Docstoc

Causes-of-the-American-Revolution

Document Sample
Causes-of-the-American-Revolution Powered By Docstoc
					                   Causes of the American Revolutionary War

Authors: Marta Belfrage and Sandi Hurst

Grade Level: 8th

Overview/Purpose:
    Develop a knowledge base for students of the transformation from a
      relatively stable monarchical society to dissatisfaction with English rule,
      finally resulting in a call for independence in America.

      Gain an appreciation of the concept of liberty.

Learning Objective:
    Students will understand the many causes of the American Revolutionary
      War.

      Students will explain the shift from satisfied colony to the impetus behind the
       call for independence (“from protected, satisfied child to rebellious teen”)
Time Required for Lesson: 12-15 days of 45-55 minute class periods

Resources/References:
Print Sources:
       Available 8th grade U.S. History textbooks – sections on causes of the
       American Revolution

       The Radicalism of the American Revolution, Gordon S. Wood; 1991

       The Words We Live By: Your Annotated Guide to the Constitution; Linda R.
       Monk, 2003; pages 137, 146-147, 149, 170, 173, 184


Websites:
      Background/Overview websites (for “Life before the Revolution”
      graphic organizer)
      http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/database/article_display.cfm?HHID=268

       http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu./database/article_display.cfm?HHID=265

       http://www.academicamerican.com/revolution/topics/amrevoverview.html
      French and Indian War Websites (for Informational Comparison Chart)
      http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/database/article_display.cfm?HHID=688

      http://www.historycentral.com/revolt/French.html


      Royal Proclamation of 1763 Website (for Jigsaw)
      http://www.historycentral.com/revolt/Royalproclomation.html



      Causes of the Revolutionary War Websites (for “Steps Toward War”
      chart)
      http://www.historycentral.com/revolt/causes.html

      http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/database/article_display.cfm?HHID=266


      Eyewitness Account of Boston Tea Party Website (for Graphic
      Organizer)
      http://www.historyplace.com/unitedstates/revolution/teaparty.htm


      Declaring Independence Website (for teacher introduction of
      Declaration of Independence)
      http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/database/article_display.cfm?HHID=269


      27 Grievances Website (for Top 10 List, Debate, and Paragraph)
      http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/database/article_display.cfm?HHID=270


      “How revolutionary was the American Revolution?” Website (for “How
      revolutionary was the American Revolution” Graphic Organizer)
      http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/database/article_display.cfm?HHID=274




Suggested Activities and Procedures:

1. Using the PowerPoint, introduce the background of the causes leading up to the
American Revolution.
2. Students individually explore causes of the American Revolutionary War using
Digital History and Academic American websites (see websites listed above) to
complete the “Life before the Revolution” graphic organizer.

3. Have students individually explore the textbook section(s) relating to the French
and Indian War and two different websites to complete the Informational
Comparison Chart (see websites listed above). Upon completion of the chart, place
students in small groups to share and discuss their findings. Following small group
discussions have each small group share one significant/vital piece of information
they discovered with the large group.

4. Using a “jigsaw” approach have students explore the Royal Proclamation of 1763
primary source document (see HistoryCentral website listed above). Directions for
jigsaw method are included in the lesson plan documents.

5. Using the textbook, HistoryCentral website, Digital History website (see websites
listed above), and class discussion have students complete the “Steps Toward War”
graphic chart, outlining the events/issues and depicting the British point of view as
well as the Colonial point of view. This is an on-going activity which helps students
summarize the key concepts leading to calls for the final break with Great Britain.

6. Read the eyewitness account of the Boston Tea Party (see History Place website
listed above) and have students complete the graphic organizer.

7. In order to emphasize the frustration the American colonists felt with “taxation
without representation,” complete the King’s M&M’s taxation simulation activity.
Directions for the simulation are included in the lesson plan documents.

8. Compare/contrast methods of protest used during colonial times with those
exhibited today using the “Methods of Protest” chart.

9. Using the information from Digital History (see website listed above), “teacher-
introduce” the background information on the Declaration of Independence.

10. Have students explore the list of 27 grievances from the Declaration of
Independence and their explanations (see website listed above). Discuss these as a
large group. Then have each student make a Top 10 list of the complaints he/she
feels is the most heinous. As a large group share the Top 10 lists and hold an
informal debate about which grievances are the most egregious. Follow up by
having each student write a paragraph identifying and defending which grievance
he/she thinks is the worst.

11. Complete the R.A.F.T. activity as a summative assessment of the causes of the
Revolutionary War. ***Note: Two different formats are provided for you to
choose from or adapt to your needs. Directions for the R.A.F.T. activity, student
R.A.F.T. instructions, two R.A.F.T. format options, and a R.A.F.T. grading Rubric are
included in the lesson plan documents

12. As a review of key concepts leading up to the Revolutionary War, have students
complete “The Road to War” acronym describing key events.

13. Have students explore societal changes that resulted from the Revolutionary
War using Digital History (see website listed above) and the “How revolutionary
was the American Revolution” graphic organizer.



Teacher Notes and Suggestions:

1. Make sure all paper materials are prepared. Copies for each student are needed
for: Life before the Revolution graphic organizer, Information Comparison Chart,
paper copy of the Proclamation of 1763 (from website provided), Steps Toward War
chart, Boston Tea Party graphic organizer, King’s M&M’s role play cards (one set per
class), King’s M&M’s Exit Slip, Methods of Protest graphic organizer, R.A.F.T. Student
Hand-out, R.A.F.T. format options, and R.A.F.T Grading Rubric (optional), “The Road
to War” acronym chart, and How revolutionary was the American Revolution?
graphic organizer.

2. Have adequate access for computer activities (exploring websites for “Life Before
the Revolution” graphic organizer, French and Indian War Comparison Chart, “Steps
Toward War” chart, Boston Tea Party graphic organizer, Declaration of
Independence Top 10 List, and “How revolutionary was the American Revolution”
website).

3. Check to make sure all the web links work.

4. As students complete the web exploration activities, circulate around the room to
ensure understanding and clarify as needed (especially during the jigsaw primary
source activity).



Student Materials/Instructions:

*** Also see “Suggested Activities and Procedures” section.

1. “Changing Society in Colonial America” PowerPoint: Using a SmartBoard (if
available), present the PowerPoint to introduce the concept of societal and political
changes that occurred as a result of the Revolutionary War.
2. “Life before the Revolution” Graphic Organizer: Write the three
“Background/Overview” websites on the board (listed in “Lesson Websites” below).
Have students explore these websites to complete the graphic organizer. They
should identify the following from the websites: reasons/causes, Overview of the
American Revolution, why the colonists rebelled and why the British resisted, why
the Revolution took place, and a reflection.

3. French and Indian War Informational Comparison Chart: Write the two
“French and Indian War” websites on the board (listed in “Lesson Websites” below).
Students also need to access the section(s) from their textbooks that deal with the
French and Indian War. Using these resources, students first complete the chart
individually. Upon completion of the chart, students meet in small groups to share
and discuss their findings. Following small group discussions, have each small
group share one significant/vital piece of information they learned with the entire
class.

4. The Proclamation of 1763: Using a jigsaw approach have students explore the
primary source document “Royal Proclomation of October 7, 1763” document
(listed in “Lesson Websites” below). Detailed directions for the jigsaw method are
included in the lesson plan documents.

5. “Steps Toward War” Chart: Have students explore the events/points of
contention leading up to the Revolutionary War (as well as the opposing
viewpoints) by reading about them on-line as well as in the textbook. Have students
complete the “Steps Toward War” chart summarizing the events and opposing
viewpoints. As an on-going activity, students will complete portions of this as they
continue to create their knowledge base.

6. “Boston Tea Party Eyewitness Account” Graphic Organizer: Read aloud to
the students the eyewitness account of the Boston Tea Party. (It would be helpful to
have students follow along if individual computers are available for access to the
website. The article can also be displayed on the SmartBoard for students to follow
along as it is being read.) (listed in “Lesson Websites” listed below)
     Have students write the topic – Boston Tea Party – in the “Topic” box.
     Read the article aloud. As you read, have students note any “Uncomfortable
       Vocabulary” (unfamiliar words or phrases) in the top left box.
     Students should note any words or phrases that relate to the Boston Tea
       Party in the bottom left “Words or Phrases connected to the topic” box.
     Discuss the article/account as a large group.
     Following the discussion have students draw a picture of what the Boston
       Tea Party looked like based on the article in the “Pictures or Images which
       represent the topic” box on the right side of the page.

7. The King’s M&M’s Taxation Simulation: Detailed instructions are included in
the lesson plan documents. Generally the format is as follows:
      Students draw one role playing card, identifying them as the King/Queen, a
       member of Parliament, a tax collector, or a colonist. Each colonist is provided
       with a fun-sized bag of M&M’s.
      Using either the provided PowerPoint or teacher-made tax cards, Parliament
       enacts taxes on the colonists.
      Tax collectors collect the taxes (required number of M&M’s) from the
       colonists for each law enacted.
      Once enough taxes are collected, the “pot” of tax money is divvied up
       amongst the tax collectors (10% each), members of Parliament (20% each),
       and the King/Queen (40%). All members of the society are allowed to
       consume their M&M’s.
      Students process the activity using oral discussion and/or the exit slip.

8. Methods of Protest chart: Describe/define the methods of protest as a large
group. Have students complete the middle “colonist” column individually. In small
groups, complete the “recent times” column. Have students complete the bottom
two boxes individually.

9. The Significance of Declaring Independence: Share the information from
Digital History (listed in “Lesson Websites” below), with the class. Emphasize the
significance of the Declaration of Independence.

10. 27 Declaration of Independence Grievances: Have students explore the list
of 27 grievances from the Declaration of Independence and their explanations (see
website listed above). Discuss these as a large group. Then have each student make
a Top 10 list of the complaints he/she feels is the most heinous. As a large group
share the Top 10 lists and hold an informal debate about which grievances are the
most egregious. Follow up by having each student write a paragraph identifying
and defending which grievance he/she thinks is the worst.

11. R.A.F.T: Distribute the R.A.F.T. Student Handout and the selected R.A.F.T.
options to the students. Discuss the concept of R = Role, A = Audience, F = Format,
and T = Topic. Instruct the students to complete their chosen written R.A.F.T.
activity.

12. “The Road to War” Acronym: Using each of the letters in the acronym, have
students describe causes/key events leading up to the Revolutionary War. Students
should be instructed to provide a variety of different events/causes.

13. How Revolutionary was the American Revolution?: Have students explore
the Digital History website (see “Lesson Websites” below) to complete the graphic
organizer. They should identify the following from the website: transformation or
changes from the monarchy, participation in politics, social expectations, radical
ideals, changes for women, and other changes in America.
Lesson Websites:
      Background/Overview websites (for “Life before the Revolution”
      graphic organizer)
      http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/database/article_display.cfm?HHID=268

      http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu./database/article_display.cfm?HHID=265

      http://www.academicamerican.com/revolution/topics/amrevoverview.html


      French and Indian War Websites (for Informational Comparison Chart)
      http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/database/article_display.cfm?HHID=688

      http://www.historycentral.com/revolt/French.html


      Royal Proclamation of 1763 Website (for Jigsaw)
      http://www.historycentral.com/revolt/Royalproclomation.html



      Causes of the Revolutionary War Websites (for “Steps Toward War”
      chart)
      http://www.historycentral.com/revolt/causes.html

      http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/database/article_display.cfm?HHID=266


      Eyewitness Account of Boston Tea Party Website (for Graphic
      Organizer)
      http://www.historyplace.com/unitedstates/revolution/teaparty.htm


      Declaring Independence Website (for teacher introduction of
      Declaration of Independence)
      http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/database/article_display.cfm?HHID=269


      27 Grievances Website (for Top 10 List, Debate, and Paragraph)
      http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/database/article_display.cfm?HHID=270


      “How revolutionary was the American Revolution?” Website (for “How
      revolutionary was the American Revolution” Graphic Organizer)
      http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/database/article_display.cfm?HHID=274
Extending the Lesson:




Assessment(s):

1. “Steps Toward War” chart – student’s ability to determine points of view of each
of the conflicting sides

2. King’s M&M’s exit slip

3. “Methods of Protest” chart

4. Most egregious grievance paragraph (from the Declaration of Independence Top
10 Activity).

5. R.A.F.T. Activity

6. “The Road to War” Acronym

7. “How revolutionary was the American Revolution?” graphic organizer



Content Standards:

United States History Standards (from McREL at
http://www.mcrel.org/compendium/SubjectTopics.asp?SubjectID=5 )

       Era 2: Standard 4: Understands how political, religious, and social
       institutions emerged in the English colonies

       Era 3: Standard 6: Understands the causes of the American Revolution, the
       ideas and interests involved in shaping the revolutionary movement, and
       reasons for the American victory


South Dakota Standards (South Dakota Department of Education website at
http://doe.sd.gov/contentstandards/documents/SocialStudies_6-8.pdf )

       8th Grade U.S. History
       Indicator 1: Analyze the U.S. historical eras to determine connections and
       cause/effect relationships in reference to chronology.
             8.US.1.1. Students are able to relate events and outcomes of the
             American Revolution to sources of conflict, roles of key
             individuals and battles, and political documents.

       Indicator 2: Evaluate the influence/impact of various cultures, philosophies,
       and religions on the development of the U.S.
              8.US.2.1 Students are able to explain the impact of the American
              Revolution on American philosophies



Miscellaneous Information:

***** Since this is a rather lengthy lesson, the amount of activities can be
modified to fit your curricular needs and available time.

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:83
posted:9/16/2011
language:English
pages:9