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					               Town of Davie
Housing and Community Development Department
  Consolidated Plan for Federal Funds
               FY 2007-2012
                                        Town of Davie
                              Consolidated Plan for Federal Funds
                                         FY 2007-2012
                                      Table of Contents

Introduction
The Town of Davie:
A Historical Overview……………………………………………………………………………. 1
Consolidated Plan for
Federal Funds 2007-2012………………………………………………………………………. 1
Community Involvement and
Citizen Participation……………………………………………………………………………… 3

Housing and Homeless Needs Assessment
General…………………………………………………………………………………………….                                 4
Categories of Persons Affected…………………………………………………………………                     4
Overview of Housing Needs 2007-2012…………………………………………………….....                5
Affordability Gap-Broward Housing Partnership Study………………………………………          5
2007 “Out of Reach” Study………………………………………………………………………                        6
Renter Occupied Households in Davie…………………………………………………………                   11
Owner Occupied Households………………………………...…………………………………                       12
Substandard Housing Conditions……………………………………………………………….                     13
Overcrowding……………………………………………………………………………………..                              13
Minority Housing Needs……………………………………….…………………………………                         13
Households with Housing Problems…………………………………………………...……...                 14
Households with Incomes below 51% HAMFI………………………..………………………                 14
Devastating Effects of Hurricane Wilma…………………………………………..................    15
Synopsis of Hurricane Wilma’s Destruction……………………………………….................   15
Low and Moderate Income Concentrations
(CDBG Target Areas)…………………………………………………………........……………                      16
Davie CDBG Target Areas- 2000
Census Tract/Block Group Data………………………………………………….....................       16
Areas of Minority Concentration…………………………………………………………………                    18
Homeless Needs – Nature and Extent of
Homelessness…………………………………………………………………………………….                               18
Foreclosures………………………………………………………………………………………                               20
Need for Homeless Facilities and Services……………………………………………………               20
Needs of Persons Threatened with Homelessness…………………………………………..             20
Other Special Needs Populations………………………………………………………………                     21
Homeless and Special Needs Populations
Special Needs (Non- Homeless)………………………………………………………………..                     21
Elderly ...…………………………………………………………………………………………..                             21
Elderly Homeowners……………………………………………………………………………..                           22
Persons with Disabilities …………………….………………………………………………….                     22
Persons with Alcohol or Other Drug Addiction……………...…………………………………           23
Persons with HIV/AIDS and their Families……………………………….……………………               23
Residents of Public Housing…………………………………………………………………….                      24
Lead Based Paints Hazards……………………………………………………………………..                       24

Housing Market Analysis
General Characteristics and Housing Supply…………………………………………………. 25
Housing Demand………………………………………………………………………………… 25
Housing Unit Type……………………………………………………………………………….. 26
Age of Housing Stock……………………………………………………………………………. 26
Housing Stock Condition………………………………………………………………………….. 27
2006 Rental Housing Surveys………………………………………………………………….. 27
Condo Conversions……………………………………………………………………………… 27
2006 Mobile Home Park Survey……………………………………………………………….. 28
Housing Affordability- Housing Bubble………………………………………………………… 30

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Mobile Home Park Redevelopment……………………………………………………………. 32
Moratorium on Redevelopment of
Mobile Homes………………………………………………………......................................... 32
Mobile Home Task Force (MHTF)……………………………………………………………… 34
Lack of Affordable Housing…………………………………………………………………...... 35
Disproportionately High Rental Rates in Davie………………………………....................... 35
Davie’s Not-For –Profit Partners See Increase in Demand for Services……………………. 35
Public and Assisted Housing (BCHA)………………………………………………………….. 35
Comprehensive Grant Program (CGP)………………………………………………………... 36
Areas with Concentrations of Minority Groups……………………………………………….. 37
Areas with Concentrations of Low and Moderate-Income Families………………………           37
Public and Assisted Housing……………………………………………………………………. 37
Additional Homestead Exemption for persons 65 and older………………………………… 38
State Housing Incentive Partnership Program (SHIP)……………………………………….. 38
Homeless Facilities………………………………………………………………..................... 39
Emergency Shelters…………………………………………………………………………….. 40
Transitional Housing……………………………………………………………………………... 40
Permanent Affordable and Supported Housing………………………………………………. 41
Special Need Facilities and Services………………………………………………………….. 41
Elderly Service Providers and Facilities……………………………………………………….. 41
Retirement/Nursing Homes……………………………………………………….................... 42
Mental Health Providers…………………………………………………………………………. 42
Development Disabilities………………………………………………………………………… 43
Group Home Serving the Developmentally Disabled………………………………………… 43
Inventory of Other Groups……………………………………………………………………… 43
Persons with HIV/AIDS and their Families……………………………………………………. 43
Homeless Services………………………………………………………………………………. 44
Alcohol/ Drug Treatment Facilities and Services…………………………………………….. 45
Social Service Providers ……………………………………………………………………….. 45
Continuum of Care for Homeless Assistance and Prevention………………………………. 46
Other Special Needs…………………………………………………………………………….. 48
Available Resources…………………………………………………………………………….. 48
Local Programs………………………………………………………………………………….. 49
Federal Programs……………………………………………………………………………….. 49
State Programs…………………………………………………………………………………... 50
Other………………………………………………………………………………………………. 50
Land Use Controls and Growth Limits…………………………………………………………. 52
Land Development Code………………………………………………………………………... 52

Affordable Housing Incentive Plan…………………………………………………………..                        53
Role of Housing and Community Development Department………………………………..               55
Building Codes……………………………………………………………………………………                                   58
Code Enforcement/Compliance…………………………………………………………………                             59
Fees and Charges………………………………………………………………………………..                                 59

Five Year Strategic Plan
General……………………………………………………………………………………………. 59
Process of Determining Needs and Priorities for Funding………………………................. 59
2007 Community Needs Assessment Survey of CDBG Target Areas…………………….. 60
2007 Community Needs Assessment-Survey Results………………………………………. 61
Davie CDBG Target Areas-Census Tract and Block Group Low/Mod Data…………...........62

Evaluation and Appraisal Report (EAR) Comprehensive Plan……………................... 63
Redevelopment Plan Objectives that Relate to Affordable Housing – Davie CRA…………70
Transit Oriented Corridor (TOC) Proposed Amendment
PCT 06-06 to the Broward County -Land Use Plan…………………………………………. 70
Affordable Housing- Priority Housing Needs………………………………........................... 71
2005 Disaster Recovery Funds- Hurricane Wilma…………………………………………… 72
2005 Disaster Recovery Programs…………………………………………………………….. 73

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Housing Projects Completed/Underway in FY 2005/06………………………………………               74
Housing Projects Completed/Underway in FY 2006/07………………………………………               74
Davie Housing Projects Proposed for FY 2007/08……………………………………………                74
Homelessness-Priority Homeless Needs………………………………………………………                      74
Other Special Needs (Supportive Needs of the Non-Homeless)…………………………….         75
Priority Non- Homeless Needs………………………………………………………………….                         75
Persons with Disabilities…………………………………………………………………………                          75
Persons with Alcohol and Chronic Substance Abuse…………………………………………               76
Persons with HIV or AIDS………………………………………………………………………..                          76
Public Housing Residents………………………………………………………………………..                          76
Priority Community Development Needs……………………………………………………….                     77
Priority Community Development Needs ………………………………………………………                     78
Assignment of Priorities/Long Term Goals and Objectives…………………………………..         78
Hurricane Preparedness…………………………………………………………………….......                        79
Removal of Barriers to Affordable Housing and
Proposed Fair Housing Initiatives……………………………………………………………....                   80
Anti-Poverty Strategy…………………………………………………………………………….                            81
Institutional Structure and Intergovernmental Coordination………………………………….       84
Actions to Overcome Gaps……………………………………………………………………..                           85
Public Housing Resident Initiatives……………………………………………………………..                   86
Monitoring Standards and Procedures…………………………………………………………                      87
Performance Outcome Measurement System………………………………………………..                     87

One Year Action Plan…………………………………………………………………………..                             88
Proposed Funding for FY 2007/08……………………………………………………………..                       89
Matching FY 2007/08 Goals and Objectives to Identify Needs.......………………………..   90
Eastern Target Area ……………………………………………………………………………..                            93
Southern Target Area (Driftwood)……………………………………………….....................        94
Western Target Area (Orange Park)……………………………………………………………                       95
Affordable Housing Incentive Strategy…………………………………………………………                    96
Affordable Housing Incentives Provided……………………………………………………….                   97
Fair Housing Education and Outreach Initiatives……………………………………………..             99
Other Actions……………………………………………………………………………………..                                100
Project Descriptions and Locations…………………………………………………………….                     101
Homeless and Other Special Needs Activities………………………………………………..                101
Public Housing……………………………………………………………………………………                                 102
Certification of Consistency with Consolidated Plan………………………………………….           102
Glossary of Terms- Definitions………………………………………………………………….                       102
Information Sources……………………………………………………………………………..                             105

Exhibit 1- Consolidated Plan Forms
Exhibit 2-Grantee Certification
Exhibit 3-Target Area Maps
Exhibit 4-Legal Advertisements




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INTRODUCTION
The Town of Davie: A Historical Overview

The Town of Davie is located southwest of Fort Lauderdale in Broward County, midway between Miami and Palm
Beach. Settled at the turn of the century, Davie was identified as the "first improved town in the Everglades".
Construction of irrigation and drainage canals began in the early 1900's; and, the first permanent settlers arrived
from the Panama Canal Zone in 1909. They named the swampy area "Zona", in recognition of their former home.
“Zona” was renamed in 1916, in recognition of R. P. Davie's presence in the settlement. Davie was originally
incorporated on November 16, 1925 and was dissolved during the following legislative session to avoid the
taxation resulting from incorporation. Davie was reincorporated on 6/22/61 with less than 2,000 residents.

The 2000 Census lists Davie’s population at 75,720; however, in October 2006, both Pine Island Ridge (5,199)
and United Ranches (827) were incorporated into Davie increasing that number to 81,746. As a result of the
newly annexed population, the Town contracted with GEOWeb Consulting Services in early 2007, to develop
recommendations for newly balanced councilmember districts i.e., to comply with re-districting regulations for
elections boundaries. As a result of that study, Davie’s overall estimated population in 2006 was 92,431.

According the 2000 Census data the median age in Davie is 35.5 years; and, the average number of persons per
household is 2.64. The Town's median household income in 2000 was $47,014. Davie is still fairly homogeneous
i.e., 87.1% of the residents are White, 4.6% are Black, 2.8% are Asian, and 5.5% are listed in other categories.
Nineteen percent (19%) of the residents in Davie are of Hispanic origin.

Given the recent annexations, there are now 34,791 housing units in Davie available for the 31,851 households.
The 2000 Census vacancy rate was 8.3% (excluding seasonal vacancies). The housing “bubble” that hit South
Florida in 2005, caused an “affordable housing crisis” which will be detailed later in this document.

Davie is a "university town" and proudly hosts the South Florida Education Complex which includes: Nova
University, Florida Atlantic University, Florida International University, Broward Community College, McFatter
Vocational/Technical Center, Broward Fire Academy, Division of Forestry, Criminal Justice Institute, and others.
The population is well educated; and, 73% are either high school graduates, possess some college, or have a
college degree.

 A large portion of the land in the Town is still undeveloped and recent annexations opened new horizons for
industrial and economic growth. Davie is geographically the largest municipality in Broward County,
encompassing over 36 square miles.

Davie struggles to preserve its western heritage, while progressing in economic, industrial, and business
development. Championship rodeos are still held year-round, and the Sunshine State Pro Rodeo classic, held
annually at the Bergeron/Davie Rodeo Arena, attracts over 25,000 fans. The Town is committed to addressing the
needs of its residents, and strives to balance growth and quality of life.

Consolidated Plan for Federal Funds 2007- 2012

Davie’s population grew above 50,000 residents in 1996; and, Davie became an “entitlement recipient” of Federal
Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds from the United States Department of Housing and Urban
Development (HUD) starting in 1997. The goals of the CDBG program are to:

      • develop viable urban communities by providing decent housing and a suitable living environment;

      • expand economic opportunities for low and moderate income individuals and families; and

      • strengthen the partnerships between all levels of government and the private sector, including for-profit
        and not-for-profit organizations, in the production of affordable housing sufficient to meet the needs of the
        community.

The Town adopted its first Consolidated Plan for Federal Funds in July 1997, which identified the Town’s housing
and community development needs, and outlined funding strategies to address such. This Plan also shaped the
various federally funded programs into a 5-year neighborhood and community development strategy.
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The Town’s Consolidated Plan also serves as:

     • a long and short-term planning document for the Town of Davie, which builds on a participatory
       process from the grassroots level;

     • an application for the federal funds;

     • a strategy to be followed in carrying out HUD programs; and

     • an annual action plan that provides a basis for assessing and monitoring program performance.

Long-range goals and objectives were developed based on the needs identified by the residents. When the
second Consolidated Plan for FY 2002-2007 was developed, the Town’s goals and objectives were expanded,
but kept within the same basic frame-work of the original Plan.

Although there have been significant achievements since the first two Consolidated Plans were adopted, the
majority of the goals and objectives are still generally applicable to the new Plan for FY 2007-2012. However,
based on recent studies and quality of life surveys, new items were added and some others clarified. Thus, the
Town will pursue the following long-range goals and objectives for this Consolidated Plan:

      • to rehabilitate, construct and/or expand public facilities and infrastructure e.g., street improvements
        (improved lighting, landscaping, drainage, sidewalks, streets, connections to sewer systems, etc., the
        installation or replacement of water lines, and the renovation of existing public (community) facilities.

     • to upgrade the existing housing stock and provide loans and/or grants to income-eligible homeowners to
       make home repairs and replace existing substandard/leaking roofs, or “harden” the structures to protect
       them from Hurricanes.

     • to expand affordable rental housing and homeownership opportunities for Davie residents, especially
       housing for low and very low-income families and individuals, and Davie’s workforce.

     • to enhance and/or increase park and recreation opportunities and expand programs that serve at-risk
       youth e.g. the renovation of existing parks (e.g. improved lighting, landscaping, equipment), construction
       of new parks or recreation facilities, the provision of services, or acquisition for new facilities.

     • To provide swale area drainage (percolation), positive discharge drainage, and the connection of low/
       moderate income homes to the new or existing sewer systems e.g. connections to the sewer laterals.

     • to promote economic development initiatives and stimulate the local economy through neighborhood
       revitalization, commercial revitalization, or facade renovation programs.

     • to minimize the displacement of Davie residents and mitigate adverse effects caused by federally
       assisted activities, and to provide fair and adequate relocation benefits when needed.

     • to assist mobile home residents who are being permanently and involuntarily displaced due to the
       redevelopment of mobile home parks.

     • to upgrade and/or supplement the existing transportation and mobility services in Davie, especially those
       needed by low and moderate income persons and individuals with special needs.

     • to undertake Fair Housing outreach and education campaigns to ensure that Davie residents have the
       widest range of housing choices.

     • to remove architectural barriers and impediments to the elderly and to the physically, mentally, or
       developmentally disabled.



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      • to promote the county-wide strategies and efforts aimed at addressing homelessness, and provide
        homeless prevention and emergency assistance programs and services.

      • to provide social services related to healthcare, mental healthcare, housing, food, transportation,
        emergency assistance etc.

      • to expand affordable child day care and after-school opportunities for at-risk youth.

      • to remove slums, blight & blighting conditions i.e., clearance, demolition, and code enforcement.

      • to encourage the retention of significant historic structures and historic preservation efforts.

      • to improve the Town's capacity to plan and administer its CDBG funds, undertake comprehensive
        planning activities, and apply for other HUD Community Planning and Development (CPD) programs or
        related grants.

Each year within the five-year period covered by the Consolidated Plan, the Town must develop and submit to
HUD, an Action Plan which contains the CDBG budget for that year. This Action Plan must be submitted to HUD
on or before August 16th of each year.

The Town’s Housing and Community Development Office is responsible for the planning, preparation,
implementation, and monitoring of the Consolidated Plan and all incremental One-Year Action Plan activities.

Community Involvement and Citizen Participation

The Town’s Consolidated Plan was the result of an exhaustive data analysis and an extensive citizen participation
process, and represents collaboration between the Town, local social service providers, faith-based not-for-
profits, housing providers, the Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA), and other residents in Davie. Both the
Consolidated Plan for 2007-2012 and the Action Plan for FY 2007/08 were developed in accordance with the
Town’s Citizen Participation Plan which sets forth the Town's policies and procedures for citizen participation.

The Town strives to ensure citizen involvement, in an advisory role, in the planning, implementation, and
assessment of the programs covered by the Consolidated Plan and each Action Plan. In developing the
Consolidated Plan, the Town encouraged the participation of all of its residents, especially from those in
designated CDBG Target Areas where funds are proposed to be expended.

Prior to the adoption of the Consolidated Plan and each Annual Action Plan, Davie residents are provided with
timely access to local meetings, public hearings, grant documents, and copies of the Plan, in accordance with the
federal regulations at 24 CFR Part 570. The Town ensures that hearing, sight, and mobility impaired persons
have full and timely access to meetings and grant related documents.

The following citizen participation process was utilized to develop the Consolidated Plan for FY 2007-2012, which
includes the CDBG Action Plan for FY 2007/08:

      • Pre-Development Public Hearings were held on May 8, 2007 in the Eastern Target Area of Davie, on
        May 17, 2007 in the Driftwood Target Area, and on May 23, 2007 in the Orange Park Target Area in
        Western Davie. A fourth Pre-Development Hearing was held on May 29, 2007 in the Town Hall
        Community Room.

      • A draft of the Consolidated Plan for FY 2007-2012 which includes the Action Plan for FY 2007/08
        was made available for a 30-day public comment commencing June 18, 2007 at the Housing and
        Community Development Office at 4700 SW 64th Avenue.

      • A summary of the Action Plan was published in the Sun Sentinel on June 17, 2007 describing its
        contents, purpose, activities to be undertaken, and the proposed use of funds.

      • A summary of the Consolidated Plan and the FY 2007/08 Action Plan was provided to Broward
        County and to the adjacent municipalities of Fort Lauderdale, Dania Beach, Sunrise, Plantation,

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          Cooper City, Weston, Pembroke Pines, Miramar, and Hollywood, as well as the Broward County
          Housing Authority (BCHA), Broward County Community Development and the Office of Housing
          Finance (OHF) and the Broward County Human Services Department (Family Success Center
          Office), to obtain their input.

        • The Town’s Neighborhood Revitalization Program (NRP) staff undertook extensive surveys in the
          spring of 2007 order to obtain information on what “quality of life” issues were facing the residents in
          order to prioritize the identified needs within each CDBG Target Areas.

        • Prior to adopting the Plan, a Public Hearing was held by the Davie Town Council on July 26, 2007 in
          the Town Council Chambers.

No letters were received in response to the 30-day public comment period.

HOUSING AND HOMELESS NEEDS ASSESSMENT
General

As a result of the housing boom in 2002-2005, and the annexation of two previously unincorporated areas,
Davie's population has grown to 92,431 residents. This represents significant growth since the 2000 Census when
Davie’s population was 75,720 i.e., 16,681 new residents in seven years. According to the Census 2000, Davie is
still fairly homogeneous i.e., 87.1% of the residents are White, 4.6% are Black, 2.8% are Asian, and 5.5% are
listed in other categories. Nineteen percent (19%) of the residents in Davie are of Hispanic origin.

Due to the annexation of United Ranches and Pine Island Ridge in October 2006, there are now 34,791 housing
units available for the 31,851 households in Davie. 70% of the residents in Davie are living in family households;
and, the average number of persons per household is 2.64.

Davie is a relatively young community with an average age of 35.5 years, up from 32.6 years in 1990. The Town
is suburban in nature with 85% of the residents living in family households.

Categories of Persons Affected

This section describes the Town’s estimated housing needs and supportive service needs projected for the
ensuing five year period. General housing needs are traditionally measured by assessing the number of
extremely low, very low, and low-income households who live in substandard conditions, live in overcrowded units
or, pay more than 30% of their income for housing i.e., are cost-burdened.

Since the terms “low and moderate-income” will be used repeatedly throughout this document, the income levels
for the CDBG Program are outlined below. The U.S. Department of HUD bases these definitions on the total
adjusted gross income for each household, as measured by the family size. The income levels published by HUD
for 2007 follow: (Effective March 21, 2007)

          Household                Low Income               Moderate Income
          Size                     (50% of Median)          (80 % of Median)
          1                        $21,500                  $34,350
          2                        $24,550                  $39,300
          3                        $27,650                  $44,200
          4                        $30,700                  $49,100
          5                        $33,150                  $53,050

According to the 2000 Census, Davie has a fairly large number of households that are considered “at-risk. For
example:

    •     40.5% of Davie households earned less than $34,999 (80% of median income)

    •     24.3% of Davie households earned less than $24,999 (50% of median income)


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    •    14.0% of Davie households earned less than $14,999 (30% median income)

    •      8.0% of Davie households earn less than $10,000 (poverty level)

The rule-of-thumb is that a household should not pay more for rent/utilities or mortgage PITI, than 30% of their
adjusted household income, or they are considered cost-burdened. According to the Census:

    •    45% of all Davie renters pay more than 30% of their adjusted household income; and,

    •    30% of Davie home owners pay more than 30% of their adjusted household income in mortgage/PITI.

This represents a significant portion of Davie’s HH’s in the economic “at-risk” category. The loss of a job, a death
in the family, or any unexpected financial event, could cause them to become homeless. The average American
family lives three (3) paychecks from being homeless (i.e., they would deplete their savings in that period of
time).

Overview of Housing Needs 2007 – 2012 - The Housing Conundrum in Davie

The inflated real estate market in South Florida during 2005 and 2006 gave rise to an “affordable housing crisis”;
and, all municipalities are struggling to find workforce housing for their local job markets. A recent study
commissioned by the Broward Housing Partnership found that 75% of all Broward households earn less than
$77,000 per year; but, they would need to earn $91,000 to afford the current median price of $361,100 for a
single-family home. Fifty (50%) of all Broward households earn $50,000, which is needed to purchase a median-
priced Condo @ $193,000.

Over the past year, most households have been priced out of the housing market, because of the unprecedented
growth in real estate prices. Even though the housing market slowed down in 2007 (some would say the bubble
burst) major gaps still exist between what a single-family home costs, and what most families can afford to pay
throughout Broward County.

                         Affordability Gap – Broward Housing Partnership Study (2006)

  Housing Type                     Median Price             Income Required
  Single Family Homes              $361,100                 $90,720
  Condominiums                     $193,000                 $50,500
  Rental Apartments                $ 1,222 mthly            $45,000  (2-Bedroom)

  Occupation              Median Wage              Median Home      Affordable       Gap
  Nurse (RN)              $50,362                  $361,100         $192,764         -$168,336
  Police Officer          $49,188                  $361,100         $179,440         -$181,660
  School Teacher          $39,876                  $361,100         $149,983         -$211,117

The Broward Housing Partnership’s Report stresses that the growing housing affordability crisis will have the
following serious consequences:

        • First – Broward County’s Economy is At-Risk - Out of control housing costs make it difficult to fill jobs,
             and it discourages businesses from locating or expanding here. Meanwhile many young college
             graduates from our State College and University system will be forced to pursue jobs in other areas
             of the Country that have a lower cost of living.

        • Second – The Social Fabric of Communities and Neighborhoods is Threatened – Due to escalating
            housing costs, people cannot afford to maintain their existing community ties or live close to their jobs
            or extended families. Many of us could not even afford to buy our own homes at today’s prices.

The recent phenomena of rental apartments converting to condominiums, and mobile home parks starting to
convert to townhomes, is reducing the number and type of housing units available to low/moderate income
families and the majority of the Town’s workforce. Hurricane Wilma also had a devastating affect on the Town of
Davie’s housing stock. The Town’s initial assessment of housing units lost was over 985 structures: 832 Mobile
Homes, 51 Single-Family Homes, 33 Townhomes/Condos, and 55 Apartment Units. (The Town also had

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damage to commercial units). Subsequent to the Storm, many other housing structures, particularly mobile
homes became un-occupiable due to mold and mildew infestations, sagging floors, collapsed roofs, etc.

It has been extremely difficult to rehouse these displaced Davie residents, as there is little to no comparable
affordable replacement housing available to them. Many of the mobile home residents that were displaced by
Wilma were subsequently rehoused in lower-cost rental units. Thus, the rental vacancy rate is now extremely
low; and, many landlords are capitalizing on the demand for units by raising their rents.

Additionally, in FY 2005/06 the Town was notified by seven (7) rental apartment complexes of their intent to
convert to condominiums: and, 889 affordable market rate rental apartments were lost, and the majority of these
Davie households/families were displaced as they could not afford to purchase their unit when it converted to
condo.

These problems must be tackled at a regional level, with all counties and municipalities working together. The
Town of Davie’s Housing and Community Development Director actively participates in all County-wide Affordable
Housing Task Forces and housing groups, to help design new programs and policies to address the current
housing crisis in South Florida. The Housing and Community Development Director was chosen in 2005 to join
the Broward County Planning Council’s Affordable Housing Ad Hoc Committee.

Another challenge facing the Town in meeting its Consolidated Plan goals, is addressing the housing needs of its
lower-income residents living in sub-standard mobile homes. Based on the 2000 Census Data, the Town
estimates that it has 23,000 residents living in 7,400 mobile homes, which represents 24% of the total housing
units.

There is currently no source of funds available to assist these mobile home owners to make needed repairs to
their homes, since the regulations governing both the CDBG and SHIP Programs prohibit the use of these grant
funds to renovate them. Unfortunately, the Government does not recognize mobile homes as “permanent”
homes. Given these constraints, the Town’s strategy for assisting these mobile home occupants, is to provide
new opportunities in Davie for the development of affordable rental and homeownership housing.

The disproportionately high rental rates in Davie in comparison to other Broward County cities, make it difficult to
find affordable rental units (in good condition), and attract Landlords that will participate in the Section 8 Program.
Because of these factors, many lower-income families have a difficult time finding affordable rental housing,
particularly those families that are “cost-burdened” (paying 30>% of their gross income for rent/utilities).

                                           2007 “Out of Reach” Study
                                     National Low Income Housing Coalition

The Fair Market Rent (FMR) for a two-bedroom apartment in Florida is $850. In order to afford this level of rent
and utilities, without paying more than 30% of income on housing, a household must earn $2,834 monthly or
$34,008 annually. Assuming a 40-hour work week, 52 weeks per year, this level of income translates into a
Housing Wage of $16.35. In Florida, a minimum wage worker only earns an hourly wage of $6.40, leaving a gap
of $9.95, which equals a 20,696 gap annually.

In order to afford the FMR for a two-bedroom apartment, a minimum wage earner must work 102 hours per week,
52 weeks per year; or, a household must include 2.6 minimum wage earner(s) working 40 hours per week year-
round in order to make the two-bedroom FMR affordable.

In Florida, the estimated mean (average) wage for a renter is $11.94 an hour. In order to afford the FMR for a
two-bedroom apartment at this wage, a renter must work 55 hours per week, 52 weeks per year; or, working 40
hours per week year-round, a household must include 1.4 worker(s) earning the mean renter wage in order to
make the two-bedroom FMR affordable.

A monthly Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payment for an individual in Florida is $603. If SSI represents an
individual's sole source of income, $181 in monthly rent is affordable, while the FMR for a one-bedroom is $715.
This leaves a significant “rental gap” of $534. A unit is considered affordable if it costs no more than 30% of the
household’s adjusted income.



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HH’s                           State-wide    Broward
       Total                   6,337,929     654,445
       Renter                  1,896,218     199,820
       % Renter                30%           31%

2006 Median                    State-wide    Broward
      Annual                   $56,131       $60,600
      Monthly                  $ 4,678       $ 5,050
      30% of AMI2              $16,839       $18,180

Maximum Affordable Monthly Housing Cost by % of Family AMI
                             State-wide     Broward
       30%                   $ 421          $ 455
       50%                   $ 702          $ 758
       80%                   $1,123         $1,212
      100%                   $1,403         $1,515

2007 Fair Market Rent (FMR)
                               State-wide    Broward
       0-Bedroom               $ 638         $ 784
       1-Bedroom               $ 715         $ 877
       2-Bedroom               $ 850         $1,054
       3-Bedroom               $1,116        $1,458
       4-Bedroom               $1,288        $1,851

% Change from 2000 Base Rent to 2007 FMR
                            State-wide       Broward
      0-Bedroom             26%              24%
      1-Bedroom             26%              24%
      2-Bedroom             26%              24%
      3-Bedroom             26%              24%
      4-Bedroom             26%              24%

Annual Income Needed to Afford FMR
                              State-wide     Broward
        0-Bedroom             $25,539        $31,360
        1-Bedroom             $28,616        $35,080
        2-Bedroom             $34,007        $42,160
        3-Bedroom             $44,626        $58,320
        4-Bedroom             $51,504        $74,040

Percent of Family AMI Needed to Afford FMR
                              State-wide     Broward
        0-Bedroom             45%             52%
        1-Bedroom             51%             58%
        2-Bedroom             61%             70%
        3-Bedroom             80%             96%
        4-Bedroom             92%            122%

2006 Renter Household Income
                               State-wide    Broward
Estimated Median               $32,245       $36,497

                            State-wide       Broward
% Needed to Afford 2 BR FMR 105%             116%

Rent Affordable at Median      $806          $912



                                                    7
% Renters Unable to Afford 2 BR FMR
                               53%        57%

2005 Estimated Mean Renter Wage
                            $11.94        $13.54

Rent Affordable at Mean Wage $621         $704

2006 Minimum Wage            $6.40        $6.40

Rent Affordable
at Minimum Wage              $333         $333

Monthly SSI Payment          $603         $603

Rent Affordable at SSI       $181         $181

Housing Wage                 State-wide   Broward
       0-Bedroom             $12.28       $15.08
       1-Bedroom             $13.76       $16.87
       2-Bedroom             $16.35       $20.27
       3-Bedroom             $21.45       $28.04
       4-Bedroom             $24.76       $35.60

Housing Wage as % of Minimum
                            State-wide    Broward
       0-Bedroom            192%          236%
       1-Bedroom            215%          264%
       2-Bedroom            255%          317%
       3-Bedroom            335%          438%
       4-Bedroom            387%          556%

Housing Wage as % of Mean Renter Wage
                             State-wide   Broward
       0-Bedroom            103%          111%
       1-Bedroom            115%          125%
       2-Bedroom            137%          150%
       3-Bedroom            180%          207%
       4-Bedroom            207%          263%

Work Hours/Week at Minimum Wage Needed to Afford FMR
                            State-wide    Broward
      0-Bedroom              77            94
      1-Bedroom              86           105
      2-Bedroom             102           127
      3-Bedroom             134           175
      4-Bedroom             155           222


Work Hours/Week at Mean Renter Wage Needed to Afford FMR
                            State-wide   Broward
      0-Bedroom             41             45
      1-Bedroom             46             50
      2-Bedroom             55             60
      3-Bedroom             72             83
      4-Bedroom             83           105




                                                   8
Full-time Jobs at Minimum Wage Needed to Afford FMR
                              State-wide     Broward
         0-Bedroom            1.9            2.4
         1-Bedroom            2.1            2.6
         2-Bedroom            2.6            3.2
         3-Bedroom            3.4            4.4
         4-Bedroom            3.9            5.6

Full-time Jobs at Mean Renter Wage Needed to Afford FMR
                               State-wide    Broward
         0-Bedroom             1.0           1.1
         1-Bedroom             1.2           1.2
         2-Bedroom             1.4           1.5
         3-Bedroom             1.8           2.1
         4-Bedroom             2.1           2.6

Number of Households (2000)
                              State-wide    Broward
       Total                  6,337,929     654,445
       Renter                 1,896,218     199,820
       % Renter               30%           31%

2006 Area Median Income       State-wide    Broward
       Annual                 $56,131       $60,600
       Monthly                $ 4,678       $ 5,050
       30% of AMI             $16,839       $18,180

Maximum Affordable Monthly Housing Cost by % of Family AMI
                             State-wide     Broward
       30%                   $ 421          $ 455
       50%                   $ 702          $ 758
       80%                   $1,123         $1,212
      100%                   $1,403         $1,515

2007 Fair Market Rent (FMR)
                              State-wide    Broward
       0-Bedroom              $ 638         $ 784
       1-Bedroom              $ 715         $ 877
       2-Bedroom              $ 850         $1,054
       3-Bedroom              $1,116        $1,458
       4-Bedroom              $1,288        $1,851

% Change from 2000 Base Rent to 2007 FMR
                            State-wide      Broward
      0-Bedroom             26%             24%
      1-Bedroom             26%             24%
      2-Bedroom             26%             24%
      3-Bedroom             26%             24%
      4-Bedroom             26%             24%

Annual Income Needed to Afford FMR
                              State-wide    Broward
        0-Bedroom             $25,539       $31,360
        1-Bedroom             $28,616       $35,080
        2-Bedroom             $34,007       $42,160
        3-Bedroom             $44,626       $58,320
        4-Bedroom             $51,504       $74,040



                                                   9
Percent of Family AMI Needed to Afford FMR
                              State-wide     Broward
        0-Bedroom             45%            52%
        1-Bedroom             51%            58%
        2-Bedroom             61%            70%
        3-Bedroom             80%            96%
        4-Bedroom             92%            122%

2006 Renter Household Income
                               State-wide    Broward
       Estimated Median        $32,245       $36,497


Percent Needed to Afford 2 BR FMR
                               State-wide    Broward
                               105%          116%

Rent Affordable at Median      State-wide    Broward
                               $806          $912

% Renters Unable to Afford 2 BR FMR
                               State-wide    Broward
                               53%           57%

2005 Renter Wage               State-wide    Broward
    Mean Renter Wage           $11.94        $13.54
    Rent Aff at Mean Wage      $621          $704

2006 Minimum Wage              State-wide    Broward
                               $6.40         $6.40

Rent Affordable at Minimum Wage
                             State-wide      Broward
                             $333            $333

2006 Monthly SSI Payment
                               State-wide    Broward
                               $603          $603
Rent Affordable at SSI         $181          $181

Housing Wage                   State-wide    Broward
       0-Bedroom               $12.28        $15.08
       1-Bedroom               $13.76        $16.87
       2-Bedroom               $16.35        $20.27
       3-Bedroom               $21.45        $28.04
       4-Bedroom               $24.76        $35.60

Housing Wage as % of Minimum Wage
                            State-wide       Broward
       0-Bedroom            192%             236%
       1-Bedroom            215%             264%
       2-Bedroom            255%             317%
       3-Bedroom            335%             438%
       4-Bedroom            387%             556%

Housing Wage as % of Mean Renter Wage
                            State-wide       Broward
       0-Bedroom            103%             111%
       1-Bedroom            115%             125%

                                                  10
        2-Bedroom                137%            150%
        3-Bedroom                180%            207%
        4-Bedroom                207%            263%

Work Hours/Week at Minimum Wage Needed to Afford FMR
                            State-wide    Broward
      0-Bedroom              77            94
      1-Bedroom              86           105
      2-Bedroom             102           127
      3-Bedroom             134           175
      4-Bedroom             155           222

Work Hours/Week at Mean Renter Wage Needed to Afford FMR
                            State-wide   Broward
      0-Bedroom             41             45
      1-Bedroom             46             50
      2-Bedroom             55             60
      4-Bedroom             83           105

Full-time Jobs at Minimum Wage Needed to Afford FMR
                              State-wide     Broward
         0-Bedroom            1.9            2.4
         1-Bedroom            2.1            2.6
         2-Bedroom            2.6            3.2
         3-Bedroom            3.4            4.4
         4-Bedroom            3.9            5.6

Full-time Jobs at Mean Renter Wage Needed to Afford FMR
                               State-wide    Broward
         0-Bedroom             1.0           1.1
         1-Bedroom             1.2           1.2
         2-Bedroom             1.4           1.5
         3-Bedroom             1.8           2.1
         4-Bedroom             2.1           2.6

Renter Occupied Households in Davie

A review of the 2000 Census information indicated that 22.5% of occupied housing units in Davie are occupied by
renters. As illustrated below, 45.5% of Davie renters are in the low/moderate-income category earning 80% or
less of the median income for Broward County. The income distribution for renter households, as extrapolated
from the 2000 Census follows:

        15.5%       1,045        Extremely low           ( 0-30%)
        12.9%         870        Low-income              (31-50%)
        17.1%       1,153        Moderate-income         (51-80%)
         9.5%         640        Middle-income           (81-95%)
        27.9%       1,881        Over 95% of Median      (95% + )
        100 %       7,149        Total Renter HH's

A review of the percent of housing costs attributable to rent indicates that 45% of all Davie renters pay more than
30% of their adjusted household income for rent. This represents a significant portion of the rental population that
is cost-burdened. Traditionally, as income levels increase, housing problems decrease, as the owners have the
financial wherewithal to make needed home repairs.

In 2000 there were 815 extremely low-income renter households earning 0-30% of the median income. The
largest sub-component was the “all other households” at 37.6%. “Small related households” (4 or less individuals)
constituted 35.8% of the total households, “elderly households” comprised 20.8%, and “large related households”
represented 5.8%.


                                                        11
There was a higher incidence of housing problems for "large related households" (5 or more persons) as
compared to other income groups, especially in regard to overcrowding and cost-burdening. These conditions
existed for other income groups, but overall, the rates of the “low-income” category (those earning 31-50% of
median), were lower.

For the low-income group, the “all other households” category was at the 100% threshold for having “any housing
problems” and for being “cost-burdened”(146 renter households). “Small related households” in the low-income
category had high measures for these problems as well.

Approximately 28% of the renter households in Davie in 2000 were found in the moderate-income category
(earning 51-80% median). 44% were found in the “small related households”; most likely younger couples with or
without a child. Almost 65% of these renters had some kind of housing problem. The second largest housing type
was “all other households”, who had the worst combination of housing related problems. Taken as a whole, the
moderate-income group experienced overcrowding, coupled with a high level of cost-burdening. The incidence of
housing problems for middle-income households was much less evident. The segment of this income group in
1990 was the “small related households” at 52.2%.

It should be noted that 74.3% of “elderly households” were found to have "some housing problem", likely due to
cost-burdening (paying more than 30% of adjusted gross household income for rent plus utilities).

Owner Occupied Households

Thirty percent (rounded-up from 29.7%) of all owners pay 30%> in mortgage PITI and this represents a significant
portion of owner-occupied households that are considered to be cost-burdened in their housing costs. The
following income distributions for owner-occupied households were extrapolated from the 2000 Census
percentages as follows:

        5.0%        1,097      Extremely low           ( 0-30% of median)
        6.9%        1,514      Low-income              (31-50% of median)
       13.2%        2,896      Moderate-income         (51-80% of median)
        8.5%        1,865      Middle-income           (81-95% of median)
       66.4%       14,568      Over 95% of Median      (95% + of median)
       100 %       24,657      Total Occupied HH's

It was noted that in the lowest income category (0-30% of median), the percentages for “any housing problems”
and “cost-burdened” i.e. paying more than 30% of adjusted household income for mortgage PITI were
comparable to renters. There was not a significant difference between “elderly households” and “all other
owners” in this category. Thus, generally speaking, for the extremely low-income owner households, the needs
indicators were similar to renters.

In the next higher income class (31-50% of the median income), about the same number of households were
found in each owner type. The indicators of housing problems decreased at this level, and were generally below
those for renters. The “all other owners” in this income category showed the highest percentage of “any housing
problem” and “cost-burdening” conditions @ 85.4% yielding 385 households.

Only 13.2% of owner households in 1990 were in the moderate-income class (51-80% of the median income),
representing 1,777 households, of which over 40% were “elderly”. The extent of problems for this group was
much lower than for renters or owners with lower incomes.

Of the “all other owner” category 63.7% experienced some kind of housing problem, but relative to the previous
values, that was an improvement. “Cost-burdening” at this income level declined to 50.7%.

In 2000, 36% of the Town's owner households earned over 95% of the median income paying $1,500 to $2,000+
for Mortgage PITI. “Elderly” persons represented 23% of the middle-income households. The incidence of
problems among elderly owners was double that for renters.




                                                      12
Substandard Housing Conditions

The quality of the housing stock is one indicator of the overall quality of life and economic health of a community.
According to the 2000 Census, the Town of Davie had 129 units which lacked complete plumbing, 92 units which
lacked a complete kitchen; and, 791 units which lacked central heating. Considering South Florida’s tropical
climate, the lack of central heating is not as significant a factor for substandard housing as is the lack of plumbing
or kitchen facilities.

In 1990, only 79 units in Davie lacked full plumbing; however, the 2000 Census indicates that there were 129
units lacking complete plumbing. In 1990, the majority of these units were located in the Eastern Target Area;
and, the lack of plumbing appeared to be concentrated in Black and Hispanic households. This holds true for the
2000 Census; however, many mobile homes in western Davie were also included in the mix.

The majority of the Town's site-built substandard units are considered "suitable for rehabilitation" since the City's
housing stock was primarily constructed after the 1980's. It should be noted that the Town of Davie was
significantly affected by Hurricane Wilma in October 2005; and, as a result, there are still a significant number of
units requiring demolition and replacement, or rehabilitation, to bring them up to an acceptable living standard.

Overcrowding

Overcrowding is defined as more than one (1) occupant per room, excluding the kitchen and bathroom. According
to the 2000 Census, 1,644 units (5%) in the Town of Davie were overcrowded. As more families move into Davie,
it is apparent that they are sharing dwellings or occupying units insufficient to meet the family size, simply
because the cost of the housing far exceeds their ability to pay. Given this, the 2000 figure is not reflective of the
true over-crowding that exists today. There is evidence of Code Compliance complaints indicating that as many
as 12-15 individuals are occupying one housing unit. Housing costs increased 33% in the past two years; yet,
wages only increased by 4%. This has caused many families and unrelated individuals, to share housing units.
Although the households’ size was reported to be 2.64 in 2000, the average family size was 3.13.

The overcrowding problem was also exacerbated by the Condo Conversion Craze in 2005-06, the redevelopment
of mobile home parks, and the loss of units due to Hurricane Wilma. Given that there was little to no comparable
replacement housing affordable to the displaced individuals, many ended-up living in over-crowded conditions.
Again, this can be attributed to the high housing costs, which have limited housing opportunities for Davie
residents.

Minority Housing Needs - Income Distribution of Households

Of the 968 minority-headed households 34.4% were extremely low-income, 19.7% were low-income, and 10.7%
were moderate-income. Of the 395 Black renter households 53.7% were extremely low-income, 18.5% were low-
income, and 5.8% were moderate-income. Of the 478 Hispanic renter households, 18.8% were extremely low-
income, 21.8% were low- income and 14.0% were moderate-income.

Disproportionately greater needs exist, when the percent of persons in a category of need who are members of a
particular racial or ethnic group is 10% higher than the percentage of persons in the category as a whole. For
example, the CHAS data showed that the income categories for Hispanic renter households fell within 10% of the
total renter households. Black renter households experienced an even higher difference (38.2%) in the extremely
low-income categories compared to total renter household percentages. Both minority groups had a lower
percentage of moderate-income households, compared to total renter households.

Using extrapolations from the 1990 Census, of the 21,940 owner-occupied households in Davie, 5.0% were
extremely low-income (0-30% of the median ), 6.9% were low-income (31-50% of the median), and 13.2% were
moderate-income (51-80% of the median). For minority-headed owner households in general (1,250), 2.4% were
extremely low-income, 7.6% were low-income, and 9.7% were moderate-income. For Black owner households
specifically (123), none fell into the extremely low-income category, 17.1% were low-income, and 6.5% were
moderate-income. Of 907 Hispanic owner households, 3.3% were extremely low-income, 5.7% were low-income,
and 8.8% were moderate-income.

The Hispanic owner households fell within 10% of the total owner household income category in 1990; however,
Black owner households experienced a slightly higher difference (10.2%) in the low-income categories compared

                                                         13
to total owner household percentages. Both minorities had a lower percentage of moderate-income owner
households, compared to total owner households.

Households with Housing Problems (Of Any Type)

Of the 668 extremely low-income renter households (earning 0-30% of the median) identified in the 2000 Census,
82.5% (551 households) experienced housing problems. Compared to this overall rate, 93.4% (198) of Black
households and 66.7% (60) of Hispanic households in this category experienced housing problems.

Of the 553 low-income renter households (earning 31-50% of the median), 83.4% (461) of the households
experienced housing problems. This included housing units which lacked either full kitchen and/or plumbing
facilities, or which were over-crowded. Compared to this overall rate, 45.2% (33) of Black households and 82.7%
(86) of Hispanic households in this category, experienced housing problems.

Of the 738 moderate-income renter households (earning 51-80% of the median), 77.0% (568) of the households
experienced housing problems. Compared to this overall rate, 30.4% (7) of Black households and 47.8% (32) of
Hispanic households experienced housing problems.

Based on this data, it appears that extremely low-income Black renter households, and low-income Hispanic
renter households, had a disproportionately greater need with respect to the incidence of housing problems.

Of the 675 extremely low-income owner households, (0-30% of the median) in 2000, 81.5% (550 households)
experienced housing problems. Compared to this overall rate, 0% of Black households (no Black households fell
into this category) and 100% (30) of the Hispanic households in this income category, experienced housing
problems.

Of the 923 low-income owner households (earning 31-50% of the median) in 2000, 64.8% (598 households)
experienced housing problems. Compared to this overall rate, 100% (21) of Black households and 80.8% (42) of
Hispanic households in this category experienced housing problems.

Of the 1,777 moderate-income owner households (51-80% of the median) in 2000, 51.8% (921) experienced
housing problems. Compared to this overall rate, 100% (8) of Black households and 76.3% (61) of Hispanic
households in this same income category experienced housing problems.

Extremely low-income (0-30%) Hispanic owner households and low-income and moderate-income Black owner
households had a disproportionately greater need with respect to housing problems; however, low-and moderate-
income Hispanic households experienced greater housing problems. It should be noted that the Town of Davie
was extremely impacted by Hurricane Wilma in 2005. This information is fully detailed later in this document.

Households with Incomes below 51% HAMFI by Family Type with Housing Problems

In 2000, 69.0% of the extremely low-income elderly renters (0-30% of median) and low-income elderly
households (31-50%), experienced some form of housing problems, compared to 79.2% for Black elderly
households and 51.4% for Hispanic elderly households in the same income categories.

82% of the extremely low-income and low-income small renter households (50%<) experienced housing
problems, compared to 79.0% for Black households and 67.7% for Hispanic households in the same income
categories. Finally, 85.5% of the large renter households (containing 5 or more people) in 1990, experienced
housing problems, compared to 71.8% for Black households and 100% for Hispanic households in the same
income categories.

60.8% of the total extremely low-income and low-income elderly households experienced housing problems,
compared to 0% for Black elderly households (as no Black elderly owner households fell into that category) and
65.5% for Hispanic elderly households in the same income categories.

82.9% of the total extremely low and low-income small households (4 or less individuals) experienced housing
problems, compared to 100% for Black households and 100% for Hispanic households in the same categories.



                                                      14
Finally, 100% of the total extremely low-income and low-income (50%<) large households (5 or more persons)
experienced housing problems, compared to 0% for Black households (as no Black large owner households fell
into this category) and 100% for Hispanic households in the same income categories.

This data shows that, elderly, large, and small Hispanic households had a disproportionately greater need. Data
was not available to make middle-income comparisons with respect to minority status and housing problems.

Devastating Effects of Hurricane Wilma on the Town of Davie

No other municipality in Broward County suffered the level of devastation from Hurricane Wilma in October 2005,
as the Town of Davie. This is due in part to the fact that we have the highest concentration of mobile homes in
Broward which represent over 24% of our entire housing stock. This “housing of last resort” is where Davie’s low-
income residents live because it is the most affordable alternative available to them.

Given the magnitude of the disaster, all Town employees were called into emergency response service. The
Town’s Housing and Community Development Office served as the lead agency for the distribution of food, water,
ice, MRE’s, and blue tarps to the lower-income families living in Davie’s 31 Mobile Home Parks. The majority of
these mobile home owners were uninsured, and they lost everything.

The National Guard was called in to assist Davie in maintaining order, until the distribution sites completed their
10 day emergency service period. During this time, Town employees were dispatched into the mobile home parks
to undertake “Displaced Residents Surveys” to determine how many people became homeless as a result of the
storm, and how to serve the medically needy and/or physically disabled residents.

It was initially estimated that 3,500 individuals lost their housing and became homeless as a result of the Storm.
Davie, in conjunction with the Red Cross, opened two (2) Emergency Shelters. Potter Park Community Center in
Eastern Davie which housed 210 individuals remained open until December 3, 2005, and the Church on the
Davie Road Extension housed 56 residents for 2 weeks. Housing and Community Development Staff were at the
Shelters on a daily basis, at specific times, to assist FEMA, Broward County’s Human Services Department, and
other agencies to rehouse Davie’s lower-income residents.

It has been extremely difficult to rehouse these displaced Davie residents, as there is little to no comparable
affordable replacement housing available to them. Many of the mobile home residents that were displaced by
Wilma were subsequently rehoused in lower-cost rental units. Thus, the rental vacancy rate is now extremely low;
and, many landlords are capitalizing on the demand for units by raising their rents.

The Housing and Community Development Staff served as the liaison with FEMA and the State of Florida
Emergency Response Teams (SERT) to process FEMA applications and appeals. As of this date, there are still
Davie residents living in FEMA RV's, Commercial FEMA trailers or mobile homes, staying in hotels, living in their
cars or tents, etc., because they have not yet been successfully transitioned back into permanent housing that is
affordable to them.

Synopsis of Hurricane Wilma’s Destruction in Davie:

    Red-Tagged Units

           55           Single Family Homes
          386           Multi-Family (Condo’s Townhomes)
           55           Units Rental Housing
          832           Mobile Homes – Destroyed
           14           Commercial Properties
        1,432

    Roofs Damaged or Destroyed

        3,442           Permits for Re-Roofs – Residential
           79           Permits for Re-Roofs – Commercial
        3,521


                                                        15
    Additional Compromised Mobiles Homes

         100+           Roofs Breached – Mold/Mildew Now Uninhabitable
        1,400           Estimated Repairs Needed (Held Together With Blue Tarps/Duct Tape/Plywood
        1,500

    Red Cross Shelters Operated

        210 Beds        Potter Park Facility – Eastside
         56 Beds        Church – Davie Road Extension - Driftwood

        6,453           Units Damaged/Destroyed/Compromised in Davie

        3,580           Initial Homeless Estimates

Subsequent to the Storm, many other structures e.g. 100+ mobile homes became uninhabitable due to mold and
mildew infestations, sagging floors, collapsed roofs, etc. The Town estimates that there are approximately 1,400
mobile homes held together with blue tarps, plywood, and duct tape. These low-income families are living in very
fragile conditions.

As outlined above, the focus of the Town’s Housing and Community Development Department post Hurricane
Wilma, had to be aimed at the relief and recovery of Davie’s low-income, elderly, and uninsured families who
were left without shelter. While most other Departments could return to their normal duties, Housing and CD Staff
have continued to assist residents in the CDBG Target Areas to find permanent sustainable housing. Regrettably,
this impacted the Departments ability to maintain our regular duties. Even though we routinely worked 10-12
hours daily for several months, we are still catching-up on many items.

Low and Moderate Income Concentrations (CDBG Target Areas)

As previously stated, the term “low/moderate income” for use in the CDBG Program, applies to those individuals
and households who earn up to eighty (80%) percent of the median income for the area, as adjusted by family
size. These income levels are published annually by HUD, and adjusted for each CDBG program year. The
Median Income for Broward County in 2007 is $58,200. The income levels by household size were previously
outlined under "Category of Persons Affected".

Davie CDBG Target Areas - 2000 Census Tract and Block Group Low/Mod Data

The analysis outlined above revealed those Census Tracts and Block Groups in Davie that contain the highest
concentrations of persons whose incomes are 80%< of the median income, and who would qualify for assistance
under the CDBG Program. Based on this, information coupled with other indicators such as sub-standard
housing, lack of infrastructure, lacking social services etc., the Town Council adopted three (3) geographic areas
as "CDBG Target Areas" for redevelopment and revitalization, as follows:
                                                                                        th
Western Target Area a/k/a Orange Park: The Western Target Area is located north of SW 14 Street between
130-136th Avenues, in Census Tract 703.05 BG 1, which encompasses the Orange Park Trailer Park, Flamingo
Elementary School, and Western High School.

                        Census Tract/Block Group                 703.05 BG 1
                        Total Population                         3341
                        Low-Moderate Income Population           68%
                        Unemployment Rate                        4.92%
                        Average Household Income                 $40,669
                        Female Head of Households                31%
                        Housing units w/1.01+ Per. per Room      7%
                        Housing Units w/ No Heating Fuel         8%

Southern Target Area a/k/a Driftwood: The Southern Target Area is located in CT 705.02 BG 1& 2; and, is
situated south of Stirling Road, east of 78th Avenue, and north and west of the Davie Road Extension.


                                                       16
                        Census Tract/Block Group                705.02 BG 1& 2
                        Total Population                        4,729
                        Low/Moderate Income Population          80%
                        Unemployment Rate                       6.57%
                        Average Household Income                $30,055
                        Female Head of Households               51%
                        Housing units w/1.01 + Per. per Room    3%
                        Housing Units w/ No Heating Fuel        1%

Eastern Target Area a/k/a Eastside: The Eastern Target Area is bounded to the north by SW 29th Street (near
Nova Drive), on the south by Orange Drive, formerly bounded to the west by Davie Road, and to the East by the
Florida Turnpike. The area boundaries were amended by the Town Council to coincide with the Community
Redevelopment Area and encompass the Neighborhood Service Center.

                Census Tract/Block Group              701.01 BG 1&2 - 706.00 BG 1&2
                      Total Population                       7,437
                      Low/Moderate Income Population         77%
                      Unemployment Rate                      7.10%
                      Average Household Income               $31,707
                      Female Head of Households              36%
                      Housing units w/1.01 + Per. per Room 9%
                      Housing Units w/ No Heating Fuel       5%

When the Consolidated Plan 2002-2007 was prepared, an analysis of the Town's demographic profile was
undertaken to define geographic concentrations of low/moderate income families and minority residents. This
analysis revealed that the following areas contained the highest concentration of low/moderate income persons:

        Census          Block           Low/Mod                 Low/Mod
        Tract           Group           Number                  Percent
        7.01            1               2,307                   59.8 %
        7.01            9                378                    61.2 %
        7.03            2               1,412                   36.8 %
        7.05            2               1,728                   53.7 %
        7.06            1               1,243                   38.7 %
        8.03            9                188                    79.0 %

Since no Census Tract in Davie contained 51% or greater low/moderate income individuals (as a whole), HUD
and the Town analyzed the Census data by Block Groups, to determine the geographic areas that would qualify
for assistance. Based this, HUD established 36.8% as the threshold for designation of a CDBG Target Area i.e., a
specific geographic area where CDBG funds can be expended with the assumption that they would “principally”
benefit low/moderate income residents. The area from Orange Drive north to 42nd St. between SW 55th and 57th
Avenues was approved by HUD as a result of a special income-survey performed in 1994 by the Davie CRA.

Based on the income distributions previously outlined, coupled with other factors such as sub-standard housing
and inadequate infrastructure, the Davie Town Council adopted the following three (3) CDBG Target Areas to
undergo neighborhood redevelopment/revitalization:

      • The Western Target Area a/k/a Orange Park is located between 130th-136th Avenues, north of 14th
        Street and south of State Road 84.

      • The Southern Target Area a/k/a Driftwood, is located south of Stirling Road, east of 78th Avenue, and
        north and west of the Davie Road Extension.

      • The Eastern Target Area a/k/a Potters Park, is bounded to the north by Nova Drive (including the Palma
        Nova Mobile Home Park), to the south by Orange Drive, to the east by NW 62nd Avenue, and to the west
        by Davie Road. The Eastern Target Area boundaries were was amended by Town Council to coincide
        with Community Redevelopment Area and encompass the new Neighborhood Service Center “One-Stop-
        Shop”.


                                                      17
In preparation of this new Consolidated Plan, the demographics, physical conditions, and quality of life issues
existing within the three (3) CDBG Target Areas were reexamined; and, it was determined that the three (3)
Target Areas are still cogent.

Areas of Minority Concentration:

The Town does not formally define an “area of minority concentration”; however, for the purpose of preparing the
Town’s original Consolidated Plan, Block Groups containing 20% or more racial/ethnic minority households
(Black, Hispanic, Asian) were used. According to the 2000 Census, minority households in Davie are now
distributed as follows: 4.6% Black, 18.8% Hispanic, 2.8% Asian, and 5.5% Other.

At the block group level, the only area of minority concentration in 1990 was Census Tract 7.05 BG 2, which was
composed of 20% Black households. Hispanic households constituted 8% of the population in Census Tract 7.01
BG 1, 4% in Census Tract 7.01 BG 9, and 15% in Census Tract 7.05 BG 2. Asian and other ethnic groups
constituted 4% or less in each of the three block groups. The detained Census 2000 data is not yet available at
the Block Group level for comparison.

Homeless Needs - Nature and Extent of Homelessness

Although dispersed throughout Broward County, the vast majority of homeless persons are concentrated within
the older communities of Pompano Beach, Fort Lauderdale, and Hollywood, where the majority of services to the
homeless are provided. The nature and extent of homelessness by racial and ethnic data is limited to the
information produced by the Broward Coalition's Annual Survey, which found that there were 5,070 homeless
persons in February/March 2000.

That survey was coordinated by Lisa Margolis from the Cooperative Feeding Programs, and 1,690 homeless
individuals were interviewed. A multiplier of 3 was used for under counting, yielding a total of 5,070 homeless
persons in Broward County. A synopsis of the Homeless Survey results follows:

                               BROWARD COUNTY HOMELESS SURVEY 2000
                                        February-March, 2000
Individuals
Staying in emergency/transitional shelter:             579             (42%)
Staying in substandard living conditions:              795             (58%)
Needing Legal Services:                                466             (35%)
Medically Needy:                                       503             (33%)
Chronic Substance Abusers:                             707             (47%)
Seriously Mentally Ill:                                477             (32%)
Dually-Diagnosed (Ment. Ill & Sub. Ab.):               290             (21%)
Veterans:                                              343             (24%)
Persons with HIV/AIDS:                                 110             (08%)
Victims of Domestic Violence:                          100             (07%)
Youth:                                                  95             (07%)
Physically Disabled:                                   475             (32%)
Elderly:                                                27             (02%)

Persons in Families with Children
Staying in emergency/transitional shelter:              140            (72%)
Staying in substandard living conditions:                54            (28%)
Chronic Substance Abusers:                               58            (35%)
Seriously Mentally Ill:                                  35            (20%)
Dually-Diagnosed (Ment. Ill & % Sub. Abuse):             22            (13%)
Veterans:                                                23            (08%)
Persons with HIV/AIDS                                    11            (06%)
Victims of Domestic Violence:                            34            (19%)
Physically Disabled:                                     31            (17%)
Youth:                                                  356            ( 6%)

The Coalition's 2000 Survey did not note any homeless persons within the Town of Davie

                                                      18
It should be noted that there is anecdotal information from the EASE Foundation (Emergency Assistance Service
Effort) and the Hope Outreach Center (two local social service providers), indicating that although there are a few
homeless persons in Davie, many families are at-risk of becoming homeless i.e., are only marginally financially
stable.

In 2006, the Davie Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) in conjunction with the Housing and Community
Development Office identified a homeless population of 6-8 adult males living in the Downtown Davie area near
Orange Drive and the Davie Road Extension. Broward County’s Homeless Partnership was called in to visit the
sites at night, to offer shelter assistance to these homeless individuals.

In the Spring of 2007, the Broward Coalition for the Homeless undertook a night-time study of homeless. Of the
2,121 individuals interviewed that night, eight (8) were located in the Town of Davie, representing only .38 % of
the County’s Homeless population counted. In the Broward County Survey, homeless individuals were asked
“Where did you sleep last night?” The following are the results.

             Level                              Count             Percent
             Coconut Creek                          8              0.38%
             Cooper City                            2              0.09%
             Coral Springs                         24              1.13%
             Dania                                 61              2.88%
             Davie                                  8              0.38%
             Deerfield                             24              1.13%
             Ft. Lauderdale                       877             41.43%
             Hallandale                            42              1.98%
             Hillsboro Beach                        1              0.05%
             Hollywood                            417             19.70%
             Lauderdale by the Sea                 12              0.57%
             Lauderdale Lakes                      11              0.52%
             Lauderdale                           121              5.72%
             Margate                                6              0.28%
             Miramar                                9              0.43%
             North Lauderdale                       7              0.33%
             Oakland Park                          70              3.31%
             Parkland                               3              0.14%
             Pembroke Park                          7              0.33%
             Pembroke Pines                        25              1.18%
             Plantation                             4              0.19%
             Pompano Beach                        343             16.20%
             Southwest Ranches                      4              0.19%
             Sunrise                               14              0.66%
             Tamarac                                4              0.19%
             Wilton Manors                          9              0.43%
             Total                               2121            100.00%
                N Missing = 739



                        Broward - 2007 Homeless Survey - 3,872 Survey’s completed
                             (Per State Definition of Homelessness –Not HUD’s)

    •   947 Full Emergency Shelter Beds (only 539 people                     408 in Emergency Shelters
         Counted during survey as living in Emergency Shelter)

    •   1966 Transitional Shelter Beds are full (only 637 surveyed          1,329 in Transitional Shelters
         reported living in Transitional shelter)

    •   Temporary residences for those intended to be institutionalized     Unknown
        Includes children waiting for foster care placement, formerly
        Homeless persons who are residing in Section 8, Shelter Plus

                                                        19
         Care, SHP or other permanent housing units, adults living in
         Mental health facilities, chemical dependency facilities, etc.
         Those persons who are living doubled-up in conventional
         Housing -1.65% of Total Population.

Subtotal:
                                                                              5,609
Deduct those that do not fit State definition due to imprisonment         -     391

Total:
                                                                              5,218 without multiplier

A multiplier of 3 is historically used for average daily count             15,654 with multiplier

Note: Average daily count means the number of homeless people on any given day. Since homelessness is a
temporary condition for most people, with different people experiencing homelessness on different days, the
number of people who experience homelessness in any given year in Broward is much higher.

Foreclosures

In 2006 and 2007 the number of foreclosures has significantly increased, as homeowners face huge increases in
taxes and insurance post Hurricane-Wilma, and many were victims of predatory sub-prime lenders. The Housing
and Community Development Office and its not-for-profit partners, have responded to this need by increasing
assistance for foreclosure prevention and credit enhancement and repair programs. It is anticipated that the
foreclosure rate will continue to increase as many families purchased homes beyond their means.

The Town's Housing and Community Development Office responded to a growing need and demand for
emergency housing services, by creating a CDBG-funded Homeless Prevention/Emergency Assistance Program
in 2003/04. Since this program was created, 562 individuals and families have been provided with financial
assistance which halted eviction, prevented foreclosure, or secured affordable housing. The Town now utilizes the
services of the Hope Outreach Center, as a CDBG Sub-Recipient Agency, to provide emergency services to
Davie's at-risk populations.

In addition, the Town is in the process of creating the first Neighborhood Service Center (NSC) which will be a
One-Stop-Shop for persons requiring assistance. The goal is to centralize all not-for-profit service providers under
one roof. The facility is located on a major transit line, and the Town’s fixed-route transit. The Town will provide
leased space at a nominal rate ($1 per year) to the not-for-profits, so that the funds they previously used to pay
rent can now be directed exclusively to client services.

Need for Homeless Facilities and Services

There are many facilities and services available to homeless persons throughout the County, which include:
prevention, outreach, emergency shelter, transitional housing, and permanent supported and affordable housing.
On a county-wide basis, there are excellent "continuum of care" services. There is a 400 bed Housing Assistance
Center (HAC) on Sunrise Boulevard which provides a quality "Continuum of Care" for the Homeless. The lack of
need and demand within the Town of Davie for homeless services, would not justify an emergency shelter;
however, extensive facilities and programs for the homeless are available within the Fort Lauderdale, Hollywood,
and Pompano Beach areas should anyone in Davie become homeless.

As previously indicated, the Town of Davie also grants CDBG funds to the Hope Outreach Center to provide
emergency financial assistance to prevent homelessness. The creation of the new Neighborhood Service Center
(NSC) will also address the needs of the homeless; and, will permit several agencies to cooperate in a “case
managed” system, which will prevent homelessness and serve those already homeless.

Needs of Persons Threatened with Homelessness

Persons threatened with homelessness include lower-income individuals living in marginal financial situations
such as lower wage earners with no financial savings. For these households, the loss of a job, an injury that


                                                           20
interrupts a paycheck, an increase in rent, or some other sudden change in income could result in missed rent or
mortgage payments, and the loss of shelter.

The 2000 Census Summary Data shows that 40.5% of Davie’s households earn less than $35,000 yearly, and of
those households 14% earn less then $15,000. This segment of the population clearly needs housing assistance,
(rental assistance and appropriately sized units), in order to prevent them from becoming homeless.

Given the high rental rates in Davie, and the lack of affordable housing units (both rental and homeowner) in the
County, many families are only marginally managing to pay their housing costs. Following the downturn in the
economy post 9/11, many lower income workers e.g. cooks, mechanics, etc. lost their jobs, and are faced with
losing their current housing and are potentially homeless.

Following Hurricane Wilma, the Town also saw a significant increase in the number of families unable to secure
comparable replacement housing that was affordable to them.

During the Housing Bubble of 2003-2006, many sub-prime lenders capitalized on the market, and placed
individuals into mortgages with variable rates and/or “balloons”. We are now seeing high foreclosure rates, as
these families were unprepared and untrained for homeownership. Increased taxes and insurance Post-Hurricane
Wilma have left huge escrow shortages, which many are unable to pay. Without assistance, these families are at-
risk of becoming homeless.

Other Special Needs Populations

This section describes the needs of persons who are not homeless but who may require supportive housing. This
includes the elderly, the frail elderly, persons with disabilities (mental, physical, or developmental), persons with
alcohol or other drug addiction, persons with HIV/AIDS and their families, and residents of public housing. It
should be noted that the information in this section of the Plan was derived by applying either national, state, or
county percentages against Davie's base population; therefore, the data extrapolations may or may not be truly
reflective of the "special needs" populations within Davie today.

Homeless and Special Needs Populations Special Needs (Non-Homeless)


Persons in Need of Supportive Housing

            Elderly                                        182
            Frail Elderly                                   46
            Severe Mental Illness                          636
            Developmentally Disabled                       707
            Physically Disabled                          1,014
            Persons with Alcohol/Drug Addiction            471
            Persons with HIV/AIDS                          786

Elderly

The 2000 Census summary population figures indicate that there are 7,127 persons in Davie who are 65 years of
age or older, which represents 9.4% of the total population. Of this number, 3,012 (4%) are males and 4,115
(5.4%) are females. There are 28,682 households in the Town of Davie of which 18.8 % are occupied by elderly
persons 65 years of age or older. This is up from the 16.6% occupied by elders in 1990. In order to understand
the housing needs of elderly renters in Davie, housing characteristics for elderly households in 1990 were
extrapolated against the total elderly population per the Census 2000 i.e. 7,127 individuals. The result of this
extrapolation follows:

    20.8%       1,482        Extremely Low         0-30%
    12.8%         912        Low-Income            31-50%
     2.4%         171        Moderate              51-80%
     8.5%         606        Middle-Income         81-95 %
    55.5%       3,995        Other                 95% and over


                                                         21
As illustrated above, a significant number of elderly renters in Davie have incomes below 30% of the median
income; and, a total of 36% are considered low/moderate income earning 80% or less of the median income. An
analysis of the elderly rental households was performed in order to determine the incidence of:

      • cost-burdening (housing payments in excess of 30% of income);
      • severe cost-burdening (housing payments in excess of 50% of income); or
      • housing problems (including overcrowding, and units that lack plumbing, kitchen facilities, or central
        heating)

A breakdown of the income categories among elderly renters revealed that elderly individuals on fixed-incomes
are generally the most cost-burdened group. Extremely low-income elderly renters (0-30% of the median), were
the group most significantly affected, since a significant number paid in excess of 50% of their income for housing
costs making them "severely" cost-burdened. This leaves little monthly income to cover the basic necessities
within elderly households, such as food, medication, transportation, clothing, etc.

In addition to being cost-burdened in their housing costs, a significant number of elderly rental households
experienced one or more housing problems. According to the 1990 Census, 310 households below 95% of
median experienced housing problems, 73% of the extremely-low income elderly renter households evidenced
housing problems, while 71% of the low-income, 50% of the moderate-income, and 74.3% of middle-income
households respectively had some form of housing problems.

Elderly Homeowners

The needs of elderly homeowners were also examined to determine the extent of housing needs among the
general elderly population. 2000 Census information indicates that 89% of the elderly households in the Town of
Davie were owner-occupied (as opposed to rental).

The largest segment of elderly homeowners in 1990, were those that earned 50%< of the median income. As was
the case with elderly renters, the most severely affected elderly homeowners, are individuals whose incomes
were 30%< of the median income. This group was severely cost-burdened i.e., 60+% paid more than one-half of
their income for their housing costs (mortgage principal, interest, taxes and insurance). The second most affected
group in 1990, were low-income elderly homeowners with incomes between 31% and 50% of the median income.
In this income category, 22% of all persons paid in excess of 50% of their income for their homes.

Another indication of need among the general elderly population is the number and type of facilities that provide
supportive housing services for elderly and frail elderly persons. There are numerous facilities throughout the
Broward County area designed to serve this special population.

The State of Florida reports that there are currently 209 Adult Living Facilities (ALF's) licensed in Broward County,
containing 8,418 beds. ALF's traditionally provide housing for elderly persons who are quasi-independent and
ambulatory, but who may require assistance with bathing, grooming, medications, preparation of meals, and
laundry.

There are two licensed ALF's (serving 39 elderly persons) in Davie, and two nursing homes. In addition to these
facilities, the Broward County Housing Authority (BCHA) owns and operates 100 units of public housing for elderly
and disabled persons, at Griffin Gardens Apartments located at 4881 Griffin Road; and, the Jewish Federation of
South Florida owns and operates 80 units of elderly rental housing.

Persons with Disabilities

The Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services - District 10, Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health Unit
estimated that ten percent (10%) of the general population had some form of disability. Within this group, 3%
were developmentally disabled, 2.7% were mentally disabled and 4.3% were physically disabled (this includes
disabled frail elderly persons). Approximately 50% of disabled adults need some form of supportive housing. If
that figure was applied to Davie's population of 92,431 persons, the following residents would require supportive
housing.




                                                         22
      • Developmentally     (3.0%) 2,773 persons

      • Mentally Disabled   (2.7%) 2,496 persons

      • Physically Disabled (4.3%) 3,974 persons

There is a general assumption that disabled persons have lower incomes, particularly developmentally disabled
individuals who may not be able to work.

The Broward Adult Rehabilitation Center (BARC), formerly known as the Broward Association of Retarded
Citizens, operates an Interim Care Facility (ICF) for developmentally disabled adults, at their facility located at
2750 SW 75 Avenue in Davie. BARC has three (3) buildings each housing 12 clients (for a total of 36 clients).
Additionally, the Sunrise Community Center located at 5450 Stirling Road provides a structured workshop for
developmentally disabled individuals.

Several mental health agencies, including: Nova Geriatric Institute (located in the Town of Davie), Henderson
Mental Health Center, Archways, and the Pierce Center, provide supportive housing (ranging from group homes
to supervised apartments) to persons returning from mental health institutions and others who require supportive
provisions.

According to the Nova Mental Health Center, Davie residents are currently receiving a wide range of supportive
services including: psychiatric care, case management, individual and group counseling, adult day treatment,
assisted job training and placement, activities of daily living skills and training, and General Education Diploma
(GED) preparation.

Persons with Alcohol or Other Drug Addiction

According to the Developmental Services Section of the Dept. of Children & Families of Broward County, 19.7%
of the total U.S. population has some form of substance (alcohol/drug) disability. If this percent were accurate,
and if it was applied against Davie's population established by the 2000 Census, it would represent 14,917 Davie
residents with alcohol or drug abuse problems.

According to the Florida Department of Children and Families, Aging and Adult Services, there are two licensed
facilities in Davie that provide alcohol and substance abuse treatment services:

      • Lifeline of Miami, 6550 Griffin Road, Suite 104 (Detox/out-patient services) (954) 791-5484

      • Nova Southeastern University, 3301 College Avenue (954) 262-5722 (treatment/counseling)

Other facilities located outside of the Town, but which serve Davie residents include:

      • BARC (Broward Addiction and Recovery Center):

      • Out-patient: 1011 SW 2nd Street, Ft Lauderdale 33312 (954) 765-4200

      • In-patient - detox/treatment (BARC Central Treatment Center), 4125 Davie Road, Ft. Lauderdale, 33301
        (954) 327-8750

      • Henderson Mental Health Ctr. 2900 West Prospect Road, Ft. Lauderdale, 33301        (954) 731-1000

      • Central Treatment Center (954) 831-1553. (Detox, day treatment, and out-patient services, and an in-
        patient facility for alcohol and drug addiction treatment at their Pompano Beach facility).

Persons with HIV/AIDS and their Families

Broward County's Public Health Unit estimated that in 1990 one in sixty persons living in Broward County was
infected with HIV/AIDS. If this 1/60 ratio were applied against the Town of Davie’s population of 92,431 persons,


                                                        23
this would indicate that 1,540 Davie residents could be HIV positive. (This projection method does not take into
consideration the specific demographics of each community, and may therefore, not be valid).

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development provides grant funds under the Housing Opportunities
for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) Program that is designed to meet the special housing needs of persons living
with AIDS, and their families. The HOPWA regulations require that the most populous municipal jurisdiction within
each urban county area, administer the HOPWA Program on behalf of all the municipal jurisdictions contained
therein. The City of Ft. Lauderdale (Planning and Economic Development Department, Community Development
Division), administers the HOPWA funds for the Broward County area, which includes the Town of Davie.

The Town has reported to the U.S. Dept. of HUD, in each annual Action Plan since 2004, that the City of Ft.
Lauderdale has not included the Town in its HOPWA allocation or distribution process, or provided any
information to illustrate that Davie residents are being served under this program. This information would be
greatly appreciated.

Residents of Public Housing

Davie residents in need of subsidized rental housing are served by the Broward County Housing Authority
(BCHA), which owns and operates the following two housing projects in Davie:

            Ehlinger Apartments              Griffin Gardens Apartments
            7481 N.W. 33rd Street            4881 Griffin Road
            Family Rental Housing            Elderly and Disabled Rental
            100 units                        100 units

In addition to the projects described above, BCHA determines the eligibility of tenants, inspects units, and pays
rent subsidies for the following privately owned Section 8 Moderate Rehabilitation project:

            El Jardin Apartments
            3300 El Jardin Drive
            Family Rental Housing
            232 units

The Housing Authority's Section 8 Certificate/Voucher distribution list (updated through May 31, 2007), revealed
that the Authority is currently administers 5,341 Vouchers of which 342 are located in the Town of Davie.

Lead-Based Paint Hazards

According to the 2000 Census, 41% of the Town's housing units (12,654), were built prior to 1980. Homes and
apartments that were built before 1978, prior to the reduction of lead in paint for residential purposes, are at-risk
for potential lead-based paint hazards. Hazards may consist of defective paint surfaces, where there is evidence
of peeling or cracking, or when surface friction creates dust particles, such as the opening and closing of a door
that is hung in a wood frame or door-jamb. These hazards are more likely to occur in low- and moderate-income
homes where maintenance may not be a priority.

In order to determine the extent of lead-based paint hazards in the Town of Davie, the Office of Environmental
Health and the Broward County Public Health Unit, both part of the Florida Department of Health and
Rehabilitative Services, and the Broward County Housing Authority were consulted. The following cases of
excessive lead (15 micrograms per deciliter) were reported:


                Year             Zip Code                 Cases Reported
                1998             33314                           1
                                 33317                           1
                                 33024                           3
                                 33025                           2
                1999             33024                           1
                2000             33024                           2


                                                        24
The Town of Davie will continue to monitor the incidence of findings of high lead levels in the population by
contacting the Office of Environmental Health annually to determine the extent of excessive lead reports within
the Town. Further, the Town will comply with lead-based paint regulations and abatement measures whenever
CDBG funding is utilized.

HOUSING MARKET ANALYSIS
General Characteristics and Housing Supply

The 2000 Census indicates that 91.7% of the total housing units in Davie are occupied, with only 8.3% either
seasonally vacant or vacant year-round. In terms of housing tenure, approximately 76.5% (21,940) of Davie’s
housing units were owner-occupied in 2000; the remaining 23.5% (6,742) of the households were renter-
occupied.

Davie’s housing growth through new construction has been slow in recent years; and, the majority of the new
housing constructed is considered to be “luxury” housing. The following is a synopsis of the building permit
activity in the past four (4) years:

        Housing         10/1/03- 1      10/1/04-        10/1/05-         10/1/06-
        Type             9/30/04        9/30/05         9/30/06          5/29/07

        Mobile Home     146             128              347            128             Total             749
        Single-Family   345             272              151             48             Total             816
        Townhouse       129             117               52              6             Total             304
        Apartment         0               2                0              0             Total                2
        Duplex            0               2               0               0             Total              _ 2___
                        620             521              550            182             1,873

        Commercial       14              31              24               12             Total             81

It should be noted that the Town of Davie issues only one building permit for each rental apartment building,
irrespective of the number of units in each building. For single-family dwellings including townhouses and
condominiums, a building permit is issued to each owner (i.e. one per unit).

You will note that 40% of all residential permits pulled, were for mobile homes. This can be accounted for two
ways. First, as the cost of housing has risen, more people are being forced into mobile home living as “housing of
last resort” since they can not afford any other type of housing. Second, Post-Wilma, many mobile homes that
were destroyed were subsequently replaced either through FEMA or private insurance. This is evidenced by the
high number of permits issued for mobile homes in the 10/1/05 to 9/30/06 period, as Hurricane Wilma struck
Florida on October 24, 2005. It should be noted that, in the current Fiscal Year i.e. October 2006 to date, over
70% of the residential permits issued were for mobile homes. This far out from the storm, these are likely not
replacement housing per se. Rather, this reflects the inflated housing market which exists today. Housing costs
have risen by 33% in the past 2 years; but, wages have only risen about 4%.

The affordable housing boom (post 2003) saw permits issued primarily for luxury housing i.e. single-family homes
on one-acre lots ranging in price from $400,000 to $2.5 Million. In 2006, the Housing and Community
Development Dept. hired a firm to ascertain the median cost of all homes sold, based on Documentary Surtax
transactions. The average cost for a new single family home was $424,980 and $345,832 for an existing single-
family home. The median cost of a new detached single family home was $269,900 and $266,000 for an existing
single-family home. These figures are clearly out of range for the average working family.

Housing Demand

This housing demand in 2003-2005 was fueled by a variety of factors which include the following: low mortgage
interest rates, condo conversions, speculative investing, sub-prime lenders, foreign investment, the burgeoning
population in Broward County and the availability of developable land in western Davie.

Davie is still more rural and less densely developed than some of its neighbors; and, as such, is more able to
accommodate anticipated future growth than neighboring municipalities. It should be noted however, that the
Zoning and Land Use Regulations for western Davie i.e., west of Nob Hill Road, limit residential development to
                                                       25
one unit per acre, thus increasing the cost and limiting the type of housing that can be constructed. This makes it
virtually impossible to develop affordable housing since the land costs are high and density levels are low. This
limits affordable housing developments to the area east of University Road in eastern and southern Davie.

Additionally, it should be noted that many residents strive to maintain the "rural" atmosphere in Davie; and, this
often causes conflicts and Nimbyism, when economic development initiatives are proposed. The desire to keep
Davie "green" also limits Ad Valorem taxes which are necessary to offset residential housing costs.

In 2006, Davie saw the beginning of a disturbing trend to redevelop mobile home parks, causing the permanent
and involuntary displacement of Davie residents. The State Statutes at 723 are clearly outdated, and do not
protect the rights of mobile home lot renters. Further, the majority of Davie’s mobile home stock is comprised of
older non-windstorm-rated units which cannot be moved to another park. Residents are forced to “abandon” their
mobile homes, and accept a paltry payment which is insufficient to secure comparable, replacement housing that
is affordable to them.

This was evidenced when the Seminole Tribe of Florida (STOF) forcing 65 Davie families from their homes, many
of whom ended up homeless, living in sub-standard over-crowded conditions, or forced to leave the area. The
occupied older pre-1992 models had to “abandon” their homes for $1, and receive relocation assistance of $1,375
(single-wide) or $2,750 (double-wide). They lost their biggest asset, which is their home i.e., the mobile home unit.
As will be discussed later in this document, in response to this growing crisis, the Town of Davie adopted a One-
Year Moratorium on the redevelopment of Mobile Home Parks.

Housing Unit Type

In 1990, single family housing constituted 54% of the housing stock in the Town of Davie; and, multi-family
housing and mobile homes represented 29% and 16% of the housing stock, respectively. By 2000, the number of
owner occupied units rose to 76.5%, and renter households declined to 23.5%. The number of mobile homes rose
from 16% to 24% of the total housing unit in Davie.

It is important to note that 24% of the housing units (roughly 7,400+- units) are mobile homes, the majority of
which are not wind-storm rated i.e., Pre-Hurricane Andrew models. This means that Davies elderly residents on
fixed incomes, and lower-income families, occupy fragile housing which could be lost due to fire, tropical storms,
or hurricanes. There are 31 mobile home parks; and, it is estimated that 23,000 Davie residents live in these
units.

As previously indicated, luxury single-family housing constitutes the fastest growing segment of the Town’s
housing industry. Lower growth in these segments of the housing market does not reflect a correspondingly low
demand for these housing sectors. Such factors as local policy, land use regulations, financial institution lending
practices, and developer profit incentives all influence the type of housing structure which is constructed.

There is a clear demand for affordable housing and workforce housing; however, the high cost of land makes it
very difficult for developers to produce “affordable” units. Higher density, deep subsidies, and financial incentives
are needed county-wide for this type of housing to occur.

Age of Housing Stock

Like other municipalities in western Broward, Davie’s housing stock is relatively young; and the majority (59.4%)
of housing units in Davie were built after 1980. Most of the housing constructed in Davie in the 1980's occurred in
Census Tract 705.00 Block Group 2, and CT 701.00 BG 9. From 1970 to 1979, 77% of the structures built in
Davie were located in CT 705.00 BG 2. From 1980 to 1988, 82% were built in CT 701.00 BG 9. Building permit
activity indicates that the majority of single-family housing has been constructed in Western Davie as “luxury
housing”.

One significant exception is the Town’s aging mobile home stock. The majority of the units are not wind-storm
rated, meaning they were built prior to Hurricane Andrew in 1992. In fact, the majority are 1980+ models, many of
which have aged in place since the owners lack the financial resources to renovate or maintain their units. Since
both SHIP and CDBG funds prohibit mobile-home-repair programs, residents have no governmental agency to
turn to for home repair assistance.

                                                         26
Housing Stock Condition

Sub-standard housing is traditionally defined using the following characteristics: lack of complete plumbing, lack
of complete kitchen facilities, lack of central heating, and overcrowded housing conditions. Census 2000 figures
indicate that 129 units lack complete plumbing, 92 units lack complete kitchen facilities, and 791 lack central
heating, and 1,644 units (5.7%) are considered to be over-crowded with more than one person per room
(excluding kitchens and bath).

The 79 units which lacked full plumbing in 1990 were primarily concentrated in Hispanic house-holds, where 0.7%
of the occupied Hispanic households lacked complete plumbing. Of the 79 housing units which lacked plumbing
in 1990, 25 (31.7%) were located in Census Tract 701.00 BG 1 representing the largest concentration in Davie.
The majority the substandard housing units are considered suitable for rehabilitation, due to the fact that the City's
housing stock was constructed primarily after the 1980's, and severe deterioration has not occurred.

Again, the Town is concerned with its aging mobile home stock. The majority of the units are not wind-storm
rated, meaning they were built prior to Hurricane Andrew in 1992. In fact, the majority are 1980+ models, many of
which have aged in place, since the owners lack the financial resources to renovate or maintain their units.

2006 Rental Housing Surveys

In 2003, the Department of Housing and Community Development established the “base-line” for the median
rental rates, by undertaking a “Rental Housing Survey” of all apartments listed in the Town’s Occupational
License Database. At that time, the median rent was $881. In the Spring of 2006 the Department undertook a new
rental survey to keep track of rental increases, condo conversions, and the number of vacancies. Survey forms
were mailed to all apartment owners/managers, licensed by the Town. The surveys were analyzed, and in order
not to skew the data, the mom-pop type apartments with six or less units, subsidized units, and/or dormitory-type
housing were not included in the calculations. These units are typically smaller, less well maintained, and their
rents reflect less than the current market rates.

The 2006 survey revealed that Davie’s median rent is now $1,341, which represents a 34% increase in rents from
the 2003 Survey. A summary follows:

        Unit                       Davie          HUD              GAP
        Size                       Survey         FMR
        Efficiency                 $ 730          $ 652            ($ 78)
        1-Bedroom                  $ 855          $ 752            ($ 103)
        2-Bedroom                  $ 949          $ 911            ($ 38)
        3-Bedroom                  $1,566         $1,205           ($ 361)
        4-Bedroom                  $2,605         $1,377           ($1,228)

The housing market in South Florida has sky-rocketed, and the prices for all types of housing, significantly
increased in 2004, 2005, and 2006. It is hoped that this new survey will assist the Housing and Community
Development Office in identifying apartments which may still be viewed as affordable for Davie’s Workforce. Also,
the survey data will be provided to the Broward County Housing Authority (BCHA), so that they can request that
HUD increase the FMR’s for this area.

Condo Conversions
                                         # of       One           Two      Three
     Apartment Name & Address            Units    Bedroom       Bedroom   Bedroom       Developer

 Courtyards at Davie f/k/a Davie
 Crossings - 6920 SW 39th Street
 Davie, FL 33314                            219      No           Yes         Yes     Lennar Homes
 Sundance Apts. f/k/a Cedar Key
 2876 S. University Drive                                                             Becker &
 Davie, FL 33328                            180      Yes          Yes         No      Poliakkoff
 Westview Apartments
 5060 SW 64th Avenue                                                                  Ackerman
 Davie, FL 33314                            42       No           Yes         No      Senterfitt

                                                           27
 Gardens at Nova Apts.
 6857 College Court                                                                BF Group, LLC
  Davie, FL 33317                       140     Unknown      Unknown   Unknown     Coral Gables
 Poinciana Lake Apts.
 2600 S. University Drive                                                          BF Group, LLC
 Davie, FL 33328                        208     Unknown      Unknown   Unknown     Coral Gables
 Nova Park Apartments
 6700 Nova Drive
 Davie, FL 33317                         92        No           Yes       No       Nova Park LLD
 Fasano Apartments
 4050 SW 61st Avenue                                                               Fasano
 Davie, FL 33314                         6      Unknown      Unknown   Unknown     Investments

 Total Conversions                      889

2006 Mobile Home Park Survey

During the summer of 2006, the Department of Housing and Community Development mailed-out “Mobile Home
Survey” forms to twenty-five (25) of the thirty-one (31) Mobile Home Parks licensed by the Town’s Occupational
License Office- Development Services Department. Although there are 31 Mobile Home Parks in Davie, four (4)
have no homeowner’s association/office, and two are privately owned communities where each resident owns a
mobile home on an acre of land; therefore, they were not included in this statistical analysis. For example, the
Seminole Health Club, located at 3800 SW 142nd Avenue, 33330 is a nudist colony. In the Orange Park Area
(Western Davie) the following Parks have no homeowner’s association/office; however, there are 305 mobile
homes located in these parks.

    •   Alander Subdivision
    •   Carlan Mobile Home Park
    •   Cinnamon Tree Estates
    •   Saga Estates

The 25 Mobile Home Park Surveys analyzed in 2006, provide an 80% sample of the total of 31 mobile home
Parks in Davie. For statistical purposes, a sampling in excess of 15% is considered to provide a clear picture of
the housing costs. The survey revealed that the lot rents in Davie averaged $445-$468 during 2006, yielding a
median lot rent of $457. According to the last survey in June 2005, the median lot rents were $405. This
represents a 13% increase in lot rents since the last survey.

The purchase prices for mobile homes (both new and used) in 2006 ranged from $2,000 to $103,000; and, the
median purchase price for a mobile home (irrespective of size or width) in 2006 is $38,143. This is in stark
contrast to the 2005 survey which revealed that the purchase price for mobile homes (both new and used) in 2005
ranged from $2,000 to $186,000; and, the median purchase price for a mobile home in 2005 (irrespective of size
or width) was $42,478 which is lower than in 2006. This discrepancy may be due to several factors.

First, Davie was significantly impacted by Hurricane Wilma, and over 832 mobile homes were destroyed. Some
Parks are no longer accepting new units, due to lack of space following the Hurricane, since FEMA located a
number of Commercial Trailers and Mobiles in various Mobile Home Parks in Davie. Finally, the majority of the
mobiles in Davie are older models built in the 1960’s, 1970’s and 1980’s, which do not meet the State Windstorm
Requirements; and, the value of these older models depreciates rapidly.

                                      Mobile Home Survey - May/June - 2006

Mobile Home Park                # of Units              Lot Rents                Sales Prices

American Mobile Homes           44                       $325                    $7,000-$25,000
13281 SW 8th Street
Davie, FL 33325




                                                        28
Cheron Village/ Hometown   202    $670                   $20,000-$30,000
            th
13222 SW 9 Court
Davie, FL 33325

Dell Trailer Park          13      $265                  $5,000
4633 SW 73rd Ave.
Davie, FL 33314

Driftwood Acres Mobile     53     $225                   $25,000- $53,000
4800 Griffin Road
Davie, FL 33314

East Pine Ridge            70      $420                  $16,000- $65,000
4800 S. Pine Island Road
Davie, FL 33328

Everglades Lakes           639    $423-$458              $39,900-$59,900
            nd
2900 SW 52 Ave.
Davie, FL 33314

Garden Park Estates        38      Unknown               Private 1/ac

Grove Park Estates         35     Unknown                Private 1/ac

Kings Manor Estates        297    $549-$554              $20,000- $85,000
12500 State Rd. 84
Davie, FL 3325

Lauderdale/Anchorage       10     $550-$600              $8,000- $22,000
            rd
4681 SW 73 Avenue
Davie, FL 33314

Moonlight Ranches          54      $349                  $10,000- $18,000
4651 Griffin Road
Davie, FL 33314

Orange Blossom             100    $413                   $ 6,000
6651 SW 45th Street
Davie, FL 33314

Orange Park Club, Inc.
Stahl Family Limited       51      $300-$310             Not Applicable
            th
500 SW 130 Avenue
Davie, FL 33325

Palm Haven Mobile Homes    79     $405                   $ 4,000- $58,000
4791 SW 82nd Avenue
Davie, FL 33328

Palma Nova                 878     $420-$435             $ 2,000- $50,000
3020 SW 61st Ave.
Davie, FL 33314


Paradise Village           452    $551 & Up              $60,000- $85,000
12850 State Rd. 84
Davie, FL 33325

Park City                  1201   $51-$74                $69,000-$100,000
8640 SW 20th Street               Maintenance Fees for
Davie, FL 33324                   Common Areas Only

Park City West             332    $460-$640 S/W          $35,000 -110,000
10550 State Road 84               $605-$683 D/W
Davie, FL 33324


                                  29
Ponderosa                          2                      $600 Tenant Occupied     Unknown
            rd
4701 SW 73 Ave.                   16                      $400-Owner Occupied
Davie, FL 33314 Total             18

Rexmere Village                  774                      $555-650                 $20,000-158,900
11300 Rexmere Blvd.
Davie, FL 33325
Riverside                        35                       $290-$300                $20,000-$30,000
4730 SW 46th Lane
Davie, FL 33314

Seminole Health Club             40                       $450                     No Sales
3800 SW 142nd Avenue
Davie, FL 33330

Stirling Mobile Home Park        65                       $455                     No Information Available
5401 Stirling Road
Davie, FL 33314

Sunshine Village                 356                      $525-552                 $15,000-103,000
            th
13453 SW 5 Street
Davie, FL 33325

Swaying Palms                    78                       $451-461                 $12,000- $20,000
4851 Griffin Road
Davie, FL 33314

Twin Lakes Travel Park           374                      $350                     Unknown
3055 Burris Road
Davie, FL 33314

Western Hills Estates             96                      $900-$1000               $29,000-$50,000
            th
13000 SW 5 Court                 310                      $513
Davie, FL 33325                  406

Average Rentals                  6,994                    $445-$468                $21,145-$55,140

Median Rentals/Value                                       $457                    $ 38,143

Housing Affordability - Housing Bubble

The inflated real estate market in South Florida (indeed all of Florida) has given rise to an “affordable housing
crisis”; and, all municipalities are struggling to find workforce housing for their local job markets. A recent study
commissioned by the Broward Housing Partnership found that 75% of all Broward households earn less than
$77,000 per year; but, they would need to earn $91,000 to afford the current median price of $361,100 for a
single-family home. Only 50% of all Broward households earn $50,000, which is needed to purchase a median-
priced Condo @ $193,000.

Over the past two years, most households have been priced out of the housing market, because of the
unprecedented growth in real estate prices. Major gaps exist between what a single-family home costs, and what
most families can afford to pay throughout Broward County.

As noted earlier in this document, in 2006 the median price for a single-family home was $361,100. In order to
purchase a home at that price, a household would have to earn $90,720. The median price for a Condo/
townhome was $193,000; and, a household would have to earn $50,500 to purchase a unit at that price. Looking
at the wages of jobs critical to any county or municipality, there are huge gaps between housing costs and
housing wages. For example, Nurse (RN) earns $50,362; therefore, their purchase price maximum is $192,764,
leaving a gap of $168,336. A Police Officer earns $49,188; therefore, their purchase price maximum is $179,440
leaving a gap of $181,660. Finally, a School Teacher who earns $39,876 can only afford a mortgage of $149,983
leaving a gap of $211,117. Broward County is clearly losing its middle class and its workforce.

The recent phenomena of rental apartments converting to condominiums, and mobile home parks starting to
convert to townhomes, continues to reduce the number and type of housing units available to low/moderate

                                                         30
income families and the majority of the Town’s workforce. Hurricane Wilma also had a devastating affect on the
Town of Davie’s housing stock. The Town’s initial assessment of housing units lost was: 832 Mobile Homes, 51
Single-Family Homes, 33 Townhomes/Condos, and 55 Apartment Units. Subsequent to the Storm, many other
structures, particularly mobile homes became un-occupiable due to mold and mildew infestations, sagging floors,
collapsed roofs, etc.

It has been extremely difficult to rehouse these displaced Davie residents, as there is little to no comparable
affordable replacement housing available to them. Many of the mobile home residents that were displaced by
Wilma were subsequently rehoused in lower-cost rental units. Thus, the rental vacancy rate is now extremely low;
and, many landlords are capitalizing on the demand for units by raising their rents. Additionally, in FY 2005/06 the
Town lost 989 affordable market rate rental apartments due to condo conversions of seven properties, and these
Davie households/families were displaced as they could not qualify for, or afford to purchase, their current unit.

These problems must be tackled at a regional level, with all counties and municipalities working together. The
Town of Davie’s Housing and Community Development Director actively participates in all county-wide Affordable
Housing Task Forces and housing groups, to help design new programs and policies to address the current
housing crisis in South Florida. In 2005, the Housing and Community Development Director was chosen to join
the Broward County Planning Council’s Affordable Housing Ad Hoc Committee.

As stated previously, Davie must continue to address the housing needs of its lower-income residents living in
                                                                                                               1
sub-standard mobile homes. The Town estimates that it has 23,000 residents living in 7,400 mobile homes ,
which represents 24% of the total housing units. There is currently no source of funds available to assist these
mobile home owners to make needed repairs to their homes, since the regulations governing both the CDBG and
SHIP Programs prohibit the use of grant funds to renovate them. Unfortunately, the Government does not
recognize them as “permanent” homes.

Given these constraints, the Town’s strategy for assisting these mobile home occupants, is to provide new
opportunities in Davie for the development of affordable rental and homeownership housing. Our goal is to assist
mobile home occupants via a stair-step approach to wealth-building and economic self-sufficiency by 1) credit
enhancement and repair, 2) subsidized rental housing, 3) down-payment assistance or access to newly built
affordable housing units.

The disproportionately high rental rates in Davie in comparison to other Broward County cities, make it difficult to
find affordable rental units (in good condition), and attract Landlords that will participate in the Section 8 Program.
Because of these factors, many lower-income families have a difficult time finding affordable rental housing,
particularly those families that are “cost-burdened” (paying 30>% of their gross income for rent/utilities).

Although the Town has strengthened its Affordable Housing Incentive Plan three (3) times since it’s inception in
1997, it is still very difficult to find suitable sites that are attractive to both the Town and the developer. The Town
is in the process of developing a Regional Activity Center (RAC) in Eastern Davie which will encourage mixed-use
and mixed-income development; and, the Town recently adopted a Transit Oriented Corridor (TOD) along State
Road 7 in Eastern Davie, which mandates a 15% set-aside of all residential units as affordable housing.

Several years ago, Davie's Housing and Community Development Office spearheaded the development of
Summerlake Apartments on 61st Avenue in the Eastside Target Area (a/k/a Potters Park), which opened in
January 2001. Summerlake contains 108 two and 3-bedroom affordable rental units. The Town used $100,000 of
its SHIP funds to leverage an additional $350,000 for pre-development costs through Broward County’s SHIP
Program. The Town also assisted the developer in obtaining $5.6 Million in Tax-Exempt Bonds from the Housing
Finance Authority of Broward County, and waived $19,750 in permit fees.

Stirling Road Apartments, 250 units of affordable rental housing located on Stirling Road in the Southern Target
Area, opened in the fall of 2000. This project was financed with Federal Low-Income Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC)
and Tax-Exempt Bonds, and contains 2/3-bedroom units. Davie waived impact-fees @ $123,000, and permit fees
@ $19,750 as an incentive for this affordable housing.



1
  7,370 mobile homes x the average household size of 2.64 = 19,456. If the average “family” size of 3.13 were used, it would equal 23,068
individuals living in mobile homes.

                                                                    31
In 2003 and 2004 Davie Town completed Phase I and Phase II of the “Harmony Village Community Initiative”,
which entailed the development of a 4.5 acre parcel in the Southern (Driftwood) Target area into 22 single-family
homes that were sold to first-time home buyers through Habitat for Humanity. In addition to donating the land, the
Town provided over $750,000 for the infrastructure, and waived all fees associated with development. Town
employees, the FBI, and the Miami Dolphins all donated time physically working on the project.

Mobile Home Park Redevelopment – Permanent and Involuntary Displacement of Low Income Residents
and Senior Citizens on Fixed incomes

As a result of increasing land values, several mobile home parks in Davie are proposing to convert their land use
and/or have been sold for the purpose of redevelopment. These actions will result in the permanent and
involuntary displacement of thousands of Davie's lower-income and at-risk residents, including the elderly. Since
the Town has more mobile home parks per capita than any other jurisdiction in South Florida, the pressures of
redevelopment in Davie are far more acute.

24% of Davie's housing stock is comprised of mobile homes, representing 7,400+- units in 31 mobile home parks.
There are varying ownership patterns within Davie's 31 mobile home parks which house approximately 23,000
Davie residents. There are situations where the mobile home owners own their land, where residents rent both
the mobile and the land, and finally where the resident owns the mobile and rents the lot space from the Park.

The majority of these mobile homes are older non-windstorm rated structures; and they are not suitable for
relocation. Even if these mobiles could structurally withstand the moving process, prospective mobile home parks
will likely not take them due to liability issues as most older mobiles are now uninsurable.

While many residents, elderly individuals, and transient "snow-birds" choose to live in mobile homes, most
families and individuals in Davie live there as "housing of last resort". This is due to the fact that the affordable
housing crisis has driven prices so high for both rental apartments and homeownership, that the majority of the
workforce is having trouble locating and sustaining their housing. The foreclosure rates are climbing; and, many
people are now living on the edge of homelessness as housing costs, taxes, and insurance climb - but wages lag
behind. Senior citizens living on a fixed Social Security income are also adversely affected, as any significant
increase in housing costs could result in them becoming homeless.

Davie residents living in mobile home parks as "housing of last resort" are typically families and individuals whose
incomes are very low; and, many have poor credit histories making it difficult to get rental housing since most
landlords now require both a credit check and proof of a bank account. Given the income levels of the majority of
these residents, it is also highly unlikely that they would be credit-worthy buyers.

Moratorium on Redevelopment of Mobile Homes

On 2/21/07, the Davie Town Council adopted Ordinance Number 2007-4 “Moratorium on the acceptance of
development applications for the redevelopment of mobile home parks within the corporate limits of the Town”.

    WHEREAS, several Mobile Home Parks (collectively the "Mobile Home Parks") are located within the Town's
    boundaries; and

    WHEREAS, the Mobile Home Parks serve a critical role in providing affordable housing for those persons
    who live in, and are employed in, the Town; and

    WHEREAS, the existing supply of affordable and workforce housing is insufficient to meet the current demand
    for affordable and workforce housing needs; and

    WHEREAS, the lack of affordable housing in the Town is of particular concern to the residents of the Town’s
    mobile home owners who are being permanently and involuntary displaced as a result of the sale of their
    Mobile Home Parks to developers proposing to change the land use; and

    WHEREAS, the Town finds itself facing increasing pressure concerning the possible redevelopment of Mobile
    Home Parks in the Town, and such redevelopment pressure could result in the loss of critical workforce and
    affordable housing units in the Town; and


                                                         32
WHEREAS, by Resolution R-2006-328, dated December 20, 2006, the Town recognized and declared that
there is an affordable housing crisis in Davie and mobile home residents have no comparable affordable
housing in which to relocate should they lose their residence; and

WHEREAS, the loss of affordable housing provided by the Town's Mobile Home Parks has a detrimental
impact on the existing inventory of affordable housing and its availability for those who work and live in the
Town; and

WHEREAS, the Town recognizes the need to develop comprehensive plan policies, land development
regulations, and programs to preserve the existing stock of affordable housing and increase the availability of
affordable housing for those who live in, and are employed in, the Town; and

WHEREAS, in order to address this need, the Town plans to set up a Mobile Home Task Force, consisting of
Mobile Home Park residents, owners, and those appointees the Council sees fit, to study the problem of a
lack of affordable housing within the Town, and to develop possible solutions; and

WHEREAS, utilization of the moratorium as a temporary measure to facilitate governmental decision-making,
study, and the adoption of comprehensive plan amendments and/or land development regulations, is a
legitimate governmental tool to facilitate logical and considered growth and as a means of avoiding inefficient
and ill-conceived development; and

WHEREAS, the Town has determined that Chapter 723, Florida Statutes does not preempt the Town from
enacting a temporary moratorium by virtue of the Town’s right to accept or deny the approval of site plans for
proposed development within its jurisdictional boundaries; and

WHEREAS, the Town finds it necessary to establish a temporary moratorium on acceptance of development
applications that seek development approvals for the redevelopment of Mobile Home Parks so that the Town
can undertake its study to determine the number of affordable housing units in the Town including Mobile
Home Parks, the population served by the Mobile Home Parks, and the affordable housing needs of those
residents if the Mobile Home Parks are redeveloped; and

WHEREAS, the provisions of this Ordinance are consistent with the Town’s Comprehensive Plan.

Now, therefore, be it ordained by the Town Council of the town of Davie, Florida:

SECTION 1. Recitals. The above recitals are true, correct and incorporated herein by reference.

SECTION 2. Moratorium Imposed. During the time that this Ordinance is in effect as specified herein, there
shall be a moratorium upon the issuance of building permits, acceptance of development applications or
issuance of development orders and development permits, as those terms are defined in Chapter 163, Florida
Statutes (Collectively "Development Orders") within the Town concerning the matter of redevelopment,
modification or conversion of existing Mobile Home Parks to any other use, except as provided herein.

SECTION 3. Exemptions. Exempt from this moratorium is the replacement of mobile homes pursuant to
Section 723.041(4), Florida Statutes.

SECTION 4. Definitions. The following definitions shall be utilized in the application of this Ordinance:

(1) "Mobile Home Park" means any real property that is governed by Chapters 513 and 723, Florida Statutes.

(2) "Mobile Home" has the same definition as set forth in sections 320.0l (2) (a), 513.01(3) and 723.003(3),
Florida Statutes.

(3) “Redevelopment" means the proposed removal, replacement, or demolition of existing mobile homes for
the purpose of installing, building or constructing on the property single family, multi-family, or other structures
other than mobile homes and any appurtenances thereto.




                                                      33
   SECTION 5. Vested Rights. Nothing in this Ordinance shall be construed or applied to abrogate the vested
   right of a property owner of a Mobile Home Park to complete development where the property owner can
   demonstrate each of the following:

   (1) A governmental act of development approval obtained prior to the effective date of this Ordinance:

   (2) Upon which the owner has detrimentally relied, in good faith, by making substantial expenditures: and

   (3) That it would be highly inequitable to deny the property owner the right to complete development.

   Any property owner claiming to have vested rights under this Section must file an application with the Town
   staff for a vested rights determination within 45 days of the effective date of this Ordinance. The application
   shall be accompanied by a fee established by resolution of the Town Council and contain a sworn statement
   as to the basis upon which the vested rights are asserted, together with documentation required by the Town
   and any other documentary evidence supporting the claim. The Town Council shall hold a public hearing on
   the application and based upon the evidence submitted shall make a determination as to whether the property
   owner has established vested rights.

   SECTION 6. Exhaustion of Administrative Remedies. No property owner claiming that this Ordinance as
   applied constitutes or would constitute a temporary or permanent taking of private property or an abrogation
   of vested rights may pursue such claim unless he or she has first exhausted all administrative remedies.

   SECTION 7. Term. The moratorium imposed by this Ordinance is temporary and, unless dissolved earlier by
   the Town Council, shall automatically dissolve in one (1) year unless otherwise extended in accordance with
   applicable law, or upon adoption of new comprehensive plan policies and land development regulations
   concerning affordable housing, the formulation of which shall be expeditiously pursued. Town staff shall
   institute such steps as may be necessary to form the committee to conduct the study to determine what
   specific types of housing are provided by the Mobile Home Parks, including affordable and workforce housing
   and prepare any changes the Town Council directs to amend the Town's comprehensive plan and land
   development regulations to address the lack of adequate affordable housing and the loss of existing
   affordable housing caused by the redevelopment of Mobile Home Parks.

   SECTION 8. Severability. The provisions of this Ordinance are declared to be severable and if any section,
   sentence, clause or phrase of this Ordinance shall for any reason be held to be invalid or unconstitutional,
   such decisions shall not affect the validity of the remaining sections, sentences, clauses, and phrases of this
   Ordinance but shall remain in effect, it being the legislative intent that this Ordinance shall stand
   notwithstanding the invalidity of any part.

   SECTION 9. Effective Date. This Ordinance shall be effective immediately upon its passage and adoption.

Mobile Home Task Force (MHTF)

In addition to adopting the one-year Moratorium, the Davie Town Council, via Resolution 2007-71 adopted on
February 21, 2007, established a Mobile Home Task Force (MHTF) for the stated purpose of “studying, and
adopting a solution to Affordable Housing Problems within the Town exacerbated by the displacement of mobile
home residents….”. At that time, the Town Council recognized that:

       1) Mobile Home Parks serve a critical role in providing affordable housing for those persons who live in
       and are employed in the Town;

       2) The existing supply of attainable, affordable and workforce housing is insufficient to meet the current
       demand for affordable and workforce housing;

       3) The Town finds itself facing increasing pressure concerning the possible redevelopment of Mobile
       Home Parks in the Town, and such redevelopment pressure could result in the loss of critical workforce
       and affordable housing units in the Town;

       4) The loss of affordable housing provided by the Town’s Mobile Home Parks has a detrimental impact on
       the existing inventory of affordable housing and its availability for those who work and live in the Town;

                                                       34
        5) The Town recognizes the need to develop comprehensive plan policies, land development regulations
        and programs to preserve the existing stock of affordable housing and increase the availability of
        affordable housing for those who live in and are employed in the Town.

Additionally, the Town set-aside $45,000 for this study, and the Town entered into contract with Carras
Community Investment Inc. The MHTF is meeting every two (2) weeks to develop viable recommendations and
“best-practices”, with the intent of holding a Town Council Workshop in September or October 2007.

Davie's Lack of Affordable Housing:

The average purchase price of a newly constructed home in Davie in May of 2005 was $424,980 as evidenced by
the Florida New Business Report using the "Doc Stamps" recorded for each residential real-estate transaction in
Davie. A 2006 rental survey undertaken by the Town's Housing and Community Development Department,
revealed that Davie’s median rent is now $1,341. This represents a 34% increase in rents from the 2003 Survey
when rents were stable at $881. These prices are hardly affordable to the average working family or senior
citizens on fixed-incomes, much less to those earning less than 80% of the median income in Broward County.

In stark contrast to these high housing costs, is the fact that the median mobile home lot rent in Davie in 2006 was
only $457 monthly, which is considered "affordable". The gap between the median rent for an apartment @
$1,341 and the mobile home lot rent of $457 is $884 per month. This means that most mobile home owners could
not afford to move into the rental market, and few are likely to qualify to purchase a site-built home. In addition,
the mobile home owner enjoys a lifestyle with a separate lot in which children can play and pets can be
accommodated; so, comparing rentals to mobile homes is like comparing apples and oranges.

Disproportionately High Rental Rates in Davie:

The disproportionately high rental rates in Davie in comparison to other Broward County cities, make it difficult to
find affordable rental units (in good condition), and attract landlords that will participate in the Section 8 Housing
Voucher Program, which assists low-income residents with their rental payment. Because of these factors, many
lower-income families have a difficult time finding affordable rental housing, particularly those families that are
“cost-burdened” i.e., who are paying 30%> of their gross income for rent/utilities. Many of the mobile home
residents that were displaced by Hurricane Wilma were subsequently rehoused in lower-cost rental units. The
rental vacancy rate is now extremely low; and, many landlords are capitalizing on the demand for units by raising
their rents.

Davie's Not-For-Profit Partners See Increase in Demand for Services:

The Housing and Community Development Department works closely with its not-for-profit partners, the Hope
Outreach Center, the EASE Foundation, and the Family Success Center (FSC) who provide emergency financial
assistance to prevent homelessness. These agencies have seen a significant increase in the demand for their
services, especially following Hurricane Wilma.

Also, many families are facing undue economic hardships which put them at-risk of becoming homeless, as they
struggle to make ends meet. The eviction and foreclosure rates are climbing along with taxes and insurance
costs; and, without the case-management and the financial assistance provided by these three (3) agencies,
many Davie families and individuals would lose their homes. Sadly, the demand for their services far outweighs
the funding available to them; so, they cannot address all of the needs of Davie's fixed-income and at-risk
populations.

Public and Assisted Housing (BCHA)

The Town has an excellent working relationship with the Broward County Housing Authority (BCHA), which is
evidenced by the partnership formed to address the quality of life for the residents of Ehlinger Apartments, located
at 7481 N.W. 33rd Street in the Southern Target Area a/k/a Driftwood. The BCHA recently repainted all 100 units,
upgraded the landscaping, and provided new entrance signage.

The primary “quality of life” complaint from the tenants in Ehlinger Apartments, was the lack of air-conditioning;
therefore, Davie provided $225,000 in CDBG funds which were used to match the Housing Authority’s CGP

                                                         35
funds, for the installation of central air-conditioning at Ehlinger Apartments. This project was complete in 2003;
and, the tenants are now enjoying an improved quality of life. The Town is also working on plans to expand and
beautify SW 33rd Street, which leads into the Ehlinger complex.

In FY 2005/06 both Ehlinger and Griffin Gardens Apartments were refurbished. New security screening/
surveillance devices were installed at Griffin Gardens. The Town waived all Building Permit and related fees, for
work done under the auspices of the BCHA. The BCHA also determines the eligibility of tenants, inspects units,
and pays rent subsidies for El Jardin Apartments, a privately-owned Section 8 Moderate Rehabilitation Family
Rental Project with 232 units, located at 3300 El Jardin Drive. The Broward County Housing Authority also owns
and operates the Griffin Gardens Apartments, 100 units of Elderly and Disabled Rental Housing located at 4881
Griffin Road. This is a well maintained housing complex; and, no complaints have been received regarding the
living conditions at this site.

The current flat rents at Davie’s two (2) public housing projects follow:

        Project                           Units            1 Bdrm           2Bdrm         3Bdrm
        Ehlinger Apartments (Family)      100              N/A              $545          $652
        Griffin Gardens (Elderly)         100              $495             $595          N/A

The BCHA administers 4,749 Section 8 Vouchers; and, the Tenant Based Program has 340 families on the
Waiting List, which has been closed for 45 months. They also administer 586 Public Housing Units; and, have 371
families on that Waiting List which has been closed for 15 months. The need for rental assistance in Broward
County is critical; and, the Town is very pleased that the BCHA is exploring all options to expand its portfolio of
rental housing opportunities.

For example, the Town and the BCHA are exploring the redevelopment of Ehlinger Apartments to add additional
rental units. Hurricane Wilma damaged/destroyed 4 units; and, since the new Boys and Girls Club facility was
developed adjacent to the project, they no longer need the community facilities at Ehlinger. These buildings could
be demolished to pave the way for the new construction of 30 rental units. This project is still in the planning
phases, but promises to be a wonderful opportunity to provide desperately needed affordable hosing to Davie
residents. This project is contained in the PHA’s 5 Year Plan for Fiscal Years 2005-2009, as a “mixed-finance”
development. They are requesting HUD approval for “Demolition/ Disposition” for Ehlinger Apartments FL
29PO790002, with an application for submitted on Sept. 1, 2006.

The Town is also working with the BCHA on getting approval to increase the Section 8 FMR’s based on the
Town’s recent Rental Housing Survey. The rents in Davie are extraordinarily high, making it difficult for many
landlords to participate in the Section 8 program due to the large gap between the FMR’s and the current post-
Wilma rental increases.

Comprehensive Grant Program (CGP)

Both of the public housing projects owned by the Broward County Housing Authority (BCHA) were constructed
post-1975, and are in sound structural condition but require minor improvements and upgrades to enhance the
quality of life for the existing residents.

The BCHA’s Action Plan for 2005-2009 identifies the following funds for Davie’s two housing projects:

        Year             Ehlinger Apartments               Griffin Gardens Apts
        Funded           (FL29-2A)                         (FL29-6)
        2007             $ 50,000                          $154,200
        2008             $      0                          $165,000
        2009             $      0                          $425,000
        2010             $200,000                          $0
        2011             $ 70,000                          $215,000

The United States Department of HUD classifies all public housing authorities as either “troubled” or “non-
troubled”, and we are delighted to report that the BCHA is a top-producing and well run agency.



                                                          36
Areas with Concentrations of Minority Groups

As previously indicated, the Town of Davie does not formally define an “area of minority concentration.”; however,
for the purposes of this Plan an “area of minority concentration” is a Census Block Group with a total number of
racial/ethnic minorities (Black, Hispanic, Asian) that form 20% or more of the total number of households in a
Census Block Group. According to the 2000 Census population data for Davie, 4.6% are Black, 18.8% are
Hispanic, 2.8% Asian, and 2.9% are “Other”.

In 1990 the only area of minority concentration in Davie is CT 705 BG 2. That block group is composed of 20%
Black households, and is located in the extreme southeastern portion of the Town in the Potters Park Area.

Areas with Concentrations of Low and Moderate-Income Families

When the first Consolidated Plan was prepared in 1997, an analysis of the Town's demographic profile was
undertaken, to identify concentrations of low and moderate-income persons and minority residents. This was
done for the purpose of defining specific geographic areas where the federal resources could be allocated in a
manner that would provide the highest level of benefit to those in need of assistance.

Traditionally, geographic areas are targeted to receive CDBG funds if more than half (51%) of the households in
any given census tract or block group, contain low- to moderate-income persons. As previously indicated,
low/moderate-income levels are measured HUD based on the total adjusted annual gross income of a household,
as measured by household size.

The term low-income is used to define families who earn 50%< of the area median income, while moderate-
income is defined as those households whose income does not exceed 80% of the median income level. The
annual median income level for the Ft. Lauderdale Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) for 2007 is $58,200.

Since the Town of Davie did not qualify under the traditional 51% low- and moderate- benefit rule i.e., requiring
that more that one-half of the residents in any given census tract/block group be low- and moderate-income,
"quartile" data analysis (utilizing 1990 Census data), was undertaken. This analysis revealed the specific census
tracts and block groups in Davie that contain the highest concentrations of persons whose incomes are at or
below 80% of the median income, and who would qualify for assistance under the CDBG Program.

Public and Assisted Housing

A review of the Housing Authority's Section 8 Certificate/Voucher distribution list (updated through 4/30/02),
revealed that the Authority is administering 298 Section 8 rental units in the Town of Davie as follows: 37 one
bedroom units; 246 two bedroom units; 15 three bedroom units. The unit distribution by bedroom type indicates
that the 1-bedroom units represent only 12.4% of the total Section 8 units administered by the BCHA in Davie,
while the 2-bedroom units represent 82.6%, and the 3-bedroom units represent 3%.

Thus, the preponderance of the Section 8 units administered in the Davie are for families i.e., 85.9% of the total
units. This illustrates the need for affordable family rental housing. In addition to the Section 8 and Public Housing
units administered by the Broward County Housing Authority, Jewish Federation of South Florida owns 80 units of
Elderly rental housing

                                  Affordable Housing Projects Located in Davie

Project Name/Address                      # of units      Unit Type                 Funding Source
Harmony Village: NW 32 Place               10 units       Single-family             Habitat/SHIP
Potters Park: 4278 SW 56 Avenue             1 unit        Single-family             Habitat/SHIP
Potters Park:4291 SW 56th Avenue            1 unit        Single-family             Broward CDBG
Potters Park: 5740 SW 44th Street           1 unit        Single-family             Broward CDBG
Potters Park 5655-5650 SW 43rd Street       4 units       Single-family             Davie CRA
Nova Park: 6940 Nova Drive                 92 units       Multi-family              Bond Financed
Stirling Road Apts: 6401 Stirling Road    250 units       Multi-family              Tax Credit/Bond
Summerlake Apartments:61st Avenue         108 units       Family Rental             Tax Exempt Bond
Elinger Apartments: 7481 NW 33rd Street   100 units       Family Rental             Public Housing
Griffin Gardens:4881 Griffin Road         100 units       Elderly Rental            Public Housing
El Jardin Apts:3300 El Jardin Drive       232 units       Family Rental             Section 8 Mod.

                                                         37
Section 202/Section 8 Housing for the Elderly:

B’NAI B’RITH Apts                        299 S.W. Third Avenue, Deerfield Beach   Phone:   426-5577
Hurley Hall                              632 N.W. First Street                    Phone:   454-0855
Federation Plaza                         3081 Taft Street, Hollywood              Phone:   989-7555
Federation Gardens                       5010 Nob Hill Rd, Sunrise                Phone:   746-7960
Hillmont Gardens                         2001 N.W. Ninth Avenue, Ft. Lauderdale   Phone:   462-2310
Federation Gardens                       5701 S.W. 82nd Avenue, Davie             Phone:   434-9666
Gateway Terrace                          1943 N.E. Sixth Court, Ft. Lauderdale    Phone:   463-6721
St. Elizabeth Gardens                    801 N.E. 33rd Street, Pompano Beach      Phone:   941-4597
ST. Joseph Towers                        3475 N.W. 30th Street Lauderdale Lakes   Phone:   485-5150

Addressing Other Special Needs

As previously indicated, there are 100 units of public housing for elderly/disabled residents in Davie that are
owned and operated by the Broward County Housing Authority (BCHA). The Jewish Federation of South Florida
operates 80 units of elderly rental housing. In addition to publicly assisted housing for people with special needs,
there are many Nursing Homes, Adult Living Facilities (ALF), and Group Homes in Davie serving the needs of the
elderly, frail-elderly, and disabled persons. The following represents facilities in Davie that were licensed as of
May 2007:

                           Nursing Homes, Adult Living Facilities, & Group Homes

Facility                          Address                         Zip              Telephone
BARC Housing, Inc.                2750 S.W. 75th Avenue B         33314            (954) 746-9400
Davies Country Living             5540 S.W. 64th Avenue           33314            (954) 792-8878
Day Star, Inc.                    3800 S.W. 124th Avenue          33330           (954) 473-0167
God’s VIP Senior Haven, Ltd.      4681 S.W. 66th Avenue           33314            (954) 581-9111
Joan’s Group Home                 7740 N.W. 40th Street           33314           (954) 435-2407
Teen Challenge of Florida, Inc.   13601 S.W. 26th Street          33325            (954) 434-1613
United Cerebral Palsy Home-3      6041 S.W. 36th Court #A         33314            (954) 797-8681
United Cerebral Palsy Home-4      6601 S.W. 41st Street           33314            (954) 584-5710
United Cerebral Palsy Broward     4251 S.W. 61st Avenue           33314            (954) 792-3746
Victoria Villas                   5151 S.W. 61st Avenue           33314            (954) 791-8881
Lucanus Developmental Center      13854 S Garden Cove Cir         33325            (954) 981-4019
L & J Retirement Home             5540 S.W. 64 Ave                33314            (954) 792-8878
Absolute Rehabilitation Corp      14024 N Cypress Cove Circle     33325           (954) 588-1453
Helmut Group Homes, Inc. 4098 SW 82 Ter                   33328           (305) 931-1931
Lulu's Group Home II, Inc. 1740 SW 150 Lane               33324           (954) 816-3203
St Hilda's Home Care, Inc. 4250 SW 53 Ave          33314          (954) 583-8638
Sunrise Community, Inc.           8430 SW 55 Ct                   33328            (305) 596-9040
Victoria Manor, Inc.              11150 SW 42 Ct          33328           (954) 236-8660
Whispering Oaks                   4100 NW 77 Ave.         33024           (954) 450-6012

Additional Homestead Exemption for Persons 65 and Older in Davie

In November 2001 the Town of Davie adopted important legislation to assist elderly homeowners whose gross
income is less than $20,000 per year, by providing an additional Homestead Exemption from Ad Valorem Taxes
levied by the town for persons 65 and older. The Town hopes that this will relieve some of the financial burden felt
by Davie's senior residents regarding their housing costs.

State Housing Incentive Partnership Program (SHIP)

In 1997, the Town of Davie became an “entitlement” recipient of State Housing Incentive Partnership Program
(SHIP) funds from the State of Florida, which was created by the Sadowski Act. On April 1, 1998, the Town
Council unanimously adopted the Town’s Affordable Housing Incentive Strategy; and, the Broward County Local
Housing Assistance Plan (LHAP) was amended to include the Town of Davie. Although Davie falls under the
County’s LHAP, the Town determines how it’s proportionate share of SHIP grant funds are allocated, and retains
oversight of the Town’s housing programs and initiatives.

                                                        38
It should be noted that the Town of Davie has modified/amended its Affordable Housing Incentive Plan three (3)
times to expand the nature and type of “incentives” to encourage the development of workforce and affordable
housing. The Town, since inception, waives all fees for an affordable housing unit, except Water/Sewer Impact
fees which cannot be waived. Davie does however, pay for such impact fees using SHIP funds.

Sixty-five percent (65%) of the Broward County LHAP funds are reserved for owner-occupied housing including
construction, rehabilitation, purchase assistance and lease-purchase financing. The remaining 35% of the funds
are available for rental housing assistance. The required matching funds for the SHIP Program are derived from
the County’s federal HOME Program.

In FY 2005/06 forty-nine (49) applications were processed and forwarded to the Broward County Office of
Housing Finance (OHF) who is contracted to administer Davie’s SHIP-funded Home Repair Program. Of the
applicants, 21 were very low income, 17 were low income and 11 were moderate income. A total of 23 applicants
were female heads of household, of which 12 were very low income, 7 were low income, and 4 were moderate
income heads of household.

Fifteen (15) homes were renovated between October 1, 2005 and September 30, 2006 i.e., 13 Home Repair
Grants and 2 Barrier-Free Grants were completed; and, 7 homes are currently under construction. Of the 15
homes completed, 6 were occupied by female heads-of-household.

It should be noted, that following Hurricane Wilma in October 2005, the demand for CDBG/SHIP-Funded Home
Repair Grants dropped significantly. This was due to the fact that many homeowners received either a FEMA
claim or and insurance settlement (or both) to make needed home repairs resulting from hurricane damage.

The Town assisted four (4) income-eligible victims of the Arrowhead Condominium fire of 2003, who did not have
“content insurance” for their units. Due to failure of the Condo Association to fully insure the building, the
individually-owned units did not have coverage for the kitchen cabinets, sinks, bathroom fixtures, ceiling fans, etc;
so, $40,820 in CDBG funds was allocated to Antol Restoration, Inc on behalf of four (4) income eligible clients.
These families were finally able to return to their homes in September 2006, three (3) years following the fire.
Three (3) of the four income-eligible families received financial assistance through the Town’s not-for-profit
partners due to the undue economic hardship they faced by paying maintenance fees during their time of
displacement. This action, funded in part through the Town’s Public Service component, prevented the
foreclosure of these families by the Homeowners Association.

Homeless Facilities

In March 1995 the Broward Coalition for the Homeless prepared and published a document entitled Building
Bridges of Opportunity: Assembling a Continuum of Care for the Homeless in Broward County. This document
was updated in final form in June of 1996, and provides up-to-date information regarding the existing services and
facilities serving the homeless in the Broward County area. It updates and supplements the 1993 Broward County
Task Force for the Homeless base report.

According to the Homeless Survey conducted by Broward County in February/March 2000 by the Cooperative
Feeding Program (Lisa Margolis) there are 5,070 homeless persons in Broward County. Of the 1,690 individuals
surveyed 579 (42%) of the individuals were staying in emergency/ transitional shelter, and 795 (58%) were
staying in substandard living conditions.707 (47%) were chronic substance abusers, and 477 (32%) were
seriously mentally ill. 27 (0.2%) were elderly. Of persons in families with children, 140 (72%) indicated that they
were staying in emergency/ transitional shelter; and, 54 (28%) were staying in substandard living conditions. 58
(35%) were chronic substance abusers; and, 35 (20%) were seriously mentally Ill. 356 of those were youth.

Standard information sources, such as the Broward Coalition's Annual Survey outlined above, did not indicate that
there were any homeless persons recorded within the Town of Davie. Additionally, the 2000 Census Shelter and
Street (S-Night) enumeration reported “0" homeless persons in Davie. As a result, the Homeless and Special
Needs Populations in Davie are based on this information. However, as was previously indicated, 6-8 homeless
males have been seen in the Downtown Davie area, and post-Hurricane Wilma, other families have lived in their
cars, tents, or in other non-traditional housing. The Town’s Housing and Community Development Office and it’s
not-for-profit partners have worked hard to re-house displaced individuals, and prevent homelessness through
homeless prevention programs.

                                                         39
The 400-bed Housing Assistance Center (HAC) located on Sunrise Blvd. opened in 1999 and provides a
multitude of services to the homeless. It is the single largest facility serving Broward's homeless population. The
Salvation Army facility located on Broward Blvd. in Ft. Lauderdale is also a large multi-purpose facility serving the
homeless. It houses 166 men, women and children. 132 emergency beds are available on a first come first-
served basis for two days at a time (longer for families). Thirty-four (34) beds are available for transitional housing
up to sixty (60) days, @ $8.00 per night. Families may be referred to the Salvation Army's south Broward facility
for up to 24 months.

Emergency Shelters

The 200-bed HAC located at 920 N.W. 7th Avenue in Fort Lauderdale is the single largest emergency shelter
serving Broward’s homeless population. Homeless individuals can stay in the HAC for up to 60 days.

The Salvation Army facility located at 1445 Broward Boulevard, Fort Lauderdale, Florida (954) 524-6991 is the
largest "multi-purpose facility" serving the homeless. It houses 166 men, women and children; and, has 132
emergency beds are available on a first come first-served basis for two days at a time (longer for families). Thirty-
four (34) beds are available for transitional housing up to 60 days @ $8.00 per night. Other Emergency Shelter
Facilities in Broward County include:

    •   Broward Outreach                                             90 Beds
        2056 Scott Street, Hollywood 33020
        (954) 926-7417

    •   Broward Partnership for the Homeless                       200 Beds
        920 NW 7th Ave., Ft. Lauderdale
        (954) 779-3990

    •   Cosac Foundation/Helping People in America                   50 Beds
        1203 N. Federal Highway, Hollywood 33020
        (954) 964-0123

    •   Covenant House Florida (Kids in Crisis)                    104 Beds
        733 Breakers Avenue, Ft. Laud. 33304
        (954) 561-5559

    •   Deeper Life                                                  10 Beds
        1527 Argyle Drive, Ft. Laud. 33312
        (954) 462-5364

    •   Shadowwood (HIV/AIDS)                                        40 Beds (36 male/4 female)
        307 SW 5th Street, Ft. Laud. 33315
        (954) 462-3719

    •   Shepherd’s Way                                               80 Beds
        1232 NE 26th St., Wilton Manors 33305
        (954) 524-4638

    •   Women in Distress                                            63 Beds (female)
        1153 South Andrews Ave., Ft. Laud. 33316
        (954) 760-9800

Transitional Housing

Transitional housing customarily includes support services to address one or more of the underlying causes of
homelessness, and permits a length of stay of up to 24 months. According to the 1996 report there are twenty
nine (29) agencies providing transitional housing in the Broward County area, 18 of which are located in the
central area, where Davie is located. The 1996 inventory of "beds by need" including beds and services for the
homeless, follows:
                                                          40
   •    Families                    82 beds
   •    Mentally Ill               212 beds
   •    Substance Abuse            438 beds
   •    HIV+                        71 beds
   •    Veterans                    12 beds
   •    Corrections                 87 beds
   •    Medical                     20 beds
   •    Unspecified                132 beds
   •    Unwed mothers               32 beds
   •    Youth (under 21)            16 beds
                                 1,102 beds

Permanent Affordable and Supported Housing

Supported housing is traditionally linked to the service provider agency or agencies giving the support. In some
cases, supported housing reduces the needs for traditional transitional housing for clients. There are recent
models of supported independent living, where the actual housing is separate from the service. The case worker
comes to the housing site (normally in group clusters), and the client visits medical professionals at out-patient
clinics. In many cases this offers a greater degree of residential stability and encourages independent living.

As of 1995 there were 16,678 subsidized housing units in Broward County including Public Housing, Section 8
housing and privately owned and subsidized units. There are 150 Section 8 units in place serving homeless
families. There are six (6) local housing authorities in Broward County: Dania, Deerfield Beach, Ft. Lauderdale,
Hollywood, Pompano Beach, and the Broward County Housing Authority (BCHA) which covers the remaining
municipalities and unincorporated areas.

The BCHA owns and operates 200 units of public housing in the Town of Davie (100 units elderly/disabled, and
100 units for families), and manages 232 units of Section 8 Moderate Rehabilitation subsidized rental units for
families. Additionally the BCHA administers 284 Section 8 certificates/Vouchers in the Town of Davie.

The following is a list of facilities and services available to these homeless persons residing in the Broward
County area:

       • BCHA-Section 8               150 beds        Families
       • BCHA - Section 8              50 beds        Mentally Ill
       • BCHA Shelter +               100 beds        Homeless mentally Ill
       • Volunteers of America         19 beds        Mentally Ill
       • The Commons                    9 beds        Mentally Ill Families
       • The Commons                    9 beds        HIV+
                                      337 beds

Special Needs Facilities and Services

Individuals defined as having special needs include the elderly, the frail elderly, persons with disabilities (mental,
physical, or developmental), persons with alcohol or other drug addiction, persons with HIV/AIDS and their
families, and residents of public housing. The Broward County area has a multitude of agencies that provide
services to these special needs populations. Additionally, there are several agencies located within the Town of
Davie that provide quality social services at little or no charge to Davie residents.

This section of the Housing Market Analysis provides an overview of the number and type of facilities and
services that are currently available to Davie residents, and identifies known gaps in existing service delivery.

Elderly Service Providers and Facilities

The State of Florida Agency for Healthcare Administration, reports that there are currently 209 Adult Living
Facilities (ALF's) in Broward County, with a total of 8,418 beds. ALF's traditionally provide housing for persons


                                                         41
who are quasi-independent and ambulatory, but who may require assistance with bathing, grooming, medications,
preparation of meals, and laundry.

Of the 209 ALF's located throughout Broward County, 34 offer extended care and/or nursing services to 1,634
residents. 40 offer limited mental healthcare to 1,206 persons; and, 13 offer a combination of extended
congregate care and limited nursing services for 236 persons. Seventy-three (73) of these facilities reserve a
number of their beds specifically for clients whose incomes are supplemented by the State.

Although Davie residents can avail themselves of the many facilities in the Broward County area, the Town hosts
several facilities that are designed to meet the specific needs of this segment of the population. The State of
Florida Agency for Health Care Administration, is responsible for licensing Adult Living Facilities. According to
their records, there are two licensed ALF’s in the Town of Davie, (as of May 19, 1997), as follows:

      • L & J Retirement Home         5540 SW 64th Avenue 16 beds       (954) 792-8878
      • God's VIP Senior Haven        4681 SW 66th Avenue 19 Beds       (954) 581-9111

Retirement/Nursing Homes

Nursing homes generally provide care for persons who are no longer ambulatory and who require intensive
supervision and medical care. There are 34 licensed nursing homes in Broward County with a total of 3,046
beds. Two of these facilities are located in the Town of Davie, as follows:

      • Day Star Nursing Home on Flamingo Road
      • Christian Science Nursing Care Facility located at 3800 Flamingo Road

In addition to ALF and nursing home care, there are other services available to frail elderly residents of Davie.
Some examples of existing services include:

      • Hope Outreach Center, Inc., 4700 SW 64th Avenue, Davie, shopping assistance to home-bound elderly
        persons & limited transportation to medical appointments, etc.
      • Share A Meal Inc., 2071 SW 70th Avenue #421.
      • The Central West Senior Center operated by Catholic Community Services.
      • The Steven Danzinger Community Center, 4642 Davie Road.

Mental Health Providers

A wide range of mental health support services are available in the Broward County area, including: psychiatric
care, case management, individual and group counseling, adult day treatment, assisted job training and
placement, activities of daily living skills and training, and General Education Diploma (GED) preparation. The
Nova Southeastern University Geriatric Institute is located in the Town of Davie at 4800 North State Road 7.

Other facilities providing mental health services include:

•       Henderson Mental Health Center, Inc., Davie Branch
        3301 College Avenue, Davie, FL. 33314 (954) 731-5100
        Central Branch, 330 S.W. 27th Avenue, Fort Lauderdale, FL. (954) 791-4300

•       Archways Supported Housing Project & Psychological Rehabilitation Center
        919 N.E. 13th Street, Fort Lauderdale, FL. 33304 (954) 763-2030

•       Volunteers of America of Florida,
        5190 N.W. 167th Street, Suite 281, Hialeah, FL. 33014 (305) 621-0882
        19 supported housing units & apartments (Pompano Beach & Ft. Lauderdale)

•       Broward County Elderly & Veterans Services Dept.
        2995 North Dixie Highway,
        Fort Lauderdale, FL. 33334, (954) 537-2936
        In-home services to veterans and persons over the age of 60, plus respite care.

                                                         42
•         P.E.E.R Center, Inc. (Personal Empowerment, Education and Recreation)
          4545 N.W. 9th Avenue, Oakland Park, FL. 33309 (954) 202-7379
          Crisis intervention and housing assistance.

Developmental Disabilities

The Broward Adult Rehabilitation Center (BARC), formerly known as the Broward Association of Retarded
Citizens, operates an Interim Care Facility (ICF) for Developmentally Disabled Adults, at their facility located at
2750 SW 75 Avenue in Davie. BARC has three (3) buildings each housing 12 clients, for a total of 36 beds.
Additionally, Sunrise Community Center located at 5450 Stirling Road provides a structured workshop for
developmentally disabled individuals.

The Foundation for Learning, 1357 So. University Drive in Plantation is a non-profit agency providing residential,
vocational, & supported independent living services to the developmentally disabled.

Project Stable, 5790 SW 130th Avenue in Ft. Lauderdale also provides special programs for the mentally
challenged, including alternative education, at-risk drop-out prevention, and summer camps.

Davie has a number of group homes that serve various special needs populations including physically and/or
mentally disabled individuals. According to the State Department of Children and Families, the following list
represents those group homes in Davie that were licensed as of May 1997:
                                                                      2
Group Homes Serving the Developmentally Disabled

       • Stirling Road Apt's,                     4100 NW 77 Ave.                15 adults
       • Jones Group Home,                        740 NW 40 St.                    6 adults
       • Sunrise Opportunities, Inc.              8430 SW 55th Court               6 adults
       • United Cerebral Palsy,                   4251 SW 61 Ave.                  6 adults
       • United Cerebral Palsy #4,                6601 SW 41 St.                 15 children
       • United Cerebral Palsy #3,                6041 SW 36 Ct.                   5 adults

The community facilities are generally located in the eastern portion of Davie.

Inventory of Other Group Homes

A review of the Occupational Licenses for the Town of Davie revealed that the following agencies are operating in
Davie:

       • Diane Harper Group Home,                 6890 SW 57 Avenue                            8
       • Wesley Group Home                        6500 SW 47 Avenue                        12
       • BARC Housing                             2750 SW 75 Avenue                        36
                                                                                           56

Persons with HIV/AIDS and their Families

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development provides grant funds under the Housing Opportunities
for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) Program that is designed to meet the special housing needs of persons living
with AIDS, and their families. The HOPWA regulations require that the most populous municipal jurisdiction within
each urban county area, administer the HOPWA Program on behalf of all the municipal jurisdictions contained


2 Source: Bill Doble, Fla. Dept. of Children and Families, Aging and Adult Services, 5/20/97

                                                                     43
therein. The City of Ft. Lauderdale's Community Development Division administers the HOPWA funds for all of
Broward County, which includes Davie.

The City of Ft. Lauderdale has not furnished the Town with information on its current allocation of HOPWA funds;
however, it is our understanding that the HOPWA application submitted to HUD encompasses the following
activities which are designed to meet the needs of all persons with AIDS, including Davie residents:

      •   emergency financial assistance (short-term transitional housing)
      •   outreach and education services
      •   Adult living facilities (ALF’s) long-term housing
      •   direct client assistance to prevent homelessness (rent arrearages and utilities)
      •   substance abuse treatment
      •   home companion and “buddy” services
      •   mental health counseling
      •   independent housing (funding for the acquisition and/or renovation of long-term housing)

We believe that the following list represents the current HOPWA Contract Providers:

      •   Broward House - Ft. Lauderdale
      •   Center One - Ft. Lauderdale
      •   Poverello Center, Inc. - Wilton Manors
      •   Shadowood II, Inc. - Ft. Lauderdale
      •   Sunshine Health Center - Pompano Beach
      •   Think Life - Ft. Lauderdale

In addition, the HIV/AIDS Support Services, (765-5364), provides supportive housing.

Homeless Services

Since there are very few undomiciled homeless persons in Davie, the Town’s focus is on homeless prevention
programs, credit enhancement and counseling, and economic self-sufficiency programs designed to keep people
employed and adequately housed (i.e. not cost-burdened). The problem of homelessness is generally viewed as
a regional problem that is best handled with regional solutions and strategies. The Town's Housing and
Community Development Office compiled a listing of all homeless service providers, so that appropriate referrals
can be made when needed.

The Emergency Assistance Service Effort (EASE) Program currently located at 6700 Orange Drive, Davie, (954)
797-1097, provides information/referrals, has a food and a clothing bank available to homeless persons and those
at-risk of becoming homeless. Each year, the Davie Town Council approves a Sub-Recipient Agreement with the
HOPE Outreach Center a 501 (c) (3) faith-based not-for-profit organization serving Davie’s lower-income families,
through the Town’s Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program.
                                                                              th
In June 2007 the Town acquired the JENNMAR Building located at 4700 SW 64 Avenue, to become the Town’s
first Neighborhood Service Center (NSC) One-Stop-Social Service Center. This collaboration between the Town’s
not-for-profit partners, Broward County, et. al., represents “one-stop-shopping” for Davie residents seeking
housing and related assistance.

Since the JENNMAR building is located on a public transportation route and the Town’s new Community Transit
route, residents have convenient access to a myriad of social, public, and housing services.

The Hope Outreach Center, Inc. has traditionally provided: information & referrals, food pantry, support groups &
counseling, youth enrichment programs, elderly visitation and companionship, tutoring/mentoring for children &
families, and general social services. Under the terms of the Town's CDBG Sub-Recipient Agreement, Hope
Outreach created an “Emergency Assistance Program/Homeless Prevention” which includes the provision of
emergency financial assistance on a Town-wide basis to eligible lower-income Davie residents, to prevent
homelessness and/or address emergency situations such as the need for food, shelter, transportation, health
care, on a case-by-case basis; including, but not limited to:


                                                         44
        •   homeless prevention (rental/mortgage assistance)
        •   food vouchers (e.g. Publix, Winn-Dixie, Sadano’s),
        •   emergency utility bill payments (electric, water, sewer, gas),
        •   bus passes/special transportation,
        •   clothing/ school uniform vouchers, and
        •   child-care subsidies
        •   assistance with food stamps
        •   Workforce One employment station

According to Helen Shinners, Hope Outreach’s Executive Director, their organization is “Reaching Out for Davie
Residents Who Fall Between the Cracks”; and, she hopes to enhance the quality of life for the “marginalized”
residents of Davie. Last year, the Center served 700 families, who are now on the road to self-sufficiency. This
was made possible with the help of over 120 volunteers who contributed 11,000 hours of service.

Alcohol/Drug Treatment Facilities and Services

According to the Florida Department of Children and Families, Aging and Adult Services, there are two licensed
facilities in the Town of Davie (as of May 1997), that provide alcohol and substance abuse treatment services:

    •       Lifeline of Miami, 6570 Griffin Road, Suite 104 (Detox and out-patient services)
    •       Recovery Resources, 6915 Stirling Road (Outpatient services)

    Other facilities located outside of the Town, but that serve Davie residents include:

    •       Alcohol & Drug Abuse Services (formerly BARC), 1011 SW 2nd Street, Ft Lauderdale (954) 765-4200 or
            Central Treatment Center (954) 831-1553 in Pompano Beach.

    •       Henderson Mental Health Center, Inc., services for dually diagnosed (psychiatric and substance abuse)
            (954) 791-4300. Outreach Program, Contact: (954) 462-3330

    •       Dual Diagnosis Day Program, 5460 No. State Road 7, Suite 101, Ft. Lauderdale 485-7882, and
            Individual/Group Therapy 791-4300 or 731-1000

Social Service Providers in Davie

There are several excellent not-for-profit social service providers located in the Town of Davie, many of whom
serve special needs and at risk population populations. As a part of the pre-development phase of the
Consolidated Plan, one-on-one interviews were performed with many social service and housing providers, in an
attempt to identify the existing level of services, and determine the gaps in service delivery. One objective of this
process was to develop a comprehensive master listing of the various service providers and the scope of services
available to Davie residents. A synopsis of the providers follows:

•   Hope Outreach Center, Inc. Helen Shinners and Sister Germana, 4700 SW 64th Avenue, Davie, (954) 321-
    0909. Information and referral, emergency assistance, food pantry, advocacy and a “mentoring” program.
    Services to the elderly include shopping assistance and limited transportation to medical appointments, etc.
    Additionally, they operate an after-school program, i.e., a children’s enrichment program at Palma Nova
    (Silver Oaks) Mobile Home Community.

•   Emergency Assistance Service Effort (EASE) Linda Owen, Program Coordinator, 6700 Orange Drive. Food,
    clothing, emergency and referral services (954) 797-1077.

•   Hope Crisis Pregnancy Center Nancy McDonald, 3700 Davie Road (SW 64th Avenue), Davie, (954) 581-
    6991, Crisis pregnancy counseling, lifestyle and post-abortion counseling, pregnancy tests, baby clothing and
    baby food/formula, social service referrals.

•   Broward County Family Success Center (Potter Park) Financial assistance and family counseling is provided
    at this facility which is located adjacent to the Potter Park Multi-Purpose Facility


                                                             45
•   NOVA Mental Health Clinic 3301 College Avenue, Davie, Fl 33134, Dr. Ana Martinez, (954) 262-5730
    Individual and group mental health counseling and medical services.

•   David Posnack Jewish Community Center 5850 Pine Island Road, Davie, (954) 434-0499. Cultural,
    recreational and educational center. Preschool and after school programs, summer camp, fitness facility
    pool, tennis, racquetball, Holocaust Learning Center, classes for children and adults.

•   Work Force One Employment Center of So. Broward 7500 Davie Road Extension, Hollywood, (954) 967-
    1010. Unemployment compensation and claims, benefits, work registration, and Veteran services counseling.

Other Social Service Providers

Other service providers located outside of the Town that serve Davie residents, follows:

•   Broward County Family Success Center Program - Broward County has three (3) centers, including a Davie
    office in Eastern Davie at the Potter Park Multi-Purpose Facility. This office will be relocated and expanded at
    the new Neighborhood Service Center (One-Stop-Shop) on Davie Road (64 Ave.).

•   United Way of Broward County 1300 So. Andrews Avenue, Ft. Lauderdale, (954) 462-4850

•   Joe DiMaggio Children Hospital - Mobile Health Center - Anna Airy, RN.

Hospitals

•   Plantation General Hospital 401 NW 42nd Avenue, Plantation, (954) 587-5010

•   Westside Regional Medical Center 8201 West Broward Blvd., Plantation, (954) 437-6600

•   Memorial West 703 North Flamingo Road, Pembroke Pines, 33023, (954) 436-5000

•   Proposed – New facility at Nova Southeastern University (NSU) in Davie.

Clinics

•   Cleveland Clinic (Florida-Weston) 3100 Weston Road, Weston, 33331 (954) 689-5000, Services:
    Comprehensive medical and surgical care for insured patients.

Schools/University

•   NOVA Southeastern University. 3301 College Avenue, Davie, 33314 (954) 262-7870

•   University School of NOVA Southeastern University 3301 College Avenue, Sonken Bldg., Ft. Lauderdale,
    (954) 262-4506 Services: Pre K - Grade 12 and college preparatory programs

•   Florida Atlantic University 2912 College Avenue, Davie, 33314 (954) 236-1000

•   Florida International University, 16957 Sheridan Street, Pembroke Pines, 33331 (954) 201-3608

•   Broward Community College, 3501 SW Davie Road, Davie, 33314 (954) 201-6500

Continuum of Care for Homeless Assistance and Prevention:

Since homeless persons in Broward County are concentrated in the older communities of Pompano Beach, Fort
Lauderdale, and Hollywood, where the majority of services to the homeless are provided, the problem of
homelessness is viewed as a regional problem that requires regional solutions. The Town’s Housing and
Community Development Director works closely with the Broward Homeless Initiatives Board and the Homeless
Partnership in developing the annual Continuum of Care For the Homeless application; and, the Town promotes
county-wide strategies and efforts aimed at addressing homelessness.

                                                        46
The Cooperative Feeding Program conducted a survey of homeless persons in Broward County In February-
March 2000, and 1,690 surveys were collected from 1,374 individuals and 194 from persons in families with
children. Using a multiplier of “3” to compensate for under-counting, the Homeless Partnership estimates that, as
of March 2000, there were 5,070 homeless persons in Broward County. Of the individuals interviewed (non-
family), 42% indicated that they were staying in emergency/transitional shelters, and 58% said they were staying
in substandard housing conditions. Of the families with children present, 72% were staying in emergency or
transitional shelters, and 28% were staying in substandard housing conditions.

Although the 2000 Census Shelter/Street Night Enumeration showed no homeless persons in Davie, in 2007 the
Davie CRA and the Housing and Community Development Office noted 6-8 homeless persons in downtown
Davie near Orange Drive and Davie Road. The County’s Homeless Task Force was immediately called in for an
“intervention”; and, they visited the homeless encampment at night to render assistance and referrals to these
individuals.

Data from social service providers indicates that there are a significant number of lower-income individuals and
families at-risk of becoming homeless i.e., they are in marginal financial situations (paying greater than 30-50% of
their gross income for housing related costs). There are 1,348 households in Davie (7.6% of the total households)
who earn less than 30% of the median income. This segment of the population needs both rental assistance, and
appropriate sized units, to prevent them from becoming homeless.

The following is a synopsis of the Town’s homeless initiatives:

      • The Town's Housing and Community Development Office, responding to an urgent need in the
        community, developed an in-house Emergency Assistance/Homeless Prevention Grant Program in 2007.
        During the time this program was operated, seven (7) foreclosure actions against low-income Davie
        residents were halted or prevented, fifteen (15) evictions were halter or prevented, and one family (who
        was living in a tent) was housed in a new affordable rental unit.

      • Since 2001, the Town of Davie has partnered with the Hope Outreach Center, to provide emergency
        assistance to Davie's homeless or residents who are at-risk of homelessness, to address the need for
        emergency food, shelter, medication, etc. This program replaced the one previously provided by the
        Town’s Housing and CD Staff. Each year, the Sub-Recipient Agreement has been expanded to
        encompass more services and serve a growing clientele. In 2006, the Hope Outreach Center served
        700+- at-risk residents.

      • On June 3, 1998, the Davie Town Council adopted Resolution 98-180 urging the Florida Legislature and
        the Governor to enable Broward County to use one (1) cent of its local option motor fuel taxes to address
        the needs of homeless men, women, children, and families in Broward County.

      • Each year (since 1998), the Town endorsed the County’s annual SuperNOFA Continuum of Care
        application for HUD funds, and pledged its support through the in-kind contributions of the Housing and
        Community Development Director, to assist in County-wide homeless efforts.

      • A comprehensive referral list was developed for persons requiring assistance through the new HAC or
        other support services for the homeless, or those facing homelessness.

      • The Town’s Housing and Community Development Office works closely with the E.A.S.E. Foundation,
        Hope Outreach Inc., the County’s Family Success Center, and the local Clergy in referring clients for
        emergency assistance e.g. rent and utility payments, for those threatened with homelessness.

      • In 2005, using General Funds and Endowment Funds, the Town created its own Neighborhood
        Revitalization Program (NRP) within the Dept. of Housing and Community Development, which is now
        staffed by a Program Coordinator and two (2) Neighborhood Resource Specialists. In 2006, that program
        staff made 27,000+- referrals to service providers for special needs and at-risk populations.

      • The Town works closely with the agencies serving the Broward County area in addressing emergency
        shelter and transitional housing needs, and helping homeless individuals make the transition to
        permanent housing.
                                                        47
Other Special Needs:

As previously indicated, there are 100 units of public housing for elderly and/or disabled individuals in Davie, that
are owned and operated by the Broward County Housing Authority (BCHA), and the Jewish Federation of South
Florida operates 80 units of elderly rental housing.

In addition to publicly assisted housing for people with special needs, there are many Nursing Homes, Adult
Living Facilities (ALF), and Group Homes in Davie serving the needs of the elderly, frail elderly, and disabled
persons. The following represents facilities in Davie that were licensed as of May 2002:

FACILITY                           ADDRESS                        ZIP              TELEPHONE
Barc Housing, Inc.                 2750 S.W. 75th Avenue B        33314            (954) 746-9400
Davies Country Living              5540 S.W. 64th Avenue          33314            (305) 792-8878
Day Star, Inc.                     3800 S.W. 124th Avenue         33330            (305) 473-0167
Elite Home Health, Inc.            7320 Griffin Road, #223        33314            (954) 581-8700
God’s VIP Senior Haven, Ltd.       4681 S.W. 66th Avenue          33314            (954) 581-9111
Health Care Respiratory, Inc.      7000 S.W. 22 Court #153        33317            (954) 474-7251
Joans Group Home                   7740 N.W. 40th Street          33314            (954) Unknown
Med Tech Private Care, Inc.        5400 S. Univ. Dr. #205         33328            (954) 434-1613
Med Tech Svs. of So. Florida       5400 S. Univ. Dr. #207a        33328            (954) 434-4341
Med-Psych Health Care Svs, Inc.    7900 Nova Drive, #200          33324            (954) 424-7577
Medical Asso. Consultants, Inc.    5400 S. Univ. Dr. #112a        33328            (954) 252-9500
Personal Touch Home Care           8001 S.W. 36th Street, #8      33328            (954) 474-4140
South FL Physical Therapy Assoc.   4491 State Road 7 #208         33314            (954) 434-4341
Spectra care of South Florida      4970 S.W. 52nd St #325         33314            (954) 791-7301
Teen Challenge of Florida, Inc.    13601 S.W. 26th Street         33325            (954) 434-1613
United Cerebral Palsy Home-3       6041 S.W. 36th Court #A        33314            (305) 797-8681
United Cerebral Palsy Home-4       6601 S.W. 41st Street          33314            (305) 584-5710
United Cerebral Palsy of Broward   4251 S.W. 61st Avenue          33314            (305) 792-3746
United Medical Consultants, Inc    5400 S. Univ. Dr. 417J         33328            (954) 252-0109
Victoria Villa                     5151 S.W. 61st Avenue          33314            (305) 791-8881

The needs of persons living with AIDS, are generally met through the Housing Opportunities for Persons With
AIDS (HOPWA) Program. The City of Ft. Lauderdale administers the HOPWA funds for the Broward County area,
which includes Davie. The Town’s Housing and Community Development Director served on the RFP Selection
Committee for the 2001/02 HOPWA funds.

Available Resources

Surprisingly, the primary funding source for the projects and activities outlined in this Consolidated Plan are not
the Town's CDBG funds. This is because the Town successfully uses its CDBG funds to leverage other local and
non-local funds, which serve as a catalyst for revitalization and redevelopment. The Davie Town Council,
recognizing the growing demand for services to Davie’s lower-income and at-risk residents, sets aside both
General Funds and Community Endowment Funds, for the Housing and Community Development Department to
run a myriad of neighborhood revitalization, self-sufficiency, and at-risk youth programs. The Town has been
successful in leveraging funds and services from: Memorial Healthcare Systems (MHS), the Children’s Services
Council of Broward County, the Broward County Family Success Center, the FBI, Home Depot, and 50/50
matching grants for Davie CDBG projects from various sources.

In June 2002, Broward County, along with several eligible municipalities formed a Consortium to receive federal
grant funds from U.S. HUD under the Home Investment Partnership (HOME) Program. These funds can be used
for the purchase, rehabilitation, and new construction of affordable multi-family and single-family housing for lower
income families. Broward County’s Office of Community Development administers and monitors the Grant
Program on behalf of the local municipalities in the Consortium; however, the Town retains authority over the use
of its allotted HOME funds. Davie’s Housing & Community Development Office coordinates all such housing
activities. Davie’s HOME funds are currently being used for down-payment assistance to first-time home-buyers.

A variety of financing options and opportunities are also available to the Town of Davie, which include (but are not
limited to) the following:


                                                           48
Local Programs:

Community Endowment Fund The Town of Davie has an Endowment Fund which was established many years
ago to undertake social or public services determined to be needed by the residents. Each year, the Davie Town
Council allocates funds to charitable organizations which assist Davie residents. Davie’s faith-based not-for-profit
partners, the Hope Outreach Center and the EASE Foundation, have been successful in receiving this funding
source. The Community Endowment Fund also finances the Neighborhood Revitalization Program (NRP), and
matched from the CDBG funds for the Orange Park At-Risk Youth Program in western Davie.

Neighborhood Revitalization Task Force: The Neighborhood Revitalization Task Force, chaired by the Housing
& Community Development Director, helps identify needs within the CDBG Target Areas, address specifically
identified issues, and develop strategies to meet the long-term needs of each area over the Five-year period
covered by the Town’s Consolidated Plan. Davie’s Code Compliance and Community Oriented Policing Officers
play a crucial role in this process, as they are the “eyes and ears” of the neighborhoods. These individuals have
the opportunity to interact with the residents at the grass-roots level. The "Neighborhood Revitalization Task
Force" concentrates on:

      •   improved housing conditions and affordable housing opportunities
      •   infrastructure improvements - streets, public facilities, water, sewer, etc.
      •   crime prevention and gang-activity abatement
      •   improved social conditions and social services
      •   job creation and retention opportunities
      •   health and welfare issues
      •   aesthetic improvements - code compliance, clearance, etc.

Community Oriented Policing (COP’s) Program: Davie has a Community Oriented Policing Program, and has
assigned “Neighborhood Officers” to areas that coincide with the CDBG Target Areas. When the new Boys &
Girls Club facility opened in the “Harmony Village Community”, a Field Office for the Police Officer was included.
The Town’s Housing and Community Development Director works closely with these COP’s so that they can
collaborate on strategies and resources to address neighborhood needs and revitalization efforts.

Tax Increment Revenues (TIF): Enabled by State Statute 163, the Community Redevelopment Act (CRA),
provides the major source of funding for redevelopment projects. TIF is 95% of the difference between: the
amount of ad valorem taxes levied each year by each applicable taxing authority on property within the
redevelopment area; and, the amount of ad valorem taxes that would have been produced by the current mileage
rates prior to establishment of the Redevelopment Trust Fund. (Both are exclusive of debt service millage). Since
the Eastern CDBG Area, encompasses the Town’s CRA district, TIF funds are used in conjunction with CDBG
funds, to address needs identified in that neighborhood.

Redevelopment Revenue Bonds: Florida Statute 163.385 allows the Town’s CRA, to issue "Revenue Bonds" to
finance redevelopment actions, with the security based on the "anticipated assessed valuation of the completed
community redevelopment.” In this way, additional annual taxes generated within the CRA Area, and the "tax
increment" are used to finance the long-term bond debt. Prior to the issuance of long-term revenue bonds, the
CRA may issue bond anticipation notes to provide up-front funding for redevelopment actions until sufficient tax
increment funds are available to amortize a bond issue.

General Revenue Bonds: The Town can also issue General Obligation (Revenue) Bonds that are secured by
debt service millage on the real property within the City and must receive voter approval.

Industrial Revenue Bonds: IRBs are used to finance industrial, and commercial projects, with emphasis on the
creation of jobs. As a consequence, speculative ventures are not normally financed by this means. IRB’s are
typically issued by the county, with repayment pledged against the revenue of the private enterprise being funded.
IRB's are tax exempt and several percentage points below prevailing interest rates. Such financing has been
used effectively in South Florida.

Federal Programs:

Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) Program: HUD provides grant funds under the HOPWA
Program to meet the housing needs of persons living with AIDS. The City of Ft. Lauderdale administers the
                                                            49
HOPWA funds for Broward County. As a result of the Town’s expression of interest in the HOPWA process,
Davie’s Housing & CD Director served on the FY 2001/02 RFP Selection Committee, to ensure that Davie
residents were given equal access to all HOPWA services and activities. Since that time however, the City of Ft.
Lauderdale has failed to notify, or involve, the Town in any HOPWA activities. The Town would like to receive
reports identifying any Davie residents served.

HUD Homeless Continuum of Care Initiatives- SuperNOFA funds: The Broward Homeless Initiatives Partnership
submitted an application under the SuperNOFA for homeless assistance to serve the entire Broward County area.
If funded, this will provide services for the County’s homeless. Davie’s Housing and Community Development
Director participates in their annual “Planning Day” event to formulate the response to HUD’s Continuum of Care
RFP.

State Programs:

State Housing Initiatives Partnership Program (SHIP): In 1997, the Town also became an “entitlement” recipient
of State grant funds under the SHIP Program. The Broward County Office of Housing Finance assists the Town in
administering its SHIP Program, under the terms of an InterLocal-Agreement; and, the Town’s SHIP funds are
currently directed toward the following:

          •   Single-Family Home Repair/Housing Rehabilitation Program
          •   Single-Family New Construction (townhomes and condos)
          •   Town-Wide Purchase Assistance - First-Time Homebuyer Program
          •   New Construction of Affordable Rental Housing
          •   Barrier-Free Rehabilitation
          •   Fee Waivers & Water/Sewer Impact Fees

Housing Finance Authority of Broward County: the FHA provides Tax Exempt Bond Financing for affordable rental
projects. Two (2) projects have been funded in Davie using these bonds: Stirling Road Apartments (Phases I and
II), with 350 units, and Summerlake Apartments, which received a $5.6 Million allocation in March 2000 to build
108 units.

The Federal Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC): is part of the 1986 Tax Reform Act and allows corporations
to finance housing developments to receive a dollar for dollar reduction in income tax liability in exchange for the
developer's acquisition and substantial rehabilitation or new construction of low-income rental housing. Lenders
are secure in providing bridge, construction and permanent financing since the tax credits are available and
designed to pay down the loans. Stirling Road Apartments located in the Southern Target Area, is subsidized
using these funds.

The State Apartment Incentive Loan (SAIL) Program: Funds to provide construction/permanent financing for
rental projects, with 15-year, non-amortizing loans at a 9% interest rate, with a 3 percent base. Projects are
reviewed annually to determine if the cash flow is sufficient to pay the rate. The interest payments may be
deferred; and, at the end of the 15 year term, the principal balance and any deferred interest become due. A
waiver may be granted for the deferred interest portion. The developer of the project, who is the direct recipient of
the funds, must sign a land use restriction agreement to keep the units affordable.

Other:

Davie Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA): The Davie CRA works closely with the Town’s H & CD Office
to build affordable single-family homes in the Eastside Neighborhood of Davie (Potters Park Area). The land is
provided at no charge (donated by the CRA) to eligible home buyers, and conventional mortgages are
supplemented by a SHIP grant to cover down-payment assistance and closing costs. In 2006, four (4) new Key-
West Style 2-story homes were completed and occupied. Hurricane Wilma significantly delayed this project, and
caused the construction costs to increase. Rather than allow the deal to die-on-the-vine, both the CRA and the
Town stepped-up to the plate with added subsidy, to complete the units. Additionally, the Davie CRA is working
hard to develop true mixed use, mixed-income projects, and asks all developers to set-aside 20% of their
residential units as workforce/affordable housing.

Broward County Housing Authority (BCHA): The BCHA owns and operates two (2) public housing projects in
Davie (100 units of family rental housing, and 100 units of elderly and disabled housing). They also manage 232
                                                         50
units of privately owned rental housing (funded under the Section 8 Moderate Rehabilitation Program). The BCHA
also administers 342 Section 8 Rental Certificates in the Town. The BCHA and the Town are currently working on
a joint venture to provide central air-conditioning in Ehlinger Apartments as part of the Town's "Harmony Village
Community" initiative.

Boys and Girls Club of Broward – The Town has a very close working relationship with the Broward County Boys
and Girls Club; and, and Davie is the only municipality to host three (3) fully staffed facilities. The Rick and Rita
Case Club in Driftwood (southern Davie) opened in 2004, the Florence DeGeorge Unit in Western Davie opened
in 2005, and in 2006 the new Admirals Club opened in northeast Davie. This new Club is tailored to the
burgeoning marine industry, by training teens to repair yachts, become First-mates, etc.

Comprehensive Grant Program (CGP): The Broward County Housing Authority (BCHA) participates in the CGP
Program, which addresses the needs of public housing facilities. As indicated above, the BCHA is working closely
with the Town on improvements to the Ehlinger Apartments, a family rental housing project.

Federal Bureau of Investigation – The Housing and Community Development Office works with the Miami FBI
Office on community initiatives and at-risk youth programs. The H & CD Director is one of the inaugural graduates
of the FBI Citizens Academy, which has formed it’s own not-for-profit entity. The FBI Alumni Academy sponsors
at-risk teens to go through the FBI’s Junior Academy, by providing scholarships for low-income students. In 2005,
three (3) of Davies at-risk teens graduated from this program. FBI Agents and FBI personnel also volunteered to
work on the Harmony Village Initiative i.e., the Habitat homes.

HUD Housing Programs: Private housing developers can take advantage of programs such as the Section 202
Program for the elderly or the Section 811 Program for persons with special needs.

Habitat for Humanity, Inc.: The Town works closely with Habitat for Humanity of Broward Inc., in developing
single-family homes for lower-income families. The Town donated a 4.2 acre parcel in the Southern Target Area
a/k/a Driftwood to Habitat for Humanity to develop 22 new single-family homes. Completed in 2005/06, this site is
immediately adjacent to the 10 homes constructed by Habitat in 1996-98. Five (5) Habitat homes were also
constructed in the "Potters Park" area of Davie in 2001-2004.

Memorial Healthcare Systems (MHS): This is a unique hospital system that undertakes community initiatives in
order to establish “health communities”. They understand that it takes more than traditional healthcare to improve
a neighborhood. MHS has matched the Towns CEF’s for two (2) separate neighborhood initiatives. The PILOT
Demonstration Program was in the Driftwood CDBG Target Area; and, the second program was in the Eastern
Target Area. In each case, MHS provided 50% of the salary for a Neighborhood Program Coordinator, and also
funded all refreshments for community meetings, supplies and equipment. The value of each grant was
approximately $78,000. In each Target Area, the top three (3) needs identified by the residents were funded and
accomplished. This program paved the way for the Town’s Neighborhood Revitalization Programs in the Housing
and Community Development Dept funded by the community chest endowment.

Salvation Army: The Salvation Army, located at 1445 West Broward Boulevard in Ft. Lauderdale, is one of the
primary service providers for homeless individuals and families in the Broward County area. The Salvation Army
provides emergency and transitional housing for men, women, and families.

Social Service Agencies: There are several not-for-profit social service providers in Davie, many of whom serve
special needs populations. The Town will continue to support these agencies, so that information/referrals can be
made expeditiously. The primary social service agencies in Davie are:

    •   Broward County Family Success Center (FSC), the Town works closely with the Broward Human
        Services Department to case-manage at-risk Davie families and individuals. In 2003/04 Davie opened it’s
        1st Family Success Center in Potter Park in Eastern Davie. The Town donates the facility to the County,
        and used CDBG funds to renovate it for their use.

    •   Hope Outreach Center, 4700 SW 64th Avenue, information/referral, emergency services, food pantry,
        advocacy, children’s enrichment program (Palma Nova Mobile Home Park), shopping assistance, and
        limited transportation for elderly residents. This agency is next to the Housing and Community
        Development Office, providing one-stop-shopping for Davie’s lower-income families in need of
        assistance.

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    •   Emergency Assistance Service Effort (EASE), located near Town Hall on Orange Drive, provides
        information and referrals, emergency assistance, food, and clothing.

    •   Hope Crisis Pregnancy Center, 2215 So. University Drive in the Promenade West, (581-6991) provides
        crisis counseling, lifestyle and post-abortion counseling, pregnancy tests, baby clothing and baby
        food/formula, social service referrals.

Private Institutions: The Town has established close working relationships with several lenders, realtors,
developers, and landlords, and will continue to cultivate these professional relationships, and expand
opportunities for other public-private partnerships to work with the Town on these initiatives.

Land Use Controls and Growth Limits

All local governments in Florida must prepare and adopt a comprehensive plan in accordance with Chapter 163 of
the Florida Statutes. The Act establishes the local comprehensive plan as the primary instrument for regulating
land use in Florida. After the adoption of local land development regulations, all local development orders must be
consistent with the plan. The Town of Davie's Comprehensive Plan, adopted in July 1989, consists of seven Plan
elements. The adopted components constitute Town policy in each of the 7 prescribed subject areas for
managing future urban growth in Davie.

The Housing Element provides the framework for the housing needs of the current and future population of the
Town. The element establishes a goal, objectives, and policies aimed at meeting these needs, including the
needs of housing for low- and moderate-income households. It also presents policies and programs aimed at
attaining the housing goal and objectives.

Specific objectives and policies in the current element include:

OBJECTIVE 4: Permit housing for low- and moderate-income families, mobile homes, and specialized housing
opportunities in a wide range of residential categories of the Future Land Use Plan.

Policy 4-1: Review and evaluate the Future Land Use Plan and amendments thereto to insure that housing for
low- and moderate-income families and mobile homes are adequately provided for in the residential category.

OBJECTIVE 6: Formulate a Housing Implementation Program.

Policy 6-1: Compile and monitor the programs and efforts herein described and referenced.

Policy 6-2: Review regulatory and permitting processes for improvement and/or streamlining.

There is a wide range of land use regulations affecting the provision of affordable housing for low- and moderate-
income households. However, it is usually difficult to quantify the impact on housing costs.

Moreover, various regulations have been put in place to achieve a public purpose of some type. For example, in
order to preserve the ranch lifestyle in western Davie, development densities for residential uses west of Nob Hill
are very low. Although these land use controls may achieve the public purpose of preserving a heritage and
lifestyle that is associated with the Town of Davie, this exclusivity has the negative impact of reducing the amount
of land available for affordable housing. Affordable housing, from a market perspective, can only be constructed
largely in eastern Davie due to the large one acre lots zoned in the west.

Land Development Code

The Town of Davie Land Development Code allows for a variety of residential zoning districts that permit very low
to medium high density residential development up to 16 units per gross acre. The higher density residential
districts assist in the construction of more affordable housing, as the amount of land required, a major cost of
housing development, is reduced at higher densities.

In the same light, mobile homes are also permitted within Davie and this also provides another means for low-
and moderate-income households to obtain affordable housing. Further, mixed uses within the same building are

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permitted in the western theme downtown area. This increases affordable housing opportunities in primarily non-
residential areas.

The Land Development Code does not permit land use development options which are cost-saving land-use
methods, such as cluster development, Planned Area Development, and zero-lot-line housing. A cluster
development maintains the overall subdivision gross density but allows for higher net density through reduced lot
sizes. This leaves more private open spaces. The technique has the advantage of lowering costs by reducing lot
sizes and by reducing the amount of land subject to site improvements.

In addition, a Planned Area Development (PAD), also referred to as Planned Unit Development (PUD), is also a
useful cost saving technique and makes use of clustering. This technique features overall development
regulations but allows flexibility in the size of buildings and the housing mix. A PAD calls for varying lot and
housing size to provide a mixture of housing. However, the practical minimum size for this type of development is
20 acres or more. The maximum density permitted may be increased by 15 percent for each development tract
that incorporates an equivalent percentage of government subsidized low- and/or moderate-income housing.

Finally, zero-lot-line is a design technique that is particularly advantageous in small lot developments. Allowing a
side of the house to be on the lot line creates one useful side yard, thereby providing some of the benefits of a
larger lot. Privacy can be ensured through placement of fences and windows. This type of development allows for
reduced per-unit costs.

Unlike the cluster and PAD approaches, zero-lot-line developments generally involve higher overall densities
rather than simple redistribution within a given level of gross density. Zero-lot-line developments make available
needed housing at a more affordable cost. Although zero-lot-line housing is not permitted per se, a compromise
lot-line house is permitted, which requires a reduced setback to 5 feet from the lot line.

Affordable Housing Incentive Plan - Synopsis of Incentives as Amended April 5, 2006

Incentive #1 - Affordable Housing Definition

Housing is considered affordable when the monthly rents or monthly mortgage payments, including taxes and
insurance, do not exceed 30% of an amount representing the percentage of the area’s median annual gross
income for the household, and housing for which a household devotes more that 30% of its income shall be
deemed affordable if the institutional first mortgage lender is satisfied that the household can afford mortgage
payments in excess of the 30% benchmark or, for rental housing, rents do not exceed those limits adjusted for
bedroom size published annually by the Florida Housing Finance Corporation.”

This definition conforms to the statutory definition of affordable housing under the Sadowski Act, and is consistent
with the definition used by both the Broward County Community Development Division, and the Broward County
Office of Housing Finance (OHF), which administers the County’s SHIP Program funds.

Additionally, in 1997, the Town of Davie became an “entitlement recipient” of federal Community Development
Block Grant (CDBG) Funds which principally benefit persons that earn up to 80% of the median income level. The
U.S. Department of HUD also defines “affordable housing” to be housing in which the occupant pays no more
than 30% of their adjusted gross income for rent plus utilities, or mortgage (PITI) plus utilities. This is generally
consistent with the SHIP Program definition.

Incentive #2 - Expediting Permits

The State Statutes require that the “processing of approvals of development orders or permits, as defined in State
Statute 163.3164(7) and (8), for affordable housing projects be expedited to a greater degree than other projects”.

Based on this requirement, the Town’s Housing and Community Development Director was assigned to guide
affordable housing developers through the permitting process; and, affordable housing projects/ initiatives will be
expedited to a greater degree than all other projects in Davie.

The Housing and Community Development Director works closely with the Planning and Zoning Director, Town
Engineer, and the Town’s Chief Building Official to ensure that any “glitches” in the permitting process for
affordable housing initiatives are resolved in an expeditious manner.

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Resolution 98-110 adopted on April 1, 1998 was amended by Resolution 98-175 on May 20, 1998 to effectuate
these changes.

Incentive #3 - Modification of Impact, Building Permit, and Related Fees (Restated 4/5/06)

In order to attract qualified developers of Affordable Workforce Housing, Davie’s Affordable Housing Incentive
Strategy (Plan) was amended as follows: “The Director of Housing and Community Development will carefully
review all prospective affordable housing projects, to verify their level of benefit and period of affordability. The
waiver of all fees e.g., Park and Recreation Impact fees, Design Review and Site Plan Processing Fees,
Engineering Review Fees, Building Permit Fees, etc., will be based on this review. It is acknowledged that the
only fee that may not be waived for Affordable Workforce Housing is Water and Sewer Impact Fees; however,
nothing prohibits the use of the Town’s SHIP or HOME funds to pay these impact fees in order to reduce the cost
of the housing. Deed restrictions or other covenants may be required of all developers to ensure that the level and
period (length) of affordability is maintained.”

Davie’s Affordable Housing Incentive Strategy (Plan) is also hereby amended and restated to reflect that “An
Affordable Housing Certification will be issued by the Housing and Community Development Director, if
appropriate; and, Affordable Housing Flex Units (AFU’s) and/or Flex in Reserve Units will be allocated based on
this Certification Process.”

Incentive #4 - Parking and Set-Back Requirements

There are currently no parking impact fees or metered parking in the Town of Davie; and, set-back requirements
are established in the Town Code for all residential developments.

In those instances where there is vacant property that may not conform to Code requirements (e.g. lot width and
set-back requirements), but which would otherwise prove suitable for the development of affordable housing, the
Director of the Development Services Department could “administratively waive” certain requirements to
effectuate affordable housing e.g., the construction of a new single-family home on a “non-conforming” lot.

Section 12-308 (B) (1) of the Land Development Code currently allows the Town Administrator and/or designee to
approve “non-use special permit requests” through a written administrative decision. This process allows
administrative approval for minor deviations from the provisions of the Town Code of Ordinances for rear set-
backs, building separations, height limitations, and the number of parking spaces.

This administrative process is currently limited to approving: set-back requirements for principal or accessory
buildings or structures, the spacing requirement between principal and accessory buildings, and the height of a
building or structure, if they are not increased by more than ten (10) percent of that which is permitted by the
Code. Additionally the Code permits the administrative approval on the number of parking spaces required, if not
reduced by more than twenty (20) percent of the Code.

Davie’s Affordable Housing Advisory Committee recommended that Section 12-308 (b) (1) of the Davie Town
Code be amended to permit a waiver of up to twenty-five percent (25%) of that which is permitted by Code, for
affordable housing initiatives only. This incentive will allow the development of in-fill single family homes on
vacant property not otherwise suited for development, and could significantly lower the cost of housing, since the
land acquisition costs should be minimal. This recommendation requires a formal amendment to the Town Code.

The Committee also supported the spatial deconcentration of affordable housing units, and recommended the
integration of affordable housing units into existing neighborhoods in a cohesive manner, allowing all residents the
same amenities and opportunities for a quality life-style.

In regard to parking requirements, national precedents have been set regarding parking variances or reduced
requirements for certain types of affordable housing developments. The majority of elderly projects require fewer
parking spaces, since many older individuals, particularly those in public housing projects, have already given up
their driving privileges.




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Each prospective affordable housing project will be reviewed by the Town’s Housing and Community
Development Director; and, based on the target population to be served and the period of affordability, will make
a recommendation on the reduction in parking requirements, if warranted.

Incentive #5 - Review of Proposed Policies and Procedures on Housing Costs

The Davie Land Development Code, Section 12 Article X “Planning and Development”, guides the processing and
granting of rezoning, special permits, variances and vacations or abandonment’s of right-of-way in a manner
consistent with the Town of Davie’s Comprehensive Plan. Section 12-320 through 12-359 established the
“Development Review Procedures” for the Town.

The Development Services Director currently reviews all items that relate to growth management, and attends all
Town Council and related meetings where proposed policies or procedures would be presented for consideration.
The Development Services Department of the Town of Davie encompasses the following Divisions: Building,
Occupational Licensing, Planning & Zoning, Engineering, and Code Compliance. The Development Services
Director will identify those proposed policies, procedures, plans, etc., that may impact the development of
housing, and forward such to the Town’s Housing and Community Development Director for review and comment.

The Housing and Community Development Director will ensure that such proposed action does not negatively
impact housing costs or produce a barrier to affordable housing, does not create potential impediments to fair
housing choices and other impacts on the provision of affordable housing, and is consistent with the Town’s
adopted Consolidated Plan for Federal Funds. The Planning and Zoning Director will work closely with the
Housing and Community Development Director to assure consistency with the Town’s Comprehensive Plan.

The Town’s Housing and Community Development Director shall review all proposed policies, procedures, plans,
etc., that may impact the development of housing, in order to ensure that such proposed action is consistent with
the Town’s adopted Consolidated Plan for Federal Funds, and does not negatively impact housing costs or
produce a barrier to affordable housing. The Housing and Community Development Director will identify any
potential impediments to fair housing choices and other impacts on the provision of affordable housing. The
Planning and Zoning Director will work closely with the Housing and Community Development Director to ensure
consistency with the Town’s Comprehensive Plan.

The Director of Housing and Community Development will carefully review all prospective affordable housing
projects to verify their level of benefit and period of affordability, and recommend the use of “Affordable Housing
Density Bonuses”, the reduction in parking requirements, and the waiver of Park and Recreation Impact Fees,
Building Permit Fees, etc., when applicable. Deed restrictions or other covenants will be required of all developers
to ensure that the level and period (length) of affordability is maintained.

The Town’s Housing and Community Development Director shall guide affordable housing developers through
the permitting process; and, affordable housing projects/initiatives are to be expedited to a greater degree than all
other projects in Davie.

Incentive #6 - Inventory of Publicly Owned Land

The Town of Davie is considered to be one of the largest land-owners; however, the majority of the land that the
Town owns is not land suitable for the development of affordable housing since it is already developed and/or is
designated for open-space or park improvements.

The Town’s GIS Dept., currently maintains a list of all publicly-owned land in Davie. In May 2006, this inventory
was updated, and current and future uses are identified, as well as any deed-related or other restrictions on the
land. This list was provided to Davie’s Mobile Home Task Force and Consultant James Carras, in order to
recommend to the Davie Town Council which sites (if any) were suitable for the development of affordable
housing units. The Town Council is expected to hold a public hearing on this matter in July or August 2007.

Role of the Housing and Community Development Department

The Housing and Community Development Office is responsible for the revitalization and redevelopment of
designated target areas in Davie, which includes esthetically enhancing the physical environment, expanding

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affordable housing opportunities, promoting self-sufficiency, and providing an improved quality of life for lower-
income and at-risk Davie residents.

A "holistic" approach to revitalization is used which combines: improved housing conditions, new/expanded
infrastructure, new rental and homeownership opportunities, crime prevention, education, vocational training,
economic development, job development and placement, and social services (such as subsidized child care,
health care, etc.). These items are brought together to create a significant and positive impact in Davie.

The Housing and Community Development Office also works to expand affordable rental housing and
homeownership opportunities; upgrade the existing housing stock through the rehabilitation of single-family and
multi-family housing; and, undertakes Fair Housing initiatives that ensure Davie residents have the widest range
of housing choices.

As an “entitlement” recipient of Federal Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) and HOME Investment
Partnership Program funds from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), and State
Housing Initiatives Partnership (SHIP) Program funds, the Town receives over $1.6 Million dollars annually, which
leverages other resources for these neighborhood improvements and affordable housing initiatives.

The Affordable Housing Programs currently administered by the Housing and Community Development Office
include:

      •   Single-Family Housing Rehabilitation
      •   Barrier-Free Rehabilitation - Removal of Impediments to Disabled individuals
      •   Down payment/Purchase Assistance for 1st-time Homebuyers
      •   Construction of New Rental Units
      •   Construction of New Single-Family Homes
      •   Fair Housing Education/Outreach
      •   Housing Counseling and Referral Services
      •   Emergency Assistance/Homeless Prevention

The deferred loans and/or grants associated with the programs outlined above, are secured using a restrictive
deed or covenant to ensure that the period of affordability for each affordable housing unit is maintained. For
example, when a deferred loan is made to an income-eligible homeowner to make needed home repairs, a lien is
recorded for the value of the rehabilitation work. Each year that the homeowner does not sell or rent the home,
the lien will be reduced by 20%; and, after five years the lien is “forgiven”. If however, the homeowner decides to
sell or rent the home during the 5-year period, the outstanding balance of the Lien becomes due and payable to
the Town. These funds are then deposited back into the SHIP Home Repair/Rehabilitation Account to assist other
Davie homeowners.

A large number of Davie households are considered “cost-burdened” in that they pay in excess of 30% of their
adjusted gross income for their mortgage PITI. One of the goals of the Housing and Community Development
Office to help homeowners reduce existing indebtedness and reduce their monthly housing costs. Towards this
end, the Housing and Community Development Director is empowered to approve requests for Subordination of
such SHIP or CDBG Liens when, in their opinion, it is in the best interest of the homeowner to reduce debt by
refinancing their home mortgages or consolidating debt.

Other duties associated with Davie’s Housing and Community Development Office include:

      • Conducting in-depth analyses/studies of demographic profiles e.g., population characteristics, housing
        costs and conditions, market analysis, infrastructure needs/improvements, and inventories to determine
        the “gaps” in services and needed resources to fill such gaps.

      • Developing policies and plans to secure federal and state grant funds for neighborhood revitalization,
        affordable housing, and quality of life programs for residents of targeted lower-income and/or blighted
        neighborhoods.




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• Serving as the Town's official liaison with developers of affordable housing, to ensure that their projects
  are expedited through the development review/approval and permitting process, to a greater degree than
  other projects in Davie

• Issuing Certificates of Consistency with the Town's Consolidated Plan for Federal Funds, for all
  prospective affordable housing projects which involve Federal financing/funding.

• Preparing/processing Building Permit Fee Waivers for qualified affordable housing initiatives.

• Undertaking Rental Housing Surveys to compare and contrast market rate rents, with HUD's Fair Market
  Rents (FMR's) using such data to forecast needs and design responsive programs.

• Developing and implementing Neighborhood Self-Sufficiency and Safe Neighborhood Programs in each
  of the CDBG Target Areas using a grass-roots participatory process.

• Chairing the Neighborhood Task Force and conducts community meetings, effectuating grass roots level
  involvement in the various programs in the Targeted Areas.

• Negotiating and securing public-private partnerships, using Federal or State funds to leverage other
  public and private funds, for the new construction of affordable rental properties and new single-family
  homes.

• Negotiating and securing public-private partnerships needed to provide a new or quantifiable increase in
  the level of services to Davie’s at-risk and lower-income residents.

• Coordinating the rehabilitation, construction and/or expansion of public facilities and infrastructure
  improvements in designated Community Development Target Areas.

• Overseeing development and implementation of the Town’s Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing
  Choices (AI) as required by U.S. HUD. Maintains documentation of efforts to remove or ameliorate
  impediments.

• Designing and administering special "Fair Housing Education and Outreach Initiatives" to ensure that
  Davie residents have the widest range of housing choices available. Educates landlords and lenders on
  fair housing laws and rights.

• Researching, preparing and submitting annual grant applications and related documents to U.S. HUD and
  the State of Florida for community development, redevelopment, neighborhood revitalization, and
  affordable housing and social service programs.

• Tracking applicable legislation and proposed policies that affect the distribution of federal and state grant
  funds affecting Broward County and the Town, and prepares comments on rule making that would benefit
  the Town.

• Coordinating the Census counts in Davie, and participates in the Special Count for the “Hard to
  Enumerate” populations which include the homeless in Broward County.

• Evaluating the need for, and method of implementing a Minimum Housing Standards Code for Davie.

• Analyzing the need for, and feasibility of, developing Linkage Ordinances or Inclusionary Zoning
  Ordinances to effectuate affordable housing.

• Analyzing the existing housing stock to monitor evidence of lead-based paint and lead-poisoning.

• Preparing Environmental Review Records/Assessments of federally funded projects and activities.

• Representing the Town on numerous boards and committees at the state, county and local level, and
  represent the Town at meetings of various private agencies and governmental groups.

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      • Serving as a liaison between civic groups, private and public agencies, businesses, and residents in
        solving community problems.

The Town’s Housing and Community Development Director shall review all proposed policies, procedures, plans,
etc., that may impact the development of housing, in order to ensure that such proposed action is consistent with
the Town’s adopted Consolidated Plan for Federal Funds, and does not negatively impact housing costs or
produce a barrier to affordable housing. The Housing and Community Development Director will identify any
potential impediments to fair housing choices and other impacts on the provision of affordable housing. The
Planning and Zoning Director will work closely with the Housing and Community Development Director to ensure
consistency with the Town’s Comprehensive Plan.

The Director of Housing and Community Development will carefully review all prospective affordable housing
projects to verify their level of benefit and period of affordability, and recommend the use of “Affordable Housing
Density Bonuses”, the reduction in parking requirements, and the waiver of Park and Recreation Impact Fees,
Building Permit Fees, etc. Deed restrictions or other covenants will be required of all developers to ensure the
level and period (length) of affordability is maintained.

The Town’s Housing and Community Development Director shall guide affordable housing developers through
the permitting process; and, affordable housing projects/ initiatives are to be expedited to a greater degree than
all other projects in Davie.

The Town’s Housing and Community Development Director shall review all proposed policies, procedures, plans,
etc., that may impact the development of housing, in order to ensure that such proposed action is consistent with
the Town’s adopted Consolidated Plan for Federal Funds, and does not negatively impact housing costs or
produce a barrier to affordable housing. The Housing and Community Development Director will identify any
potential impediments to fair housing choices and other impacts on the provision of affordable housing. The
Planning and Zoning Director will work closely with the Housing and Community Development Director to ensure
consistency with the Town’s Comprehensive Plan.

The Director of Housing and Community Development will carefully review all prospective affordable housing
projects to verify their level of benefit and period of affordability, and recommend the use of “Affordable Housing
Density Bonuses”, the reduction in parking requirements, and the waiver of Park and Recreation Impact Fees,
Building Permit Fees, etc. Deed restrictions or other covenants will be required of all developers to ensure the
level and period (length) of affordability is maintained.

The Town’s Housing and Community Development Director shall guide affordable housing developers through
the permitting process; and, affordable housing projects/ initiatives are to be expedited to a greater degree than
all other projects in Davie.

The Town of Davie believes that every American has a right to live where they choose with dignity and without
fear of discrimination; and, the Town certified to U.S. HUD that it will affirmatively further fair housing opportunities
and work to identify and remove impediments to fair housing choices.

Building Codes

A building code is a series of standards and specifications designed to establish minimum safeguards in the
erection and construction of buildings, to protect human beings who live and work in them from fire and other
hazards, and to establish regulations to further protect the health and safety of the public. However, building
codes inevitably add to the costs of housing production.

In order to address this concern, the South Florida Building Code includes a provision for the use of alternate
materials and types of construction by allowing persons wishing to use alternate materials and types of
construction to provide proof regarding the sufficiency of such type of construction or materials or methods of
design, and to request approval for their use. Therefore, there are no impediments to new technology, nor
production techniques such as prefabrication, use of components, mechanical cores, pre-finished materials, nor
modular construction. In Davie, responsibility for administering the various codes is located in one administrative
department i.e. the Development Services Department, facilitating close communication and coordination.


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The South Florida Building Code was extensively revised following Hurricane Andrew to include more stringent,
protective measures as a result of the Storms damage. This presented a problem in that building permits and
construction costs rose significantly. Increased costs of construction are typically passed on to the homeowner or
tenant; not absorbed by the developer. Increased costs would particularly affect households of low-income. While
it is important to recognize this issue, it is also important to recognize that the South Florida Building Code is
beyond the regulation of local municipalities.

Code Enforcement / Compliance

In Davie, as in other municipalities, code enforcement/compliance is used as a tool in neighborhood preservation.
The Town currently administers and enforces the Land Development Code, but the Town does not have a
"minimum housing standards" code. Albeit, the code enforcement function in the Town is an integral tool in
housing programs and a key element in meeting housing rehabilitation and neighborhood improvement
objectives.

The Town’s Housing and Community Development Office holds monthly community meetings in each of its three
(3) CDBG Target Areas, to identify community needs and priorities and develop solutions to those needs. Each
community meeting is attended by the applicable Code Compliance Officer assigned to that area. In this manner,
the neighborhood concerns are addressed in a timely manner.

Fees and Charges

Developmental impact fees affect the cost of housing. These are fees levied against the development to pay for
capital improvements that are required by the subdivision. Local governments have turned to impact fees as they
experience limits to the taxing and borrowing powers. Therefore, impact fees often finance expansion of the
infrastructure.

Impact fees are favored for financing infrastructure required by new growth and development because they make
the new development pay for a substantial proportion of the costs it may impose without burdening other existing
taxpayers. However, impact fees have a number of well-known shortcomings. Impact fees have an increasing
influence on housing costs and home ownership. Such fees are especially burdensome to lower-income
households when they attempt to purchase or rent a residence.

The Town of Davie has impact fees for recreation and at the time of platting, Broward County has impact fees for
roads or transit, schools and regional parks. Section 12-326 (D) of the Town of Davie Land Development Code
permits Davie to waive recreation and or building permit fees for low- and moderate-income housing. This
exemption has the advantage of lowering costs and making available needed housing at a more affordable cost.

Additionally, the Town's Affordable Housing Incentive Plan has been expanded/amended three (3) times since its
inception, to strengthen it and expand the number and type of incentives available to affordable housing
developers. The Plan now permits the waiver of all fees and a rebate for Water/Sewer Impact fees. Additionally,
the Housing and Community Development Director was assigned to be the "liaison" for such developer to "ensure
that affordable housing projects are expedited to a greater degree than all others in Davie".

FIVE YEAR STRATEGIC PLAN
General

This section outlines both the Town's housing and non-housing needs that have been identified following an
exhaustive data analysis and an extensive citizen participation process. Known gaps in existing service levels are
identified in this section, as well as the institutional structure, and the actions that will be taken to overcome the
gaps in service delivery. The Strategy also outlines the long-range goals to be achieved over the five-year period
covered by the Consolidated Plan. Finally, the Strategic Plan identifies the general priorities for allocating
resources geographically within the Town of Davie.

Process of Determining Needs and Priorities for Funding

In order to determine the existing needs and gaps in service-delivery within the Town of Davie, one-on-one
interviews were held with local social service providers, housing providers, many of the Town's Administrative
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staff and elected officials, and other interested residents in the Town of Davie. Using this process, both statistical
(client service levels) and anecdotal information regarding the needs of specific population groups, was gathered
and analyzed.

The following groups or individuals provided information regarding the type and number of clients served, as well
as the gaps in service levels:

        •   Hope Outreach Center, Inc.
        •   Emergency Assistance Service Efforts (EASE)
        •   Broward County Human Services - Family Success Center Program
        •   Broward County Homeless Coalition
        •   Broward County Housing Authority (BCHA) and Hollywood Housing Authority
        •   Town of Davie, Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) Administrator

Meetings were also held with the Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) Director, to obtain input and
recommendations regarding the proposed use of CDBG funds in the designated Redevelopment Area, which
generally coincides with the area designated as the Eastern CDBG Target Area. An analysis of the Town’s CRA
Plan (as amended in 1994) was also undertaken.

2007 Community Needs Assessment Survey of CDBG Target Areas

The Housing and Community Development Department’s Neighborhood Revitalization Program (NRP) staff
undertook “Needs Assessment Surveys” of the residents living in Davie’s three (3) CDBG Target Areas, to
determine the services and programs needed to enhance their quality of life. The NRP staff conducted a mass
mail-out of the survey instrument in both English and Spanish to every resident in the three (3) CDBG Target
Areas and also conducted door-to-door surveys from March 7, 2007 to May 4, 2007. A copy of the survey
instrument and the overall results follows:

                               Housing and Community Development Department
                                  Community Needs Assessment Survey

The purpose of this survey is to gather information concerning community needs. We would like your opinion on
what the Town of Davie can do to assist you in improving your neighborhood and your quality of life.

1. What programs or services listed below do you feel need to be improved, to better serve you and your
neighborhood? Place a number next to each item in the order you feel is most important, with # 1 being the most
important and 15 being the least important.

    •       Affordable Childcare
    •       Educational/Vocational Training
    •       Home Repair Grants
    •       Affordable Pet Services
    •       First-Time Home Buyers’ Programs
    •       Mobile Home Repair Grants
    •       Affordable Rental Housing
    •       Food Assistance
    •       Neighborhood Clean-up
    •       Credit Repair/Counseling
    •       GED Courses
    •       Job Training & Placement
    •       Crime Reduction
    •       Healthcare
    •       Recreation Activities

2. Have you seen an overall improvement in you community over the last 5 years? __Yes __ No

3. If the answer is Yes, what community improvements have you seen?


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4. If the answer is No, what areas have you seen decline or that need improvement?

 5. If a community meeting was held monthly, or once every other month, to discuss community needs and
concerns, would you attend? ___Yes ___ No

6. Would you like to be involved in the planning, or volunteer your time, to help with community services and
improvements? ___Yes ___No

7. How would you rate the services that the Housing and Community Development Department provides in your
community?

__Below Average    __ Average    __ Good __ Very Good       __Excellent   __Unknown

2007 Community Needs Assessment - Survey Results

CDBG Target Area                Response
Driftwood                       323 surveys completed
Orange Park                     225 surveys completed
Eastside                        429 surveys completed
Total Surveys                   977 total surveys

The survey results were tabulated; and, the community needs for each Target Area were rank-ordered as follows:

Driftwood                                               Orange Park
1. Crime Reduction                                       1. Crime Reduction
2. Affordable Childcare                                  2. Affordable Rental Housing
3. Affordable Rental Housing                             3. Mobile Home Repair Grant
4. Healthcare                                            4. Affordable Childcare
5. First-Time Home Buyers Programs                       5. Healthcare
6. Neighborhood Clean-up                                 6. Home Repair Grants
7. Education/Vocational Training                         7. Job Training and Placement
8. Job Training and Placement                            8. Food Assistance
9. Credit Repair Counseling                              9. Neighborhood Clean-up
10. Food Assistance                                     10. Recreation Activities
11. GED Courses                                         11. Educational Vocational Training
12. Home Repair Grants                                  12. GED Courses
13. Mobile Home Repair Grants                           13. First Time Home Buyers
14. Recreation Activities                               14. Credit Repair Counseling
15. Affordable Pet Services                             15. Affordable Pet Services

Eastside
 1. Crime Reduction
 2. First Time Home Buyers Program
 3. Healthcare
 4. Affordable Childcare
 5. Affordable Rental Housing
 6. Neighborhood Clean-up
 7. Job Training and Placement
 8. Educational/Vocational Training
 9. Food Assistance
 10. Credit Repair Counseling
 11. GED Courses
 12. Home Repair Grants
 13. Recreational Activities
 14. Mobile Home Repair Grants
 15. Affordable Pet Services



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Additionally, as a part of the Town's citizen participation process, pre-development public hearings were held in
each of the three (3) CDBG Target Areas, and one pre-development hearing was held at a centralized location in
the Community Room at Davie Town Hall. A summary of the suggestions, needs, and comments made at those
hearing follows:

    Eastside Target Area

      •    Repair of sidewalks in the Eastside Target Area
      •    A cover over the Betty Booth community pool to supply shade from the sun
      •    Emergency transitional housing in the event of a Hurricane or disaster
      •    Improvements to the water and sewage systems
      •    A Satellite Police Station and funds to be expended in an effort to lower the crime rate

    Orange Park Target Area

      •    A resident requested that 8th street be made “one-way”
      •    Additional fire hydrants in the area, especially on 8th Street
      •    Additional street lights be installed, especially on 9th Street where there are either no poles or the lights
           have been broken for an extended period of time. Solar lights were suggested

    Driftwood Target Area

      •    Purchase of the building where the Blue Nile Market is located
      •    Gymnasium, goalposts and bleachers for the Rick & Rita Case Boys & Girls Club
      •    Neighborhood beautification and clean-up

In addition to gathering information through the citizen participation process, an additional analysis of the Town's
demographics was undertaken, in order to identify concentrations of low- and moderate-income persons and
minority residents. This was done for the purpose of defining specific geographic areas where the federal
resources could be allocated in a manner that would provide the highest level of benefit to those in need of
assistance.

The term low-income is used to define a family who earns at or below 50% of the area median income, while
moderate-income is defined as those households whose income does not exceed 80% of the median income
level. The median annual income level for the Ft. Lauderdale Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) is $58,200. The
income levels to be used for the 2007/08 Action Plan component of this Strategic Plan are:

          Household               Low Income                Moderate Income
          Size                    (50% of Median)           (80 % of Median)
          1                       $21,500                   $34,350
          2                       $24,550                   $39,300
          3                       $27,650                   $44,200
          4                       $30,700                   $49,100
          5                       $33,150                   $53,050

It should be noted that the income levels above are adjusted annually by HUD. Thus, each year during the 5-year
period covered by the Consolidated Plan, the projects and activities funded through the CDBG program, will be
determined to benefit low/moderate-income persons based on these income levels.

Davie CDBG Target Areas - Census Tract and Block Group Low/Mod Data

The analysis outlined above revealed those Census Tracts and Block Groups in Davie that contain the highest
concentrations of persons whose incomes are 80%< of the median income, and who would qualify for assistance
under the CDBG Program.

Based on this, information coupled with other indicators such as sub-standard housing, lack of infrastructure,
lacking social services etc., the Town Council adopted three (3) geographic areas as "CDBG Target Areas" for
redevelopment and revitalization as follows:

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Western Target Area a/k/a Orange Park: The Western Target Area is located north of SW 14th Street between
130-136th Avenues, in Census Tract 703.05 BG 1, which encompasses the Orange Park Trailer Park, Flamingo
Elementary School, and Western High School.


                        Census Tract/Block Group                  703.05 BG 1
                        Total Population                          3341
                        Low-Moderate Income Population            68%
                        Unemployment Rate                         4.92%
                        Average Household Income                  $40,669
                        Female Head of Households                 31%
                        Housing units w/1.01+ Per. per Room       7%
                        Housing Units w/ No Heating Fuel          8%

Southern Target Area a/k/a Driftwood: The Southern Target Area is located in CT 705.02 BG 1& 2; and, is
situated south of Stirling Road, east of 78th Avenue, and north and west of the Davie Road Extension.

                        Census Tract/Block Group                  705.02 BG 1& 2
                        Total Population                          4,729
                        Low/Moderate Income Population            80%
                        Unemployment Rate                         6.57%
                        Average Household Income                  $30,055
                        Female Head of Households                 51%
                        Housing units w/1.01 + Per. per Room      3%
                        Housing Units w/ No Heating Fuel          1%

Eastern Target Area a/k/a/ Eastside: The Eastern Project Area is bounded to the north by SW 29th Street (near
Nova Drive), to the south by Orange Drive, and was formerly bounded to the west by Davie Road, and to the East
by the Florida Turnpike. The Eastern Project Area boundaries were was amended by Town Council on 12-20-06
to coincide with Community Redevelopment Area and encompass the new Neighborhood “One-Stop-Shop”
Service Center.

                        Census Tract/Block Group                  701.01 BG 1&2/706.00 BG 1&2
                        Total Population                          7,437
                        Low/Moderate Income Population            77%
                        Unemployment Rate                         7.10%
                        Average Household Income                  $31,707
                        Female Head of Households                 36%
                        Housing units w/1.01 + Per. per Room      9%
                        Housing Units w/ No Heating Fuel          5%

As a result of the analysis of the Census Tracts and Block Groups listed groups above, the U.S. Department of
HUD established 36.8% as the threshold level of low- and moderate-income persons, in order for an area to be
designated as an area eligible to receive CDBG funds, i.e. a CD Target Area.

Evaluation and Appraisal Report (EAR) Comprehensive Plan - Adopted by Town Council on April 19, 2006
- Letter of Sufficiency from DCA Received on July 11, 2006

Background and Analysis The Town of Davie is projected to have a population of 108,202 (based on Broward
County Population Forecasting Model 2004) or approximately 24,167 new residents by the Year 2020. This
increase becomes even more significant when it comes to providing housing for low and moderate income
residents, particularly those living in substandard housing and in mobile homes. As the cost of land continues to
increase, and the amount of vacant land diminishes, it is imperative that strategies and opportunities for
affordable and workforce housing are afforded.

The Town of Davie will address strategies and opportunities for affordable and workforce housing as it relates to
existing land limitations within the Town, future land use plan limitations, service/infrastructure limitations, and
economic limitations. This will include housing needs relative to cost burdens and an assessment of the supply of

                                                        63
decent, safe, and sanitary housing in suitable neighborhoods, with special consideration towards housing for
Davie’s workforce.

As a means of setting the stage for an analysis of affordable and workforce housing as mentioned above, staff
deems it necessary to first assess (using the most recent data available) the following general housing
characteristics within the Town: housing unit inventory; mobile home annexations; housing by tenure, and house
values. The Town of Davie at 34.2 square miles represents 8 percent of the total urbanized land area within
Broward County, and contains 4.7 percent of the County’s estimated housing units (see Table II.C.1.). Based on
2002 data from the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing, the Town contains over

Table II.C.1. 2005 Comparison of Estimated Housing Units - Davie vs. Broward County

 Units in Davie                       Units in Broward                       % of Broward
 35,022                               752,704                                4.7
        Source: Regional and Local Profiles, Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing.

27 percent of the mobile homes in Broward County, 2.1 percent of the multi-family residences in Broward and 4.6
percent of the single family homes in Broward. Since the 1995 EAR, the total number of housing units has
increased by 47 percent. The total number of single family housing units increased by 6,729 units representing
an increase of 64 percent. Multi-family units decreased by 9 percent; however, the accuracy of this baseline
figure is questionable due to the fact that 1995 data was obtained by tabulating building permits (issued between
October 1987 through the end of December 1994 and adding those numbers to 1987 data) while U.S. Census
data was used for 2002 figures. Mobile homes increased by 4,299 units, representing a 140 percent increase.

Table II.C.2. Town of Davie Historical Housing Unit Inventory

                Type of Unit              1995                          2002                         ’95-’02   %
                                          Units          % Total        Units          % Total       Change
                Single Family             10,584         48.6           17,313         54             64
                Multi Family              8,108*         37.3           7,365          23              -9
                Mobile Home               3,070          14.1           7,369          23            140
                TOTAL                     21,762         100            32,047         100           47
        Source: Regional and Local Profiles, Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing. Town of Davie 1995 EAR.
        *1995 data obtained by tabulating building permits issued between Oct. 1987- Dec. 1994 + 1987 data.

Table II.C.3. Mobile Home Annexations

               Mobile Home Park                           Yr.               Acres            Number of Units
               Kings Manor - owned                        1998              44.5              314
               Park City West - rental                    1998              59.5              368
               Park City East - owned                     1998              172.5            1,200
               Rexmere Village - owned                    1998              142.5             775
               Silver Oaks/Palma Nova – rental            1995              110.7             940
               Everglades - rental                         1996             99.7              639
               TOTAL                                                        629.4            4,236
        Source: Town of Davie

This increase is a result of the annexation of six mobile home parks since 1995 (see Table II.C.3.). Currently,
there are 31 Mobile Home Parks located within the Town of Davie .By the year 2020, Broward County projects
that the Town will have a population of 108,202. Based on this population projection, the Town will need
approximately 9,782 additional housing units (between 2000 and 2020) assuming a projected person per
household size of 2.64 (see Table IV.A.5.).

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According to the Town’s most recent (Nov. 2004) land use inventory (see Table IV.B.1.), there is a total of 1,869
acres of vacant residential land available, 72 percent of which is designated at 1 dwelling unit per acre. This
acreage will have the capacity for approximately 3,584 housing units based on the assumption that 1,218 acres
will be utilized at the maximum density of 1 dwelling unit per acre while the remaining 651 acres will be utilized at
3-10 dwelling units per acre. With a projected population increase of 24,167 residents by the year 2020, the
Town will experience a shortage of approximately 6,198 dwelling units.

According to the U.S. Census 2000, the median household income in the Town of Davie was $47,014 compared
to $41,691 in Broward County. More recent data from the U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey
2003, indicates that median household income has increased by 9 percent in the Town to $51,242 and increased
by 2.3 percent to $42,659 in Broward County.

Median house values, on the other hand, have gone from $151,900 in 2000 to $225,778 in 2003, a 49 percent
increase. By comparison, figures for Broward County indicate a 50.6 increase in median house value from
$128,600 in 2000 to $193,623 in 2003.
                                        1
Table II.C.4. Town of Davie House Values Based on S/F Owner-Occupied Homes

                                2000                                   2003
 House Value                    No. of Houses          Percent         No. of Houses            Percent
 $149,999 or less               7,018                  49              2,603                    17
 $150,000 to $199,999           3,382                  24              3,542                    22
 $200,000 to $499,999           3,717                  26              7,801                    49
 $500,000 or more               197                    1               1,857                    12
  Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, Census 2000. U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey 2003.
  Note 1: 2000 median house value is $151,900. 2003 median house value is $225,778.

In 2000, 49 percent of the house values were below $149,999. Figures for 2003 indicate 49 percent of the house
values were between $200,000 - $499,999 and only 17 percent were $149,999 or less. These figures are
supported by the fact that new housing construction since 2000 has primarily been luxury housing selling for
$325,000 to over $1 million dollars. The quality of housing stock within the Town is one indicator of both the
overall quality of life, and the economic health of the area.

Table II.C.5. indicates that substandard conditions, particularly overcrowding, have increased since the 1995 EAR
and still remain an issue to be addressed.

The 1995 EAR suggested that “…overcrowding in dwelling units may continue to diminish to the point that the
condition will be virtually eliminated”. Current data does not reflect this opinion. According to the U.S. Census
2000, 1,644 housing units in the Town of Davie were deemed overcrowded, a 975 percent increase since the
1995 EAR.

Table II.C.5. Inventory of Substandard Housing: 1995 vs. 2000


                                         1980-89          1995                         2000
                                         Number of        Number of        %     of    Number of      %     of
      Characteristic                     Units            Units            Units       Units          Units
      Lack of complete plumbing
                                         67               79               .4          129            .5
      Lack of kitchen facilities
                                         85               --               --          92             .3
      Overcrowded (1.01            or
      more persons/room)                 277              153              .7          1644           5.7
         Source: Regional & Local Profiles, Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing. Davie 1995 EAR.




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Affordable and Workforce Housing

Affordable housing has been defined by the Town of Davie’s Affordable Housing Incentive Plan as “housing
where the occupants pay no more than 30 percent of gross income on gross housing costs, including utility
costs.” As an example, if the total household income for a family of four (4) is $76,000 per year, they could
technically “afford” payments of $1,900 per month (to include mortgage/PITI or rent/utilities) based on 30 percent
of their gross household income.

Workforce housing is defined by the Urban Land Institute as “affordable to households of low, moderate and
above moderate income in a range of 60-120 percent of Area Median Income” (see Table II.C.6.).

Table II.C.6. - Income Levels

 Extremely Low Income                      At or Below 30 % of Area Median Income (AMI)
 Very Low Income                           30.1% to 50% of the Area Median Income (AMI)
 Low Income                                50.1% to 80% of the Area Median Income (AMI)
 Moderate Income                           80.1% to 120% of the Area Median Income (AMI)
 High Income                               Above 120% of the Area Median Income (AMI)
Source: Broward County, Office of Urban Planning and Redevelopment, Planning Services Division, 2004

The individuals who are in need of affordable and workforce housing include those who work within Davie, but
who cannot reside within town limits due to the high cost of housing in comparison to their income. The Town of
Davie’s Housing and Community Development Office currently administers several housing programs which are
designated to:

            expand affordable rental housing and homeownership opportunities for Davie residents, especially
            housing for the low and very low-income families and individuals.

            upgrade the existing housing stock by providing loans and/or grants to income-eligible homeowners to
            make home repairs and replace existing substandard/leaking roofs.

            Undertake Fair Housing outreach and educational campaigns to ensure that Davie residents have the
            widest range of housing choices available.

The Housing and Community Development Office also cultivates private and public partnerships which result in
the provision of new and/or expanded programs and services to provide a continuum of care for all low income at
risk residents.

Table II.C.7. Town of Davie- Affordable Housing Projects

 Development Name                 Location                     Total       Housing Program
                                                               Units
 Assisted Housing
 Barc Housing                     2750 SW 75th Ave.            21          HUD-Multi-Family/Rent
                                                                           Supplement/HUD Bonds
 Cameron Cove                     2571 SW 79th Ave.            221         Bonds
 Federation Gardens of            5701 SW 82nd Ave.            80          HUD-Multi-Family/Rent
 Davie                                                                     Supplement/HUD Bonds
 Stirling Apartments              7350 Stirling Rd.            147         Bonds/Guarantee/Housing
                                                                           Credits/SAIL/SHIP
 Stirling Apartments              4100 NW 77th Ave.            15          HUD-Multi-Family/Rent
                                                                           Supplement/HUD Bonds/SHIP
 Summerlake Apartments            5941   Summerlake            108         Bonds/Housing
                                  Dr.                                      Credits/SAIL/SHIP
 Newport Apartments               6900 SW 39th St.             219         HUD
 Other
 Ehlinger Apartments              7481 NW 33 St.               100         Public Housing
 Griffin Gardens                  4881 Griffin Rd.             100         Public Housing
 El Jardin                        3300 El Jardin Dr.           233         Section 8 project based
                                                                 66
 Single-family homes
 Harmony Village                   Driftwood Area               22             Habitat for Humanity of Broward
                                                                               County/SHIP housing grant
 “Key West Style” Homes            SW 43 St.                    9              CRA
 TOTAL                                                          1,275
Source: Town of Davie Housing & Community Development. Assisted Housing Inventory, Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing.

The Town has worked collaboratively with many housing partners. Table II.C.7. identifies the affordable housing
projects (including subsidized public housing) in the Town. The Town of Davie’s Affordable Housing Incentive
Plan was originally developed in 1998 to provide incentives (e.g. expediting permits, modification of impact fees)
to qualified developers of affordable housing. As housing costs and land values continue to increase, it has
become more difficult for many working families/individuals to rent or own a home. The Town’s Affordable
Housing Incentive Plan was enhanced in the summer of 2003 to expand the level of incentives available to
developers. An additional revision in April 2004 encourages the development of much-needed affordable housing
for Davie’s workforce.

Cost-Burdened

Davie’s Consolidated Plan for Federal Funds 2002-2007 notes that when a household spends 30 - 50 percent of
its annual income on housing, it is considered “cost-burdened”; and if a household spends more than 50 percent
of their annual income on housing, it is considered “severely cost burdened”.

According to the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing (2002), 9,457 households or 32 percent of all
households in the Town of Davie were cost-burdened, 3,519 of these households were “severely” cost-burdened
(see Table II.C.8.). According to 2005 data from the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing, 10,584 households
are cost burdened, a 12% increase since 2002.

Affordable Housing Needs Assessment

Table II.C.9. indicates that of the “severely” cost-burdened households in 2002, 3,154 households, or 11 percent
of all households, have incomes less than 80 percent of the AMI (Area Median Income). Further analysis of these
3,154 “severely” cost-burdened households (see Table II.C.10.) indicates that 47 percent have an income at or
below 30 percent of the AMI, which is an “extremely low” income level. Thirty-three percent fell into the income
level of “very low” (30-50% of AMI), and 20 percent were considered “low” income level (50-80% of AMI).

Table II.C.8. HH Cost Burden (CB) % of Income Spent on Housing by Tenure 2002

               <30% CB                     30-49.9% CB                50+% CB                  Total Households
Tenure           Number          %         Number           %         Number           %       Number           %
Owner          16,588            72.3      4,176            18.2      2,178            9.5     22,942           100
Renter         3,883             55.6      1,762            25.2      1,341            19.2    6,986            100
Total          20,471            68.4      5,938            19.8      3,519            11.8    29,928           100
Source: Regional and Local Profiles, Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing.

Table II.C.9. Severely Cost Burdened (50%+) HHs with 80%< AMI by Tenure

Tenure            2002                2005             2010              2015              2020         2025
Owner             1,834               2,097            2,551             3,049             3,617        4,150
Renter            1,320               1,477            1,746             2,010             2,279        2,542
 Total            3,154               3,574            4,297             5,059             5,896        6,692
Source: Affordable Housing Needs Assessment (AHNA), Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing.




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Table II.C.10. Severely Cost Burdened (50%+) HH’s with 80%< AMI by Tenure, 2002

Income Level                             Owner        Renter       Total      %
Extremely Low (<30 of AMI)                 790          693        1,483          47
Very Low (30-50% of AMI)                   546          487        1,033          33
Low (50-80% of AMI)                        498          140         638           20
Total                                    1,834        1,320        3,154      100
        Source: Affordable Housing Needs Assessment (AHNA), Shimberg Center for    Affordable Housing.

In order to determine the housing needs of current and future Davie residents, data from the Affordable Housing
Needs Assessment provided by the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing is analyzed by staff in this report
along with locally generated data.

Potential Social, Economic and Environmental Impacts

Section 163.3191 (2)(e), F.S., requires that the potential social, economic, and environmental impacts for each
major issue identified be addressed in the EAR.

Providing decent, safe and sanitary housing has numerous social benefits. Helping families to move into better
quality housing, reduces substandard housing hazards, and saves in public health care costs. Children in low
income households with access to affordable housing, have a better chance of succeeding in school, and later in
the workforce.

Affordable housing can also help families build their income. According to the National Center for Children in
Poverty (NCCP), former and/or current welfare recipients with affordable housing aid had higher employment
rates and incomes than those without it. As a result, households have more money to spend on goods (including
health care, food, and transportation) that they might not have purchased without affordable housing.

Providing affordable housing opportunities near employment centers will not only enhance a competitive position
in attracting and retaining business, but will also limit sprawl, traffic congestion and pollution. The availability of
affordable housing near one’s job results in shorter commute times, and allows for more time to be devoted
towards building community participation in civic and school activities.

Identification of Comprehensive Plan Elements Impacted and Assessment of Effects on Specific Objectives
Section 163.3191 (2)(g), F.S., requires that the EAR assess whether current Comprehensive Plan objectives
within each element, as they relate to the major issues, have been achieved.

a. Future Land Use Element Objective 25 and policies 25.1, and 25.3 are impacted because they address
strategies to promote development in urban redevelopment areas, including low interest loans for housing
rehabilitation and CDBG funding for new efficient affordable housing units.

b. Transportation Element Goal 8 is impacted because it addresses retaining and expanding transit services for
the elderly and other transportation disadvantaged groups.

c. Housing Element Objective 3 and policies 3.1, 3.2 are impacted because they address the rehabilitation of
substandard housing (through low interest loans, code enforcement efforts and the Neighborhood Improvement
District)

Objective 4 and policies 4.1, 4.2 are impacted because they address housing opportunities in residential
categories of the Future Land Use Plan for low and moderate income families, mobile homes, and specialized
housing.

Objective 6 and policies 6.1 and 6.2 are impacted because they address the actual compilation and monitoring of
the efforts herein described.

d. Utilities Element no impacts requiring amendments.

                                                              68
e. Recreation and Open Space Element no impacts requiring amendments.

f. Intergovernmental Coordination Element Objective 1 and policies 1.5, 1.6, 1.7 are impacted because they
address maximizing the coordination of state, region, county, other municipalities, special districts and
organizations when it comes to affordable housing programs and opportunities.

g. Capital Improvements Element no impacts requiring amendments

Recommendations- A major goal of the Town is to expand affordable rental housing and homeownership
opportunities for Davie residents and continue to upgrade the existing housing stock. As a means of realizing this
goal, it is recommended that the Town implement the following strategies:

1. Ensure residential developments offer at least 20 percent affordable units for every project or other affordable
   house initiative/measure. Incentives can be provided to developers to ensure that all approved residential
   projects offer at least 20 percent affordable units that will allow households and families to secure affordable
   rental housing or purchase a new home, townhouse or condo. Incentives may consist of but not limited to a
   reduction in fees in the permitting and construction process, faster review time for building permits, donation
   of land, use of Federal, State and local grant funds, and tax incentives. Housing costs are rising at a rate
   where it has become unreasonable for the average worker to afford decent housing. A way that policymakers
   can measure the affordable housing needs of working families and households is to look at the age
   characteristics of those who are facing affordability problems and encourage communities designed for these
   specific family categories. The age categories for working families and households include 25 – 34 years of
   age, 35 – 54 years of age, and 55 – 64 years of age.

2. The Town of Davie should look for opportunities for infill and redevelopment allowing affordable housing
   projects. The areas that should be considered are within the Regional Activity Center (RAC), the Driftwood
   Target Area, and vacant sites east of University Drive, south of Griffin Road and certain locations within the
   State Road 7 Corridor. The RAC and State Road 7 would be an appropriate place for infill and
   redevelopment because the Community Redevelopment Area is within the RAC and additional funding
   sources are available through the Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) to assist in the development of
   parcels suitable for affordable housing. The RAC provides opportunities for additional residential design
   types permitting more developments to be built at allowable densities. The Driftwood Target Area still has
   vacant land that is suitable for affordable housing and affordable housing projects.

3. Creation of an Affordable Housing Trust Fund. The funds available through an Affordable Housing Trust Fund
   will ensure that affordable, decent, safe, and sanitary housing for low- and very low-income households is
   available. Eligible projects can include the acquisition and rehabilitation of existing housing; new construction
   for single family and multifamily housing; and adaptive reuse of nonresidential buildings. Possible
   mechanisms to assist in getting funds for this Trust Fund include: including an additional fee in the
   development application process; developer fees in lieu of their 20 percent unit set-aside; and waiving the
   current technology fee within the fee schedule. Another possibility would involve the Town’s budgeting for the
   Trust Fund. The State of Florida could provide matching funds (i.e. include money to supplement the fund).
   Another mechanism used successfully in other communities is requiring developments that cannot set aside a
   certain number of housing units to buy land and donate the land to the Town to build affordable housing units.

4. Need for zoning flexibility and increased density in areas, designated by Town Council, where appropriate
   density already exists to support mixes of housing types and income levels. Begin discussions on where and
   when it may be appropriate to provide increases in residential density to create affordable housing units. Also
   begin discussion on allowing mother-in law quarters in certain developments or communities where
   homeowner associations exist and deed restrictions are put in place.

5. Redevelopment of Substandard Mobile Home Communities. Recognizing that most mobile homes in the
   Town are not developed at their maximum density, begin pursuing affordable housing strategies in those
   parks most susceptible to redevelopment, the leased lot communities.

6. Continue to monitor the airport noise impact upon the eastern Mobile Home Parks and create a mitigation
   program to address the issue. Upon any expansion of the Ft. Lauderdale/Hollywood Airport all mobile home
   communities affected will require noise mitigation. For mobile homes this inevitably requires complete
   removal of housing units. Begin discussion with property owners of the leased parks on future development

                                                        69
    and potential redevelopment to include affordable housing units for existing residents with assistance from the
    Town’s various mechanisms in place (fee reduction, affordable housing pool, outright subsidy, and federal
    and state housing funds).

Redevelopment Plan Objectives that Relate to Affordable Housing - Davie CRA

The Redevelopment Plan focuses in part on the affordable housing needs existing in the east side of Davie. The
following objectives are contained in the Town's adopted CRA Plan (as amended in 1994):

      • Objective B-4: The Community Redevelopment Agency shall strive to improve the existing housing stock
        within the community redevelopment area, and to increase the availability of affordable housing
        opportunities.

      • Policy B-4. 1: The Community Redevelopment Agency shall provide financial support for various CRA
        selected public and private Housing Improvement Programs which are aimed at rehabilitation and the
        provision of additional affordable housing.

      • The Community Redevelopment Agency shall work with the Town in the preparation of neighborhood and
        redevelopment plans. The CRA may provide funding or utilize its unique powers for implementation of
        appropriate provisions of these plans.

      • Policy B-4.3: The Community Redevelopment Agency shall implement an "Affordable Housing Program"
        to increase affordable housing opportunities in the area and to demonstrate the type of infill housing
        which could be built on available vacant lots within the redevelopment area.

      • Policy B-4.4: Each Redevelopment Program adopted by the CRA which causes the temporary or
        permanent displacement of persons from housing facilities within the community redevelopment area will
        contain an element and provision for the providing of replacement housing for such persons in decent,
        safe, and sanitary dwelling accommodations within their means and without undue hardship to such
        families, which such relocation assistance shall include but not be limited to the following methods:

All affected residents will receive a timely written notice of the CRA's intent to acquire their property; The CRA will
identify reasonable alternative housing opportunities for such displaced family which shall be reasonably
comparable to the property being taken, in size, price, rent, and quality; The CRA may provide moving expenses
in reasonable amount for each displaced household. The CRA may elect to provide subsidies to displaced
families in cases where suitable replacement housing, reasonably equivalent to the property being taken, is not
available in order to make other replacement housing available within the displaced family's means.

As previously indicated, the Davie CRA works closely with the Housing and Community Development Office on
projects and initiatives in eastern Davie; and, a solid partnership in the development of affordable housing has
been forged. Four new single-family homes were developed in 2006, as a joint venture partnership between the
two agencies. Additionally, the Davie CRA asks that its mixed-use developers set aside 20% of their residential
units as “affordable housing”.

Transit Oriented Corridor (TOC) Proposed Amendment PCT 06-6 to the Broward County Land Use Plan

On March 1, 2006, the Davie Town Council adopted the Transit Oriented Corridor (TOC) in Eastern Davie, that
generally coincides with State Road 7 (US 441). This designation encompasses 903.7 acres of land in Eastern
Davie, a portion of which is located in the CRA area. The TOC is located on the south side of I-595 between SR 7
(U.S 441) and the Florida Turnpike. Density and Intensity of Land Uses include:

        6,428            Residential Dwelling Units
          750            Hotel Rooms
          120            Acres of Open Space
          600K           Sq. Ft. Commercial
         1.7 M           Sq. Ft. Office Space
         3.6 M           Sq. Ft. Industrial/Flex
         15 %            Affordable Housing Units = 964

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Section 8.01.04 (V) states that “As part of the proposed TOC Amendment, the Town of Davie has committed to at
least 15%, 964 dwelling units, of the residential units shall be provided as affordable, as defined in Article 8 of the
“Administrative Rules Document: Broward County Land Use Plan.”

This is the first time the Town has made the inclusion of affordable housing units “mandatory” in any plan.

Affordable Housing - Priority Housing Needs

The priority housing needs table was developed utilizing both Census Data, the Town’s 2006 Rental Housing
Survey, 2006 Mobile Home Survey, 2006 Residential Real Estate Analysis, the EAR-Based Amendments, the
TOC, the RAC, and consultation with: housing providers and developers, Town Administrators, elected officials,
social service and housing providers, and the community at large.

Each category of need was ranked according to the incidence (on a percentage basis) of either:

      •   cost-burdening at the 30% of gross household Income level,
      •   cost-burdening at the 50% of gross household income level,
      •   substandard housing conditions, or
      •   overcrowded conditions

As previously indicated, the "housing conundrum" in Davie is how to address the housing needs of its lower-
income residents living in sub-standard mobile homes, particularly in light of redevelopment pressures which may
cause these residents to be permanently and involuntarily displaced. The Florida Statutes at 723 do not provide
ample protection for this large segment of Davie’s population, and many of these individuals would find
themselves homeless, since no comparable replacement housing is affordable to them.

Davie estimates that there are over 23,000 residents living in 7,400+- mobile homes, a significant portion of which
are in sub-standard condition, especially post Hurricane Wilma. There was previously no source of funds
available to assist these mobile home owners to make needed repairs to their homes, since the regulations
governing both the CDBG and SHIP Programs prohibit the use of grant funds to renovate them. However, the
Town of Davie was able to convince both HUD and DCA to permit the use of its 2005 Disaster Recovery Funds
for a Mobile Home Repair or Replacement Program.

The Town’s primary strategy for assisting mobile home occupants is to provide new opportunities in Davie for the
development of affordable rental and homeownership housing, so we can help mobile home occupants segue to
subsidized/affordable rentals, while enhancing their credit and assisting them to save for down-payment on a
home. Then, once credit worthy, we hope to move forward into the Town First-Time Home-Buyer Programs.

However, the disproportionately high rental rates in Davie make it difficult to find affordable rental units (in good
condition), and attract Landlords that will participate in the Section 8 Program. Additionally, many existing Davie
renters (other than mobile homes) are “severely cost-burdened” i.e., paying greater than 50% of their gross
income for rent/utilities.

The Town will continue to work closely with the Broward County Housing Authority (BCHA) and the Hollywood
Housing Authority to try to increase the current level of Section 8 Certificates and/or Vouchers to serve the needs
of Davie residents, and will continue to try to get existing landlords interested in participating in the Section 8
program.

Based on the needs identified and the gaps in service delivery, the Town of Davie's Consolidated Plan is directed
towards specific long-term housing objectives, including the following housing strategies:

      • to expand affordable rental housing and homeownership opportunities for Davie residents, especially
        housing for low and very low-income families and individuals.

      • to upgrade the existing housing stock and provide financial assistance to income-eligible homeowners to
        make home repairs and replace existing substandard/leaking roofs and make home accessible to those
        with physical handicaps.


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      • develop an Affordable Housing Trust Fund, financed via a linkage ordinance or inclusionary zoning, which
        would provide a dedicated source of funds to develop new workforce and affordable housing.

      • develop appropriate “Exit Plans” to be used by the Town/Developer if a mobile home park closes, in order
        to ensure that residents receive adequate financial assistance to ensure their comparable replacement
        into sustainable housing.

The Town’s LHAP and Incentive Plan for Workforce and Affordable Housing is designed to focus on helping
residents transition up the economic ladder, by moving from sub-standard mobile homes, into affordable (or
subsidized) rental housing, then into credit enhancement and repair programs, then into down-payment savings
programs, then finally into First- Time homebuyer programs. Given the large gap in rents between mobile home
lots and rental apartments, newly constructed rental housing is of prime importance.

Maintenance of the housing stock is currently addressed through the use of both the Town's State Housing
Initiatives Partnership (SHIP) Act Program and the CDBG Program. In the FY 2006/07 $145,000 in SHIP funds
was earmarked for home repair/rehabilitation assistance that will benefit 5 homes with an average grant of
$30,000 (average). CDBG funds for FY 2006/07 totaling $60,000 are also budgeted to address the home repair
needs of four (4) homes whose owners do not meet the SHIP guidelines to their maximum assessed values. If
CDBG and SHIP funding remain stable for the next five years, approximately 50 households will receive CDBG
assistance totaling $300,000; and 100 homes could be renovated using SHIP funds totaling $1.5 million dollars.

Homeowner assistance is also addressed under the Town's SHIP Program. Each years SHIP allocation includes
funds for Purchase/Down payment assistance, to help Davie renters and mobile home owners, become first-time
homebuyers. Finally, the 2006/07 SHIP allocation (and the 4 previous year’s budgets) includes pre-development
costs associated with the Davie CRA constructing new single-family homes. Homeowner counseling is also
provided under a contract with the Broward County of Office Finance for approximately 15 families per year.

At this time, the Town of Davie, through the Mobile Home Task Force (MHTF) and the Town’s Housing
Consultant, is studying numerous solutions to the current affordable housing crisis. One major “tool” in the
affordable housing toolbox, is the development an Affordable Housing Trust Fund, which could be financed via a
linkage ordinance or inclusionary zoning. A dedicated source of funds to develop new workforce and affordable
housing is essential, since the Town’s allocation of SHIP, HOME, and CDBG are inadequate to address the
magnitude of the affordable housing crisis.

On February 17, 2007, the Town of Davie adopted a one-year Moratorium on the redevelopment of any mobile
home park. This was essential, given the demands for redevelopment, Davie’s lower-income families and senior
citizens on fixed-incomes were facing homelessness as a result of park closures. Davie is working to develop
appropriate “Exit Plans” to be used by the Town/Developer if a mobile home park closes, in order to ensure that
residents receive adequate financial assistance to ensure their comparable replacement into sustainable housing.
At the same time, it is imperative that the Florida Statutes at 723 be revised to protect the Floridians who face the
same plight as Davie’s mobile home occupants.

2005 Disaster Recovery Funds – Hurricane Wilma

Under the 2005 Disaster Recovery Initiative Broward County was allocated $22,163,887, and must apply on
behalf of all entitlement cities. Grant recipients are only required to utilize at least 70% of their CDBG Disaster
funding for the restoration of disaster impacted affordable housing; but, given the devastation in Davie, the Town
is going to use 100% of it's allocation for this purpose. Emphasis will be given to affordable housing projects
which promote long-term housing recovery.

Public Law 109-148, approved on December 30, 2005, allocated funds for the “2005 Disaster Recovery Initiative”.
DCA is administering this program on behalf of the State of Florida; and, Broward County is slated to receive
$22,163,887. DCA is requiring that each County serve as the lead agency to submit a county-wide application on
behalf of all eligible municipalities within their jurisdiction. The County asked each municipality to prepare and
                                                          th
submit their grant application documents by August 4 , 2006 as the County-wide application to DCA was due by
          th
August 18 , 2006.

Two (2) meetings were held by Broward County to finalize the allocation distribution process; and, on July 24th a
formula was developed that would yield $3,309,741 to the Town. Davie sustained the greatest number of

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damaged units, destroyed mobile homes, and uninsured disaster victims @ 1,328 residential units; yet, Davie did
not receive the proportionate share of the Disaster Recovery funds based on this data.

The Town is still struggling to rehouse displaced Hurricane Wilma victims, as there is little to no comparable
affordable replacement housing units available. The rental vacancy rate is extremely low due to recent condo
conversions; and, landlords are capitalizing on the demand for units by raising their rents. Most of Davie’s 832
mobile homes affected by Wilma were completely destroyed, and the residents were permanently displaced.
Sadly, the majority of the residents were low-income families and the elderly and/or disabled, who were
uninsured; and, they lost everything.

The Town of Davie sustained the greatest number of damaged/destroyed units in the County @ 1,328 residential
units, and the Town is still struggling to rehouse displaced Hurricane Wilma victims as there is little to no
comparable affordable replacement housing units available.

The Town did not concur with the County’s distribution formula for the 2005 Disaster Recovery Initiative, as Davie
sustained the greatest number of damaged units, destroyed mobile homes, and uninsured disaster victims, yet
did not receive the proportionate share of the funds based on this data.

Although the Town does not feel the County’s formula properly allocated the Disaster Funds based on actual
Hurricane damage sustained within the municipalities, we agreed to move forward with the County’s process
given the impending deadline to DCA and so as to not injure other municipalities who legitimately sustained
Hurricane Damage.

The Town’s Housing and Community Development Office has done an outstanding job of assisting uninsured,
disabled, elderly, and other at-risk Davie residents displaced by Hurricane Wilma, despite the lack of adequate
financial resources or manpower. Without the 2005 CDBG Disaster Recovery Funds, the Town is unable to
recover from this disaster.

On 8/2/06, the Davie Town Council adopted a Resolution authorizing the Town’s Director of Housing and
Community Development to submit Davie’s Grant Application for 2005 CDBG Disaster Recovery Funds to
Broward County, who must collectively submit an application representing all municipalities to the State of Florida
Department of Community Affairs (DCA) by August 18, 2006.

The Town’s Director of Housing and Community Development was authorized to act on behalf of the Town in all
matters related to the grant application process, to prepare all necessary grant documents, housing plans,
programs and projects, etc., necessary for the implementation of disaster recovery housing initiatives.

2005 Disaster Recovery Programs

$ 1,275,000     Mobile Home Repair or Replacement Program - Funds to repair mobile homes, or, if mobile home
                cannot be brought up to code (i.e., wind-storm rated) the grant would cover cost to remove sub-
                standard unit, purchase of new unit, and installation. $25,000 x 51 Households.

$   225,000     Relocation/Rental Assistance Program - Financial assistance to disaster victims for either
                replacement housing e.g. rental assistance. $6,250 x 36 Households.

$ 480,000       Home Repair Hardening Program - Home-repair program targeted at “hardening” existing single-
                family homes/townhomes/condos with hurricane resistant materials, e.g. roofing, hurricane
                shutters, windstorm rated windows. $40,000 x 12 Housing Units.

$ 540,000       Purchase Assistance for Mobile Home Owners - Down-payment and closing costs assistance for
                credit-worthy mobile home owners who are seeking to transition to site-built housing. $60,000 x 9
                Households.

$ 789,741       Generators for Essential Public Facilities - Provide permanent generators for EOC’s, Emergency
                Shelters, e.g., Pine Island Community Center, Fire Administration (secondary EOC) Ivanhoe Fire
                Station #91, and Neighborhood Service Center. 4 Public Facilities x $197,435 (average)



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Housing Projects Completed/Underway in FY 2005/06

Program                                           Units               Unit Cost            Funding Source
Single-Family Rehab Program                        3 Homes            $ 15,000             $45,000             CDBG
Home Repair Program                               18 Homes            $ 15,000             $270,000            SHIP
Harmony Village Purchase Assistance               12 Homes            $ 12,000             $144,000            SHIP
Davie Purchase Assistance Program                  9 Homes            $ 8,000              $72,000             SHIP
CRA New Construction                               4 Homes            $ 16,000             $64,000             CRA
CRA New Construction                               4 Homes            $ 42,661             $169,044            SHIP
Arrowhead – Condo Restoration                      4 Units            $ 10,800             $43,200             CDBG
New Const -Villas of Palomino                     36 Units            $ 3,006              $108,200            Fee
New Const - Village Park Townhomes 3              70 Units            $ 3,006              $210,420            Fee
Homeless Prevention                               49 Homes            $    600             $29,400             CDBG
Counseling/Credit Enhancement                     40 Homes            $    500             $20,000             SHIP
Fair Housing Educ/Training                        49 Homes            $    100             $ 4,900             CDBG

Housing Projects Completed/Underway in FY 2006/07

Program                                           Units               Unit Cost            Funding Source
Single-Family Rehab Program                        4 Homes            $ 30,000             $ 60,000            CDBG
Home Repair Program                                5 Homes            $ 30,000             $ 100,000           SHIP
Purchase Assistance Program                        6 Homes            $ 40,000             $ 180,000           SHIP
Barrier-Free Program (Rehab)                       2 Homes            $ 35,000             $ 60,000            SHIP
Homeless Prevention                               68 Homes            $    600             $ 40,000            CDBG
Counseling/Credit Enhancement                     40 Homes            $    500             $ 20,000            SHIP
Fair Housing Educ/Training                        60 Homes            $    100             $   6,000           CDBG
CRA New Construction                               4 Homes            $ 35,554             $ 126,000           SHIP
CRA New Construction                               4 Homes            $ 35,816             $ 143,265           CRA

Davie Housing Projects Proposed for FY 2007/08

Program                                              Units            Unit Cost            Funding             Source
Home Repair Program                                  5 Homes          $ 30,000             $ 100,000           SHIP
Purchase Assistance Program                          6 Homes          $ 40,000             $ 180,000           SHIP
Barrier-Free Program (Rehab)                         2 Homes          $ 35,000             $ 60,000            SHIP
Homeless Prevention                                68 Homes           $    600             $ 40,000            CDBG
Counseling/Credit Enhancement                      40 Homes           $    500             $ 20,000            SHIP
Fair Housing Educ/Training                         60 Homes           $    100             $    6,000          CDBG
Hurricane Hardening – BCHA Griffin                100 Units           $ 2,500              $ 25,000            BCHA
New Construction – BCHA Ehlinger                   30 Units           $150,000             $4,500,000          BCHA
S/F Home Hardening Program                         12 Units           $ 40,000             $ 480,000           Disaster
Mobile Home Repair or Replacement                  51 Units           $ 25,000             $1,275,000          Disaster
Purchase Assistance for M/Home Owners               9 Units           $ 60,000             $ 540,000           Disaster
Relocation/Rental Assistance                       36 Units           $ 6,250              $ 225,000           Disaster

Homelessness - Priority Homeless Needs

As indicated in both the Housing Needs Assessment and the Housing Market Analysis, the Town's Housing and
Community Development Director works closely with the Broward Homeless Coalition and Homeless Partnership
to address the needs of the homeless population throughout Broward County; and, the Town will continue to
promote the county-wide strategies and efforts aimed at addressing homelessness.

At a local level, CDBG Public Service funds totaling $34,000 have been budgeted for FY 2007/08 for the Hope
Outreach Center, a CDBG Sub-Recipient (not-for-profit faith-based entity) to continue to provide emergency
financial assistance to prevent homelessness. Additionally, the Town of Davie supports both the Hope Outreach
Center and the EASE Foundation through Community Endowment funds to provide homeless prevention
services.

Of prime note, is that fact that the Town of Davie is in the process of establishing its first Neighborhood Service
Center (NSC) which will be a one-stop-shop for social services. All agencies that will occupy the facility will

3
 Due to the impact of increased costs following Hurricane Wilma, this project may no longer be financially feasible. The developer has
withdrawn his request for HOME/SHIP Funds and is working to revise the projects size, scale, and mixed-use concept.

                                                                     74
provide financial assistance to prevent ensure economic self-sufficiency and prevent homelessness. The Town
expects this facility to open in the winter of 2007.

The Town will also continue to work closely with the agencies serving the Broward County area in addressing
emergency shelter and transitional housing needs, and helping homeless make the transition to permanent
housing.

Other Special Needs (Supportive Needs of the Non-Homeless)

This section of the Strategic Plan focuses on the needs of persons who are not homeless but who may require
supportive housing. This includes the elderly, the frail elderly, persons with disabilities (mental, physical, or
developmental), persons with alcohol or other drug dependence, and persons with HIV/AIDS and their families.
The Supportive Housing Needs of the Non-Homeless are included in the Exhibits to this Plan. It should be noted
that these are only rough estimates, based in part, on County-wide or State-wide percentages used to determine
the various sub-populations. For example, the HIV/AIDS estimate assumes that the ratio of 1/60 persons in the
general population are infected/affected. This may, or may not hold true for the Town of Davie.

Priority Non-Homeless Needs

Although there are excellent services and facilities available to the elderly and frail elderly residents of Davie, both
of these categories received a high ranking, since elderly individuals on fixed-incomes are generally the most
cost-burdened group.

A large percent of elderly renters in Davie pay in excess of 30% of their income for rent plus utilities. The
extremely low-income elderly renters (those earning 0-30% of the median income), were the most significantly
affected. A significant number paid in excess of 50% of their income for housing costs, leaving little monthly
income for senior citizens to cover the basic necessities such as food, medication, transportation, clothing etc.

As was the case with elderly renters, the most severely affected elderly homeowners, were individuals whose
incomes were at or below 30% of the area median. This group was severely cost-burdened, with over 60% paying
more than one-half of their income for their housing costs (mortgage principal, interest, taxes and insurance).

There are 100 units of public housing specifically for elderly and handicapped individuals in Davie, and the Jewish
Federation of South Florida operates 80 units of elderly rental housing. Additionally, Section 8 Certificates and
Vouchers are assisting the elderly, but many more are needed to address the needs of this population.

As previously indicated, the Town of Davie makes many contributions through the Community Endowment Fund
(CEF), including agencies to assist senior citizens. The Hope Outreach Center, Inc., also has a program for the
elderly, including home visitation, shopping and cleaning assistance, and financial assistance when needed.

Davie’s Home Repair and Barrier-Free Programs also assist elderly residents who lack the financial ability to
make needed home repairs, or to “age in place” by removing architectural barriers in their homes and making
their homes suitable to their changing needs.

Persons with Disabilities

There is no valid assessment of the number and type of disabilities affecting the residents of Davie. However, as
was previously indicated, the HRS District 10, Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health Unit estimates that
approximately ten percent (10%) of the general population has some form of disability. Within this disabled
group, 3% are developmentally disabled, 2.7% are mentally disabled and 4.3% are physically disabled (this
includes disabled frail elderly persons). Approximately 50% of all disabled adults need some form of supportive
housing.

If these same percentages were applied to the Town total population in 2000 of 75,720 persons, it could be
assumed that there are 2,272 developmentally disabled residents in Davie, 2,044 persons with mental disabilities,
and 3,256 persons who are physically disabled, and who may need supportive housing. Once again, these are
state-wide averages, and therefore, may not be truly reflective of the needs in Davie. These categories all
received a low priority due to the fact that there are a significant number of facilities and services already available
in Davie.

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As previously indicated, the Town of Davie makes many contributions through the Community Endowment Fund
(CEF), including agencies to assist persons with disabilities. The Hope Outreach Center, Inc., also has a program
for the frail/disabled elderly, including home visitation, shopping and cleaning assistance, and financial assistance
when needed.

Davie’s Home Repair and Barrier-Free Programs also assist and person with disabilities (regardless of age), to
make needed home repairs, by removing architectural barriers in their homes and making their homes suitable to
their needs.

Persons with Alcohol and Chronic Substance Abuse

This category received a low priority due to the fact that there are several existing services and facilities
addressing the needs of this segment of the population.

According to the Florida Department of Children and Families, Aging and Adult Services, there are two licensed
facilities in the Town of Davie (as of May 1997), that provide alcohol and substance abuse treatment services:

      • Lifeline of Miami, 6570 Griffin Road, Suite 104 (Detox and out-patient services)

      • Recovery Resources, 6915 Stirling Road (Outpatient services)

In addition there are several facilities in the Broward County area that serve Davie residents, including: the
Alcohol & Drug Abuse Services (ADA) Program formerly known as the Broward Addition and Recovery Center
(BARC), 1011 SW 2nd Street, Ft Lauderdale; the Henderson Mental Health Center, Inc., which provides services
for dually diagnosed clients (psychiatric and substance abuse); and, the Dual Diagnosis Day Program located at
5460 No. State Road 7, Suite 101, Ft. Lauderdale.

Persons with HIV or AIDS

There is no data readily available that would identify the number of individuals living in Davie that are either HIV+
or have AIDS; and, no apparent need for services for this population surfaced during preparation of this Plan.
The Broward County Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services (HRS) - Public Health Unit estimated that
in 1990 one in sixty persons living in Broward County was infected with HIV/AIDS. If this 1/60 ratio were applied
against the Town of Davie’s population of 75,720 persons, this would represent 1,260 Davie residents that could
be infected with HIV/AIDS. This data may not be valid however, since linear projections (like this for the County)
do not take into account the unique population and household characteristics of each community.

Given the fact that the specific needs of HIV/AIDS individuals did not surface during the planning process for this
Plan, and given the fact that there are various housing opportunities made available through the HOPWA funds
administered by the City of Ft. Lauderdale, this category received a low priority ranking.

Public Housing Residents

Davie residents in need of subsidized rental housing are served by the Broward County Housing Authority
(BCHA) and the Hollywood Housing Authority. The BCHA owns and operates the two housing projects in Davie
each with 100 units. Ehlinger Apartments located at 7481 N.W. 33rd Street provides family rental housing, and
Griffin Gardens located at 4881 Griffin Road provides units for elderly and disabled persons. The BCHA also
determines tenant eligibility, inspects units, and pays rent subsidies for El Jardin Apartments located at 3300 El
Jardin Drive, which provides 232 family rental units. The Housing Authority also administers 298 Section 8
Certificates or Vouchers; and, the Jewish Federation of South Florida has 80 units of elderly rental housing in
Davie.

The Housing and Community Development Office enjoys a wonderful working relationship with the BCHA. The
two parties are currently reviewing opportunities to expand the number of units at Ehlinger Apartments. One
building at this site was damaged by Hurricane Wilma and has not been reoccupied. Thus, the BCHA is
evaluating the use of that site, coupled with the buildings which formerly housed the Boys & Girls Club (the new
Rick & Rita Case facility down the street).


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Priority Community Development Needs

The non-housing community development needs component of the Consolidated Plan, identifies those needs in
the community, other than housing, which may be eligible for assistance under the Community Development
Block Grant (CDBG) Program. In order to determine the needs and existing gaps in service-delivery, interviews
were conducted with the primary social service and housing providers, and statistical and/or anecdotal information
regarding the needs of specific population groups was obtained from the agencies that were identified in the
beginning of this section. Finally, in early 2007, the Town Housing and Community Development Office, through
the Neighborhood Revitalization Program (NRP) undertook extensive surveys of the residents living in the three
(3) CDBG Target Areas, in order to determine community needs and desires for services.

Meetings were also held with the Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA), Memorial Healthcare Systems
(MHS), the Boys and Girls Club, Hope Outreach Center, EASE, and the Children’s Services Council to obtain
their input and recommendations regarding the proposed use of CDBG funds. It should be noted that the
“estimated dollars to address” the activities identified, are rough estimates, and are provided within the context of
the CDBG funds contemplated over the next five-year period, along with any other local funds or potential federal
and state funds that may be leveraged. No estimates are provided when “no such need” was identified.

The Town's Housing and Community Development Office utilizes a "holistic" approach to neighborhood
revitalization and redevelopment. The total needs of the Target Areas were evaluated, and programs and
activities were formulated into an overall revitalization/redevelopment plan, to meet the specific needs of that
Target Area. Davie maintains that no one factor can "turn a neighborhood around"; rather, the combination of
affordable housing, improved housing conditions, expanded infrastructure, parks and related facilities, education
and vocational training, economic development initiatives (job development/placement), subsidized child care,
health care, etc., must be brought together to create a significant impact on the community. Using the information
gained through this process, the following needs were identified in the CDBG Target Areas:

Driftwood
     • Crime Reduction
     • Affordable Childcare
     • Affordable Rental Housing
     • Healthcare – Affordable/Available
     • First Time Home Buyers Programs

Orange Park
   • Crime Reduction
   • Affordable Rental Housing
   • Mobile Home Repair Grants
   • Affordable Childcare
   • Healthcare – Affordable/Available

Eastside
   • Crime Reduction
   • First-Time Home Buyers Programs
   • Healthcare – Affordable/Available
   • Affordable Childcare
   • Affordable Rental Housing

The Surveys indicated that the number one priority among Target Area residents is public safety i.e., reduced
crime. The Town, through it’s NRP Program, and programs for at-risk youth, will target crime prevention and
reduction techniques. These programs are aimed at empowering people by transitioning them from welfare to
economic independence. There is a direct correlation between poverty and domestic violence, petty larceny, and
juvenile crimes. Thus, a renewed focus on the Police Departments “Community Oriented Policing” Unit is
warranted.




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Priority Community Development Needs

Based on the community input, the following categories where ranked as high priorities:

    •     Public Services – health services, senior services, handicapped services, legal services, youth services,
          child-care services, employment/training, health services, crime awareness and prevention, and tenant
          landlord counseling

    •     Public Facilities - youth centers, neighborhood facilities, child care centers/facilities, park and/or
          recreation facilities

    •     Infrastructure - water/sewer improvements, street improvements, sidewalks, drainage improvements

The following categories where ranked as medium priorities:

    •     Code enforcement
    •     Tree planting
    •     Fire stations/equipment
    •     Fair Housing activities
    •     Economic development
    •     Acquisition of real property

The following categories where ranked as low priorities:

    •     Clearance and demolition
    •     Clearance of contaminated sites
    •     Senior centers and handicapped centers
    •     Homeless facilities
    •     Health or mental health facilities
    •     Parking facilities
    •     Asbestos removal
    •     Historic preservation
    •     Solid waste disposal
    •     Transportations services
    •     Substance abuse services
    •     Lead hazard screening
    •     Micro-enterprises

Assignment of Priorities/Long Term Goals and Objectives

Based on the needs identified and the gaps in service delivery, the Town of Davie's Consolidated Plan is directed
towards the following long-term objectives:

    •     expand affordable rental housing and homeownership opportunities for Davie residents, and address the
          needs of mobile home occupants who may be permanently and involuntarily displaced by redevelopment.

        • the rehabilitation, construction and/or expansion of public facilities and infrastructures e.g., the renovation
          of existing public (community) facilities (e.g. the NSC) and street improvements such as: improved
          lighting, landscaping, drainage, sidewalks, streets, connections to sewer systems, etc.

        • upgrade the existing housing stock and providing loans and/or grants to income-eligible homeowners to
          make home repairs, replace existing substandard/leaking roofs, “harden” the structures and Disaster
          Assistance for Hurricane Wilma Victims living in sub-standard mobile homes.

        • increased/enhanced park and recreation opportunities and expanded programs that serve at-risk youth
          e.g. the renovation of existing parks (improved lighting, landscaping, equipment, etc.), construction of new
          park and/or recreation facilities (e.g. a new gym), the provision of services, or acquisition for new facilities.

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      • swale area drainage (percolation) and positive discharge drainage, new or improved water/sewer lines,
        and connection of low/moderate income homes to the existing sewer system e.g. connections to the
        sewer laterals.

      • expanded affordable child day care and after-school opportunities for at-risk youth and teens.

      • new programs for crime prevention and crime reduction in the CDBG Target Areas.

      • economic development initiatives that stimulate the economy through neighborhood revitalization,
        commercial revitalization, facade renovation programs, or job creation/ retention.

      • mitigation of potential adverse effects caused by federally assisted activities, minimize displacement of
        Davie residents, and fair and adequate relocation benefits when needed.

      • upgrade and/or supplement the existing transportation and mobility services in Davie, especially those
        needed by low and moderate income persons and individuals with special needs.

      • Fair Housing outreach and education campaigns designed to eliminate all types of discrimination and
        ensure that Davie residents have the widest range of housing choices.

      • remove architectural barriers and impediments to the elderly and to the physically, mentally, or
        developmentally disabled.

      • promote the county-wide strategies and efforts aimed at addressing homelessness, and provide
        homeless prevention services to at-risk residents

      • to provide social services related to healthcare, mental healthcare, housing, food, transportation,
        emergency assistance, etc.

      • the removal of slums, blight and blighting conditions i.e., clearance, demolition, and code enforcement.

      • the retention of significant historic structures and historic preservation efforts.

      • improve the Town's capacity to plan and administer its CDBG funds, undertake comprehensive planning
        activities, and apply for other HUD Community Planning and Development (CPD) programs or related
        grants.

Hurricane Preparedness

The Town of Davie has over 23,000 mobile home residents, representing a quarter of the Town’s overall
population. Many mobile home residents are single mothers, elderly, or disabled persons on fixed incomes, who
rely on this form of “affordable housing”. During FY 2005/06, the Housing and Community Development
Department, in an attempt to better protect the population living in this vulnerable housing stock, developed a new
and swift approach for evacuating all 31 mobile home parks once a “Hurricane Warning” is issued. In conjunction
with the Memorial Healthcare System (MHS), the Town assembled a 17-member volunteer team that mobilizes
under the Direction of the Housing and Community Development Director, when the Town’s Emergency
Operations Center (EOC) Director orders the “mandatory evacuation” of mobile home parks. Once the Town
receives notice that the Red Cross has opened shelters, evacuations begin.

This evacuation plan divides the Town into zones of about four (4) mobile home communities each. Teams of two
(2) persons are dispatched into each zone; and, the teams post and distribute evacuation notices at each mobile
home community, and coordinate transportation of residents to the Red Cross Shelters. This process, not only
alleviates the burden on the small Housing and Community Development Staff, it expedites the evacuation
process.




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Many of the MHS volunteers live in the Town of Davie, and they understand the vulnerability of mobile homes
during a storm. The MHS volunteers ensure that each resident has the opportunity to safely reach a designated
shelter or other alternative space.

Given the magnitude of Hurricane Wilma’s devastation in South Florida (particularly Broward County), the Town’s
evacuation efforts saved countless lives that may have been lost if the residents had stayed in their vulnerable
mobile homes. Davie alone, lost over 832 mobile homes i.e., that were completely destroyed, as well as
extensive damage to homes, and apartments.

Removal of Barriers to Affordable Housing and Proposed Fair Housing Initiatives

In an effort to remove barriers to affordable housing the Town will continue to implement its "Affordable Housing
Incentive Plan" which was previously described in the Housing Market Analysis section of this report. That Plan
and other Town incentives include, but are not limited to:

      • ensuring provision of low-and moderate-income housing in the Comprehensive Plan by establishing a
        Town-wide goal in the EAR that 20% of all new housing developed be affordable or workforce housing;

      • requiring a mandatory set-aside of 15% affordable housing for all residential units in the Transit Oriented
        Corridor (TOC);

      • requiring a 20% set-aside for affordable housing in the Regional Activity Center (RAC) in Eastern Davie;

      • expedited permits for affordable housing and workforce housing developments;

      • encouraging development of vacant land for affordable residential uses;

      • waiving all planning, processing, and permitting fees, and waiving recreation impact fees for affordable
        housing projects;

      • payment or rebate of Water/Sewer Impact Fees for affordable/workforce housing units;

      • providing for sufficient multi-family development for future needs in the Future Land Use Map;

      • ensuring the streamlining of the development review process in the Comprehensive Plan;

      • preserving the existing housing stock through code enforcement and housing rehabilitation.

The Town of Davie affirmatively furthers fair housing opportunities and works to identify any impediments to fair
housing choices. Impediments to fair housing include “any actions, omissions, or decisions taken because of
race, color, religion, sex, disability, familiar status, or national origin which restrict housing choices or the
availability of housing choices”.


As previously indicated, Davie's “Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choices” (AI) was predicated on the
fact that equal and free access to residential housing (housing choice) is fundamental to meeting the overall
needs of the community. The AI evaluated and identified barriers to affordable housing, and contains a strategy to
address and ameliorate any problems identified.

The Town's AI also included a review of the Town’s laws, regulations, and administrative policies, procedures and
practices affecting the location, availability and accessibility of housing, as well as an assessment of conditions,
both public and private, affecting fair housing choice.

Given that the Town is entering into a new Five-Year Consolidated Plan, the Housing and Community
Development Director will review and analyzes the number and type of discrimination complaints, if any, that have
been filed on behalf of Davie residents by the Broward County Human Rights Division, the Florida Human
Relations Commission, and the Fair Housing Equal Opportunity (FHEO) Office of U.S. HUD. The Town's current


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policies and zoning laws will also be reexamined to insure that they are not impeding the development of
affordable housing.

The Housing and Community Development Office is currently evaluating the possibility of the Town adopting a
linkage ordinance or some form of Inclusionary zoning, so that affordable housing units can either be integrated
into new developments or a fee is paid into an Affordable Housing Trust Fund. In addition, information on the
current and past lending practices will be carefully evaluated, and Davie’s lending institutions will be encouraged
to participate in the Town’s Fair Housing training programs.

In 2007, when the Town adopted a one-year Moratorium on the redevelopment of mobile home parks, it
established a Task Force to look at options and solutions to assist mobile home occupants. It is expected that the
preliminary findings of this group, spearheaded by a Consultant, will be presented to the Davie Town Council in
September/October 2007.

The AI provides opportunities for effective, on-going relationships with all elements of the community, with a clear
and continuous exchange of concerns, ideas, analysis and evaluation of results. In addition to working with the
lending institutions, (both on an educational basis and in order to obtain their input), the Town's Housing and
Community Development Director has developed a good relationship with local realtors, developers, as well as
affordable housing providers.

The Town of Davie has a good working relationship with both the Broward County Housing Authority and the
Hollywood Housing Authority, and will continue to cultivate opportunities for joint venture projects and activities.
Indicative of this positive relationship and as an incentive to further affordable housing, the Town of Davie (via an
Inter-Local Agreement with the Housing Authority), waives their annual payment in lieu of taxes in exchange for
services provided.

The Town of Davie and the BCHA jointly funded central air-conditioning improvements at Ehlinger Apartments
(family public housing project). The Town will continue to work closely with the BCHA to ensure that Davie
residents receive the level of services necessary, and to examine the potential for additional Section 8
vouchers/certificates necessary to address the need for affordable rental units by individuals that are cost-
burdened.

In addition to the above, other organizations and individuals, including neighborhood groups, social service
providers, etc., were identified to obtain their guidance, input, and support in identifying impediments to fair
housing choice at the neighborhood level, and in developing appropriate plans to address these needs.

One aspect of fair housing choice is neighborhood revitalization and the provision of services to areas in which
there are concentrations of minorities and/or low and moderate income families. The Consolidated Plan, and the
CDBG Action Plan for 2007/08 attempt to balance the Town’s limited CDBG funds in a manner that benefits the
greatest number of lower-income families and minority individuals.

An integrated, holistic, approach to neighborhood revitalization has been developed under this 5-Year Strategic
Plan, which sets up the opportunity to address the physical improvements within the targeted areas (e.g. street
improvements, new sidewalks, lighting, landscaping and drainage), improve the existing housing stock, and
integrate existing social services.

The CDBG Strategic Plan also integrates the Town’s CRA Plan, and resources which may be used for
neighborhood revitalization.

Anti-Poverty Strategy

An anti-poverty plan is not a housing plan, but rather an economic development plan that increases job
opportunities and the income levels of low-income households i.e., to help at-risk residents achieve economic
self-sufficiency. The Town's holistic approach to revitalizing/redeveloping the CDBG Target areas, will enhance
the quality of life for these residents by providing job training and placement, subsidized child care, computer
skills, and other items which are designed to make them self-sufficient, and non-reliant on government services.
The goal is to transition residents from welfare to independent economic status.



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Neighborhood Revitalization Program (NRP)- This program, funded with both General and Community
Endowment Funds, is an example of a successful anti-poverty program. A Pilot Demonstration Program with
Memorial Healthcare Systems (MHS) evidenced both the need for this type of programming, and the benefits to
the Town as a whole. The NRP staff meet with the Target Area residents on a monthly basis, to identify needs,
and develop both short-term solutions and long-range strategies to meet identified needs. This program has
successfully prevented foreclosures and evictions, helped people obtain jobs, provided urgently needed training in
the areas of financial management and credit enhancement, provides hurricane preparedness programs, etc.
27,773 referrals were made in FY 2005/06 to local service providers for special needs or at-risk individuals by the
Housing and Community Development Staff, which includes a Neighborhood Revitalization Program Coordinator
and two Neighborhood Resource Specialists. The majority of these referrals were for housing assistance used to
prevent homelessness.

Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) - The Town works closely with both Broward County and Hispanic Unity, to
promote use of the Earned Income Tax Credit among Target Area residents. The Town coordinates both on-site
tax preparation and mobile vans that come into the Town to provide free-tax preparation for lower-income wage
earners. The following is a breakdown of how each site performed.

Flamingo Elementary                      Rick & Rita Case Boys & Girls Club
Total Taxpayers Served: 13               Total Taxpayers Served: 14
Total Refunds: $ 21,878                  Total Refunds: $ 25,111

Davie Town Hall                          Palma Nova Community Center
Total Taxpayers Served: 7                Total Taxpayers Served: 29
Total Refunds: $ 8,765                   Total Refunds: $ 12 089

63              Total Taxpayers Served
$67,843.00      Total Refunds:

Love to Read – Love To Achieve - the Town partners with the Broward County Head Start Program to undertake
the “Love to Read – Love to Achieve” Program. Male mentors go into Head Start schools each day for one week,
to read to the children and spark their interest in reading. Town employees (Fire Fighters, Police, Engineers,
Elected Officials etc.,) read to the children.

CSC After-School Programs - Town of Davie in partnership with the Davie Community Redevelopment Agency
(CRA) successfully negotiated a contract with the Children’s Services Council of Board County, to fund an 85 slot
after-school program for the children living in the Eastern CDBG Target Area. This program is operated by
Memorial Healthcare System (MHS) at no cost to the Town of Davie or the participants. In addition to traditional
after-school activities, the students received one hour of reading instruction daily and two hours of math
instruction weekly, by certified teachers. MHS also employs a certified child behavior therapist to work with the at-
risk youth.

CSC-Memorial Healthcare Services (MHS) Teen REACH Program – The Town of Davie in a partnership with
Memorial Healthcare Systems (MHS) to leverage CDBG funds to operate the “Teen REACH” Program
(Responsibility through Education, Achievement, Community, and Health) to enhance the current programming at
the Orange Park Community Center. Teen REACH is a program designed for teenagers between the ages of 11 -
17 and allows youth to be part of the “decision makers” regarding program scheduling and activities. MHS has
successfully partnered with the Town of Davie on several youth initiatives, including after school programming at
the Potter’s Park Multipurpose Facility, summer camps at Eastside Community Center and Orange Park, and
assisted with counseling, tutoring and supportive services at the Davie PAL Emergency Hurricane Shelter in
November and December 2005.

Leveraging - The Consolidated Plan focuses the resources available to meet the needs of the lower-income
population in Davie; and, the CDBG, HOME, and SHIP funds are used to leverage both public and private sector
funds for community improvement programs. Indeed, the Town has been very successful in leveraging other
funds, both public and private, to meet its Consolidated Plan goals and objectives. The Town has developed
effective and fruitful partnerships which have made many of the projects and initiatives financially feasible.

"Harmony Village Community " - The Town donated a vacant 4.2 acre parcel fronting the Davie Road Extension,
to Habitat for Humanity to construct 22 new single-family homes. Although Habitat normally develops homes for

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low-income families who earn 50%< of the median income, this development will have a mix of incomes; and,
approximately one-third of the homes will be set aside for families earning up to 80% of median income. The
design of the homes vary (i.e. there are different site elevations), and mirror market rate housing. The homes
were financed by local lenders with interest-free loans payable over 20 years. No cash down-payments were
required of the homeowners; however, they were required to contribute 500 hours of sweat equity in their unit.
The monthly mortgage payments (PITI) for the 22 new single-family homes was $500 or less, and sold for
$57,000-60,000. The Town allocated $725,000 in SHIP Grant Funds for the predevelopment of the site; and
building permit and related fee waiver for this affordable housing venture will be provided.

Boys & Girls Club Facility: In 2004/05 the new Rick and Rita Case Boys & Girls Club was constructed on the
southeast corner of Driftwood Park. CDBG funds totaling $800,000 successfully leveraged an additional $500,000
from the County under the new Parks Bond Initiative “Challenge Grants”. It is hoped that during this Consolidated
Plan period, that a new gymnasium or covered basketball courts can be added to this facility.

Healthcare and Community Services-Memorial Healthcare: The Town’s joint venture with the Memorial
Healthcare System for the “Neighborhood Revitalization Program (NRP)” in the Driftwood Target Area proved to
be a tremendous success; and, a steady, progressive agenda for self-sufficiency was developed, and is moving
forward. As indicated previously, once the MHS grant ended in 2003, the Town funded (and expanded) the
program using both General Funds and Community Endowment Funds.

The Town’s NRP program now successfully operates in all three (3) CDBG Target Areas. Joe DiMaggio
Children’s Hospital, through Memorial Healthcare, has committed their mobile van to the Driftwood Area, once per
month. In this manner, free vision and hearing screening will be provided, along with school immunizations, and
well-care physicals. Affordable health insurance opportunities will also be provided to these residents. The Mobile
Health Van makes a tremendous impact on the under-served and uninsured children in this area, since these
services will be provided in their own neighborhoods, parents will not have to worry about transportation to a clinic
or emergency room, if their children become ill. MHS also provides a Mobile Health Van for adults.

During the tenure of this Consolidated Plan, efforts will be made to get the North Broward Hospital District to
provide similar programming for the residents of the Western Target Area who fall into their “catchment area”.

Improved Conditions for Residents Living in Ehlinger, El Jardin, and Griffin Gardens: The BCHA works closely
with the Town in renovating/upgrading the living conditions at the Public Housing Project. The Housing Authority
has recently pressure cleaned and painted the exterior of all buildings, provided new signage, and landscaping.
The Town and the Housing Authority have jointly funded the installation of central air-conditioning for all 100 units.
The El Jardin apartments are privately owned “Section 8 Project Based” units; and, the Town plans to work with
the owners to enhance the aesthetics of that enterprise. Exterior painting has already been undertaken; and,
plans to reconstruct the roadways and landscaping are planned. During this Consolidated Plan period, it is hoped
that the Town can partner with the BCHA to install hurricane shutters at the Griffin Gardens project for the elderly
and disabled; and, construct some new rental units at the Ehlinger site.

Infrastructure Improvements: A major street improvement program in the Driftwood Target Area, funded through
the Town’s CDBG Program, was completed in January 2000. This venture included new drainage systems, newly
resurfaced streets and landscaping. The eastside street improvement program is currently underway, and the
street and sidewalk improvements are complete. The 41st Street drainage project and the new decorative street
lighting program are underway. In western Davie, the N-29A drainage canal improvements were “permitted” and
ready for construction, as soon as sufficient funds are earmarked for this project, unfortunately Governor Christ
Vetoed the 50 % match.

Community Oriented Policing Program: Davies Code Compliance and Community Oriented Policing (COP’s)
Officers play a crucial role in revitalizing neighborhoods as they are the “eyes and ears”, and have the opportunity
to interact with the residents at the grass-roots level. Although, Davie’s Community Oriented Policing (COP’s)
Program has “Neighborhood Officers” assigned to areas that generally coincide with the CDBG Target Areas,
these Officers are frequently called-upon to undertake other duties, and have not been able to dedicate their full
time and attention to these revitalization efforts. One of the primary elements of community-oriented policing, is to
be directly accessible to the residents, in order to gain their respect and their trust. In this manner, the level of
communication between the Town and the residents is enhanced, providing an unique insight to neighborhood
problems and “trouble-spots”.


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Institutional Structure and Intergovernmental Coordination

Town of Davie: The Housing and Community Development Dept. is charged with carrying out the Consolidated
Plan and each annual Action Plan. This office is the main source of information to other agencies and/or entities
in administering and carrying out the goals and objectives of the Consolidated Plan, and incremental Action
Plans. This Department secures and administers the CDBG funds, the SHIP Grant funds, and oversees Davies'
share of HOME Funds under the HOME Consortium, well as any other HUD funds that the Town may be entitled
to receive in the future. The Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) works closely with the Town's Housing
and Community Development Dept., to ensure that the CRA and Consolidated Plan goals and objectives are met
in the most cost effective manner, eliminating any duplication of efforts. The designated CRA area generally
coincides with the Eastern/Potters Park CDBG Target Area in the eastern part of Davie.

Broward County Housing Authority: The Broward County Housing Authority (BCHA) owns and operates two (2)
public housing projects located in the Town of Davie containing 100 units of family rental housing and 100 units of
elderly and disabled rental housing. The BCHA also manages 232 units of privately owned rental housing which
was funded under the Section 8 Moderate Rehabilitation Program. Additionally, the Authority is administering 298
Section 8 rental certificates in the Town of Davie. As noted earlier, the Town of Davie has a good working
relationship with the Broward County Housing Authority, waiving their annual payment in lieu of taxes in exchange
for services provided. The Town also works closely with the BCHA regarding the routine maintenance of the
public housing units under its stewardship, and closely coordinates the CGP improvements with the Town. The
Town will continue to foster its close working relationship with the BCHA.

Broward County: The Town is an "entitlement" recipient of State Housing Incentive Partnership Program (SHIP)
funds from the State of Florida, under the Sadowski Act. On April 1, 1998, the Town Council unanimously adopted
the Town’s Affordable Housing Incentive Strategy; and, the Broward County Local Housing Assistance Plan
(LHAP) was amended to include the Town of Davie. Although Davie falls under the County’s LHAP, the Town
determines how it’s proportionate share of SHIP grant funds are allocated, and retains oversight of the Town’s
housing programs and initiatives.

Davie Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA): In conjunction with the Housing Finance Authority of Broward
County, the Davie Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) promotes the development of new single-family,
affordable homes in the Eastside neighborhood of Davie. Applicants must be existing residents who qualify under
the CDBG income guidelines, and must be able to afford a mortgage. The CRA provides the land at no charge to
eligible home buyers, and conventional mortgages are supplemented by a SHIP grant to the homeowners. The
CRA has established a goal that 20% of all its residential units are “affordable workforce” housing.

Habitat for Humanity, Inc: The Town's partnership with Habitat for Humanity, Inc. resulted in the provision of new
single-family homes that are affordable to lower income families. Using donated land, ten homes were
constructed in the Driftwood Estates section of Davie, in the area called "Harmony Village" in 1996-98; and,
twenty-two (22) new homes were built on a 4 acre parcel adjacent to the original Harmony Village Site. Four
homes were also constructed in the "Potter Park” area at no cost to the Town of Davie. SHIP funds were used to
construct the necessary infrastructure (sidewalks, etc.) The Davie Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) has
set-aside an additional five (5) lots in the east side of Davie for future use by Habitat of Humanity.

Federally Subsidized Housing: According to the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing's Affordable Housing in
Florida 1996 (which utilizes U.S. HUD information), there are 363 federally subsidized housing units in the Town
of Davie in addition to those outlined above. 127 of these units are funded under the Section 202 Program for the
Elderly, and 236 units are funded under the Section 207/223 Programs. The Town of Davie will continue to work
with private developers and affordable housing providers that serve special-needs populations i.e. the elderly and
frail elderly. Following adoption of the Consolidated Plan, applicants for federal housing assistance will need a
Certificate of Consistency with the Town's Consolidated Plan. These consistency reviews will be done as
expeditiously as possible.

City of Ft. Lauderdale: The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development provides grant funds under the
Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) Program that is designed to meet the special housing
needs of persons living with AIDS, and their families. The HOPWA regulations require that the most populous
municipal jurisdiction within each urban county area, administer the HOPWA Program on behalf of all the
municipal jurisdictions contained therein. The City of Ft. Lauderdale (Planning and Economic Development
Department, Community Development Division), administers the HOPWA funds for the Broward County area,

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which includes the Town of Davie. The Town has repeatedly asked for information on how the HOPWA funds are
benefiting Davie residents, but no reports from the City have been furnished to Davie.

Salvation Army: The Salvation Army whose facility is located at 1445 West Broward Boulevard in Ft. Lauderdale,
is one of the primary service provider for homeless individuals and families in the Broward County area. They
provide emergency and transitional housing for men, women, and families.

Social Service Agencies: There are several excellent not-for-profit social service providers located in the Town of
Davie, many of whom serve special needs populations. The Town will continue to support these not-for-profit
service agencies, and has improved communication so that information and referrals can be made more
effectively. The primary social service agencies in the Town are viewed as:

        • Hope Outreach Center, Inc., 4700 SW 64th Avenue, which provides information and referral, emergency
          services, food pantry, advocacy and a “mentoring” program. Services to the elderly include shopping
          assistance and limited transportation to medical appointments, etc. Additionally, they operate an after-
          school program, i.e. a children’s enrichment program, at the Palma Nova Mobile Home Park in Eastern
          Davie. In 2001 Hope Outreach Center become the Town's first CDBG Sub-recipient Social Service
          Provider.

        • Emergency Assistance Service Effort (EASE) located on Orange Drive at the Town’s Public Works and
          Fire Administration complex, which provides information and referrals for Davie residents, food and
          clothing bank. (954) 797-1077.

        • Hope Crisis Pregnancy Center, located on University Road, which provides crisis pregnancy counseling,
          lifestyle and post-abortion counseling, pregnancy tests, baby clothing and baby food/formula, social
          service referrals.

        • Broward County Family Success Center, Potters Park, Davie – provides both emergency financial
          assistance and family counseling through licensed therapists. This program will be relocated to the new
          Neighborhood Service Center.

Private Institutions: Private Institutions, such as lenders, foundations, developers, etc. will be asked to provide
additional input and technical information in accomplishing the goals of affordable housing as outlined in the
Consolidated Plan. For example, the Town will work with interested lenders to contribute through loan consortia
or individual efforts. Significant success has been achieved in this area through the Town's participation in the
SHIP Program, wherein a group of local lenders working with the Broward County Housing Finance Authority,
have actively participated in the financing of home ownership opportunities. The Town will continue to cultivate
these professional relationships, and expand opportunities for other public-private partnerships.

Actions to Overcome Gaps

The Town of Davie will take the following actions to overcome gaps in its delivery of affordable housing and
related support services:

    •    Continue to identify opportunities to expand the supply of decent, safe and sanitary affordable and
         workforce housing in Davie for all income levels by providing both rental and homeownership
         opportunities.

    •    Explore the possibility of creating a Minimum Housing Code for the Town of Davie to ensure that the
         existing dwelling units are maintained in an acceptable standard which insures health and safety.

    •    Explore the opportunity to implement Inclusionary Zoning provisions or Linkage Ordinances related to
         affordable housing, as well as the use of bonds to create mixed use and/or mixed income properties.

    •    Establish an Affordable Housing Trust Fund to finance urgently needed workforce and affordable housing
         opportunities.




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    •   Establish policies and procedures to protect mobile home occupants who are permanently and
        involuntarily displaced by the redevelopment of mobile home parks.

    •   Expand programs to ensure that Davie’s mobile home occupants evacuate during a Hurricane or Tropical
        Storm, by providing pet vaccination and neutering services, developing pet-friendly shelters, and
        providing police protection of their household valuables.

    •   Open and operate Davie’s first Neighborhood Service Center at 4700 SW 64th Avenue in Davie and
        enhance the level of social services available to Davie's low income and at-risk populations.

    •   Expand the Neighborhood Revitalization Program to further grass-roots neighborhood revitalization, deter
        youth gangs, create economic self-sufficiency, and reduce crime.

    •   Develop a child care center which provides subsidized or affordable child care and after-school programs.

    •   Create a Learning Center in Harmony Village which will provide educational, vocational and technical
        training, as well as computer and InterNet opportunities.

    •   Continue to coordinate with the Broward County Housing Authority (BCHA) to enhance the lives of
        persons living in public housing or Section 8 units located in the Town of Davie.

    •   Evaluate opportunities to upgrade and supplement the existing transportation and mobility services in
        Davie, especially those needed by lower income persons and individuals with special needs.

    •   Expand the single-family loan and/or grant program which will provide the financial assistance needed by
        many low/moderate income homeowners to make minor repairs to their homes, and replace existing
        substandard and leaking roofs.

    •   Expand CDBG-funded homeless prevention activities and participate in regional planning activities
        through Broward County to address the problems of homelessness.

    •   Develop a gymnasium at the Rick and Rita Case Boys and Girls Club, so that the youth and teens can be
        protected from inclement weather.

    •   Refine and streamline Disaster Recovery Initiatives, to assist Davie residents impacted by a Hurricane or
        other natural disaster. Work with FEMA, CERT, HUD, and Adopt-A-Hurricane Family organizations to
        ensure that Davie residents are properly rehoused in sustainable housing.

    •   Support and share information with local and Broward-based service providers to identify resources
        available to serve special needs populations.

    •   Continue to promote the development of new single-family, affordable homes in the Eastside
        neighborhood of Davie in conjunction with the Davie Community Redevelopment Agency

    •   Continue to promote economic development initiatives that result in job training, job creation or job
        retention, and new developments which will expand the Town's tax base.

    •   Undertake an educational campaign on fair housing, to ensure that Davie residents have the widest range
        of housing choices.

Public Housing Resident Initiatives

Memorial Healthcare-Community Revitalization & Self-Sufficiency Program Driftwood/Potter Park. In 1999 the
Town of Davie and Memorial Healthcare entered into a joint funding agreement to establish a neighborhood
revitalization initiative which includes a self-sufficiency program for the residents of Ehlinger Apartments (Public
Housing) and El Jardin (Section 8 Mod Rehab). This program has proven to be a big success and the monthly
“Community Meetings” at the Boys & Girls Club have been well attended. A steady, progressive agenda for self-
sufficiency was developed, and is moving forward.

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The Town of Davie and the Broward County Housing Authority (BCHA) have developed an excellent partnership.
As a result, the entire Public Housing Project has been cleaned and painted, new landscaping and signage were
installed; and, central air-conditioning was installed at all units in Ehlinger Apartments.

Monitoring Standards and Procedures

Evaluating program performance against previously established milestones, is an important part of administering
federal and state grant programs. The Housing and Community Development Office in Davie is responsible for
administering the Consolidated Plan and the various Action Plan components.

The Housing and Community Development Director established policies and procedures to ensure both
programmatic and fiscal compliance. A comprehensive list of resource materials was developed that provide the
basic criteria for program compliance and monitoring, such as: all pertinent CDBG rules and regulations, HUD
Handbooks, OMB Circulars, HUD Notices and Circulars, and IDIS Materials. Project files were developed for each
CDBG-funded activity which includes a checklist to ensure that each project or activity meets established
milestones and benchmarks. These files are updated on a weekly basis, in order to ensure that the projects and
activities move forward expeditiously.

The Housing and Community Development Director reviews all program expenditures to ensure that they are
eligible and fully comply with CDBG rules and regulations. Once IDIS Voucher data is entered into the IDIS
system for the drawdowns, the Town's Deputy Budget and Finance Director reviews and approves the drawdown.
In this fashion, there is always a "check-and-balance" system in the CDBG grant accounting.

The Housing and Community Development Director also meets on a routine basis with the Town Administrator
and his Deputy, and provides updates on the status of the various projects and activities. The Deputy Town
Administrator provides this data, as needed, directly to the Town Administrator and Town Council.

The Quarterly Cash Transaction Reports for submission to HUD are prepared by the Housing and Community
Director and the Office Manager; and, the Town's Deputy Budget and Finance Director double-checks the figures
to ensure that the expenditures are properly reported and approves Vouchers in the IDIS System. This gives both
Departments an opportunity to evaluate the expenditure rate of the overall program.

HUD requires that each jurisdiction that has an approved Consolidated Plan, annually review and report to the
U.S. Department of HUD on the progress it has made in carrying out its Strategic Plan and Action Plan, in a form
prescribed by HUD. The Town's Consolidated Annual Plan Report (CAPR) is submitted to HUD within 90 days
after the close of the program year.

The Performance Report includes a description of the resources made available, the investment of available
resources, the geographic distribution and location of investments, the families and persons assisted, including
racial and ethnic status of persons assisted, actions taken to affirmatively further fair housing, and other actions
indicated in the Strategic Plan and the Action Plan. The report also includes an evaluation of the Town's progress
in meeting its specific objective of providing affordable housing, including the number and type of families served.

                                     Housing & Community Development
                                 Performance Outcome Measurement System

Activity/Project Name: _________________________________________________________

Funding Source:         ___________     CDBG
                        ___________     HOME
                        ___________     SHIP
                        ___________     Other

Objectives:

        _______         Enhance Suitable Living Environment
        _______         Create Decent Housing
        _______         Promote Economic Opportunity

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Outcomes:

        _______          Availability/Accessibility
        _______          Affordability
        _______          Sustainability

Activity Type:

        _______          Housing Rehabilitation                   _______          Special Needs Housing
        _______          Rental Housing Production (HOME)         _______          Homeownership Assistance
        _______          Community Facilities                     _______          Housing Counseling
        _______          Public Safety                            _______          Public Services
        _______          Infrastructure                           _______          Code Enforcement
        _______          Lead-based Paint Activities              _______          Water/Sewer
        _______          Economic Development                     _______          Utilities
        _______          Housing for Homeless                     _______          Transportation


Indicators:

       _______           Number of households assisted            _______          Number of persons stabilized
       _______           Number of new businesses assisted        _______          Acres of Brownfield’s
remediated
       _______           Number of jobs created/retained          _______          Amount of money leveraged
       _______           Number of units made 504-accessible      _______          Number of affordable units
       _______           Number of years of affordability         _______          Number of housing units for
                         guaranteed                                                HIV/AIDS
        _______          Number of jobs with health care          _______          Number of units for chronically
                                benefits                                                  homeless
        _______          Number of units meeting Energy Star      _______          Number of units made lead safe
                         standards

Income Levels Served:

        _______              30% of median
        _______              50% of median
        _______              60% of median
        _______              80% of median
        _______              120% (SHIP ONLY)

Monitoring is an on-going process involving continuous communication, especially between the Housing and
Community Development Director and the Town Administrator and Deputy Town Administrator, Department
Heads, and the Town's partners in service provisions.

ONE YEAR ACTION PLAN
The citizen participation process for this Action Plan is the same as for the Consolidated Plan:

      • Pre-Development Public Hearings were held on 5/8/07 in the Eastern Target Area, on 5/17/07 in
        the Driftwood Target Area, on 5/23/07 in the Orange Park Target Area, and 5/29/07 in the Town
        Hall Community Room.

      • A draft of the Consolidated Plan for FY 2007-2012 which includes this Action Plan was made
        available for a 30-day public comment commencing 6/18/07 at the Housing and Community
        Development Office at 4700 SW 64th Avenue.




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      • A summary of the Action Plan was published in the Sun Sentinel on 6/17/07 describing its
        contents, purpose, activities to be undertaken, and the proposed use of funds.

      • A summary of the FY 2007/08 Action Plan was provided to Broward County and to the adjacent
        municipalities of Fort Lauderdale, Dania Beach, Sunrise, Plantation, Cooper City, Weston,
        Pembroke Pines, Miramar, and Hollywood, as well as the Broward County Housing Authority
        (BCHA), Broward County Community Development and the Office of Housing Finance (OHF) and
        the Broward County Human Services Department (Family Success Center Office), to obtain their
        input.

      • The Towns Neighborhood Revitalization Program (NRP) staff undertook extensive surveys in the
        spring of 2007 order to obtain information on what “quality of life” issues were facing the residents
        in order to prioritize the identified needs within each CDBG Target Area.

      • Prior to adopting the Plan, a Public Hearing was held by the Davie Town Council on 7/26/07 in
        the Town Council Chambers.

Based on this public participation process, the following projects/activities were recommended for funding:

                       Proposed Funding for FY 2007/08 CDBG Action Plan - $654,088

2007-1 Emergency Assistance/Homeless Prevention Program $34,013 - Provision of emergency financial
assistance on a Town-wide basis to eligible lower-income Davie residents, to prevent homelessness and/or
address emergency situations such as the need for food, shelter, transportation, etc. Funds may be provided
contractually through a not-for-profit sub-recipient agency i.e., the Hope Outreach Center, Inc., or under the
direction of the Town’s Housing & CD Director. (Public Service)

2007-2 Orange Park After-School Program for At Risk Youth $58,900 - Provision of structured after-school &
evening programs for at-risk youth/teens living in the Orange Park Area north of 14th Street, south of I-595,
between 130th-136th Avenues. (Public Service)

2007-3 Scholarship Program for Target Area Children $5,200 – Provision of fee waivers/scholarship
opportunities for the children of lower-income target area residents, to allow them to participate in recreational,
educational, or vocational opportunities e.g. Summer Camp. (Public Service)

2007-4 Neighborhood Service Center - One Stop Shop $375,000 - The Town of Davie purchased the facility
                       th
located at 4700 SW 64 Avenue (formerly known as the JENNMAR Building) in June of 2007, for the purpose of
creating a Neighborhood Service Center (One-Stop-Shop) for the provision of social services and housing
services to Davie’s lower-income and at-risk residents. The Town of Davie fronted the acquisition costs with
General Funds; and, CDBG funds will be allotted over a 3-5 year period to fully cover the expenses for both the
acquisition and renovation of the facility. (Acquisition and Capital Improvements)

2007-5 CDBG Target Area Improvement Program $50,157- Capital, street, and park improvements in the
CDBG Target Areas, as follows: “Western” Target Area a/k/a “Orange Park” north of 14th Street, south of State
Road 84, between 130th and 136th Avenues; “Southern” Target Area a/k/a “Driftwood” situated south of Stirling
Road, east of 78th Avenue, and north and west of the Davie Road Extension; and, the “Eastern” Target Area
bounded on the north by SW 29th Street (near Nova Drive), to the west by Davie Road, to the East by the Florida
Turnpike; and, the southern boundary is approximately one block south of Griffin Road and is aligned with the
Davie CRA Area.

Improvements may include but are not limited to: improvements to existing community centers e.g. the
Neighborhood Service Center, public facilities/parks; new or refurbished sidewalks, resurfaced streets, traffic
calming alternatives, street lighting improvements, landscaping, and drainage. (Street and Capital Improvements)

2007-6 Fair Housing, Citizen Participation & Support Services $130,818 - To plan, administer, & monitor the
CDBG funds and activities; undertake comprehensive planning activities; apply for other related grants; expand
Fair Housing Education & Outreach Programs designed to remove impediments to fair housing choices and
provide a wide range of housing opportunities for Davie residents; participate in homeless assistance initiatives;


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prepare Environment Review Records/Assessments, etc. (Planning/Admin., Fair Housing, Citizen Participation &
Support Services).

All of the activities identified above will principally benefit low/moderate income residents of the Town of Davie,
and no displacement or relocation of Davie residents or businesses is anticipated.

Matching FY 2007/08 Goals & Objectives to Identified Needs

The Towns CDBG funds are an excellent tool to address many of the needs identified in the Consolidated Plan;
however, these funds are insufficient to address all of the needs in the three (3) Target Areas. Although the
Town’s CDBG funds successfully leverage other resources, large-scale projects/activities (e.g. new and/or
expanded capital improvements and facilities), will need to be funded over several years as "multi-year" activities
for CDBG funding.

The following Consolidated Plan goals and objectives will be met during FY 2007/08.

GOAL: to expand affordable rental housing and home-ownership opportunities for Davie residents,
upgrade the existing housing stock through single and multi-family housing rehabilitation.

Objective #1: Continue using SHIP and CDBG funds to administer Single-Family Housing Rehabilitation
Programs, which enable Davie residents to repair their homes/replace leaking roofs, and implement new “Home
Hardening Program”.

Objective #2: Expand the allocation of SHIP and HOME Funds for the Town-wide First-Time
Homebuyer/Purchase Assistance Program, which enables Davie renters and mobile home occupants to become
homeowners.

Objective #3: Ensure that the Town-wide goal in the EAR that 20% of all new housing developed, be affordable or
workforce housing.

Objective #4: Ensure that the mandatory set-aside of 15% affordable housing for all residential units in the Transit
Oriented Corridor (TOC) is achieved.

Objective #5: Continue waiving all planning, processing, and permitting fees, and recreation impact fees for
affordable housing projects, and pay or rebate of Water/Sewer Impact Fees for affordable/workforce housing
units.

Objective #6: Continue to assist the Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) in developing new single-family,
affordable homes in the Eastside neighborhood of Davie, using SHIP funds for infrastructure improvements and
purchase assistance grants to prospective homebuyers.

Objective #7: Continue to work with both the Broward County Housing Authority (BCHA) and the Hollywood
Housing Authority, to ensure that sufficient Section 8 Certificates and Vouchers are available to meet the needs of
Davie residents.

Objective #8: The Housing and Community Development Director will continue to be the “liaison” for developers
of affordable housing, expediting their permits through the Town’s building process.

GOAL: to provide comparable replacement housing for persons who are involuntarily displaced as a
result of condo conversions or mobile home park closures.

Objective #1: Develop recommendations for the Davie Town Council on new legislation, ordinances, resolutions,
etc., that further the development of affordable/workforce housing.

Objective #2: Develop an Affordable Housing Trust Fund to be financed through linkage or inclusionary zoning
ordinances, bonds or other applicable means, to ensure sufficient funds for affordable/workforce housing.

Objective #3: Develop criteria for “Exit Plans” that ensure all involuntarily displaced residents receive financial
assistance to ensure that they can pay for comparable replacement housing and do not become homeless.

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Objective #4: Continue to work with not-for-profit agencies to provide financial assistance and counseling to
displaced residents.

GOAL: to implement the 2005 Disaster Recovery Program to assist Davie residents displaced by
Hurricane Wilma.

Objective #1: Implement the Mobile Home Repair or Replacement Program, and provide funds to repair mobile
homes, or, if mobile homes cannot be brought up to code (i.e., wind-storm rated) the grant would cover the cost to
remove a sub-standard unit, purchase of new unit, and installation cost.

Objective #2: Implement the Relocation/Rental Assistance Program, and provide financial assistance to disaster
victims for either replacement housing e.g. rental assistance.

Objective #3: Implement the Home Repair Hardening Program, which is targeted at “hardening” existing single-
family homes/townhomes/condos with hurricane resistant materials, e.g. roofing, hurricane shutters, windstorm
rated windows.

Objective #4: Implement the Purchase Assistance Program for Mobile Home Owners, which provides down-
payment and closing costs assistance for credit-worthy mobile home owners who are seeking to transition to site-
built housing.

Objective #5: Provide Generators for Essential Public Facilities, e.g., for EOC’s, Emergency Shelters, e.g., Pine
Island Community Center, Fire Administration (secondary EOC) Ivanhoe Fire Station #91, and Neighborhood
Service Center (NSC).

GOAL: to undertake an educational campaign working with lenders, realtors, housing developers and
others, on the Fair Housing Act in order to ensure that Davie residents have the widest range of housing
choices.

Objective #1: Continue the Fair Housing Education and Outreach Campaign, and look for additional opportunities
to expand these programs.

Objective #2: Continue to celebrate National Fair Housing Month each April with appropriate Proclamations
and/or Resolutions, PSA’s, news articles, and paid advertisements in the Sun Sentinel and other local minority
newspapers.

Objective #3: Continue the contractual relationship with HOPE, Inc., to facilitate up to four (4) Fair Housing
Training Sessions per year, for realtors, lenders, home-owners associations, etc. in Davie.

Objective #4: Expand annual Fair Housing Poster contest for kids in community centers and Davie Elementary
Schools.

Objective #5: Enact new legislation and programs to create new affordable/workforce housing opportunities.

GOAL: to promote the county-wide strategies and efforts aimed at addressing homelessness, and
participate in activities that prevent homelessness.

Objective #1: Continue to work closely with the Broward County Homeless Initiative Partnership in developing the
annual county-wide application for “Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance” under the HUD SuperNOFA, and
participate in regional homeless prevention programs.

Objective #2: Expand the Emergency Assistance/Homeless Prevention Program; and, expand the partnership
with not-for profit providers such as HOPE Outreach Center, EASE Foundation, etc., to increase the number of
families served.

Objective #3: Open and operate the new Neighborhood Service Center (One-Stop-Shop) and provide rent-free
space to not-for-profit providers, so funds can be redirected to homeless prevention and emergency assistance
activities.

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GOAL: to rehabilitate, construct and/or expand public facilities and infrastructures e.g. the renovation of
existing public (community) facilities and street improvements such as: improved lighting, landscaping,
drainage, sidewalks, streets, connections to sewer systems, etc.

Objective #1: To undertake capital improvements and street improvements in the CDBG Target Areas (Orange
Park, Driftwood, and the Eastern Target Area). Improvements may include but are not limited to: upgrading/
expanding existing community centers including the new NSC One-Stop-Shop, facilities & parks; new/refurbished
sidewalks, resurfaced streets, traffic calming alternatives, street lighting improvements, landscaping, and
drainage.

Objective #2: To develop a new gymnasium or covered basketball facility for the kids at the Rick and Rita Case
Boys and Girls Club in the Driftwood Target Area.

Objective #3: Identify and secure funds from the SFWMD or the CBDD or other funding source, undertake the
Orange Park N-29A Canal Drainage Project.

GOAL: to increase park/recreation opportunities and expand programs for at-risk youth e.g. construction
of new recreation facilities, renovation of existing parks (i.e. improved lighting, landscaping, equipment,
etc.), provide social services, or acquire land for new facilities.

Objective #1: Expand the programs for at-risk youth at the Orange Park Community Center in Western Davie e.g.,
after-school and evening activities for at-risk youth.

Objective #2: To develop a new gymnasium or covered basketball facility for the kids at the Rick and Rita Case
Boys and Girls Club in the Driftwood Target Area.

Objective #3: Continue to work with Children’s Services Council (CSC) and Memorial Healthcare Systems (MHS)
to expand funding for the MOST Maximizing Out of School Time Programs at the Potter Park Facility and fund
similar programs in the other Target areas.

Objective #4: Continue working with the FBI and the FBI Citizens Alumni Academy to provide scholarships for at-
risk Davie Teens to participate in the FBI Junior Academy Programs.

Objective #5: Continue working with the Headstart Programs to expand the Love to Read-Love to Achieve
Reading Programs in Davie Elementary Schools.

GOAL: to provide social services (e.g. health care, mental health care, housing, food, and transportation)
to lower-income Davie residents.

Objective #1: Open and operate the new Neighborhood Service Center (One-Stop-Shop) and provide rent-free
space to not-for-profit providers, so funds can be redirected to homeless prevention and emergency assistance
for food, medications, clothing etc.

Objective #2: Continue to work with Memorial Healthcare Systems (MHS) to provide low-cost or free health
services to Davie residents living in the Eastern and Driftwood Target Areas, provide back-to-school health fairs,
and coordinate mobile healthcare vans for children (Joe DiMaggio) and adults.

Objective #3: Develop a working relationship with the North Broward Hospital District to develop free or low-cost
health programs for residents of the Orange Park Target Area in Western Davie.

Objective# 4: Expand the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) Program for Davie Target Area residents, coordinate
mobile van for free tax preparation, and market program to increase participation.

Objective #5: Work with the Davie Police Department, Community Oriented Policing Unit, on new Crime
Prevention Programs, and seek Law Enforcement Trust Funds (LEFT) or other grants to fund new programs to
prevent and reduce crime.

Objective #6: Seek private funding or grants for subsidized or affordable child day care programs.

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GOAL: improve the Town's capacity to plan/administer the CDBG funds, undertake comprehensive
planning activities, and apply for other HUD programs or related grants which the Town could receive.

Objective #1: Continue to administer and monitor the CDBG Program, Chair the Neighborhood Revitalization
Committee, provide Fair Housing Education and Outreach services, provide homeless assistance, provide
housing counseling and related services, etc.

Geographic Distribution of Funds

As previously indicated, the Town will attempt to equitably distribute the CDBG funds throughout the three CDBG
Target Areas over the 5-year period covered by this Plan. However, conditions will be reevaluated on an annual
basis, so that funding recommendations will reflect the current needs of the Target Area.

Eastern Target Area:

    •   Open and operate the new Neighborhood Service Center (One-Stop-Shop) at 4700 Davie Road to
        provide rent-free space to not-for-profit providers, so funds can be redirected to homeless prevention and
        emergency assistance for food, medications, clothing, family counseling, legal aid, job creation and
        retention programs, etc.

    •   Rental housing and home-ownership opportunities for Davie residents, e.g. Town-wide First-Time
        Homebuyer/Purchase Assistance Program, that enables Davie renters to become homeowners.

    •   Single-Family (townhomes and condos) Home Repair and Hardening Grant Programs.

    •   Programs to assist Davie residents who are involuntarily displaced as a result of condo conversions or
        mobile home park closures, to secure comparable replacement housing.

    •   Mobile Home Repair or Replacement Program for Hurricane Wilma Victims i.e., funds to repair mobile
        homes, or, if mobile home cannot be brought up to code (i.e., wind-storm rated) the grant would cover
        cost to remove sub-standard unit, purchase of new unit, and installation.

    •   Relocation/Rental Assistance Program for Hurricane Wilma Victims which provides financial assistance to
        disaster victims for either replacement housing or rental assistance.

    •   Purchase Assistance for Mobile Home Owners who were Hurricane Wilma Victims i.e., down-payment
        and closing costs assistance for credit-worthy mobile home owners who are seeking to transition to site-
        built housing.

    •   Generators for Essential Public Facilities, e.g., for EOC’s, Emergency Shelters, e.g., Pine Island
        Community Center, Fire Administration (secondary EOC) Ivanhoe Fire Station #91, and Neighborhood
        Service Center (NSC).

    •   Seek private funding or grants for subsidized or affordable child day care programs.

    •   Continue to work with Memorial Healthcare Systems (MHS) to provide low-cost or free health services to
        Davie residents living in the Eastern and Driftwood Target Areas, provide back-to-school health fairs, and
        coordinate mobile healthcare vans for children (Joe DiMaggio) and adults.

    •   Expand the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) Program for Davie Target Area residents, coordinate
        mobile van for free tax preparation, and market program to increase participation.

    •   Continue to work with Children’s Services Council (CSC) and Memorial Healthcare Systems (MHS) to
        expand funding for the MOST Maximizing Out of School Time Programs at the Potter Park Facility and
        fund similar programs in the other Target areas.



                                                       93
   •   Continue working with the FBI and the FBI Citizens Alumni Academy to provide scholarships for at-risk
       Davie Teens to participate in the FBI Junior Academy Programs.

   •   Continue working with the Headstart Programs to expand the Love to Read-Love to Achieve Reading
       Programs in Davie Elementary Schools.

   •   Work with the Davie Police Department, Community Oriented Policing Unit, on new Crime Prevention
       Programs, and seek Law Enforcement Trust Funds (LETF) or other grants to fund new programs to
       prevent and reduce crime.

   •   Emergency financial assistance to prevent homelessness and/or address emergency situations such as
       the need for food or shelter.

   •   Fair Housing Education and Outreach Services, training, and other activities.

   •   Provision of regional homeless assistance and homeless prevention programs, and local grants for
       homeless prevention and emergency assistance to forestall evictions or foreclosures.

   •   Credit repair and enhancement programs to assist families in becoming self-sufficient.

Southern Target Area (Driftwood):

   •   Develop a new gymnasium or covered basketball facility for the kids at the Rick and Rita Case Boys and
       Girls Club in the Driftwood Target Area.

   •   Open and operate the new Neighborhood Service Center (One-Stop-Shop) at 4700 Davie Road to
       provide rent-free space to not-for-profit providers, so funds can be redirected to homeless prevention and
       emergency assistance for food, medications, clothing, family counseling, legal aid, job creation and
       retention programs, etc.

   •   Rental housing and home-ownership opportunities for Davie residents, e.g. Town-wide First-Time
       Homebuyer/ Purchase Assistance Program, that enables Davie renters to become homeowners.

   •   Single-Family (townhomes and condos) Home Repair and Hardening Grant Programs.

   •   Programs to assist Davie residents who are involuntarily displaced as a result of condo conversions or
       mobile home park closures, to secure comparable replacement housing.

   •   Relocation/Rental Assistance Program for Hurricane Wilma Victims which provides financial assistance to
       disaster victims for either replacement housing or rental assistance.

   •   Purchase Assistance for Mobile Home Owners who were Hurricane Wilma Victims i.e., down-payment
       and closing costs assistance for credit-worthy mobile home owners who are seeking to transition to site-
       built housing.

   •   Generators for Essential Public Facilities, e.g., for EOC’s, Emergency Shelters, e.g., Pine Island
       Community Center, Fire Administration (secondary EOC) Ivanhoe Fire Station #91, and Neighborhood
       Service Center (NSC).

   •   Seek private funding or grants for subsidized or affordable child day care programs.

   •   Continue to work with Memorial Healthcare Systems (MHS) to provide low-cost or free health services to
       Davie residents living in the Eastern and Driftwood Target Areas, provide back-to-school health fairs, and
       coordinate mobile healthcare vans for children (Joe DiMaggio) and adults.

   •   Expand the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) Program for Davie Target Area residents, coordinate
       mobile van for free tax preparation, and market program to increase participation.


                                                      94
 •   Continue to work with Children’s Services Council (CSC) and Memorial Healthcare Systems (MHS) to
     expand funding for the MOST Maximizing Out of School Time Programs at the Potter Park Facility and
     fund similar programs in the other Target areas.

 •   Continue working with the FBI and the FBI Citizens Alumni Academy to provide scholarships for at-risk
     Davie Teens to participate in the FBI Junior Academy Programs.

 •   Continue working with the Headstart Programs to expand the Love to Read-Love to Achieve Reading
     Programs in Davie Elementary Schools.

 •   Work with the Davie Police Department, Community Oriented Policing Unit, on new Crime Prevention
     Programs, and seek Law Enforcement Trust Funds (LETF) or other grants to fund new programs to
     prevent and reduce crime.

 •   Emergency financial assistance to prevent homelessness and/or address emergency situations such as
     the need for food or shelter.

 •   Fair Housing Education and Outreach Services, training, and other activities.

 •   Provision of regional homeless assistance and homeless prevention programs, and local grants for
     homeless prevention and emergency assistance to forestall evictions or foreclosures.
 •   Credit repair and enhancement programs to assist families in becoming self-sufficient.

Western Target Area (Orange Park):

 •   Develop a working relationship with the North Broward Hospital District to develop free or low-cost health
     programs for residents of the Orange Park Target Area in Western Davie.

 •   Expand the programs for at-risk youth at the Orange Park Community Center in Western Broward e.g., to
     provide after-school and evening activities for at-risk youth.

 •   Open and operate the new Neighborhood Service Center (One-Stop-Shop) at 4700 Davie Road to
     provide rent-free space to not-for-profit providers, so funds can be redirected to homeless prevention and
     emergency assistance for food, medications, clothing, family counseling, legal aid, job creation and
     retention programs, etc.

 •   Rental housing and home-ownership opportunities for Davie residents, e.g. Town-wide First-Time
     Homebuyer/Purchase Assistance Program, that enables Davie renters to become homeowners.

 •   Single-Family (townhomes and condos) Home Repair and Hardening Grant Programs.

 •   Programs to assist Davie residents who are involuntarily displaced as a result of condo conversions or
     mobile home park closures, to secure comparable replacement housing.

 •   Mobile Home Repair or Replacement Program for Hurricane Wilma Victims i.e., funds to repair mobile
     homes, or, if mobile home cannot be brought up to code (i.e., wind-storm rated) the grant would cover
     cost to remove sub-standard unit, purchase of new unit, and installation.

 •   Relocation/Rental Assistance Program for Hurricane Wilma Victims which provides financial assistance to
     disaster victims for either replacement housing e.g. rental assistance.

 •   Purchase Assistance for Mobile Home Owners who were Hurricane Wilma Victims i.e., down-payment
     and closing costs assistance for credit-worthy mobile home owners who are seeking to transition to site-
     built housing.

 •   Generators for Essential Public Facilities, e.g., for EOC’s, Emergency Shelters, e.g., Pine Island
     Community Center, Fire Administration (secondary EOC) Ivanhoe Fire Station #91, and Neighborhood
     Service Center (NSC).

                                                    95
   •     Seek private funding or grants for subsidized or affordable child day care programs.

   •     Expand the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) Program for Davie Target Area residents, coordinate
         mobile van for free tax preparation, and market program to increase participation.

   •     Continue to work with Children’s Services Council (CSC) and Memorial Healthcare Systems (MHS) to
         expand funding for the MOST Maximizing Out of School Time Programs at the Potter Park Facility and
         fund similar programs in the other Target areas.

   •     Continue working with the FBI and the FBI Citizens Alumni Academy to provide scholarships for at-risk
         Davie Teens to participate in the FBI Junior Academy Programs.

   •     Continue working with the Headstart Programs to expand the Love to Read-Love to Achieve Reading
         Programs in Davie Elementary Schools.

   •     Continue to work with Memorial Healthcare Systems (MHS) to provide low-cost or free health services to
         Davie residents living in the Eastern and Driftwood Target Areas, provide back-to-school health fairs, and
         coordinate mobile healthcare vans for children (Joe DiMaggio) and adults.

   •     Work with the Davie Police Department-Community Oriented Policing Unit, on Crime Prevention
         Programs, and seek Law Enforcement Trust Funds (LETF) or other grants to fund new programs to
         prevent and reduce crime.

   •     Emergency financial assistance to prevent homelessness and/or address emergency situations such as
         the need for food or shelter.

   •     Fair Housing Education and Outreach Services, training, and other activities.

   •     Provision of regional homeless assistance and homeless prevention programs, and local grants for
         homeless prevention and emergency assistance to forestall evictions or foreclosures.

   •     Credit repair and enhancement programs to assist families in becoming self-sufficient

Affordable Housing Incentive Strategy:

Davie’s Affordable Housing Incentive Strategy has been amended and restated on three (3) occasions in order to
expand the incentives for developers of affordable housing. The highlights of the Town’s Incentive Strategy
include:

       • Definition of Affordable Housing: Monthly rent or mortgage payments (including taxes and insurance),
         which do not exceed 30% of the households annual gross income.

       • Expedited Permits for Affordable Housing Projects: The Town adopted a “one-stop-permitting
         process” in 1998; and, the Housing and CD Director now guides affordable housing developers through
         the process and “expedites them to a greater degree than other projects".

       • Waiver/Modification of Impact Fees: The Director of Housing and Community Development will
         carefully review all prospective affordable housing projects, to verify their level of benefit and period of
         affordability. The waiver of all fees e.g., Park and Recreation Impact fees, Design Review and Site Plan
         Processing Fees, Engineering Review Fees, Building Permit Fees, etc., will be based on this review. It is
         acknowledged that the only fee that may not be waived for Affordable Workforce Housing is Water and
         Sewer Impact Fees; however, nothing prohibits the use of the Town’s SHIP or HOME funds to pay these
         impact fees in order to reduce the cost of the housing. Deed restrictions or other covenants may be
         required of all developers to ensure that the level and period (length) of affordability is maintained.

   Davie’s Affordable Housing Incentive Strategy is was amended and restated to reflect that “An Affordable
   Housing Certification will be issued by the Housing and Community Development Director, if appropriate; and,

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   Affordable Housing Flex Units (AFU’s) and/or Flex in Reserve Units will be allocated based on this
   Certification Process.”

   The Director of Housing and Community Development will carefully review all prospective affordable housing
   projects, and verify their level of benefit and period of affordability. The waiver of all fees i.e., Park and
   Recreation Impact fees, Building Permit Fees, etc., will be based on this review. Deed restrictions or other
   covenants will be required of all developers to ensure the level and period (length) of affordability is
   maintained.

     • Administrative waivers and variances: The Affordable Housing Advisory Committee recommended that
       Code Section 12-308 (b) (1) i.e. “Administrative waivers or variances” be amended to permit a waiver of
       up to 25% of that permitted by Code, for affordable housing initiatives only. The Committee also
       supported the spatial deconcentration of affordable housing units, and recommended their integration into
       existing neighborhoods in a cohesive manner.

     • Consideration of policies and procedures that have a significant impact on the cost of housing:
       The Development Services Director identifies items which may impact housing, and sends them to the
       Housing and Community Development Director to evaluate for consistency with the Town’s Consolidated
       Plan, and to identify potential impediments, and actions which could increase the cost of developing
       affordable housing.

     • List of publicly-owned land suitable for affordable housing: A list of property suitable for affordable
       housing is retained by the Housing and Community Development Office, (periodically updated), so that
       current and future uses are identified, as well as deed-related or other restrictions on the land.

Affordable Housing Incentives Provided

Since adoption of the Affordable Housing Incentive Strategy, the Housing and Community Development Office
has diligently worked to provide financial incentives for developers of affordable housing, to encourage the
provision of quality, affordable housing for Davies lower-income residents. The Town has provided over
$4,092,479 in fee waivers and other incentives as follows:

       $ 316,426 – New Rental Housing Subsidies & Waivers
       $ 108,900 – Davie CRA Homes - Predevelopment
       $1,301,614 – Habitat for Humanity Single Family Homes
       $1,162,615 – Home Repair/Barrier Free Grants
       $ 60,305 – Home Repair/Barrier Free Fee Waivers
       $ 408,875 – Public Housing Improvements
       $ 35,744 – Public Housing Fee Waivers
       $ 212,000 – Purchase Assistance Program
       $ 168,000 – CRA New Construction Single Family
       $ 212,000 – SHIP Subsidy for Construction of CRA Homes
       $ 106,000 – Villas of Palomino New Townhomes – Fee Waivers

The following summarizes the Town’s progress in providing affordable rental and homeownership housing
opportunities since the H & CD Office was established:

     • Stirling Road Apartments, 250 units of affordable rental housing were completed in June of 2000. It was
       financed with Federal Low-Income Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC); Tax-Exempt Bonds; SHIP Funds; and,
       the Town waived impact fees ($123,000) and provided $19,750 in permit fees.

     • Summerlake Apartments, 108 units of affordable rental housing located on 61st Avenue in the Eastside
       Target Area. The Town used $100,000 of it’s SHIP funds to leverage $350,000 in Broward County SHIP
       Funds, for pre-development assistance; assisted the developer in obtaining 5.6 M$ in Tax-Exempt Bonds;
       and, the Town waived impact fees ($126,000+) and provided $19,750 in permit fee waivers.

     • The “Harmony Village Community” Redevelopment/Revitalization Plan, which includes the development
       of 22 single-family homes on a 4.2 acre site on Davie Road in the Driftwood Target area. Completed in


                                                      97
  2005, the Town donated the site, paid for the infrastructure using SHIP funds, and provided in-kind labor
  and related services.

• The Housing Element of the Town’s Evaluation and Assessment Report (EAR) was amended/expanded
  to expand the goals and objectives related to the provision of affordable rental and homeownership
  housing and workforce housing. A goal of 20% of all new residential housing be affordable units, was
  established.

• The Town adopted a Transit Oriented Corridor (TOC) Plan for Eastern Davie along State Road 7, which
  has a mandatory set-aside of 15% of the units to be affordable rental or homeownership housing.

• The SHIP Program in Davie encompasses the following programs:


    •   Single-Family Home Repair/Housing Rehabilitation Program
    •   Barrier-Free Housing (Removal of Impediments)
    •   Town-Wide Purchase Assistance (First-Time Homebuyer) Program, and
    •   New Construction of Affordable Rental Housing
    •   New Construction of Affordable Single-Family Homes, Townhomes, Condos

• 115 homes have been renovated under the Town’s SHIP-funded Single-Family Repair Program, and 3
  are currently under construction.

• The Davie Town Council designated the Housing and Community Development Director to serve as the
  “liaison” for developers of affordable housing, to ensure that their projects would be expedited to a greater
  degree than other projects in Davie.

• The Town and the Broward County Housing Authority are working on improvements to Ehlinger
  Apartments (Public Housing) in the Driftwood Target Area, as part of the Revitalization Plan for that
  neighborhood; and, central air-conditioning was installed. The BCHA is considering the construction of
  several new rental units on this site.

• Davie’s CRA developed twelve (12) two-story homes in the Eastside Target Area along SW 43rd Street,
  west of SW 55th Avenue. The CRA provided the land at no charge, and the homebuyers received SHIP
  grants of up to $56,000 depending on their income, from down-payment assistance.

• In April 5, 2006, the Davie Town Council adopted Resolution R-2006-109 increasing the maximum
  purchase price limits for the State Housing Initiatives Partnership (SHIP) Grant Program to $280,462.
  Additionally, the Town increased the average and maximum grant allocations for each program strategy,
  in order to keep pace with increase housing costs. Finally, the Town amended the Affordable Housing
  Incentive Plan to expand the number and type of fee-waivers to encourage the development of affordable
  workforce housing. Davie now waives 100% of all processing, site plan, and building permits fees for
  affordable housing developments.

• In April-May 2006 the Department undertook a new rental survey to keep track of rental increases, condo
  conversions, and the number of vacancies. Survey forms were mailed to all apartment owners/managers,
  licensed by the Town. The surveys were analyzed, and in order not to skew the data, the mom-pop type
  apartments with six or less units, subsidized units, and/or dormitory-type housing were not included in the
  calculations. These units are typically smaller, less well maintained, and their rents reflect less than the
  current market rates. 2006 survey revealed that Davie’s median rent is now $1,341. This represents as
  34% increase in rents from the 2003 Survey.

• During the summer of 2006, the Department of Housing and Community Development mailed-out “Mobile
  Home Survey” forms to twenty-five (25) of the thirty-one (31) Mobile Home Parks licensed by the Town’s
  Occupational License - Development Services Department. The survey revealed that the lot rents in
  Davie averaged $445-$468 during 2006, yielding a median lot rent of $457. According to the last survey
  in June 2005, the median lot rents were $405.This represents a 13% increase in lot rents since the last
  survey.

                                                  98
        • In order to stay abreast of the growing “affordable housing crisis” in South Florida, the Housing and
          Community Development hired a firm to undertake a residential home purchase price analysis. This
          document was prepared on May 25, 2006; and, it analyzed residential real estate transactions for the
          period of May 2005 through April 2006. Based on this analysis, the “average” purchase price for new
          homes/condos was $424,980 and $345,832 for existing homes/condos.

Fair Housing Education and Outreach Initiatives:

Davie's “Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choices” was predicated on the fact that equal access to
residential housing is fundamental to meeting the overall needs of a community. The Analysis concluded that
there are two main barriers to fair housing choices in Davie: 1) housing affordability is a major concern, and 2)
many Davie residents pay in excess of 30% of their gross income for their housing and related costs e.g. rent plus
utilities, or mortgage plus principal, interest, taxes, and insurance. This is particularly true in the rental market in
Davie, where rents are higher (on average) than the balance of Broward County, and where there is a significant
“gap” between the HUD Fair Market rents, and the current market rents.

Accessibility to home mortgage financing was also noted in the Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choices,
as it appears to be an on-going regional problem for lower-income and minority households. This “global”
impediment was also noted in the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA) data where minority and low-income
individuals were denied financing at higher rates than other applicants.

The following fair housing initiatives have been undertaken:

    •     FY 2005/06 brought about a new emphasis on “Fair Housing Education”, especially for young people.
          The Town-wide Fair Housing Poster Contest actively engaged Elementary School Children, encouraging
          understanding of their right to live where they choose, with dignity and respect. This well publicized event
          brought about a great deal of attention to the subject of housing discrimination; and, instilled values of
          “fairness” and “friendship” among children from diverse backgrounds and cultures, during their formative
          years. In 2006/07 the contest was expanded; and, the winners were honored at a Town Council Meeting
          which was on Cable TV and featured in the Town’s newsletter the Davie Update.

    •     The Town works with Housing Opportunities for Project Excellence (HOPE), to conduct fair housing
          seminars geared at lenders, realtors, and housing providers, the Center for Independent Living of
          Broward Co.; the Housing Finance Authority of Broward (First-Time Home Buyer Workshop); NOVA
          Southeastern University’s Sheppard Broad Law Center; and the Housing Finance Authority of Broward
          County (First-Time Home Buyer Workshop).

        • The Town’s Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choices (AI) was re-evaluated and the AI was
          subsequently expanded and a schedule of events (milestones) was added.

        • The HOPE Hotline (free telephone assistance) continues to serve as the screening arm of the agency’s
          Private Enforcement Housing Discrimination Initiative.

        • The Housing Element of the Town’s Evaluation & Assessment Report (EAR) was amended/expanded to
          include new policies related to removing impediments to fair housing, providing fair housing
          education/outreach services, and regional strategies to address homelessness. A goal of 20%
          affordable/workforce housing was established.

        • Officials from HUD and HOPE, Inc. receive Proclamations each April declaring Fair Housing Month in
          Davie; and, advertisements are placed in the Sun Sentinel advising the residents of their rights and
          responsibilities under the Fair Housing Act. A mass mailing was also undertaken in April 2000/01, and
          literature was sent to schools, churches, realtors, etc. advising them of Fair Housing Month, and providing
          posters for their Bulletin Boards.

        • News articles on Fair Housing laws and initiatives as well as CDBG and SHIP Housing Programs were
          featured in the Davie Update, (the Town’s Official Newsletter), which was mailed to every homeowner in
          Davie, as well as local municipalities and educational facilities.


                                                          99
     • The Town’s listing of local lending institutions and realtors was updated so that they can be invited to
       participate in future fair housing education seminars, where educational materials on the various fair
       housing laws and requirements will be provided.

     • A listing of other organizations and individuals, including neighborhood groups, home-owners
       associations, social service providers, etc., was finalized. Hopefully, this information can be used at a
       later time to identify impediments to fair housing choices at the neighborhood level.

     • Meetings were held with the Broward Co. Housing Authority (BCHA,) regarding the high rents in Davie
       and the number of residents that are “cost-burdened” ; and, as a result of the Town’s Rental Survey, the
       BCHA agreed to increase the Section 8 rents to the 110% rental level.

Other Actions

The incidence of lead-based paint in Davie is assumed to be extremely low, since the majority of the Towns
housing stock was developed after 1980 when lead-based paint was no longer in use. The Town will continue to
evaluate lead-based paint hazards by periodically contacting the Broward County Public Health Department to
determine whether any residents have been reported with high levels, and where such units are located. The
Town will consider funding lead testing through the Town's CDBG and SHIP housing rehabilitation programs. All
pre-1978 units considered for rehabilitation under the CDBG Program, will be tested for lead-based paint, and
abatement undertaken accordingly.

The Town of Davie will take the following actions to overcome gaps in its delivery of community revitalization,
affordable housing, and related support services:

     • Continue to identify opportunities to expand the supply of decent, safe and sanitary affordable
       housing in Davie for all income levels.

     • Continue working with the Broward County Housing Authority (BCHA) to enhance the lives of
       persons living in public housing or Section 8 units located in the Town of Davie.

     • Continue the efforts of the Town’s Neighborhood Revitalization Program to identify needs existing
       within the CDBG Target Areas, and develop solutions to address them.

     • Continue the Community Oriented Policing (COP’s) Program, with specific emphasis on the three
       (3) CDBG Target Areas.

     • Continue to fund the single-family housing rehabilitation program which helps low-income families
       to make minor home repairs, and replace existing substandard and leaking roofs, and implement
       the new “Home hardening” program.

     • Continue to participate in regional planning activities through Broward County to homelessness;
       and, continue to expand the Town’s Emergency Assistance (Homeless Prevention) Program.

     • Continue to work with local and Broward-based service providers to identify resources available
       to serve special needs populations.

     • The Davie CRA will continue to promote the development of affordable single-family homes in the
       Eastside neighborhood which is within the designated CDBG Target Area. The CRA has
       established a goal of 20% of all its residential units to be affordable/workforce.

     • Continue to promote economic development initiatives that result in job training, job creation or
       job retention, especially for low/moderate income Target Area residents.

     • Continue to undertake an educational campaign on fair housing, to ensure that Davie residents
       have the widest range of housing choices.



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All of the Town’s CDBG funded projects/activities are designed to benefit low/moderate income individuals who
earn 80%< of the area’s median income; therefore, the Town’s Consolidated Plan for Federal Funds and the FY
2007/08 Action Plan, principally benefit persons of low and moderate income as required by Statute.

Project Descriptions and Locations

Project #1 will provide emergency financial assistance to eligible lower-income Davie residents, to prevent
homelessness and/or address emergency situations such as the need for food, shelter, transportation, etc. on a
town-wide basis

Project #2 will provide structured after-school and evening programs targeted for at-risk youth living in the Orange
Park Area north of 14th Street and south of I-595, between 130th and 136th Avenues;

Project #3 will provide waivers/scholarship opportunities for the children of lower-income target area residents, to
allow them to participate in recreational, educational, or vocational opportunities (e.g. Summer Camp.)
                                                                                                                      th
Project #4 entails the operation a Neighborhood Service Center (One-Stop-Shop) located at 4700 SW 64
Avenue (formerly known as the JENNMAR Building), for the provision of social services and housing services to
Davie’s lower-income and at-risk residents.

Project #5 entails capital, street, and park improvements in the CDBG Target Areas, as follows: “Western” Target
Area a/k/a “Orange Park” north of 14th Street, south of State Road 84, between 130th and 136th Avenues;
“Southern” Target Area a/k/a “Driftwood” situated south of Stirling Road, east of 78th Avenue, and north and west
of the Davie Road Extension; and, the “Eastern” Target Area bounded on the north by SW 29th Street (near Nova
Drive), to the west by Davie Road, to the East by the Florida Turnpike; and, the southern boundary is
approximately one block south of Griffin Road and is aligned with the Davie CRA Area. Improvements may
include but are not limited to: improvements to existing community centers e.g. the Neighborhood Service Center,
public facilities/parks; new or refurbished sidewalks, resurfaced streets, traffic calming alternatives, street lighting
improvements, landscaping, and drainage. (Street and Capital Improvements)

Project #6 encompasses the planning, administration, and monitoring of the CDBG funds and activities;
comprehensive planning activities; application for other related grants; expansion of the town's Fair Housing
Education and Outreach Programs designed to remove impediments to fair housing choices and provide a wide
range of housing opportunities for Davie residents; homeless assistance initiatives; Environment Review Records/
Assessments, etc.

Homeless and Other Special Needs Activities

As was previously indicated, the 2000 Census does not reflect a homeless population in the Town of Davie;
however, we are aware of a small group 5-7 homeless men living in Downtown Davie near Orange Drive and
Davie Road. The Town is working closely with the Broward Homeless Coalition, to visit these individuals at night,
to offer them assistance and housing in the HAC.

Since Davie’s homeless population is so small, the problems and solution as of homelessness are viewed as
regional in nature, and the Town will closely coordinate with the various agencies serving the homeless
throughout Broward County.

Several special needs populations will be served by FY 2007/08 activities. At-risk youth will be served through the
various park and related facility improvements such as the three (3) Boys & Girls Clubs in Davie, the MOST
Program in the Eastern Target Area at the Potter Park Multi-Purpose Facility, and the After-School and TEEN
Reach Program for the Orange Park Community Center.

The street improvements will be installed in the CDBG Target Areas where there is a high concentration of low-
income and minority households.

The new Neighborhood Service Center (One-Stop-Shop) will provide services to Davie residents who are at-risk
of being homeless and can provide direct emergency financial assistance to prevent evictions or forestall
foreclosures.


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Public Housing

The U. S. Department of HUD classifies all public housing authorities as either “troubled” or “non-troubled”. The
Town is very pleased that the Broward County Housing Authority is a "high performer”.

Certification of Consistency with the Consolidated Plan

Applications for housing assistance filed under the following federal programs require the issuance of a
“Certificate of Consistency” with the Towns adopted Consolidated Plan:

      •   HOME Investment Partnerships Program
      •   Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)
      •   Emergency Shelter Grant (ESGP)
      •   HOPE I - Public Housing
      •   HOPE II - Multi-Family
      •   HOPE III Single- Family
      •   Title VI Preservation
      •   Supportive Housing for the Elderly (Section 202)
      •   Supportive Housing for Persons With Disabilities
      •   Supportive Housing - Single Room Occupancy SRO
      •   HOPE for Youth
      •   Shelter Plus Care

The Town of Davie requires that all individuals or organizations proposing the submission of applications for
housing funds that require either a Certificate of Consistency with the Town’s Consolidated Plan or a Section 213
Letter of Support, submit a written request with a copy of the proposed application for review to the Development
Services Department, Town Hall.

All such requests must be submitted 20 days in advance of the required due date established by HUD or any
other applicable agency, giving the Town’s Administrative staff sufficient time to perform the consistency review.
The request should outline the relationship of the proposed housing project to the Town’s Consolidated Plan, and
should identify reasons that the project should be found consistent.

The Housing and Community Development Director will make the determination of Consistency with the Town’s
approved Consolidated Plan. Appeals to this decision may subsequently be made to the Town Administrator.

Glossary of Terms - Definitions

Affordable Housing: Affordable housing is generally defined as housing where the occupants pay no more than 30
percent of gross income for gross housing costs, including utility costs.

AIDS and Related Diseases: The disease of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or any conditions arising from
the etiologic agent for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

Community Development Target Area: Geographic area where the majority of the residents are low/moderate
income persons. In Davie, this means those areas that qualified under the “Quartile Data Analysis” at 36.8%, and
the Potter Park Area qualified under a separate survey approved by HUD.

Consistent with the Plan: A determination made by the Town that a program application meets the following
criterion: 1) The Action Plan for that fiscal year's funding indicates the jurisdiction planned to apply for the program
or was willing to support an application by another entity for the program; 2) The location of activities is consistent
with the geographic areas specified in the plan; and 3) The activities benefit a category of residents for which the
jurisdiction’s 5-year strategy shows a priority.

Cost-burdened > 30%: A household which pays in excess of 30% of their adjusted gross income for housing costs
i.e. rent plus utilities, or mortgage (PITI).



                                                         102
Disabled Household: A household composed of one or more persons at least 18 years of age, who has a
disability e.g. a physical, mental or emotional impairment that: (1) is expected to be of long-continued and
indefinite duration; (2) substantially impedes his or her ability to live independently; and; (3) is of such a nature
that the ability could be improved by more suitable housing conditions. The term also includes the surviving
member(s) of the household who were living in an assisted unit with the disabled member of the household at the
time of his or her death.

Elderly Household: For HUD rental programs, a one or two person household in which the head of the household
or spouse is at least 62 years of age.

Family: One or more persons living in a household who are related by birth, marriage or adoption.

First Time Home Buyer: An individual or family who has not owned a home during the 3-year period preceding the
HUD-assisted purchase of a home that must be used as their principal residence. Displaced homemakers or a
single parents may not be excluded as first time homebuyers on the basis that they owned a home with their
spouse or resided in a home owned by the spouse.

HOME: The HOME Investment Partnership Program, authorized by the National Affordable Housing Act.

Homeless Individual: An unaccompanied youth (17 years or younger) or an adult (18 years or older) without
children, living in situations described by terms "sheltered" or "unsheltered".

Household: One or more persons occupying a housing unit (U.S. Census definition). See also "Family".

Housing Problems: Households with housing problems include those that: (1) occupy units meeting the definition
of Physical Defects; (2) meet the definition of overcrowded; and (3) meet the definition of cost-burdened greater
than 30%.

Housing Unit: An occupied or vacant house, apartment, or a single room separate room (SRO housing) that is
intended as separate living quarters.

Large Related: A household of 5 or more persons which includes at least one person related to the householder
by blood, marriage or adoption.

LIHTC: (Federal) Low-Income Housing Tax Credit.

Low-income: Households whose incomes do not exceed 50 percent of the median income for the area, as
determined by HUD.

Minority Household: For the purposes of the Consolidated Plan, the Town defines an area of minority
concentration as a Census Block Group with racial/ethnic minority households (Black, Hispanic, and Asian) that
form 20% or more of the total number of households in the Census Block Group.

Moderate-Income: Households whose incomes are between 51 percent and 80 percent of the median income for
the area, as determined by HUD.

Non-Homeless Person with Special Needs: Includes elderly/frail elderly persons, persons with AIDS, disabled
families, and families participating in programs to achieve economic self-sufficiency.
Occupied Housing Unit: A housing unit that is the usual place of residence of the occupant(s).

Other Household: A household of one or more persons that does not meet the definition of a Small Related
household, Large Related household, or Elderly Household.

Overcrowded: A housing unit containing more than one person per room (excluding kitchens and bath).
Owner: A household that owns the housing unit it occupies. (U.S. Census definition.)

Physical Defects: A housing unit lacking complete kitchen or bathroom. (U.S. Census definition.)



                                                        103
Project-Based (Rental) Assistance: Rental Assistance provided for a project, not for a specific tenant. Tenants
receiving project-based rental assistance give up the right upon moving from the project.

Rental Assistance: Rental assistance payments provided as either project-based rental assistance or tenant-
based rental assistance.

Renter: A household that rents the housing unit it occupies, including units rented for cash, and those occupied
without cash payment of rent. (U.S. Census definition.)

Renter Occupied Unit: Any occupied housing unit that is not owner occupied, including units rented for cash and
those occupied without payment of cash rent.

Service Needs: Services identified for special needs populations, which may include: transportation, personal
care, housekeeping, counseling, meals, case management, and other services to prevent premature
institutionalization and assist individuals to continue living independently.

Severely Cost-burdened >50%: The extent to which gross housing costs, including utility costs, exceed 50
percent of gross income, based on data published by the U.S. Census Bureau.

Sheltered: Persons whose primary nighttime residence is a supervised publicly or privately operated shelter,
including emergency shelters, transitional housing for the homeless, domestic violence shelters, and residential
shelters for runaway/homeless youth, hotel/motel/apartment voucher paid for a homeless person; but, excluding
doubled up, overcrowded or substandard conventional housing.

Small Related: A household of 2 to 4 persons which includes at least one person related to the householder by
birth, marriage, or adoption.

Substandard Condition: Housing not meeting the South Florida Building Code, containing deficiencies such as
holes in roof, faulty or non-existent plumbing, etc.

Substandard Condition Not Suitable for Rehab: By local definition, dwelling units that are in such poor condition
as to be neither structurally nor financially feasible for rehabilitation. (See also "Substandard Condition.")

Substandard Condition-but Suitable for Rehab: By local definition, dwelling units that do not meet standard
conditions but are both financially and structurally feasible for rehabilitation. This does not include units that
require only cosmetic work, correction or minor livability problems or maintenance work. (See also "Substandard
Condition.")

Substantial Amendment: The Town of Davie shall amend its Consolidated Plan whenever it makes one of the
following determinations: a) to make a change in its priorities; b) change the method of distributing funds; c) to
carry out an activity not previously described in the Action Plan (i.e. add a new activity); d) to delete an activity
that was previously described in the Action Plan; e) change the purpose, scope, location or number and types of
persons benefiting from an activity; and f) increase or decrease the budget of any individual project or activity by
50%.

Substantial Rehabilitation: Rehabilitation of residential property at an average cost for the project in excess of
$25,000 per dwelling unit.

Supportive Housing: Housing, including Housing Units and Group Quarters that have a supportive environment
and includes a planned service component.

Supportive Services: Services provided to residents of supportive housing for the purpose of facilitating the
independence of residents. Examples are: case management, medical/ psychological counseling and supervision,
child care, transportation, and job training.

Tenant-Based (Rental) Assistance: Rental assistance which allows the tenant to move from a dwelling unit with a
right to continued assistance i.e., provided for the tenant, not for the project.

Total Vacant Housing Units: Unoccupied year round housing units.

                                                        104
Unsheltered: Families and individuals whose primary nighttime residence is a public or private place not designed
for, or ordinarily used as, a regular sleeping accommodation for human beings (e.g., streets, parks, alleys).

Housing Unit: Unoccupied year-round housing unit that is available or intended for occupancy at any time during
the year.

Very Low-Income: Households whose incomes do not exceed 50 percent of the median area income for the area,
as determined by HUD, with adjustments for smaller and larger families and for areas with unusually high or low
incomes or where needed because of prevailing levels of construction costs or fair market rents. (This term
corresponds to low-income households in the CDBG Program.)

Year Round Housing Units: Occupied and vacant housing units intended for year round use. (U.S. Census
definition.) Housing units for seasonal or migratory use are excluded.

Information Sources

Although the primary data source of analytical data was the 1990 Census, many other sources of information
were utilized to provide up-to-date information on the Town of Davie, including:

2000 Census Data - prepared by the United States Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census

1990 Census of Population and Housing, prepared by the United States Department of Commerce, Bureau of the
Census

Affordable Housing Needs Assessment, prepared by the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing, University of
Florida

Florida Estimates of Population, prepared by the Bureau of Economic and Business Research, University of
Florida, February;

2007 “Out of Reach” Study -National Low Income Housing Coalition:

Building Bridges of Opportunity: Assembling a Continuum of Care for the Homeless in Broward County and Goals
for the Year 2000, prepared by the Broward Coalition for the Homeless

Town of Davie Comprehensive Plan, Future Land Use and Housing Elements, prepared by the Town of Davie
Development Services Department;

Town of Davie Proposed Evaluation and Appraisal Report (EAR), Housing and Capital Improvement Elements,
prepared by the Town of Davie Development Services Department;

Town of Davie Land Development Code, prepared by the Town of Davie Development Services Department,
updated to February, 1997;

Town of Davie Community Redevelopment Agency Redevelopment Plan, prepared by the Town of Davie
Community Redevelopment Agency, October, 1994.

NRP Quality of Life Surveys and One-On-One Interviews, Spring of 2007 – Housing and Community
Development.

2006 Mobile Home Survey – Town of Davie– Housing and Community Development.

2006 Rental Housing Survey – Town of Davie– Housing and Community Development.

Purchase Price Study prepared May 25, 2006 by FNBR Inc.

Sun Sentinel Newspaper and the Miami Herald Newspaper.


                                                      105
                     Town of Davie
                    Consolidated Plan
                     FY 2007 – 2012
                        Exhibit 1

                Consolidated Plan Forms

                  Table 1A - Homeless and Special Needs Populations

                   Table 1B- Special Needs (Non-Homeless) Populations

Transition Table 1C - Summary of Specific Housing/Community Development Objectives

              Table 2A - Priority Housing Needs/Investment Plan Table

                 Table 2B - Priority Community Development Needs

Transition Table 2C - Summary of Specific Housing/Community Development Objectives

                 Table 3A - Summary of Specific Annual Objectives

                   Table 3B - Annual Housing Completion Goals

                  Table 4 - Priority Public Housing Needs Local Jurisdiction




                                        106
                                          Table 1A
                            Homeless and Special Needs Populations
       Continuum of Care: Housing Gap Analysis Chart
                                                                        Current          Under       Unmet Need/
                                                                       Inventory      Development       Gap

                                                                 Individuals

         Example         Emergency Shelter                                100             40             26
                         Emergency Shelter                                 0              0              0
         Beds            Transitional Housing                              0              0              0
                         Permanent Supportive Housing                      0              0              0
                         Total                                             0              0              0

                                                                 Persons in Families With Children
                         Emergency Shelter                                 0               0                 0
         Beds            Transitional Housing                              0               0                 0
                         Permanent Supportive Housing                      0               0                 0
                         Total                                             0               0                 0


       Continuum of Care: Homeless Population and Subpopulations Chart

         Part 1: Homeless Population                            Sheltered              Unsheltered      Total
                                                        Emergency     Transitional
         Number of Families with Children (Family           0              0                   0             0
         Households):
         1. Number of Persons in Families with               0                  0              0             0
         Children
         2. Number of Single Individuals and Persons         0                  0              0             0
         in Households without children
         (Add Lines Numbered 1 & 2 Total
         Persons)
         Part 2: Homeless Subpopulations                          Sheltered            Unsheltered   Total

         a.   Chronically Homeless                                    0
         b.   Seriously Mentally Ill                                  0
         c.   Chronic Substance Abuse                                 0
         d.   Veterans                                                0
         e.   Persons with HIV/AIDS                                   0
         f.   Victims of Domestic Violence                            0
         g.   Unaccompanied Youth (Under 18)                          0



The Town of Davie, through its not-for-profit faith-based partner the “Hope Outreach Center” uses CDBG Funds
to undertake a Homeless Prevention (Emergency Assistance) Program. The Town also provides General Funds
(Community Endowment) to provide grant funds to other not-for-profit agencies to assist homeless individuals or
to prevent homelessness. Please see the Broward County Consolidated Plan and the Broward Continuum of
Care for the Homeless, regarding regional/county-wide solutions for homeless and special needs populations.




                                                              107
                                  Table 1B
                  Special Needs (Non-Homeless) Populations
                                           Priority Need           Dollars to
           SPECIAL NEEDS                       Level       Unmet   Address          Multi-       Annual
                                           High, Medium,   Need     Unmet           Year          Goals
          SUBPOPULATIONS                       Low,
                                           No Such Need
                                                                     Need           Goals
Elderly                                         M                  2,500,000    Same         $ 500,000
Frail Elderly                                   M                  1,500,000    Same         $ 300,000
Severe Mental Illness                           L                   250,000     Same         $ 50,000
Developmentally Disabled                        N                     0         0            0
Physically Disabled                             M                   750,000     Same         $ 150,000
Persons w/ Alcohol/Other Drug Addictions        M                   500,000     Same         $ 100,000
Persons w/HIV/AIDS                              L                   100,000     Same         $ 20,000
Victims of Domestic Violence                    M                   250,000     Same         $ 50,000
Other


TOTAL                                                              4,600,000                 4,600,000




                                                108
                                Transition Table 1C
          Summary of Specific Housing/Community Development Objectives
                                               (Table 1A/1B Continuation Sheet)

    Obj             Specific Objectives                   Sources of   Performance         Expected    Actual     Outcome/O
   #                                                        Funds       Indicators         Number                  bjective*
                                                                                                      Number
                   Homeless Objectives

            Emergency Assistance Program               CDBG            HH’s                     125                     DH-3
                                                                                                                        EO-1
            Credit Enhancement and Repair              SHIP/CEF        HH’s                    250
                                                                                                                        DH-2
            Disaster Recovery - Purchase               CDBG
            Assistance                                                                          9
                                                                                                                        DH-2
            Disaster Assistance – Rental Assistance    CDBG                                     36
                                                                                                                        DH-2
            Disaster Assistance – Replacement          CDBG
                     Housing
                                                                                                51
                                                                       Public                                            SL-3
            Disaster Assistance – Generators           CDBG            Facilities               4
                                                                                                                        DH-1
            Home Hardening Program                                                              12
                Special Needs Objectives

            Programs for At-Risk Youth                 CDBG/CSC                                                          SL-1

            Neighborhood Revitalization Program        General Fund                                                     SL-1
                                                                                                                        DH-1
            Barrier-Free Home Rehab                    SHIP




            Other Objectives

            Assistance to Davie residents who are      Linkage Fees,
            permanently and involuntarily displaced    Bonds,          HH’s                 3,500                      DH-3
            due to Mobile Home Park closures           Trust Fund



*Outcome/Objective Codes
                                    Availability/Accessibility         Affordability                  Sustainability
          Decent Housing                           DH-1                             DH-2                        DH-3
   Suitable Living Environment                     SL-1                             SL-2                        SL-3
   Economic Opportunity                            EO-1                             EO-2                        EO-3




                                                              109
                                  Table 2A
                Priority Housing Needs/Investment Plan Table
PRIORITY HOUSING NEEDS                                  Priority               Unmet Need
(households)
                                                     0-30%         H   1,500
                        Small Related               31-50%         H   2,000
                                                    51-80%         H   4,000
                                                     0-30%         H   2,500
                   Large Related                    31-50%         H   1,000
                                                    51-80%         H   4,000
Renter                                               0-30%         H   1,500
                   Elderly                          31-50%         H   3,000
                                                    51-80%         H   2,000
                                                     0-30%         H     500
                   All Other                        31-50%         H     500
                                                    51-80%         H     500
                                                     0-30%         H     600
                   Small Related                    31-50%         M     500
                                                    51-80%         H     250
                                                     0-30%         H     200
                        Large Related               31-50%         H   2,000
Owner                                               51-80%         M   4,000
                                                     0-30%         L     550
                               Elderly              31-50%         L   1,000
                                                    51-80%         M     500
                                                     0-30%         H     100
                             All Other              31-50%         H     100
                                                    51-80%         M    100
                          Elderly                    0-80%         L    500
                       Frail Elderly                 0-80%         L   1,000
                   Severe Mental Illness             0-80%         L   2,000
Non-Homeless       Physical Disability               0-80%         M   5,000
Special Needs      Developmental Disability          0-80%         L     250
                   Alcohol/Drug Abuse                0-80%         M     750
                   HIV/AIDS                          0-80%         L      20
                   Victims of Domestic Violence      0-80%         L     500




                                              110
                                             Table 2B
                               Priority Community Development Needs
                                          Priority   Unmet      Dollars to     5 Yr     Annual      Percent
                                           Need      Priority   Address        Goal       Goal       Goal
Priority Need
                                           Level      Need         Need      Plan/Act   Plan/Act
                                                                                                   Completed
Acquisition of Real Property                M                   $8,000,000
Disposition                                 L                       0
Clearance and Demolition                    L                       0
Clearance of Contaminated Sites             L                   $1,000,000
Code Enforcement                            M                   $1,000,000
Public Facility (General)                   H
  Senior Centers                            L                   $ 750,000
  Handicapped Centers                       L                       0
  Homeless Facilities                       L                        0
  Youth Centers                             H                   $ 750,000
  Neighborhood Facilities                   H                   $3,000,000
  Child Care Centers                        H                   $ 700,000
  Health Facilities                         L                       0
  Mental Health Facilities                  L                       0
  Parks and/or Recreation Facilities        H                   $1,000,000
  Parking Facilities                        L                        0
  Tree Planting                             M                   $ 100,000
  Fire Stations/Equipment                   M                        0
  Abused/Neglected Children Facilities      L                        0
  Asbestos Removal                          L                    $ 70,000
  Non-Residential Historic Preservation     L                        0
  Other Public Facility Needs               H                   $ 250,000
Infrastructure (General)                    H
  Water/Sewer Improvements                  H                   $1,200,000
  Street Improvements                       H                   $ 750,000
  Sidewalks                                 H                   $ 200,000
  Solid Waste Disposal Improvements         L                        0
  Flood Drainage Improvements               H                   $ 250,000
  Other Infrastructure                      M                       0
Public Services (General)                   H
  Senior Services                           H                    $ 100,000
  Handicapped Services                      H                    $ 50,000
  Legal Services                            H                    $ 25,000
  Youth Services                            H                    $ 300,000
  Child Care Services                       H                    $ 200,000
  Transportation Services                   L
  Substance Abuse Services                  L                       0
  Employment/Training Services              H                    $ 50,000
  Health Services                           H                       0
  Lead Hazard Screening                     L                       0
  Crime Awareness                           H                    $125,000
  Fair Housing Activities                   M                    $ 25,000
  Tenant Landlord Counseling                H                    $ 15,000
  Other Services                            M                       0
Economic Development (General)              M                       0
  C/I Land Acquisition/Disposition          M                       0
  C/I Infrastructure Development            M                       0
  C/I Building Acq/Const/Rehab              M                       0
  Other C/I                                                         0
  ED Assistance to For-Profit               M                       0
  ED Technical Assistance                   M                       0
  Micro-enterprise Assistance               L                       0
Other                                                               0

                                                      111
                            Transition Table 2C
      Summary of Specific Housing/Community Development Objectives
                                    (Table 2A/2B Continuation Sheet)

Obj          Specific Objectives             Sources of     Performance   Expected     Actual   Outcome/
#                                              Funds         Indicators   Number       Number   Objective*
      Rental Housing
           New Rental Units                 Tax Credits                   150 Units               DH-2

           RAC and TOC Development          Private                       664/600                 DH-2
                                                                           Units
      Owner Housing
            Down Payment Assistance         HOME                                                  DH-2
                                            Disaster $
           RAC and TOC Development          Private                       364/500                 DH-2
                                                                           Units
      Community Development
       Home Repairs                         SHIP                              11 /51              SL-3
                                            Disaster                          Units
      Infrastructure
                Streets/Sidewalks           CDBG                                                  SL-1

                    Drainage                CDBG                                                  SL-1

      Public Facilities
                Youth Center Gym            CDBG-Private                     1                    SL-1

              NSC- One Stop Shop            CDBG-                                                 EO-1
                                            County-
                                            Private
      Public Services
           EAP- Homeless Prevention         CDBG-Private                         126              DH-3
                                            Endowment
            At- Risk Youth                  CDBG-CSC                          160                 SL-1
                                            MHS
      Economic Development
           Credit Enhancement/ Repair       CDBG                               64                 EO-1
                                                                              HH’s


      Neighborhood Revitalization/Other
             NRP Program                    General Funds                     27000               SL-3
                                             Endowment




                                                      112
                                                 Table 3A
                                     Summary of Specific Annual Objectives


Obj           Specific Objectives               Sources of    Performance    Expected   Actual   Outcome/
#                                                 Funds        Indicators    Number     Number   Objective*
         Rental Housing Objectives
      150 units                                Tax Credits,
                                               Bonds


         Owner Housing Objectives
                                               CDBG, SHIP,
      Home Repair and Home Hardening           Disaster


             Homeless Objectives
                                               CDBG,
      Homeless Prevention                      Private,
                                               Community
                                               Endowment



          Special Needs Objectives


         Community Development
                 Objectives


          Infrastructure Objectives

      Rick & Rita Case Gym for At-Risk
      Youth


      Public Facilities Objectives
                                               CRA,
      Drainage, water, sewer                   CDBG,
                                               General


         Public Services Objectives

      At-Risk Youth                            CDBG, CSC,
      Emergency Assistance                     MHS


           Economic Development
                   Objectives




                                                      113
                                               Table 3B
                                   ANNUAL HOUSING COMPLETION GOALS
            Grantee Name:                Expected Annual     Actual Annual    Resources used during the period
                                         Number of Units    Number of Units
Program Year:                            To Be Completed      Completed       CDBG    HOME     ESG     HOPWA

    ANNUAL AFFORDABLE
      HOUSING GOALS (SEC.
              215)
 Homeless households                           0
 Non-homeless households                        0
 Special needs households                       0
    ANNUAL AFFORDABLE
        RENTAL HOUSING
         GOALS (SEC. 215)
 Acquisition of existing units                  0
 Production of new units                        0
 Rehabilitation of existing units               0
 Rental Assistance                              0
 Total Sec. 215 Affordable Rental
  ANNUAL AFFORDABLE
           OWNER
 HOUSING GOALS (SEC. 215)
Acquisition of existing units                  0
Production of new units                        15                                                       SHIP
Rehabilitation of existing units              125                                                       SHIP
Homebuyer Assistance                           50                                                       SHIP
 Total Sec. 215 Affordable Owner
  ANNUAL AFFORDABLE
 HOUSING GOALS (SEC. 215)
 Acquisition of existing units                  0
 Production of new units                        1
 Rehabilitation of existing units              100                                                      SHIP
 Homebuyer Assistance                          50                                                       SHIP
    Total Sec. 215 Affordable Housing



  ANNUAL HOUSING GOALS
 Annual Rental Housing Goal                     0
 Annual Owner Housing Goal                     15
Total Annual Housing Goal

                                                      114
                                             Table 4
                                 Priority Public Housing Needs
                                        Local Jurisdiction

     Public Housing Need Category              PHA Priority Need Level         Estimated Dollars To
                                             High, Medium, Low, No Such Need         Address
Restoration and Revitalization
Capital Improvements                                    Medium                        2M$
Modernization                                           Medium                        1M$
Rehabilitation                                          Medium                        1M$
Other (Specify) New Units                                High                         6M$




Management and Operations




Improved Living Environment
Neighborhood Revitalization (non-capital)               Medium                      $750,000
Capital Improvements                                    Medium                      $750,000
Safety/Crime Prevention/Drug Elimination                 High                       $250,000
Other (Specify)



Economic Opportunity
Resident Services/ Family Self Sufficiency              Medium                      $500,000
Other (Specify)




Total




                                                  115
   Town of Davie
  Consolidated Plan
   FY 2007 - 2012
      Exhibit 2
Grantee Certifications:

   Affirmatively Further Fair Housing
 Anti-Displacement and Relocation Plan
          Drug-free Workplace
               Anti-Lobbying
         Authority of Jurisdiction
         Consistency with Plan
                 Section 3
           Citizen Participation
      Community Development Plan
            Following a Plan
               Use of Funds
            Excessive Force
Compliance with Anti-Discrimination Laws
            Lead-Based Paint




                     116

				
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