritual leader of all the surrounding tribes, and his influence continued for
some time after his death. During the closing years of his life he once more returned to Hebron, the scene of his
earlier activities and the place where he had worked in association with Melchizedek. Abraham's last act was to
send trusty servants to the city of his brother, Nahor, on the border of Mesopotamia, to secure a woman of his
own people as a wife for his son Isaac. It had long been the custom of Abraham's people to marry their cousins.
And Abraham died confident in that faith in God which he had learned from Melchizedek in the vanished
schools of Salem.
P.1023 - §5 The Hebrew narratives of Isaac, Jacob, and Joseph are far more reliable than those about Abraham,
although they also contain many diversions from the facts, alterations made intentionally and unintentionally at
the time of the compilation of these records by the Hebrew priests during the Babylonian captivity. Keturah was
not a wife of Abraham; like Hagar, she was merely a concubine. All of Abraham's property went to Isaac, the
son of Sarah, the status wife. Abraham was not so old as the records indicate, and his wife was much younger.
These ages were deliberately altered in order to provide for the subsequent alleged miraculous birth of Isaac.
P.1796 - §5 "I know that you are Abraham's seed, yet your leaders seek to kill me because my word has not
been allowed to have its transforming influence in their hearts. Their souls are sealed by prejudice and blinded
by the pride of revenge. I declare to you the truth which the eternal Father shows me, while these deluded
teachers seek to do the things which they have learned only from their temporal fathers. And when you reply
that Abraham is your father, then do I tell you that, if you were the children of Abraham, you would do the
works of Abraham. Some of you believe my teaching, but others seek to destroy me because I have told you the
truth which I received from God. But Abraham did not so treat the truth of God. I perceive that some among
you are determined
P.1855 - §0 beggar named Lazarus, who lay at this rich man's gate, covered with sores and desiring to be fed
with the crumbs which fell from the rich man's table; yes, even the dogs came and licked his sores. And it came
to pass that the beggar died and was carried away by the angels to rest in Abraham's bosom. And then,
presently, this rich man also died and was buried with great pomp and regal splendor. When the rich man
departed from this world, he waked up in Hades, and finding himself in torment, he lifted up his eyes and
beheld Abraham afar off and Lazarus in his bosom. And then Dives cried aloud: `Father Abraham, have mercy
on me and send over Lazarus that he may dip the tip of his finger in water to cool my tongue, for I am in great
anguish because of my punishment.' And then Abraham replied: `My son, you should remember that in your
lifetime you enjoyed the good things while Lazarus in like manner suffered the evil. But now all this is changed,
seeing that Lazarus is comforted while you are tormented. And besides, between us and you there is a great gulf
so that we cannot go to you, neither can you come over to us.' Then said Dives to Abraham: `I pray you send
Lazarus back to my father's house, inasmuch as I have five brothers, that he may so testify as to prevent my
brothers from coming to this place of torment.' But Abraham said: `My son, they have Moses and the prophets;
let them hear them.' And then answered Dives: `No, No, Father Abraham! but if one go to them from the dead,
they will repent.' And then said Abraham: `If they hear not Moses and the prophets, neither will they be
persuaded even if one were to rise from the dead.'"

								
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