21st Century College English

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					           21st Century College English (Book 2)Test2
Part I Listening Comprehension (30%)
Section A (10%)
Directions: In this section, you will hear 10 short conversations. At the end of each
conversation, a question will be asked about what was said. Both the conversation and the
question will be spoken only once. After each question there will be a pause, you must read
the four choices marked A), B), C), and D), and decide which is the best answer. Then
blacken the corresponding letter on the Answer Sheet.

1. A) They will do nothing.
   B) They will do a little more homework.
   C) They will break open a few sodas.
   D) They will go out for something to drink.
2. A) He doesn’t want to be bothered.
   B) He will not answer such naïve questions.
   C) He is not sure what the woman mean.
   D) He was born there.
3. A) At a concert.
   B) At a flower shop.
   C) At an art museum.
   D) At a restaurant.
4. A) At his office.
   B) At lunch.
   C) At the travel agency.
   D) At the bakery.
5. A) A professor and a student.
   B) A customer and a cashier.
   C) An editor and an author.
   D) A lawyer and his client.
6. A) Close friends.
   B) Strangers.
   C) Friends who haven’t see each other for a long while.
   D) Father and daughter.
7. A) They have a teacher-student relationship.
   B) The woman is a lawyer and the man is her client.
   C) The woman is a doctor and the man is her patient.
   D) They are married.
8. A) He likes to see movie.
   B) He has no time.
   C) He had time every night.
   D) He would like to go every night.
9. A) The weather was better.

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    B) The weather was a little bit too warm.
    C) The weather was a little bit cold.
    D) The weather was bad.
10. A) They will cost five dollars.
    B) They will cost ten dollars.
    C) They will cost fifteen dollars.
    D) They will cost twenty dollars.


Section B (10%)
Directions: In this section you will hear 3 short passages. At the end of each passage, you
will hear a number of questions. Both the passage and the questions will be read only once.
After you hear one question, you must choose the best answer from the four choices
marked A), B), C), and D). Then blacken the corresponding letter on the answer sheet.

Questions 11 to 13 are based on the passage you have just heard.
11. A) Drug and food.
    B) Cancer and health.
    C) Food and health.
    D) Health and drug.
12. A) Drugs are always given to animals for medical reasons.
    B) Some of the additives in our food are added to the food itself and are given to the
       living animals.
    C) Researchers have known about the potential dangers of food additives for over fifty
       years.
    D) Food may cause forty percent of cancer in the world.
13. A) Because the animals are sick.
    B) Because the animals are losing weight.
    C) Because they want to make more money out of the animals.
    D) Because the drugs are preventives against cancer.

Questions 14 to 17 are based on the passage you have just heard.
14. A) Traffic accidents.
    B) Smoking-related diseases.
    C) Murder.
    D) All of these.
15. A) 75.       B) 23.    C) 30.         D) 3,000.
16. A) The National Cancer Institute is taking effective measures.
    B) Smoking is prevented among high school seniors.
    C) Many smokers have died of cancer.
    D) None of these.
17. A)Smoking rates among youth have declined very little.
    B) There are now more female than male smokers among high school seniors.
    C) High smoking rates are due to the increase in wealth.

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   D) Smokers at high school are from socio-economic backgrounds.

Questions 18 to 20 are based on the passage you have just heard.
18. A) They will soon die out completely.
    B) They were once a relative of English.
    C) They are no longer spoken.
    D) They come from the same family.
19. A) Chinese. B) English. C) Spanish. D) German.
20. A) Because of the great differences between the dialects of Chinese.
    B) Because Chinese and many foreign languages are not of the same family.
    C) Because Chinese is a very old language.
    D) Because of the great differences between the old Chinese and the present-day
      Chinese.

Section C (10%)
Directions: In this section you will hear a passage, and then decide the following
statements are true (T) or false (F). Put a T or F in the corresponding parentheses on the
answer sheet.

21. Oscar, Emmy, Grammy, and Tony are awards given to entertainers across the world
     every year.
22.The award ceremonies are usually held in New York.
23. Emmy is the oldest of these awards.
24. The Oscar awards ceremony was first held in 1928 in Hollywood to honor outstanding
  achievement in performance, photography, direction, production, music, and other areas
  of film-making.
25. The Emmy is presented by the National Academy for Television Arts and Sciences to
  the top programs, performers, and behind-the-scenes people in commercial and public
  television.
26. The Grammy is awarded to singers , dancers and other artists.
27. The Tony is an award that honors outstanding achievement in playwriting.
28.The award candidates spend weeks planning what they will wear, who they will go with,
  and what they will say in heir acceptance speeches.
29. One award ceremony usually costs one hundred thousand dollars.
30. The losers at the award ceremony are full of confidence in their future.


Part II Reading Comprehension (30%)
Directions: There are some questions or unfinished statements in this part. For each of them
there are four choices marked A), B), C), and D). You should decide on the best choice and
blacken the corresponding letter on the Answer Sheet.

Questions 31 to 35 are based on the following passage.
    CATV is a short way of saying “community antenna television”. But “ cable

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television” is the term most people use. Cable television allows viewers to receive TV
programs that they cannot pick up with their regular antennas.
      Television signals do not follow the curve of the earth. They travel in straight lines in
all directions. Signals from a TV station moves toward the horizon and go into space. If
you live only a few miles from a TV station, you may get a good picture on your set. But if
you live more than 50 miles from it, you may not get any pictures at all.
   CATV began in 1948. People in places far from TV stations shared the cost of putting up
high antennas. A community antenna was usually placed on a hill, a mountain or on a high
tower. The antenna picked up TV signals and fed them into a small local station. From the
station, thick wires called cable ran out to nearby homes. Each person using the cable paid
a monthly charge.
   CATV worked well, and soon new uses were found for it. Local stations could feed
programs into empty channels that were not in use. People along the cable could have local
news, weather reports, and farm and school news at the local stations on extra charge.
   Today, cable television has moved into cities. It brings in extra programs that city
viewers with regular antennas cannot see. It is also used in many classrooms throughout the
country.

31. This passage is about___________.
  A) how to put up high antennas
  B) a way of picking up better TV programs
  C) how to use the empty channels on your TV set
  D) the way that TV signals are set
32. From the first paragraph we know that ____________.
  A) most people use cable television
  B) “community antenna” is another name for “ regular antenna”
  C) a community antenna is used for cable television
  D) regular antennas cannot pick up TV programs
33. Which of the following is NOT the way TV signals travel?
  A) In a curve.
  B) In a straight line.
  C) In all directions.
  D) Toward the horizon.
34.Which of the following is NOT true of the community antenna according to the
     passage?
  A) It was usually placed on a roof.
  B) It was usually placed on a hill.
  C) It was usually placed on a mountain.
  D) It was usually placed on a high tower.
35. What can be inferred from the passage?
  A) TV has begun to be used for educational purpose.
  B) There is no charge for CATV.
  C) CATV cannot be used in rural areas.
  D) Antennas for CATV are usually put up in the center of a community.

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Questions 36 to 40 are based on the following passage.
     After the violent earthquake that shook Los Angeles in 1994, earthquake scientists had
news to report: The damage and death toll could have been much worse.
    More than 60 people died in this earthquake. By comparison, an earthquake of similar
intensity that shook America in 1988 claimed 25,000 victims.
    Injuries and deaths were relatively less in Los Angeles because the quake occurred at
4:31 a.m. on a holiday, when traffic was light on the city’s highways. In addition, changes
made to the construction codes in Los Angeles during the last 20 years have strengthened
the city’s buildings and highways, making them more resistant to quakes.
    Despite the good news, civil engineers aren’t resting on their successes. Pinned to their
drawings boards are blueprints for improved quake-resistant buildings. The new designs
should offer even greater security to cities where earthquakes often take place.
    In the past, making structures quake-resistant meant firm yet flexible materials, such as
steel and wood, that bend without breaking. Later, people tried to lift a building off its
foundation, and insert rubber and steel between the building and its foundation to reduce
the impact of ground vibrations. The most recent designs give buildings brains as well as
concrete and steel supports. Called smart buildings, the structures respond like living
organisms to an earthquake’s vibrations. When the ground shakes and the building tips
forward, the computer would force the building to shift in the opposite direction.
    The new smart structures could be very expensive to build. However, they would save
many lives and would be less likely to be damaged during earthquakes.

36. One reason why the loss of lives in the Los Angeles earthquake was comparatively low
  was that____________.
  A) new computers had been installed in the buildings
  B) it occurred in the residential areas rather than on the highways
  C) large numbers of Los Angeles residents had gone for a holiday
  D) improvements had been made in the construction of buildings and highways
37. The function of the computer mentioned in the passage is to ___________.
  A) counterbalance an earthquake’s action on the building
  B) predict the coming of an earthquake with accuracy
  C) help strengthen the foundation of the building
  D) measure the impact of an earthquake’s vibrations
38. The smart buildings discussed in the passage ___________.
  A) would cause serious financial problems
  B) would be worthwhile though costly
  C) would increase the complexity of architectural design
  D) can reduce the ground vibrations caused by earthquakes.
39. It can be inferred from the passage that in minimizing the damage caused by
  earthquakes attention should be focused on ___________.
  A) the increasing use of rubber and steel in capital construction
  B) the development of flexible building materials
  C) the reduction of the impact of ground vibrations

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  D) early forecasts of earthquakes
40. The main purpose of this passage is mostly to _________.
  A) compare the consequences of the earthquakes that occurred in the U.S.
  B) encourage civil engineers to make extensive use of computers
  C) outline the history of the development of quake-resistant building materials
  D) report new developments in constructing quake-resistant buildings

Questions 41 to 45 are based on the following passage.
     Andrew Carnegie, known as the King of Steel, built the steel industry in the United
States, and, in the process, became one of the wealthiest men in America. His success
resulted in part from his ability to sell the product and in part from his policy of expanding
during periods of economic decline, when most of his competitors were reducing their
investments.
     Carnegie believed that individuals should progress through hard work, but he also felt
strongly that the wealthy should use their fortunes for the benefit of society. He opposed
charity, preferring instead to provide educational opportunities that would allow others to
help themselves. "He who dies rich, dies disgraced," he often said.
     Among his more noteworthy contributions to society are those that bear his name,
including the Carnegie Institute of Pittsburgh, which has a library, a museum of fine arts,
and a museum of national history. He also founded a school of technology that is now part
of Carnegie-Mellon University. Other gifts are the Carnegie Endowment for International
Peace to promote understanding between nations, the Carnegie Institute of Washington to
fund scientific research, and Carnegie Hall to provide a center for the arts.
     Few Americans have been left untouched by Andrew Carnegie’s generosity. His
contributions of more than five million dollars established 2,500 libraries in small
communities throughout the country and that we all enjoy today.

41. Which of the following accounts for Andrew Carnegie’s success?
  A) His ability to sell the product and his policy of expanding business.
  B) His reputation as the King of steel.
  C) His founding of the steel industry in the United States.
  D) His creation of a global distribution network.
42. Which of the following is NOT true about Andrew Carnegie?
  A) He thought individuals should progress through hard work.
  B) He felt that the wealthy should use their fortunes for the benefit of society.
  C) He preferred to provide opportunities that would allow others to help themselves.
  D) He thought that charity was a good way to help the poor.
43. Which of the following is NOT included in the Carnegie Institute of Pittsburgh?
  A) A library.
  B) A school of technology.
  C) A museum of fine arts.
  D). A museum of national history.
44. How many libraries have been built in small communities with Andrew Carnegie’s
  donations?

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  A) 500.
  B) 1500.
  C) 2500.
  D) 3500.
45. Which of the following is NOT true according to the passage?
  A) Andrew Carnegie became the wealthiest men in America by his hard work.
   B) Andrew Carnegie’s noteworthy contributions to society are those that bear his name.
  C) Most Americans have benefited from Andrew Carnegie’s generosity.
  D) Libraries donated by Andrew Carnegie formed the basis of the public library system.


Part III Vocabulary
Section A (5%)
Directions: There are 10 incomplete sentences in this section. For each sentence there are
four choices marked A, B), C), and D). Choose the one that best completes the sentence.
Then blacken the corresponding letter on the Answer Sheet.

46. Your drawings are marvelous but they don’t_______ with what we’re trying to do here.
    A) fit                   B) fit in               C) suit            D) suit in
47. He seems to be __________ to colds—he just never gets them.
    A) easy                   B) immune              C) subject          D) free
48. I can’t even afford a bicycle, ____________ a car!
    A) mention              B) speak of               C) let alone         D) forget
49. When I’m very angry, I find it best to _____________myself from other people for a
  little while.
    A) separate              B) shut                  C) isolate            D) turn
50. The spacecraft _________ as it entered the Earth’s atmosphere.
    A) disintegrated           B) broke                 C) split              D) divided
51.A) I think we’re moving to a bigger house in June, but it’s only ___________.
    A) uncertain                B) tentative            C) suggestive         D) for fun
52. All the evidence ___________ suicide.
    A) points to                 B) points out             C) points up        D) points at
53. It was reported that the accident was caused by a cow that had _________ into the road.
    A) gone                      B) entered               C) stepped            D) strayed
54. Scientists are hoping for a ___________ in the search for a cure for the disease.
    A) way                       B) breakthrough     C) step              D) day
55. Parts of an engine which move can___________.
    A) wear away                B) wear out        C) wear hard           D) wear up


Section B (10%)
Directions: There are 10 sentences in this section. Write a definition or synonym
  of the italicized word on the Answer Sheet.



                                             7
56.    It used to be virtually impossible to find vegetarian restaurants outside the major
      cities, but it’s much easier now.
57.    It was an interesting read, full of fascinating insights into the most basic aspects of
      human relationships.
58.    It was ridiculous of them to have a party starting at 10 a.m.
59.    He felt a deep resentment at his parents for his miserable childhood.
60.    For the security of the passengers, all hand baggage is carefully checked.
61.    It’s certain to end in war if either side violates the treaty again.
62.    There is little indication that the protesters will leave the building peacefully.
63.    As he walked through the forest, he could feel the warm moist air on his face.
64.    The country’s economic situation is deteriorating as the statistics indicate that
      unemployment is increasing, prices rising and exports falling.
65.    Honeybees use one of the most sophisticated communication systems of any insect.


Part IV Cloze (10%)
Directions: There are 20 blanks in the following passage. For each blank there are four
choices marked A), B), C), and D) at the end of the passage. Choose the answer that best fits
into the context, and then blacken the corresponding letter on the Answer Sheet.

   The purpose of a letter of application is to help you to “sell” yourself. It should state
_____66____ the job you want, and should tell what your abilities are and what you have
to offer. It should ___67__ a quick, clear picture of your qualifications, your
accomplishments and your aims. It should present ___68______ to possible employers in
the best light.
    Your letter of application should be simple, human, personal and brief ____69____
omitting any essential fact. It should be ____70______ carefully prepared as an
advertisement, since, like advertisement, it is intended to attract attention.
    In writing a letter of application, bear in ___71____ that the things a prospective
employer is most ____72_____ to want to know about are your age; your education; your
domestic _____73____
( married or single); your personality ( how you get along with ____74______ ); your
training; your experience, your abilities (what can you do?); your record (what have you
done?); your work habits; your character; your aims or ambition.
    The opening paragraph is perhaps the most important part. ___75_______ the first few
sentences fail to win the reader’s attention, the rest of the letter may not be read at all. Try
to key your opening remarks ____76______ the needs or interests of the employer
---_____77_____ to your own need or desires. For example, instead of beginning
_____78_____ “I saw your advertisement in today’s paper.” You might say “ I
____79_____ made a careful study of your advertising during the past six moths” or “ I
have made a survey in my neighborhood to find out how many housewives use your
product and ___80_______ they like it.”
    Try to avoid generalities. Be ___81_______ about the kind of job for which you are
now applying.

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    College graduates looking for their first positions often ask ,“What can I ___82______
in a letter? Employers want experience--- which, naturally, no beginner has.” The answer is
that everything that you have ever done is experience. Any evidence of initiative,
dependability, originality, perseverance or skill is well worth mentioning.
    _____83_______ is important to write a good strong closing for your letter.
_____84______ a specific request for an interview or give the prospective employer
something definite to do or expect.
    An excellent idea is to enclose a stamped, self-address envelope with your letter. That
makes ___85_____ easier and more convenient for a prospective employer to get in touch
with you.

66.A) clearly           B) plainly          C) obviously         D) evidently
67.A) present          B) give              C) display           D) show
68.A) it               B) them              C) you               D) that
69.A) without          B) with              C) by                 D) about
70.A) so               B) more               C) as               D) still
71.A) brain            B) head               C) heart             D) mind
72.A) probable         B) possible            C) likely           D) able
73.A) status            B) statue            C) stature            D) state
74.A) another          B) others             C) anything           D) all
75.A) While            B) Although           C) As                D) If
76.A) to                B) for                C) into              D) by
77.A) not               B) nor                C) no                D) nothing
78.A) by                B) with                C) from              D) at
79.A) have              B) had                 C) do                D) did
80.A) how                B) why                  C) where             D) which
81.A) particular           B) special          C) general             D) specific
82.A) offer                B) supply          C) grant                D) provide
83.A) That                B) It               C) There                D) What
84.A) Make                B) Ask              C) State                 D) Get
85.A) him                 B) you              C) that                  D) it



Part V Writing (15%)
Directions: For this part, you are allowed 30 minutes to write a composition entitled Crime
in the City. Your composition should be based on the following outline given in Chinese.
           1.目前城市居民安全感如何。
           2. 面对罪犯,人们的不同态度。
           3. 你对改善社会治安的建议。
Your composition should be no less than 120 words. Write the composition on the Answer
Sheet.




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21st Century College English (Book 2)
End-term Achievement Test (A)
         (Script)
                10
Part I Listening Comprehension
Section A
Directions: In this section, you will hear 10 short conversations. At the end of each
conversation, a question will be asked about what was said. Both the conversation and the
question will be spoken only once. After each question there will be a pause, you must read
the four choices marked A), B), C), and D), and decide which is the best answer. Then
blacken the corresponding letter on the Answer Sheet.
1. W: Let’s go out for a coffee or a soda or something. I’m tired of doing homework.
    M: Good, I need a break from reading, too.
     Q: What are they going to do?
2. W: Excuse me, but are you familiar with this area?
     M: I’m a native.
     Q: What does the man mean?
3. W: The music and the flowers are lovely.
     M: Yes, I hope that the food is good.
     Q: Where did this conversation most likely take place?
4. M: Good afternoon. This is Dick William at World Travel Agency. Is Mr. Baker there?
     W: No. He’s out to lunch. I’ll be glad to take a message.
     Q: Where is Mr. Baker now?
5. M: When is the assignment due? And what type of report do you want?
    W: It is due on the fifteenth. I expect a full research project, approximately 20 pages in
    length and typed.
     Q: Who are two speakers?
6. M: How nice to see you again. What have you been doing these past two years?
     W: Has it really been that long? How time flying?
     Q: What’s their relationship?
7. W: What seems to be the problem?
     M: Well, I’ve been feeling dizzy and I’m often short of breath.
     Q: What can be inferred about the relationship between the two speakers?
8. W: Would you go to the cinema with me tonight?
     M: If I had time, I would go with you every night.
     Q: What is true about the man?
9. M: What was the weather like during your holidays?
     W: Not bad, but it would have been better if it had been a little cooler.
    Q: What was the weather like during the woman’s holidays?
10. M: I thought this hat was on sale for half price, but it still cost ten dollars.
     W: You are mistaken. If you buy two, the second one will be half price.
     Q: How much will two hats cost?

Section B
Directions: In this section you will hear 3 short passages. At the end of each passage, you
will hear a number of questions. Both the passage and the questions will be read only once.
After you hear one question, you must choose the best answer from the four choices

                                              11
marked A), B), C), and D). Then blacken the corresponding letter on the answer sheet.

Questions 11 to 13 are based on the passage you have just heard.
  The food we eat seems to have profound effects on our health. Although science has made
enormous steps in making food more fit to eat, it has, at the same time, made many foods
unfit to eat. Some researches have shown that perhaps eighty percent of all human illnesses
are related to diet and forty percent of cancer is related to diet as well, especially cancer of the
colon. Different cultures are more likely to cause certain different illnesses because of the
food that is characteristic in theses cultures. That food is related to illness is not a new
discovery. In 1945, government researchers realized that nitrates, commonly used to
preserve color in meats, and other food additives, caused cancer. Yet, these carcinogenic
additives remain in our food, and it becomes more difficult all the time to know which things
on the packaging labels of processed food are helpful or harmful. The additives which we eat
are not all so direct. Farmers often give penicillin to beef and living animals, and because of
this, penicillin has been found in the milk or treated cows. Sometimes similar drugs are given
to animals not for medical purposes, but for financial reasons. The farmers are simply trying
to fatten the animals in order to obtain a higher price on the market. Although the Food and
Drug Administration has tried repeatedly to control these procedures, the practices continue.
11. What is the talk mainly concerned about?
12. Which of the following is NOT true according to the talk?
13. Why do the farmer sometimes give drugs to his animals according to the talk?

Questions 14 to 17 are based on the passage you have just heard.
   Today, as every other day of the year, more than 3,000 U.S. adolescents will smoke their
first cigarette on their way to becoming regular smokers as adults. During their lifetime, it
can be expected that of these 3,000, about 23 will be murdered, 30 will die in traffic
accidents, and nearly 750 will be killed by a smoking-related disease. The number of deaths
attributed to cigarette smoking clearly outweighs all other factors, whether voluntary or
involuntary, as a cause of death.
     Since the late 1970s, when daily smoking among high school seniors reached 30
percent, smoking rates among youth have declined very little. Second, in the late 1970s,
smoking among male high school seniors exceeded that among females by nearly 10
percent. Third, several recent studies have indicated high school dropouts have excessively
high smoking rates, as much as 75 percent.
     Finally, though significant declines in adolescent smoking have occurred in the past
decade, no definite results for the declines exist. Within this context, the National Cancer
Institute is declining its current effort to determine the most effective measures to reduce
smoking levels among youth.
14. According to the speaker, what mainly causes the deaths among the young people?
15. How many high school students will become regular smokers every day?
16. Why is adolescent smoking declining?
17. What is true about smoking in the U.S.?

Questions 18 to 20 are based on the passage you have just heard.

                                                12
      Throughout history, people have been interested in knowing how language first began,
but no one knows exactly where or how this happened. However, we do know a lot about
languages, the languages of today and also the languages of earlier times. There are
probably about three thousand languages in the world today. Chinese is the language with
most speakers. English, Russian and Spanish are also spoken by many millions of people.
On the other hand, some languages in the world have less than one hundred speakers.
    There are several important families of languages in the world. For example, most of
the languages of Europe are in one large family called Indo-European. The original
language of this family was spoken about 4,500 years ago; many of the present-day
languages of Europe and India are modern forms of the language of 4,500 years ago.
    Languages are always changing. The English of today is very different from the English
500 years ago. About 1,000 years ago English was a little-known relative of German
spoken on one of the borders of Europe.
    If a language has a large number of speakers or if it is very old, there may be
differences in the way it is spoken in different areas. That is, the language may have several
dialects. Chinese is a good example of dialect differences. Chinese has been spoken for
thousands of years by many millions of speakers. The differences between the dialects of
Chinese are so great that speakers of Chinese from some parts of China cannot understand
speakers from other parts.
18. What is true about most European and Indian languages?
19. Which of the following seems to have changed a lot according to the talk?
20. Why is it most difficult for one to learn to speak Chinese?

Section C
Directions: In this section you will hear a passage, and then decide the following
statements are true (T) or false (F). Put a T or F in the corresponding parentheses on the
answer sheet.

   Oscar, Emmy, Grammy, Tony --- these sound like names of people, but actually they are
awards given to entertainers in the United States every year. Each of these award ceremonies
is a grand affair, usually held in Hollywood or New York. Hundreds of would-be winners
dress in formally to accept their prize or acknowledge others who win.
    The oldest of these awards is the Oscar, a small statue presented by the Academy of
Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. The Academy Awards ceremony originated in 1928 in
Hollywood to honor outstanding achievement in performance, photography, direction,
production, music, and other areas of film-making. The name Oscar was supposedly given to
the small statue in 1931 when the librarian and, later, executive director of the Academy,
Margaret Herrick, said that it looked like her Uncle Oscar.
     The Emmy is presented by the National Academy for Television Arts and Sciences to
the top programs, performers, and behind-the-scenes people in commercial and public
television. The Grammy is awarded by the national Academy of Recording Arts and
Sciences and honors a variety of singers, musicians, producers, writers, technicians, and the
music they have produced.
    The Tony is an award that pays tribute to the outstanding achievement in theater. It was

                                              13
first presented in 1947 and named for a then-popular actress, Antoinette Perry. It honors the
best among Broadway dramas and musicals in categories similar to those of the Oscar.
Millions of viewers watch these award ceremonies in television and are overjoyed when their
favorite stars receive a prize. The candidates themselves spend weeks planning what they
will wear, who they will go with, and what they will say in their acceptance speeches.
Hundreds of thousands of dollars are spent on an event that is over in just a few hours. The
winners take the prizes home, grateful for the recognition their talent and hard work have
brought them. The losers smile graciously, express how happy they are for the winners, and
think to themselves, “Next year will be my turn!”




                21st Century College English (Book 2)
                    End-term Achievement Test (A)
                         (Key for reference)

                                             14
Part I
Section A
1. D 2.D 3.D 4.B 5.A 6.C 7.C 8.B 9.B 10.C
Section B
11.C 12.A 13.C 14.B 15.D 16.D 17.A 18.D 19.B 20.A
Section C
21. F 22.F 23.F 24.T 25.T 26.F 27.F 28.T 29.F 30.T



Part II Reading Comprehension
31.B 32.C 33.A 34.A 35.A 36.D 37. A 38.B           39.C 40. D    41.A 42. D 43.B 44.C
  45.D


Part III Vocabulary
Section A
46. B 47.B 48.C 49.C 50.A 51.B 52.A 53.D 54 B 55.B

Section B
56. almost; very nearly
57. deep understanding; the ability to see into the true nature of something
58. deserving to be laughed at; absurd
59. bad feelings; anger
60. safety
61. break or be contrary to; break; disobey
62. a sign or suggestion; signal
63. slightly wet; damp
64. become worse; worsen
65. refined and advanced; complicated


Part IV
66.A 67.B 68.C 69.A 70.C 71.D 72.C                 73.A 74.B 75.D 76.A 77.A 78. B
79. A 80.B 81.D 82. A 83. B 84.A 85. D




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