COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS

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COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS Powered By Docstoc
					              Commonwealth of Massachusetts

              Executive Office of Public Safety
                    Programs Division




Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA)
         Federal Fiscal Year 2006 Formula Grant
               Application for Grant Funds


Mitt Romney                                            Kerry Healey
Governor                                       Lieutenant Governor


Robert C. Haas                                   John T. Farley, III
Secretary of Public Safety            Director, Programs Division

                  Executive Office of Public Safety
                        Programs Division
                     Ten Park Plaza, Suite 3720
                         Boston, MA 02116
                       Phone: 617-725-3301
                    www.mass.gov/eopsfunding
Message from Secretary Robert C. Haas


June, 2006

Dear Applicant:

I am pleased to announce that the Massachusetts Executive Office of Public Safety is making
approximately $810,000 of funding available from the federal Juvenile Justice and
Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA) Formula Grant Program, subject to the final award to
Massachusetts through the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office of
Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

The purpose of this program is to improve the lives of juveniles in the Commonwealth by
preventing their involvement with the juvenile justice system and by improving the operation
and services provided by the juvenile justice system. The FFY 2006 priority funding areas for
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts JJDPA Formula Grant Program are:

      Aftercare/Reentry                                Gender-Specific Services
      Alternatives to Detention                        Juvenile Justice System Improvement
      Delinquency Prevention                           Mental Health Services
      Disproportionate Minority Contact                School Programs
      Diversion                                        Substance Abuse

I recognize that the amount of funding available is small relative to the need for delinquency
prevention and intervention services in the Commonwealth. For this reason, I seek to make
strategic investments with this funding that will build capacity or develop repeatable models
for intervention.

Funded projects will be selected through a competitive process. Selection criteria include
ability to demonstrate an effective approach, either through connection to research results, or
by replicating a program that has been shown through evaluation to be effective. It is my
hope that judicious use of this federal funding will result in quality outcomes for juveniles,
their families, and communities around the state.

I look forward to your proposal.

Sincerely,




Robert C. Haas
Secretary of Public Safety




                                             1
                  Executive Office of Public Safety Programs Division
            Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act Formula Grant
                         FFY 2006 Application for Grant Funds
                                                                      Table of Contents


I. BACKGROUND ..................................................................................................................................................... 3

            Purpose of this Document ............................................................................................................................... 3

            Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................... 3

            Eligibility ......................................................................................................................................................... 3
II. PRIORITIES ........................................................................................................................................................... 5

            Massachusetts FFY06 Formula Grant Priority Areas ...................................................................................... 5

            Description of Priority JJDPA Program Areas ................................................................................................ 5

            Disproportionate Minority Contact and Youth Development Model .............................................................. 7

            Performance Measures .................................................................................................................................... 9
III. BASIC PROGRAM INFORMATION .................................................................................................................10

            Grant Award Match ....................................................................................................................................... 10

            Grant Award Period....................................................................................................................................... 10

            Cost Reimbursement ..................................................................................................................................... 10

            Notification of Awards .................................................................................................................................. 10
IV. GRANT PROCESS ..............................................................................................................................................11

            Application Deadline ..................................................................................................................................... 11

            Proposal Review Process ............................................................................................................................... 11

            Evaluation Criteria for Current & Former Grantees ...................................................................................... 12

            Evaluation Criteria for New Applicants ........................................................................................................ 13

            Bidders’ Conference/Communication with EOPS ........................................................................................ 14
V. APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS .......................................................................................................................15

            Instructions for the FFY 2006 JJDPA Formula Grant Program Application ................................................. 15

            Subgrantee Requirements .............................................................................................................................. 19

            Dates to Remember ....................................................................................................................................... 23

            Final Check List ............................................................................................................................................ 24
Attachment A: Resources: Proven Effective Programs ............................................................................................... 25
Attachment B: A Shared Vision for Massachusetts Youth and Young Adults ............................................................ 28
Attachment C: Bidders’ Conference for Juvenile Justice Formula Grant Applicants .................................................. 29
Attachment D: Quarterly Financial Reporting Instructions and Documentation Requirements .................................. 30




                                                                                  2
I. BACKGROUND
                                     Purpose of this Document

The purpose of this document is to invite proposals under the Juvenile Justice and
Delinquency Prevention Act Formula Grant Program for:

       replication of proven programs models to address juvenile justice and delinquency
        prevention, or
       creation of innovative program models for addressing juvenile justice and delinquency
        prevention through connection to research results.

Our goal is twofold: to borrow what works so as not to reinvent the wheel and to foster new
ideas that can be tested.

For the purposes of this application for grant funds (AGF), a proven program model is one
that has been evaluated and found to be effective.1 At the end of this AGF, there is a list of
resources (Attachment A) where applicants can find websites that list proven program models
and other useful articles. The Massachusetts Executive Office of Public Safety (EOPS)
Programs Division encourages applicants to dedicate some time in the grant writing process to
exploring these proven programs. Applicants should feel free to propose proven programs that
have been evaluated by independent evaluators that are not in this list of resources.

                                             Introduction

The EOPS Programs Division administers the federal Juvenile Justice and Delinquency
Prevention Act (JJDPA) Formula Grant Program. The JJDPA of 1974, as amended,
authorizes states to designate formula grant money to fund specific programs which offer a
high probability of improving the functioning of the juvenile justice system and to prevent
youth from entering the juvenile justice system.

                                               Eligibility

Grantees currently receive Challenge Grant2 and Formula Grant funding are encouraged to
apply. New applicants may also apply, however, please note that the amount of federal
funding available for awards this year is less than half of the funding that was available last
year. Though there may be exceptions, the grants review subcommittee will prioritize for
funding those programs and organizations in which they have already invested.

In accordance with Section 223(a)(5) of the JJDPA, states may award Formula Grant funds to
state agencies or units of general local government. A unit of general local government is

1
 These are sometimes called model programs, science-based programs, or evidence-based programs.
2
 There Challenge Grant program has ended. We expect currently Challenge grantees to apply for Formula
Grant funds if they are planning on continuing their program with EOPS federal funds.
                                                  3
defined as a city, county, or town. School districts are not considered units of local
government. However, they may serve as the implementing agency. States may also award
Formula Grant funds directly to local private agencies. Local private agencies may request
such funding if they have applied for and been denied funding and/or sponsorship for funding
by any state agency or unit of general local government for the same or similar project. For
example, a letter from a state agency or unit of general local government saying that no
funding was available for your project and confirmation that no other state agency or local
unit of government in the geographic area has proposed or is engaged in the same or a similar
program would suffice as justification for eligibility.

In addition, a local private applicant must also demonstrate adequate fiscal capacity to
manage federal funds and meet all state and federal conditions pertaining to the management
and administration of such funding. Local private applicants must submit documentation of
their status as non-profit entities and a copy of their most recent financial statement and audit
(OMB A-133 audit if previously required) by June 22, 2006. Prior to submitting the
application, these documents will be reviewed by EOPS General Counsel and applicants will
be informed as to their eligibility for funding.




                                              4
II. PRIORITIES

                   Massachusetts FFY06 Formula Grant Priority Areas

In Massachusetts, the purpose of the JJDPA Formula Grant is to implement promising and/or
effective programs. States may choose from up to thirty-four standard program areas out of
which the Commonwealth of Massachusetts has selected nine for this year’s JJDPA Formula
Grant program:

          Aftercare/Reentry                             Gender-Specific Services
          Alternatives to Detention                     Juvenile Justice System
          Delinquency Prevention
                                                          Improvement

          Disproportionate Minority Contact
                                                         Mental Health Services
           (DMC)                                         School Programs
          Diversion                                     Substance Abuse


                       Description of Priority JJDPA Program Areas

Aftercare/Reentry. Programs to prepare targeted juvenile offenders to successfully return to
their communities after serving a period of secure confinement in a DYS residential facility.
Programs will work with DYS to support aftercare services for youth leaving DYS residential
facilities that incorporate a youth development approach and address DMC. Aftercare
programs focus on preparing juvenile offenders for release and providing a continuum of
supervision and services after release.

Alternatives to Detention. Alternative services provided to a juvenile offender in the
community as an alternative to secure detention. One of the goals of this program area is to
reduce the number of youth and length of stay for youth being sent to secure detention.
Programs should incorporate a youth development model and address DMC.

Delinquency Prevention. Funding in this area supports programs, or other initiatives
designed to reduce the incidence of delinquent acts and directed to the general youth
population thought to be “at risk” of becoming delinquent. This category includes what is
commonly referred to as “primary prevention.” This program area excludes programs
targeted at youth already adjudicated delinquent, and those programs designed specifically to
prevent gang-related or substance abuse activities. Programs should incorporate a youth
development model and address DMC.

Disproportionate Minority Contact. Programs or other initiatives designed primarily to
address the disproportionate number of juvenile members of minority groups who come into
contact with the juvenile justice system, pursuant to Section 223(a)(22) of the JJDP Act of
2002.

Diversion. Programs funded in this area are designed to divert juveniles from entering the
juvenile justice system. Programs should occur pre-arraignment and should divert youth from
                                            5
the system who would otherwise become part of the system. Programs should incorporate a
youth development model and address DMC.

Gender-Specific Services. Services designed to address needs unique to the gender of the
individual to whom such services are provided. Programs should incorporate a youth
development model and address DMC.

Juvenile Justice System Improvement: Programs or other initiatives that examine issues or
improve practices, policies, or procedures on a system wide basis. Special emphasis will be
given to applicants who propose to address juvenile justice data collection, an integrated
system of care, and/or secure detention utilization in Massachusetts.

Mental Health Services. Services under this program area include, but are not limited to, the
development and/or enhancement of diagnostic, treatment, and prevention instruments;
psychological and psychiatric evaluations; counseling services; and/or family support services
that either prevent contact with the juvenile justice system or that engage youth involved in
the juvenile justice system. Programs should incorporate a youth development model and
address DMC.

School Programs. Education programs and/or related services designed to prevent truancy,
suspension, dropout and expulsion as a means to prevent and reduce contact with the juvenile
justice system. School safety programs may include support for school resource officers and
law-related education. Programs should incorporate a youth development model and address
DMC.

Substance Abuse. Programs or other initiatives designed to address the use and abuse of
illegal and other prescription and nonprescription drugs and the use and abuse of alcohol.
Programs include control, prevention, and treatment. Programs should incorporate a youth
development model and address DMC.




                                            6
             Disproportionate Minority Contact and Youth Development Model

The Massachusetts Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee (JJAC) has chosen to focus on both
disproportionate minority contact (DMC) and youth development in all of its grant programs
(in addition to the chosen program areas described in the previous pages). Grant applicants
must address both DMC and youth development in their applications regardless of which
Program Area they are applying under. Successful applicants will demonstrate that their
proposed program will help to reduce DMC and that it will utilize a youth development
model. For more information about DMC and youth development, please read the following
information:

Disproportionate Minority Contact (DMC)

Disproportionate Minority Contact (DMC) refers to the overrepresentation of minority youth
in the juvenile justice system at all points in the juvenile justice process.3 DMC is a problem
in Massachusetts and across the nation. In the United States, African American and Hispanic
youth are likely to be overrepresented at each stage of the juvenile justice process. At the
secure confinement stage, minority juveniles make up an increasingly larger segment of all
juveniles incarcerated.

In Massachusetts in 2003, the secure detention rate for minority youth was approximately five
times higher than the white rate; the rate of minority youth residing in secure juvenile
correctional facilities was seven times higher than the white rate; and the rate of minority
youth living in non-secure correctional facilities was four times higher than the white rate.
The most overrepresented group in the Massachusetts juvenile justice system is African
American.4 In 2003, the African American secure detention rate was over seven times greater
than the white rate; the African American probation placement rate was over twice as high as
the white rate; the African American non-secure correctional facility rate was almost six times
higher than the white rate; and the African American secure juvenile correctional facility rate
was twelve times higher than the white rate. 5 Please note - these rates are based on the total
juvenile population and not on arrests or adjudications.

There are many theories as to why DMC exists, grounded in hypotheses such as:

            White youth may have access to better legal representation, who more vigorously
             advocate for their release.6
            White youth may have better access to programs and services in the community
             than minority youth.7
            Minority youth may be more likely to live in areas that are more aggressively
             policed and therefore result in more arrests.8

3
  Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, “Disproportionate Minority Contact,”
http://ojjdp.ncjrs.org/programs/ProgSummary.asp?pi=18&ti=&si=&kw=DMC&PreviousPage=ProgResults.
4
  Data from the Massachusetts Department of Youth Services, 2004. Compiled by the Executive Office of
Public Safety, 2004. These rates were created by taking the number of youth at each of these stages of the
juvenile justice system and dividing by the total youth population (according to the 2000 U.S. Census).
5
  Ibid.
6
  Schiraldi, Vincent and Jason Ziedenberg “Reducing Disproportionate Minority Confinement: The Multnomah
County, Oregon Success Story and its Implications,” San Francisco, California: Center on Juvenile and Criminal
Justice.
7
  Ibid.
                                                    7
            People involved in the decision to detain a youth may bring stereotypes to their
             decision.9
            Minority youth may commit more offenses.10
            The offenses that minority youth commit may be more serious than the offenses
             that White youth commit.11

In the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA) of 2002, Congress required
that States participating in the Formula Grants Program “address juvenile delinquency
prevention efforts and system improvement efforts designed to reduce, without establishing or
requiring numerical standards or quotas, the disproportionate number of juvenile members of
minority groups, who come into contact with the juvenile justice system.” For purposes of
this requirement, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) has
defined minority populations as American Indian and Alaska Native, Asian, Black or African
American, Hispanic or Latino, and Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islanders.

To learn more about DMC please consult the following:
   Annie E. Casey Foundation: “Reducing Racial Disparities in Juvenile Detention,”
    Pathways to Detention Reform: www.aecf.org/publications/pdfs/pathways8.pdf.
   Building Blocks for Youth: www.buildingblocksforyouth.org/issues/dmc.
   Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention:
    http://ojjdp.ncjrs.org/dmc/index.html.
   The W. Haywood Burns Institute: www.burnsinstitute.org.
   Youth for Justice: http://www.crfc.org/dmc.html.

Youth Development
According to the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and the Governor’s Adolescent
Health Council, youth development is “an approach to understanding and supporting youth
and young adults as they mature that incorporates a positive, multi-dimensional view of their
lives. There are six main aspects to the youth development approach:

   It is youth centered, focusing on young peoples’ resources;
   It encourages meaningful youth participation in arenas that impact their development;
   It is asset-based, versus deficit-focused;
   It focuses on positive youth outcomes;
   It emphasizes and values caring relationships between youth and adults; and
   It involves the whole community.”12



8
  Kaufmann, Charles F. (September 1997). Disproportionate Minority Confinement in Massachusetts. Submitted
to the Massachusetts Executive Office of Public Safety, Programs Division and the Governor’s Juvenile Justice
Advisory Committee.
9
  Bridges, Geroge S. and Sara Steen. “Racial Disparities in Offical Assessments of Juvenile Offenders:
Attributionatl Stereotypes as Mediating Mechanisms.” American Sociological Review. Volume 63, 1998.
10
   Hawkins, D. Laub, J. Lauritse, J. & Cothern, L. (June 2000). Race, Ethnicity, and Serious and Violent Juvenile
Offending. OJJDP Juvenile Justice Bulletin. Washington, D.C.: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency
Prevention, p. 2 & 3.
11
   Ibid
12
   Governor’s Adolescent Health Council & Massachusetts Department of Public Health. A Shared Vision for
Massachusetts Youth and Young Adults 2003: Summary on Youth Development in Relation to Key Strategic
Goals. page i. Retrieved March 1, 2005, from www.mass.gov/dph/fch/adhealth.htm.
                                                     8
The Massachusetts Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee (JJAC) has adopted a shared vision
of youth development, which is “all Massachusetts youth grow up to be healthy, caring,
economically self-sufficient adults.” This shared vision has five goals:
   All youth have access to resources that promote optimal physical and mental health.
   All youth have nurturing relationships with adults and positive relationships with peers.
   All youth have access to safe places for living, learning and working
   All youth have access to educational and economic opportunity.
   All youth have access to structured activities and opportunities for community service and
    civic participation

The JJAC intends to fund programs that incorporate a youth development focus into their
work. A chart illustrating the model can be found in the appendix to this application.

For more information about youth development, please see Attachment B at the end of this
AGF and consult the following links:

   The Medical Foundation: http://www.youthworkcentral.org/youth_development.html
   America’s Promise: www.americaspromise.org.
   Massachusetts Office of Adolescent Health and Youth Development:
    www.mass.gov/dph/fch/adhealth.htm.
   National Youth Development Information Center: www.nydic.org/nydic.
   National Youth Leadership Council: www.nylc.org/index.cfm.
   Search Institute: www.search-institute.org.
   The Forum for Youth Investment: www.forumforyouthinvestment.org.
   The Institute for Youth Development: www.youthdevelopment.org.
   Youth Leadership Institute: www.yli.org.



                                   Performance Measures

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention now requires subgrantees to
collect information on specified performance measures outlined at the following website:
http://www.dsgonline.com/performance_measures.htm. The EOPS requires that awardees
collect information and report on all the output measures listed on the website under the
program area under which they have applied. Mandatory measures are listed in bold. All
grantees must collect and report on this information. In addition to the mandatory output
measures, awardees must select each of the mandatory outcomes and three to four non-
mandatory outcomes on which to report. Be aware that most of the outcome measures include
two categories, short-term and long-term. Short-term outcome measures are those that occur
during or by the end of the program. Long-term outcome measures are those which occur six
to twelve months after the program ends. Thus, at least some information will have to be
collected and reported on by the awardee six to twelve months after the completion of the
program. Please familiarize yourself with the website, including the lists of Formula Grant
Performance Measures, its Glossary of Terms and Frequently Asked Questions section.




                                            9
III. BASIC PROGRAM INFORMATION

                                     Grant Award Match

There is no match required for applicants to this grant.

                                     Grant Award Period

The JJDPA Formula Grant programs will be twelve months. The project period begins when
the grantee receives notification of execution of the contract by EOPS.

                                     Cost Reimbursement

Payments will be made through a cost reimbursement process only. Funds will be disbursed
quarterly, contingent upon one of the following:

   Services/goods must already be provided and paid for; or
   Services/goods must be provided and payment will be made to vendors within three
    business days of receipt of funds from EOPS.

                                    Notification of Awards

The Secretary of Public Safety in conjunction with the Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee
(JJAC) will determine all awards. Notification letters will be sent to the successful applicants
specifying the grant award amount. It is anticipated that grant awards will be announced after
August 18, 2006.




                                             10
IV. GRANT PROCESS

                                    Application Deadline

Applications must be unbound and typed in 12 point font, double-spaced with one-inch
margins. Applications must be submitted using the format described below. Please note that
the signed Certifications Regarding Lobbying, Debarment, Suspension, Other Responsibility
Matters, and Drug-Free Workplace; Northern Ireland Notice and Certification; Contractor
Authorized Signature Verification Form; and the Sub-grantee A-133 Summary must be
submitted by all applicants (see page 18 for links to all forms).

      An Original and five copies of the application must be received no later than
                             Thursday, July 20 at 4:00 pm.

All applications must be mailed or hand delivered (No faxed or e-mailed applications will be
accepted) to:

                    Executive Office of Public Safety Programs Division
                                 Ten Park Plaza, Suite 3720
                                     Boston, MA 02116
               Attention: Elizabeth Spinney, Acting Juvenile Justice Specialist
                                    Phone: 617-725-3367


Local private applicants must submit documentation of their status as non-profit entities and a
   copy of their most recent financial statement and audit (OMB A-133 audit if previously
  required) by June 22, 2006. Prior to submitting the application, these documents will be
reviewed by EOPS General Counsel and applicants will be informed as to their eligibility for
          funding. These documents can be submitted at the Bidders’ Conference.

  Applicants are asked to submit a letter of intent to apply to be considered for the Formula
  Grant. Letters of intent should be postmarked by July 10, 2006. The letter should simply
 state the name of the applicant, name of the implementing agency, and that it is intending to
          submit a Formula Grant application to the EOPS on or before July 20, 2006.

                                  Proposal Review Process

EOPS Programs Division staff and a grants review committee will review proposals and make
funding recommendations to the Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee (JJAC) and the
Secretary of Public Safety. Every proposal will be read and scored numerically by a
minimum of two readers. Please note that the highest scores alone do not guarantee an award.
While the application score is a significant factor in decision-making about grant funds, it is
not the sole factor. Other components may be incorporated into the funding decision process.
For example, for applicants who have previously received funding, prior performance will be
taken into consideration. The Secretary of Public Safety in conjunction with the JJAC will
make final decisions for awarding the grant funds. All proposals will be read and scored
based on the factors on the Evaluation Criteria outlined on the following pages:


                                            11
                        Evaluation Criteria for Current & Former13 Grantees

Points            Category
     15              Need            Demonstrated need justified by statistical data for juvenile delinquency
                                     prevention and intervention programming in community served by proposed
                                     program. A precise project narrative demonstrating a clear understanding of
                                     community needs and the specific needs of the client population.
     10         Program Design       Clearly articulated implementation plan. Feasibility of approach. Clarity of
                                     goals and objectives. Points will be awarded for the following depending on
                                     program type:
                                     1. For proven model programs to be replicated: strength of evaluation results
                                          for model program to be replicated, and the proposed program’s degree of
                                          fit with the proven model.
                                     2. For proposed innovative programs: the theoretical link to existing research
                                          and evaluation results, the degree to which the innovative approach is
                                          designed such that success can be measured, and/or any other information
                                          demonstrating program effectiveness.
     15        Disproportionate      Explanation of how the program will address the overrepresentation of minority
               Minority Contact      youth in the Massachusetts juvenile justice system. How does the program
                   (DMC)             prevent minority youth from entering the juvenile justice system or prevent
                                     youth already involved in the system from further involvement? Expertise in
                                     providing services to youth of color. For more information about DMC please
                                     see page 7.
     15       Youth Development      Ability to incorporate a youth development model throughout all programming.
                                     For more information about youth development please see page 8.
     10             Capacity         Organizational capacity to carry out the proposed project and related activities.
                                     Agency qualifications and history. Ability to provide a trained staff to deliver
                                     the services required by the proposed project. Proven track record and
                                     commitment of management team proposed for project. Evidence of
                                     collaboration among community groups, state agencies and criminal justice
                                     agencies.
     10          Sustainability      Ability to leverage federal funds into a stable long-term program that may be
                                     supported at the local level. Solid sustainability plan for program operation
                                     beyond the twelve-month EOPS-funded project period.
     15          Measurement/        Description of past progress of program funded with EOPS Formula Grant and
                                     Challenge funds in the past year(s). Ability to clearly define data that will be
                   Evaluation
                                     collected to measure program progress.
     10            Financial/        Ability to achieve results with modest resources. Financial stability. A
                                     reasonable budget that is cost-effective and directly relates to the described
                    Budget
                                     activities.
 Total:
  100




13
     If applying for funding for the same program.
                                                       12
                             Evaluation Criteria for New Applicants

Points      Category
  15           Need            Demonstrated need justified by statistical data for juvenile delinquency
                               prevention and intervention programming in community served by proposed
                               program. A precise project narrative demonstrating a clear understanding of
                               community needs and the specific needs of the client population.
  15      Program Design       Clearly articulated implementation plan. Feasibility of approach. Clarity of
                               goals and objectives. Points will be awarded for the following depending on
                               program type:
                               3. For proven model programs to be replicated: strength of evaluation results
                                    for model program to be replicated, and the proposed program’s degree of
                                    fit with the proven model.
                               4. For proposed innovative programs: the theoretical link to existing research
                                    and evaluation results, the degree to which the innovative approach is
                                    designed such that success can be measured, and/or any other information
                                    demonstrating program effectiveness.
  15      Disproportionate     Explanation of how the program will address the overrepresentation of minority
          Minority Contact     youth in the Massachusetts juvenile justice system. How does the program
              (DMC)            prevent minority youth from entering the juvenile justice system or prevent
                               youth already involved in the system from further involvement? Expertise in
                               providing services to youth of color. For more information about DMC please
                               see page 7.
  15     Youth Development     Ability to incorporate a youth development model throughout all programming.
                               For more information about youth development please see page 8.
  10         Capacity          Organizational capacity to carry out the proposed project and related activities.
                               Agency qualifications and history. Ability to provide a trained staff to deliver
                               the services required by the proposed project. Proven track record and
                               commitment of management team proposed for project. Evidence of
                               collaboration among community groups, state agencies and criminal justice
                               agencies.
  10       Sustainability      Ability to leverage federal funds into a stable long-term program that may be
                               supported at the local level. Solid sustainability plan for program operation
                               beyond the twelve-month EOPS-funded project period.
  10       Measurement/        Ability to clearly define data that will be collected to measure program progress.
            Evaluation
  10         Financial/        Ability to achieve results with modest resources. Financial stability. A
                               reasonable budget that is cost-effective and directly relates to the described
              Budget
                               activities.
Total:
 100




                                                 13
                     Bidders’ Conference/Communication with EOPS

A bidders’ conference will be held on Thursday, June 22 from 1:00-4:00 pm at the
Crowne Plaza Worcester in Worcester, Massachusetts. The Commonwealth of
Massachusetts has strict guidelines that govern the bidding process. We strongly recommend
that the person responsible for writing your application attend the bidders’ conference. If that
person is not available, we recommend that a representative from your agency attend and take
notes. Please see Attachment C for more information about the bidders’ conference. You
should R.S.V.P. by June 16, 2006.

EOPS will continue to respond to questions regarding the application until Friday, July 7 at
3:00 pm. Questions must be submitted in writing by email to Elizabeth Spinney, Acting
Juvenile Justice Specialist, Elizabeth.Spinney@state.ma.us. Because of strict guidelines that
govern the bidding process, no one else at EOPS will be able to respond to your questions.
The questions and our responses will be posted on the Programs Division website by
Thursday, July 14, and can be found at this link: www.mass.gov/eopsfunding, then click on
“Justice and Education.” The only allowable communications between your agency staff and
our staff between the time the grant is posted until the application due date on Thursday, July
20, 2006 at 4:00 are verbal questions and answers given at the bidder’s conference, and
written questions submitted by email to Elizabeth Spinney by Friday, July 7, 2006. During
the open bid process, state regulations allow potential bidders to correspond only with the
following person at the EOPS Programs Division: Elizabeth Spinney, Acting Juvenile Justice
Specialist, Elizabeth.Spinney@state.ma.us. Contact with other employees at the EOPS or the
EOPS Programs Division may result in your agency forfeiting its right to bid for 2006
Juvenile Justice Formula Grant funding.

Directions to the Bidders’ Conference

The bidders’ conference will take place at the Crowne Plaza Worcester, which is located at
10 Lincoln Square, Worcester, MA. See attachment C for more information.

For directions, please go to the following link: www.cpworcester.com/map.htm.
Or call (508) 791-1600.




                                             14
V. APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS

       Instructions for the FFY 2006 JJDPA Formula Grant Program Application

Applicants are encouraged to review the Power Point presentation presented at the 2005 Grant
Writing Workshops prior to writing the application. The presentation can be accessed in the
by going to www.mass.gov/eopsfunding, then click on “Justice and Education,” then click on
“Training & Courses,” then click on “2005 Grant Writing Workshop.” Or you can go directly
to: http://www.mass.gov/Eeops/docs/programs/fjj/2005_grant_writing_workshop.ppt#2.
A plan to reduce juvenile crime must address the Program Area(s) chosen and the following
components must be completed.

1. Program Description (Four page limit)

      Note the type of program being implemented: replication or innovative. For
       replication proposals, name the program model that is being followed. Describe the
       services/activities to be performed. For experimental programs state how the program
       is linked to existing research.

      Describe the targeted geographic area and the identified needs of the area.

      Describe the role of the implementing agency, and the number and type of staff to be
       supported with requested funds. If possible, describe the qualifications of the
       management team and other staff proposed for the project.

      State the anticipated number and type of juveniles to be served by the programs.
       Provide an anticipated number/percentage of minority youth to be served. Explain
       how your program will address disproportionate minority contact in your community,
       in your region, or in Massachusetts.

      Describe how the program will engage juveniles into the program.

      Include information that illustrates community support for your program or
       collaborations with other agencies. Letters of support from key members of the
       community may be included to demonstrate community involvement, collaboration,
       and readiness. Letters of support do not count toward page limit.

      Describe how the applicant/implementing agency will sustain the program for
       continuation beyond the one-year project period once federal JJDPA Formula Grant
       funds are exhausted.

      Describe how the program will be able to achieve results with modest resources.

      Describe how your program will utilize a youth development approach.




                                            15
2. Analysis/Justification (One page limit)
    Please include statistical information that justifies the need for this type of program
   within the targeted area. Some examples include arrest, substance abuse, truancy, and
   child abuse rates. Note minority youth population to address DMC. Applicants may find
   the EOPS publication, Massachusetts Juvenile Justice Data and Information Book to be
   helpful in this and other sections of the application. This can be found in the Research
   and Publications section of the EOPS website at the following link:
   http://www.mass.gov/Eeops/docs//programs/fjj/MAJJDataInfoDec04.doc. Use of the
   book is not mandatory, however.

3. Program Goals, Objectives, and Performance Measures (Three page limit)

   If you are a current or former EOPS Challenge Grant and/or Formula Grant grantee,
   please include information about the progress you achieved in the past year(s) of EOPS
   Challenge and/or Formula Grant funding. Do not assume we already know this. Please
   be specific when describing your progress, which would include both outputs and
   outcomes. For example, this is a good description of progress:

          “100 youth between the ages of 13 and 15 participated in the program last year.
          The program was offered twice per week and included 50 youth who are DYS-
          committed youth living in the community, 30 youth that are on probation, and
          20 youth who are considered at-risk. Of the 100 youth who participated, 65 of
          them improved their daily school attendance and 70 of them increased their
          grade point average. Only 3 of the youth were arrested during the program.
          While our goal is to avoid any arrests, 3 only arrests during the program period
          is an accomplishment since in the previous few years, 85 of the youth had been
          arrested at least once. One of our youth was nominated for most improved
          student in the school and says that the program has been „a big help in getting
          [her] back on track.‟ Teachers like the program and we have received more
          referrals than we can accept because of the popularity of the program.”

   If you are not a current EOPS Formula Grant or Challenge Grant grantee, go directly
   to the goals, objectives, and measurements.

   Current grantees still must address goals, objectives, and measurements in three pages
   but can add up to 2 additional pages (for a total of 5 pages) for their description of past
   progress.

   Goals – Goals should state, in general terms, what you hope to accomplish with the grant.
   In stating these goals, be careful to describe the desired end and not the means to an end.
   Goals should represent the intended results of your initiative and not the activities that will
   be implemented to achieve those results (e.g. “hit a home run” is a goal, whereas “swing
   the bat” is a means to an end).

   Objectives (for each goal) - Identify the specific operational objectives associated with the
   goals of the proposed program. These objectives should include measurable results
   related to the overall goals. Please state the objectives in concrete terms. Specify who
   and what will change, by how much, and over what period of time. The more specific the
   objectives are, the easier it will be to determine if the program is achieving them (e.g.
   reduce truancy at school X by 10%).
                                             16
   Measurement – To determine which performance measures you will have to report on
   please go to www.dsgonline.com/performance_measures.htm. Go to the link for the
   Formula Grant program area that you are applying under. We are requiring that you
   report on all output measures that are applicable to your program listed under your
   program area. Regarding outcome measures you must report on all the mandatory
   outcome measures (in bold) and three or four of the non-mandatory outcome measures
   (listed but not in bold) of your choice under the pertinent program area. For the purposes
   of writing your application, we ask that you acknowledge (in a brief sentence) that you
   will report on all the output measures, and all the mandatory outcome measures and then
   list the three or four non-mandatory measures that you have chosen to report on should
   you be awarded Formula Grant funds. Bear in mind that the outcome measures may
   require that you report on “long-term” information that occurs six to twelve months after
   the end of funding for the program. Please address how you will accomplish obtaining and
   reporting the performance measures, including “long-term” measures. (Performance
   measures will be discussed at the bidders’ conference.)

4. Implementation Plan and Timeline (Two page limit)

   Provide a detailed description of the basic project operations. For each objective, please
   provide the following information:
         A detailed description of the activities to be carried out;
         Identification of project personnel involved and their duties; and
       A description of how long it will take to complete each activity with specific start
          and end dates.
   Please describe how you plan to get the program up and running without delay.

5. Financial/Budget

      Applicants must submit a 12-month operating budget in two formats: 1) the EOPS
       Microsoft Excel spreadsheet 2) detailed description of budget items.

                 The EOPS Microsoft Excel spreadsheet: The application budget must be
                  prepared using the EOPS Microsoft Excel spreadsheets found at
                  www.state.ma.us/eopsfunding, then click on “Justice and Education,” then
                  click on “Grant Programs,” then click on “New Funding Opportunities.”
                  The Excel spreadsheets must be submitted electronically to
                  Elizabeth.Spinney@state.ma.us by the application deadline, and hard
                  copies must be attached to the final application that is submitted. The
                  following eight budget categories are allowable: Personnel, Fringe,
                  Indirect, Consultants/Contracts, Travel, Equipment, Supplies, and Other.
                  Definitions of each budget category are provided in Attachment C in this
                  AGF, “Quarterly Financial Reporting Instructions and Documentation
                  Requirements.”

                 Detailed description of budget items (2 page limit): Each budget item must
                  be explained in sufficient depth to permit meaningful evaluation of the
                  grant application. This section should describe how the proposed budget
                  enables the applicant to implement the project and achieve its goals and

                                            17
                  objectives. The questions: “how much;” “for whom;” “at what rate;” “to
                  what purpose” and “for how long” must be answered in each area.

6. Other Grants

   Please complete the following chart for current year and future year funding for your
   organization:
 Project Name     Current EOPS EOPS Grant(s) Other Current                    Other Grants
                      Grant $           Applied For       Grant Support        Applied For



7. Certifications/Forms

   Be sure to sign (in blue ink) and submit the following documents with your application:

      Northern Ireland Notice and Certification
       (link: http://www.mass.gov/Aosd/docs/otherforms/nirel.doc).
      Certifications regarding Lobbying, Debarment, Suspension, and Other Responsibility
       Matters; and Drug-Free Workplace Requirements
       (link: http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/Forms/cert.pdf)
      Contractor Authorized Signatory Listing
       (link: http://www.mass.gov/Aosd/docs/otherforms/consig.doc)
      Sub-grantee A-133 Summary (for units of local government and private organizations,
       not necessary for state agencies)
       (To access the form, go to www.mass.gov/eopsfunding, click on “Justice and
       Education,” click on “Grant Programs,” click on “New Funding Opportunities.”)




                                           18
                                  Subgrantee Requirements

Successful applicants will receive a comprehensive grant-award package detailing all
requirements of the grant. A summary of grant requirements is provided here for your
information and for your benefit in preparing a proposal.

Eligibility Requirements

   Non-profit agencies cannot sub-contract to state agencies or local units of government.
    However, state and local governmental agencies can sub-contract to non-profit agencies.

Fiscal and Budget Requirements

   Supplanting of funds is prohibited. Funds for programs and services provided through this
    grant are intended to supplement not supplant other state or federal funding sources.
    Specifically that means that no position previously funded by the Massachusetts
    Legislature through a state agency may be supported with JJDPA Formula Grant funds.

   Any administrative costs paid with grant funds must be relevant to the implementation of
    the JJDPA Formula Grant funded project and may not exceed 10% of the total federal
    request. Administrative costs in excess of 10% may be submitted only with the
    expressed written permission of the JJDPA Formula Grant program manager. Such
    permission must be submitted with the grant application.

   No grant funds may be spent for construction, office furniture, or other like purchases,
    e.g., copiers, air conditioners, heat lamps, fans, file cabinets, desks, chairs, and rugs.

   No grant funds may be spent for out-of-state conference fees, out-of-state travel, or out-of-
    state lodging without prior written approval from Executive Office of Public Safety
    (EOPS) Programs Division.

   No consultant or trainer may be paid more than $450 per day for an eight-hour
    workday without the prior written approval of the U.S. Department of Justice.
    Requests for a waiver of this requirement with documented justification must be made in
    writing at the time of application. The Executive Office of Public Safety Programs
    Division will submit the request to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency
    Prevention. (NOTE: $450/day is considered a maximum charge for consultants or
    trainers and should be an exception. It is not the standard consultant/trainer fee.)

   No grant funds may be spent for food or beverages without prior approval of the EOPS
    Programs Division. Requests should be made in writing as part of the application and
    accompanied by documentation of the anticipated expense(s).

   Grant funds are subject to Federal accounting and audit requirements including the
    prohibitions on co-mingling funds. Organizations that receive JJDPA Formula Grant
    funding along with other Federal funds must treat the funds independently with separate
    cost and reporting centers.



                                              19
   Non-federal entities that expend $500,000 or more a year in 2006 in federal awards shall
    have a single or program-specific audit conducted for that year in accordance with the
    provisions of the Office of Management and Budget’s circular A-133 found at
    http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/circulars/a133/a133.html.

   A minimum of three bids must be solicited when grant funds are used for purchases of
    services, supplies or equipment that cost over $500.

   Volunteer services must be documented and, to the extent feasible, supported by the same
    methods used by the recipient for its own employees (e.g., time cards).

   In addition to the requirements set forth above, successful applicants are required to agree
    to and abide by all state and federal rules, regulations and conditions pertaining to the
    receipt, administration and management of federal funding.

   As stated in the Federal Guidelines of the General Sub-grant Conditions: If a sub-grantee
    chooses to implement the proposed project by further sub-granting to an implementing
    sub-grantee or an independent contractor, all or any part of the amount of this award, the
    sub-grantee shall include the provisions of these standard sub-grant conditions in a further
    sub-grant award of contract which shall be reduced to writing and submitted to EOPS for
    its prior approval.




                                             20
Programmatic Requirements

   In accordance with Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention regulations, the
    Commonwealth of Massachusetts is committed to assessing and addressing
    Disproportionate Minority Contact (DMC) within the Massachusetts juvenile justice
    system. EOPS anticipates that all programs will directly or indirectly address DMC and
    asks that applicants be cognizant of their program’s potential impact on DMC.
    Disproportionate Minority Contact refers to the overrepresentation of minority youth in
    the juvenile justice system at all points in the juvenile justice process. This includes
    arrest, alternative lockups, pre-trial detention, probation placement, indictment as a
    youthful offender, secure confinement, and non-secure confinement. For more
    information on DMC, please see page 7.

   Grantees are required to report on Performance Measures as discussed earlier in this
    application. The format and dates for when reports on Performance Measures will be due
    are yet to be determined. As discussed above, some measures suggest using data sources
    (e.g. Commissioner of Probation or school departments) that may not be able to comply
    with providing the information due to state confidentiality laws (e.g. getting offense or re-
    offense data from the Commissioner of Probation). We are working to address that the
    reporting requirements conform with state laws and regulations. Should you be awarded
    funds, until you receive further guidance from us, please use self-reporting when
    necessary for information regarding the juveniles in your programs.

   Grantees must complete quarterly programmatic and financial progress reports and submit
    them to EOPS within 15 days of the end of each quarter. (Due dates are: January 15,
    2007; April 16, 2007; July 16, 2007; and October 15, 2007).

   Grantees are requested to participate in EOPS surveys. Surveys are designed to evaluate
    JJDPA Formula Grant programs and enable the EOPS Programs Division to learn more
    about successful endeavors.

   Grantees are requested to cooperate with EOPS Programs Division monitoring of both
    fiscal and programmatic progress, including desk reviews and on-site visits and are
    expected to participate in the resolution of issues raised at site visits, in desk reviews or
    through a corrective action plan.

   All publications, (e.g., written, visual or sound), published or produced with the use of
    JJDPA Formula Grant funds must contain the following statement:

    This project was supported by Grant # 2006-JF-FX-xxxx* awarded by the Office
    of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Office of Justice Programs,
    U.S. Department of Justice to the Massachusetts Executive Office of Public
    Safety Programs Division and subgranted to [grantee’s name]. Points of view
    in this document are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the
    official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice or the
    Massachusetts Executive Office of Public Safety Programs Division.

* specific grant number should be incorporated and will be available in the coming months.


                                              21
                    Executive Office of Public Safety Programs Division
     FFY 2006 Juvenile Justice & Delinquency Prevention Act Formula Grant Cover Page
1.    Applicant:__________________________________________________________________

      Address: ___________________________________________________________________

2.    Authorizing Official:

      Name ___________________________________________Title_______________________

      Signature________________________________________
                         (signed in BLUE ink)

3.    Implementing Agency (if different from applicant): _________________________________

      Address: _____________________________________________________________________

4.    Financial Officer: Name: ________________________ Title: ________________________

                  Address: __________________________________________________________

                  Telephone: ____________________________ Fax: _______________________

                  E-mail:____________________________________________________________

5.    Project Director:       Name:______________________________________________________

                              Title: ______________________________________________________

                              Address: ___________________________________________________

                              Telephone: ________________________ Fax: ____________________

                              E-mail:____________________________________________________

7. Primary Program Area Addressed: __________________________________________________
      Secondary Program Area Addressed (if applicable): ____________________________________
      Tertiary Program Area Addressed (if applicable): ______________________________________

8. Project Title: ________________________________________________________________

9. Federal award amount requested: $___________________
10. Check the box that describes your program:
          □ Replication                     □ Innovative

                                                   22
                       Dates to Remember


June 22   Bidders’ Conference (see page 14 & Attachment C)

June 22   Due date for submission of documentation of nonprofit status and
          Sub-grantee A-133 Summary
          (for private agencies only, see page 11)

July 7    Last day to submit written questions to EOPS (see page 14)

July 10   Letter of Intent due (see page 11)

July 14   All questions and answers will be posted on EOPS website
          (see page 14)

July 20   APPLICATION DUE (see page 11)




                              23
                                Final Check List
                     Be sure your final application includes:

 A completed Grant Application Cover Page (be sure to sign in blue ink)

 Program Description

 Analysis/Justification

 Program Goals, Objectives and Performance Measures

 Implementation Plan and Timetable

 Budget Narrative and Details

 Listing of Other Grants

 Certifications/Forms
   Certifications Regarding Lobbying, Debarment, Suspension, Other Responsibility
    Matters and Drug-Free Workplace
   Northern Ireland Notice and Certification
   Contractor Authorized Signatory Listing signed by an authorized official
   Sub-grantee A-133 Summary

 Letters of Support/Memoranda of Agreement




                                      24
                                                                                  Attachment A
                                 Resources: Proven Effective Programs

We encourage applicants to consult these and other sources for proven models. Our goal is to
enhance outcomes for juveniles in Massachusetts through replication of the program models
that have been successful elsewhere, while customizing them to our own environment.


Websites with Listings of Descriptions of Successful Program Models14

      Blueprints for Violence Prevention
       http://www.colorado.edu/cspv/blueprints/index.html
       The Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence (CSPV) has designed and launched a
       national violence prevention initiative to identify violence prevention programs that are
       effective. The project, called Blueprints for Violence Prevention, has identified 11
       prevention and intervention programs that meet a strict scientific standard of program
       effectiveness. The 11 model programs, called Blueprints, have been effective in reducing
       adolescent violent crime, aggression, delinquency, and substance abuse. Another 21
       programs have been identified as promising programs. To search model programs, go to:
       http://www.colorado.edu/cspv/blueprints/model/overview.html or just click on “Model
       Programs” on the main webpage. To search promising programs go to:
       http://www.colorado.edu/cspv/blueprints/promising/overview.html or just click on
       “Promising Programs” on the main webpage.

      OJJDP Model Programs Guide
       www.dsgonline.com
       The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) Model Program
       Guide (MPG) is designed to assist practitioners and communities in implementing
       evidence-based prevention and intervention programs that can make a difference in the
       lives of children and communities. The MPG database of evidence-based programs
       covers the entire continuum of youth services from prevention through sanctions and
       reentry. The easiest way to search this database is to go to the DSG website (listed above)
       and click on “NEW! The Model Programs Guide and Database.” You can also go directly to
       the Model Programs Guide and Database by going to this link:
       www.dsgonline.com/Model_Programs_Guide/Web/mpg_index_flash.htm.

      Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Model Programs
       (SAMHSA)
       http://modelprograms.samhsa.gov/template.cfm?page=default
       The SAMHSA Model Programs featured on this site have been tested in communities,
       schools, social service organizations, and workplaces across America, and have provided
       solid proof that they have prevented or reduced substance abuse and other related high-
       risk behaviors. Programs included have been reviewed by SAMHSA's National Registry
       of Effective Programs and Practices (NREPP). There are listings of model programs,
       effective programs and promising programs. Model Programs are well-implemented,
       well-evaluated programs, meaning they have been reviewed by the NREPP according to
       rigorous standards of research. Effective Programs are well-implemented, well-evaluated

14
     Also called science-based or evidence-based programs.
                                                     25
    programs that produce a consistent positive pattern of results. The difference between
    model and effective programs is that the developers of the effective programs have yet to
    agree to work with SAMHSA/CSAP to support broad-based dissemination of their
    programs but may disseminate their programs themselves. Promising Programs have been
    implemented and evaluated sufficiently and are considered to be scientifically defensible.
    They have demonstrated positive outcomes in preventing substance abuse and related
    behaviors. However, they have not yet been shown to have sufficient rigor and/or
    consistently positive outcomes required for Effective Program status. Nonetheless,
    Promising Programs are eligible to be elevated to Effective status subsequent to review of
    additional documentation regarding program effectiveness. Go to:
    http://modelprograms.samhsa.gov/template_cf.cfm?page=model_list to search model,
    effective and promising programs.

Resources & Articles

   Preventing Crime: What Works, What Doesn’t, What’s Promising
    http://www.ncjrs.org/works/index.htm
    This National Institute of Justice report, published in July 1997, discusses a
    congressionally mandated evaluation of State and local crime prevention programs funded
    by the U.S. Department of Justice. What works to prevent crime, especially youth
    violence? Out of all the hundreds of different strategies used in communities, families,
    schools, labor markets, places, police, and criminal justice, which ones succeed, and to
    what extent? What does the scientific evidence suggest about the effectiveness of
    federally funded crime prevention? Very few operational crime prevention programs have
    been evaluated using scientifically recognized standards and methodologies, including
    repeated tests under similar and different social settings. Based on a review of more than
    500 prevention program evaluations meeting minimum scientific standards, the report
    concludes that there is minimally adequate evidence to establish a provisional list of what
    works, what doesn't, and what's promising.

   Best Practices of Youth Violence Prevention: A Sourcebook for Community Action
    http://www.cdc.gov/ncipc/dvp/bestpractices.htm
    This sourcebook, from the Centers for Disease Control, contains the best knowledge
    available about several strategies designed to prevent youth violence. These strategies are
    among those with the strongest evidence base for reducing youth violence.

   National Criminal Justice Reference Service
    http://virlib.ncjrs.org/JuvenileJustice.asp
    This juvenile justice webpage contains a vast amount of juvenile justice resources and
    publications relating to issues such as gangs, juvenile corrections, juvenile delinquency
    prevention, missing and exploited children, juvenile substance abuse, and family
    strengthening.

   Guiding Principles for Promising Female Programming – An Inventory of Best
    Practices
    http://ojjdp.ncjrs.org/pubs/principles/contents.html
    This report describes practical policy and program development processes and promising
    programs models to assist communities in developing female-focused programs. The


                                             26
    report also provides a profile of female juvenile offenders, the problems they present, their
    needs, and our need to address them.

   Intensive Community-Based Aftercare Program (IAP)
    http://www.ncjrs.org/pdffiles1/ojjdp/181464.pdf
    Originally implemented by OJJDP as a research and demonstration project, IAP has been
    successfully implemented by States and is proven effective in reducing recidivism
    amongst high-risk parolees.

   Juvenile Delinquency Guidelines: Improving Court Practice in Juvenile Delinquency
    Cases
    http://www.ncjfcj.org/content/blogcategory/346/411/
    The Juvenile Delinquency Guidelines, published in Summer 2005, is a benchbook of best
    practices that was developed by a committee of judges, a Chief Justice, prosecutors,
    defense attorneys, juvenile justice practitioners, and other professionals representing key
    stakeholders in the juvenile justice system, through the support of the Office of Juvenile
    Justice and Delinquency Prevention.




                                             27
                                                                                                                               Attachment B


                       A Shared Vision for Massachusetts Youth and Young Adults




                                    Health & Mental Health
                                    Data: DPH, DMH health indicators

                                                     NEIGHBORHOOD/COMMUNITY
                                                      health & mental health services
                                                                                                                         Safety &
                                                                   FAMILY                                                Housing
                                                           family health insurance                                       Data: FBI Crime rates/
     Relationships                                family member health & mental health issues                            US Census Housing
     Data: US Census                                                                                                     Availability…
          Family
                                                                health &                                    crime;
      Composition
                                                               mental health                   safety       crime
                                                                  issues                      of family prevention;
                                       family                                    safety;      members;     housing
                       Neighborhood, connection
                                                     adult/peer                 housing     housing status stock
                       inter-         to other                     Youth         status
                       neighborhood,               relationships
                                      families
                       regional
                       cohesion                                civic/          school/
                                                            community           work
                                                            engagement                 family
                                                                                       member
                                                                                     education &
                                                   family involvement                employment
                                                    in civic activities                           schools; jobs;          School & Work
           Civic &                                                                                  workforce               Data: MCAS/
         Community                         voting;                                                    training             DET Employment
                                     religiosity; clubs;                                   transportation                      Rates…
         Engagement
     Data: Voting Rates/Park        community service opportunities;
      and Rec. Enrollment                      cultural events etc....
                                                                                                             Source: MA Executive Office
                                                                                                             of Health and Human Services
                                                                                                             Contact: Glenn Daly 617-573-1691
For more information see: (report): www.mass.gov/dph/fch/adhealth.htm                                        glenn.daly@state.ma.us
                       (indicators by community): www.mass.gov/eohhs/commwell                                Special thanks to America’s Promise




                                                                    28
                                                                              Attachment C

          Bidders’ Conference for Juvenile Justice Formula Grant Applicants

 Improve the quality of you application and increase you competitive edge by attending the
Bidder’s Conference. Here potential applicants will receive a step-by-step explanation of the
Formula Grant application. Meet EOPS Programs Division staff and ask questions about the
                                Formula Grant application.

                            Thursday, June 22 from 1:00-4:00
                               Crowne Plaza Worcester
                                  10 Lincoln Square
                               Worcester, Massachusetts

                   For questions regarding the workshop, please contact:
              Kelly Robichaud: kelly.robichaud@state.ma.us at 617-725-3303

                       For directions, please go to the following link:
                              www.cpworcester.com/map.htm.
                                   Or call (508) 791-1600.

                Formula Grant Bidders’ Conference Registration Form
                                     Thursday, June 22
                                      No Registration Fee

Name and title: _____________________________________________________________________

Agency: ___________________________________________________________________________

Address: __________________________________________________________________________

Phone:___________________________________Fax:_____________________________________

Email: ____________________________________________________________________________

Special Accommodations
Required:_____________________________________________________________________

 This form may be completed electronically using Microsoft Word. Return registration form
   by email, fax or mail to the address above. Please fill out 1 registration form for each
                                 registrant. Space is limited.

           Complete the registration form below on the next page and return to:

                                    Kelly Robichaud
                   Executive Office of Public Safety Programs Division
                              Ten Park Plaza, Room 3720
                                   Boston, MA 02116
                                  FAX: 617-725-0260
                                           29
                                                                            Attachment D
            Quarterly Financial Reporting Instructions and Documentation Requirements

      The following reimbursement standards detail both what must be submitted with quarterly
      programmatic and financial reports to justify reimbursement, and what documents
      subgrantees must have on file for backup during on-site monitoring visits. The following
      chart defines each allowable cost category and the documentation standards. Adherence to
      the documentation standards will be an absolute condition for reimbursement. Standard
      quarterly reporting forms will be forwarded to subgrantees following announcement of the
      awards. The quarterly reporting forms and documentation standards will be discussed and
      reviewed during the mandatory Grants Management Workshop hosted by EOPS for all
      Formula grant subgrantees during the first quarter of project operation.

                                               Documentation
                                                                Backup Documentation Required
Cost Category              Definition           Required for
                                                                          in Grantee File
                                               Reimbursement
Personnel           Full or part time regular  Name of        Payroll receipts showing dates
                     salaried employees           employee        and hourly rate of pay for each
                     working on the grant       Total number     individual charged to the grant.
                                                  of hours      Time and attendance policies: If
                                                  worked on       an employee works on multiple
                                                  grant           grants a time and attendance
                                                Total cost       policy must be developed and
                                                                  adhered to for determining
                                                                  percentage of salary charged to
                                                                  the grant or used as matching
                                                                  expenditures.
                                                                Also note that EOPS General
                                                                  Grant Conditions require that for
                                                                  all grant-paid employees earning
                                                                  in excess of $40,000 per year,
                                                                  EOPS must approve the hiring of
                                                                  the person. Resumes for all
                                                                  hires, regardless of salary must
                                                                  be on file with EOPS.
Fringe              Federally negotiated and  Approved        Signed rate agreement (by
                     approved rate by             percentage      Federal Cognizant agency and
                     subgrantee accountant/     Number of        subgrantee accountant/
                     comptroller with Federal     hours for       comptroller) needs to be
                     cognizant agency for         which fringe    provided with application to
                     health insurance,            applies         justify costs.
                     pension and terminal       Total cost     Detailed list of salary/wage pool
                     leave costs                                  used to assess fringe costs for
                                                                  quarter.

Indirect Costs      Federally negotiated and      Approved        Signed rate agreement (by
                     approved rate by               percent          Federal Cognizant agency and
                     subgrantee accountant/        Base             subgrantee accountant/
                     comptroller with Federal                        comptroller) needs to be
                                               30
cognizant agency for           Total       provided with application to
costs that are not readily                  justify costs.
assignable to a particular                 Detailed list of salary/wage pool
project, but are                            used to assess indirect costs for
necessary to the                            the quarter.
operation of the                           If subgrantee does not have a
organization and                            federally negotiated indirect cost
performance of the                          rate these costs should be broken
project. The cost of                        out under other.
operating and
maintaining facilities,
depreciation, and
administrative salaries
are examples of the
types of costs usually
treated as indirect




                           31
                                              Documentation
                                                                     Backup Documentation Required
Cost Category              Definition          Required for
                                                                             in Grantee File
                                              Reimbursement
Consultants/Co      Consultant or Contractor  Hourly rate             Indicate whether formal, written
ntracts              fees and                  Number of                Procurement Policy or the
                     office/IT/programmatic      hours of                Federal Acquisition Regulations
                     equipment contracts or      service                 are followed.
                     leases                    Total cost              Applicants are encouraged to
                                               Copy of                  promote free and open
                                                 invoice for             competition in awarding
                                                 any amount              contracts.
                                                 over $5,000            Procurement file must be kept on
                                               A description            file at subgrantee site.
                                                 of services            At the beginning of the grant
                                                 provided                period, provide a copy of the
                                                                         subcontract. As stated in the
                                                                         Massachusetts Standard
                                                                         Contract, item 9 “The
                                                                         Department is entitled to all
                                                                         subcontracts and shall not be
                                                                         bound by any provisions
                                                                         contained in a subcontract to
                                                                         which it is not a party.”
                                                                        Also note that EOPS Special
                                                                         Conditions indicate that the
                                                                         maximum rate for consultants is
                                                                         $450 per day (excluding travel
                                                                         and subsistence costs). $450/day
                                                                         is considered a maximum
                                                                         charge, not the standard
                                                                         consultant/trainer fee. Any
                                                                         request for compensation over
                                                                         $450 per day requires prior
                                                                         written approval by EOPS and
                                                                         DOJ.
                                                                        Contract must explicitly state
                                                                         deliverables and time frames.

Travel              Travel directly related to     Provide            Keep all documentation and
                     the purpose of the grant        receipts for        receipts at subgrantee level for
                                                     all travel          inspection during site visits.
                                                     expenses.
                                                     Indicate the
                                                     name of the
                                                     traveler, and
                                                     the purpose
                                                     of the trip.

                                                32
    Indicate the
     source of
     Travel
     Policies
     applied:
     Applicant or
     Federal.




33
                                         Documentation
  Cost                                                     Backup Documentation Required in
                      Definition          Required for
Category                                                                Grantee File
                                         Reimbursement
Equipment      Tangible, non-            Note the type  All equipment purchased with grant
(Communi        expendable personal         of equipment     funds having a useful life of more
-cation,        property having a useful    purchased        than a year and a unit cost equal to
IT, etc.)       life of more than one       and the cost.    or over $1,000 will be marked with
                year, cost based on       If greater        an identification tag indicating it
                classification of           than $1,000      was purchased with grant funds and
                equipment.                  per unit cost    indicating the grant number (See
                                            provide the      General Grant Conditions).
                                            receipt,       Keep all documentation and receipts
                                            packing slip     at subgrantee level for inspection
                                            or invoice.      during site visits.
                                            Note that
                                            receipts have
                                            not been
                                            required in
                                            the past.
                                            This is a new
                                            requirement.
                                          Inventory list
                                            showing type
                                            of equipment
                                            purchased,
                                            tracking/in-
                                            ventory
                                            number,
                                            serial
                                            number,
                                            location, and
                                            name of
                                            grant funds
                                            used.
Office         General supplies          List items by  If greater than $1,000 per unit cost
Supplies/       required for office         type and         provide the receipt, packing slip or
Admin-          functions (office           show the         invoice. Note that receipts have not
istrative       supplies, postage,          basis for        been required in the past. This is a
                training materials,         computation.     new requirement.
                copying paper, and other                   Keep all documentation and receipts
                expendable items such                        at subgrantee level for inspection
                as books, hand held tape                     during site visits.
                recorders, etc.)

Other          Items (e.g., rent,             List items by      Keep documentation on subgrantee
                reproduction, telephone,        major type          level sufficient to demonstrate that
                janitorial or security          and the basis       the purchases/expenses were
                services, and                   of the              incurred.
                                           34
investigative or                  computation.
confidential funds,               For example,
training fees, or                 provide the
materials) not covered in         square
indirect costs due to lack        footage and
of an indirect cost plan          the cost per
or not included in                square foot
federally negotiated              for rent, and
indirect cost plan but are        provide
used for operation of the         monthly
grant.                            rental cost.




                             35

				
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