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					 DANVERS
 HIGH SCHOOL




        2008 - 2009
PROGRAM OF STUDIES
                                    Program of Studies 2008-2009




Dr. Lisa Dana                          Mrs. Susan Ambrozavitch                 Mr. Richard Warren
Superintendent of Schools              Assistant Superintendent                Director of Finance and
                                                                               Administration

We welcome any opportunity to be of service to the parents and guardians of our students. Do not hesitate to
contact members of your high school administrative team regarding any educational concern you may have.

FOR ASSISTANCE CALL 777-8925                               GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT 777-8928

Mr. Thomas Murray                                          Mr. Thomas Walsh
Principal                                                  Assistant Director of Student Services

Mr. Mark B. Strout                                         Mr. Sean Emberley
Ms. Cornelia Varoudakis                                    Ms. Joy LeBlanc
Assistant Principals                                       Ms. Cheryl Mastrogiovanni
                                                           Ms. Susan Shawn
                                                           Guidance Counselors


             CURRICULUM AREA                     CURRICULUM DIRECTOR            TELEPHONE
             Unified Arts, Physical Education    Mr. Gary Nihan                 777-8932
             & Health
             Student Services                    Ms. Kathleen Curtis            777-6112
             9 – 12 Curriculum Director          Ms. Peggy McElhinney           777-8932
             Athletics                           Mr. John Sullivan              774-7133


                                            SCHOOL COMMITTEE

                                Ms. Jean McCartin, Chair            739-4495
                                Mr. Bill Bates                      777-5024
                                Mr. Eric Crane                      777-8158
                                Ms. Connie Pawlak                   777-1255
                                Mr. Arthur Skarmeas                 774-2661




                                                  -2-
                                             Program of Studies 2008-2009
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction .......................................................................................................................... 4
Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks .......................................................................................... 5
Danvers Public Schools Mission Statement ...................................................................................... 5
Exit Outcomes ........................................................................................................................ 5
Danvers High School’s Mission Statement and Expectations for Student Learning ....................................... 5
Graduation Requirements .......................................................................................................... 6
Scheduling Policy .................................................................................................................... 7
Course Classifications ............................................................................................................... 7
Grade Point Average ................................................................................................................ 7
Criteria for Honors Enrollment/Student Placement Policy ................................................................... 8
Transfer Policy ....................................................................................................................... 8
Foreign Exchange Student Policy ................................................................................................. 8
Independent Study .................................................................................................................. 9
Advanced Placement ................................................................................................................ 9
Criteria for Advanced Placement ................................................................................................. 9
Tech Prep ............................................................................................................................ 9
School to Career ....................................................................................................................10
STEP Program .......................................................................................................................10
Massachusetts College & University Standards ...............................................................................12
Homework Requests................................................................................................................12
Tutorial Policy ......................................................................................................................12
Ninth Grade Teams .................................................................................................................13
Title IX and Chapter 622 ..........................................................................................................14
Students’ Rights ....................................................................................................................14
Extended Block......................................................................................................................14
Summer School ......................................................................................................................14
COURSE OFFERINGS
    English ...........................................................................................................................16
    Social Studies...................................................................................................................20
    Science ..........................................................................................................................24
    Math .............................................................................................................................30
    World Languages ...............................................................................................................36
    Applied Technology Education ..............................................................................................40
    Technology Education ........................................................................................................42
    Television .......................................................................................................................43
    Visual Art........................................................................................................................44
    Music .............................................................................................................................45
    Guidance ........................................................................................................................47
    Special Education Services ...................................................................................................47
    Health ...........................................................................................................................49
    Physical Education ............................................................................................................49
    Student Assistantships ........................................................................................................51
Local Scholarships ..................................................................................................................52
High School Clubs and Activities .................................................................................................53
                                                               -3-
                               Program of Studies 2008-2009




Dear Students and Parents,

You are about to begin the process of course selection for the 2008-2009 school year. As you
do this, you should be aware of the significance of the decisions you are making. Since the
choices you make now create the master schedule, you are encouraged to select those
courses that meet your educational goals and reflect your personal needs. Every effort will
be made during the scheduling process to accommodate your individual selections so all
choices you make should be carefully considered in relationship to your educational plan.

At the beginning of your high school career, you should formulate a plan that will serve as a
guide to the courses you select over the next four years. You should access all of the
resources available during the decision-making process including parents, teachers, and
counselors. The Program of Studies will provide you with course descriptions, graduation
requirements, and program sequences.

I recommend that you use the following procedure to ensure that you have made the best
possible choices and have developed an appropriate academic program:

  Teachers will discuss curricular levels and electives and make recommendations.

  Parents and students should read the Program of Studies and discuss choices.

  Students should review graduation requirements and post-secondary plans with their
    guidance counselors.

  Students should sign up for a full program - 35 credits (except where students participate
    in student assistantships and earn 32.5 total credits) - and list 4 electives in priority
    order. Attempts will be made to honor elective requests; however, the complexity of
    the schedule and over or under subscription to courses may impact students’ original
    choices.

Curriculum development and assessment is ongoing with Danvers High School examining its
academic program and course outcomes. The major goal of the school is to engage students
in an exciting and active learning environment. We encourage all students and staff to
maximize potential, hold high expectations and standards, and present a challenging
experience at all levels.


                                            -4-
                Program of Studies 2008-2009


Thomas Murray
Principal




                             -5-
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
The Massachusetts Frameworks Guiding Principles
     Thinking and Communicating
      Each and every student is held to high standards and expectations.
      Students, teachers, administrators, and staff use a variety of strategies and approaches to enhance
          learning.
      Students, teachers, and administrators use classroom assessment as a process and a tool for the
          evaluation and improvement of work.
     Gaining and Applying Knowledge
      Curriculum, instruction, and assessment are based on inquiry, problem solving, discovery, analysis,
          and application of essential issues and concepts.
      Curriculum, instruction, and assessment point to connections within and across disciplines.
     Working and Contributing
      Students, teachers, administrators, and staff use knowledge to define meaning and purpose in their
         lives.
      Collaboration, cooperation, and partnerships among students, families, schools, and the community are
         critical to the success of education.

Danvers Public Schools A Community of Learners
The children of Danvers, their teachers and support staff, and the administrators make up the community of
learners of the Danvers Public Schools. The system has five elementary schools, a middle school, and a high
school. All of the work of this community of learners is driven by its four core values:
        Caring…                         Commitment…
        Quality…                        Collaboration…

Danvers Public Schools Mission Statement
Through a commitment to individualized instruction, assessment, supervision, and support the Danvers Public
Schools creates a dynamic community of lifelong learners who are dedicated to intellectual and personal
excellence and prepared to contribute to our global society.

Exit Outcomes
The Danvers School System has the following Exit Outcomes:
         Self-Esteem                                                  Critical and Creative Thinking
         Essential Knowledge                                          Personal/Social Management

Danvers High School Mission Statement
Danvers High School is a community of independent learners dedicated to respect, responsibility, creativity,
and the pursuit of academic excellence.

Danvers High School Expectations for Student Learning
                                                     Academic
1. Students will demonstrate effective communication skills in (a) writing and (b) speaking.
2. Students will develop appropriate reading strategies in order to achieve effective comprehension levels of
   various texts.
3. Students will use creative, analytical, and critical thinking skills.
4. Students will be independent learners.
5. Students will be creative producers in at least one area of the visual and performing arts.
6. Students will demonstrate competency in technology.
7. Students will demonstrate knowledge of behaviors that affect the health, safety, and well being of
   themselves and others.
8. Students will develop personal financial management skills.
9. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the foundations, values, and perspectives of the United
   States and other nations.

                                                   -6-
                                    Program of Studies 2008-2009
                                                     Civic
1. Students will successfully complete 40 hours of community service as a requirement for graduation.
                                                    Social
1. Students will show respect.
2. Students will develop career search life skills.




                                                  -7-
                                         Program of Studies 2008-2009
Graduation Requirements

                               SUBJECT                              CREDITS
                               English                                  20
                               Social Studies                           20
                               Science and Technology                   22.5
                               Mathematics                              20
                               World Language                           10
                                           1
                               Fine Arts                                2.5
                               Computer Literacy                        2.5
                               Health                                    5
                                                    2
                               Physical Education                       10
                               Electives                                12.5
                               TOTAL                                    125



All students should be fully scheduled (unless special circumstances exist) carrying between 32.5 and 35 credits.
Students should have earned 32.5 credits at the end of grade 9, 65 credits at the end of grade 10, and 97.5
credits at the end of grade 11. Seniors must earn no fewer than 25 credits during their senior year to qualify
for graduation.

Community Service Requirement
Danvers High School values learning that extends beyond the classroom. By investing themselves in community
service, students extend the learning environment, enhance personal growth, and contribute to their
community.

Students are required to complete forty (40) hours of community service as part of their graduation
requirement from Danvers High School. The composition of the service hours includes a minimum of ten (10)
ten hours each year in an approved setting, which includes volunteer service for a non-profit or benevolent
organization/activity within the community, school, or religious affiliation of the student’s choice.

A. Community Service Requirement: Beginning with the 2007-08 school year, Danvers High School students
   (Class of 2011) will complete a minimum of forty (40) hours of community service as a graduation
   requirement.
B. Learning Objectives for the Service Requirement
1.      The student will develop knowledge, skills and attitudes to enhance personal growth.
2.      The student will develop social skills that are necessary for effectively relating to others in society.
3.      The student will recognize and understand a variety of characteristics and actions of effective,
        dedicated, and responsible citizens.
4.      The student will develop cognitive skills necessary to enhance academic learning and acquire higher
        level thinking skills.
The student will understand skills related to positive work experience and work ethic.

Scheduling Policy
In offering electives, the high school administration will establish a certain number of sections for each
elective. Once these sections have been filled during the scheduling process, no more enrollments will be

1
    Courses may be selected from all art and music courses
2
    Students may petition for waivers in grades 11 and 12. (See physical education section for details.)
                                                        -8-
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
accepted. When this occurs, students will be enrolled in available alternate choice electives. Upperclassmen,
in descending order, will be given first preference in the selection of electives.

Course Classifications - Grades 9, 10, 11 & 12
Danvers High School offers an equal educational opportunity to all students while recognizing individual
differences. The school accommodates the unique skills, talents, learning styles, and needs of students by
differentiating instruction to the greatest extent possible. All core courses are challenging and offered on two
levels—honors and college preparatory. A.P. courses are also offered to juniors and seniors. Elective courses
provide students the opportunity to pursue an area of interest. Students can contract for honors level credit in
many elective areas.
        Advanced Placement
        The curriculum presented is equivalent in scope and depth to a full year college level course. Students
        must fulfill the requirements stated in the A.P. section of this document.
        Honors
        This curriculum is highly motivating for students who have demonstrated outstanding academic ability
        and achievement in previous courses. The criteria for placement in honors courses follows in this
        section.
        College Preparatory
        This curriculum prepares students to meet the demands of colleges and universities. Students who have
        demonstrated good academic ability and achievement will be challenged to complete rigorous
        assignments in each subject area.
        Electives
        Elective courses challenge both college-bound students and students planning to enter the work force
        immediately after high school. Electives serve a variety of interests and often combine academic
        challenges with hands-on experiences. Students may contract for honors level credit in many elective
        areas.

Weighting/Grade Point Average
The college admissions process relies on an evaluation of a variety of criteria which may include a student’s
SAT scores, interview, grade point average (GPA), rank in class, and profile of co-curricular activities. Although
all courses offered at Danvers High School are rigorous and hold students to high standards, additional weight is
given to A.P. and honors courses.

The weighted grade point average is used to determine rank-in-class and National Honor Society eligibility.
However, students' actual grades (non-weighted) appear on their report cards and transcripts and are used to
determine honor roll eligibility. Points are added only to grades earned from 70 to 100. The weighting system
applies as follows:

                   10% of the grade earned for advanced placement courses.
                   5% of the grade earned for honors courses.

The following chart is used to report a student’s academic progress and grade point average (GPA). This scale
is the most commonly aligned to the college scale. Letter grades are used to report a student’s academic
progress and GPA while actual numerical grades are used to finalize rank in class. The transcript will reflect
both a numerical weighted GPA and an unweighted GPA based on the college scale.

                                                    GRADING
            Numerical Grade     Letter Grade    GPA    Numerical Grade        Letter Grade    GPA
               97—100                A+           4.0       77—79                  C+           2.33
                93—96                A            3.84      73—76                  C            2.0
                90—92                A-           3.67      70—72                  C-           1.67
                87—89                B+           3.33      67—69                  D+           1.33

                                                     -9-
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
                 83—86               B            3.0         65—66               D           1.0
                 80—82               B-           2.67        0—64                F           0

Criteria for Enrollment In Honors Courses - Grade 9
To qualify a student must have
    1. A- in content area
    2. Teacher recommendation

Criteria for Enrollment In Honors Courses - Grades 10, 11, & 12
    1. A student must attain an 80 average in content area from honors courses in previous school year or
    2. A student must attain an 85 average in content area from college preparatory courses in previous school
        year or
    3. A student may seek teacher recommendation or
    4. A student may seek placement in an honors course by following the petition process.

Student Placement Policy Grades 9-12
The Danvers Public Schools recognize and value each child’s uniqueness and its responsibility to ensure the
success of each student. This responsibility includes student placement. Based on the joint recommendations
of teachers and guidance counselors, students are placed in curricular levels and electives. The integrity of
the school’s recommendations and rigor of curricular challenge must be maintained; therefore, the school
will not consider requests for specific teachers or levels. However, should the learning needs of a child
necessitate explanation or clarification, a letter from the parent or guardian discussing such needs may be
addressed to the Principal. A response from the school to the parents will be provided in a timely and
reasonable manner. Should parents or guardians disagree with teacher recommendations and the reasons
offered for placement of their child, they can prepare a written request in which they must present their
reason and evidence for reconsideration. Some criteria for placement may include:

           •   Student Personal and Social Management
           •   Student Learning Style and Needs
           •   Teacher Teaching Style
           •   Student Non-Academic Issues (Health, Social, Behavioral)
           •   Classroom Diversity (Academic, Cultural, Gender)
           •   Class Size
           •   Student Post-Secondary Plans

This request will be reviewed, and granted or denied by the principal in consultation with the Waiver
Committee. The Waiver Committee consists of content area teacher(s) of the course(s) in question, the
student’s counselor, and the high school curriculum director.

To maintain equity in teaching loads and to avoid student schedule changes at the beginning of the school year,
students must finalize their schedule by June of the prior academic year. Students will not be permitted to
add/drop a course after the second full week of school. If it becomes necessary to change a class during the
school year, students must appeal to the waiver committee and meet deadlines set by the guidance
department.

Transfer Policy
   1. For students who transfer to Danvers High with a ―college prep‖ course designation, college prep
       weight will be assigned to the course.
   2. If the sending school has more than one college level designation and ―Honors‖ level work is indicated,
       honors weight will be assigned to the course.
   3. All courses not designated honors will not be weighted.


                                                   - 10 -
                                      Program of Studies 2008-2009
    4. To attain a rank of 1, 2, or 3 in a class, the transfer student must be enrolled as a full-time student
       during grades 11 and 12.

Foreign Exchange Student Policy
Exchange students will be given a pass/fail grade in all courses. If an exchange student wishes a letter grade,
he/she must meet all of the requirements of the course.

Independent Study
Opportunity for independent study will be available for students to pursue areas of special interest in depth.
Students chosen for independent study will undergo a program more flexible than the usual class schedule.
        (a) Students involved must be recommended by a guidance counselor and a qualified,
            available teacher of the subject area with the approval of the curriculum director.
        (b) Students may select only one independent study program per semester. The topic selected must
            fall within the curriculum for a course regularly offered by a department.
        (c) Ordinarily, students will be limited to two independent study programs in one subject area.

Advanced Placement
Courses identified by the initials A.P. are courses designed to enrich the programs of advanced college course
students who are ready to experience college level work while still within the high school program. These
courses are very demanding. Students and parents alike must realize that an above-average investment of
talent, time, and energy are the prerequisites necessary for success.

The A.P. teachers must recommend each student wishing to take these courses. Students should talk with the
instructors prior to listing these courses on their course selection sheets. To obtain A.P. credit, students must
take the A.P. Exam at the end of the course. If in the opinion of the A.P. teacher a student should not compete,
exception to this rule may be made. Students who do not take the A.P. Exam will receive honors credit. These
examinations are under the control of the College Board Testing Bureau at Princeton, New Jersey. Successful
students may obtain credit, advanced standing, or both with the colleges of the students’ choice. The
individual colleges grant this credit. Students are cautioned that requirements vary among colleges and must
check catalogs for A.P. program details.

Criteria for A.P. Courses
Students who wish to enroll in A.P. courses should have the recommendation of the prior year’s subject area
teacher and their guidance counselor. Students must have the permission of the A.P. instructor who may
require any of the following:
    1. copy of transcript
    2. student interview
    3. portfolio

In addition, all students must sign a parent/student contract, which is a commitment to the class, summer
work, and the A.P. exam. Once the student and the parent have signed the A.P. contract, it is binding, and
students will not be allowed to drop the course. If there is an unusual extenuating circumstance, students
may appeal to the A.P. committee. All students must consider the rigor and challenge of each individual course
before selecting any A.P. course.

Introduction to Technology Preparation for Grades 11 and 12
Tech Prep is a sequential program of studies at the secondary level which offers students educational
opportunities for college credit at the associate degree level and/or the baccalaureate degree level. Curricular
offerings in Tech Prep run parallel to college prep programs and offer the potential for improved education to
all students who do not choose the traditional college-prep-to-baccalaureate-degree path.

Goals of Tech Prep are:

                                                    - 11 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
   To strengthen secondary vocational programs through increased academic content, bringing students to a
    higher level of education that enables them to adapt to new technology.
   To prepare students for employment upon high school graduation as well as later in life.
   To prepare students for education beyond high school, Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree programs,
    also in apprenticeships, on-the-job training, and continuing education.
   To attract more students into careers in business and technology.
   To assist the movement of students from high school to college.
   To use instructional methods in traditional academic areas that will encourage success in students
    representing a wide range of learning styles.
   To maximize flexibility in choices of educational and career paths and to allow students to change paths
    with minimum penalty.
   To stimulate and apply pressure to make changes in educational practices that are needed in order to
    respond to changes in society, especially those brought about by technology.

Program Prerequisites for Grade 11 Student Candidates:
 Successful completion of grade 10 Algebra I and Grade 10 English.
   Enrollment in science, English, and mathematics courses for Grade 11.
   Enrollment in either (Tech Prep) accounting or engineering/architectural drawing for Grade 11.
   Enrollment in all other courses necessary for graduation.

The following is a list of Tech Prep courses:

   600   Computer Applications I                              615 Accounting II
   601   Computer Applications II                             705 Engineering and Architecture Technology
   606   Computer Programming II                              Certified Nurses Assistant Program
   614   Accounting I

School-to-Career
As part of the Education Initiative of 1993, the town of Danvers is a member of the Southern Essex School To
Work Partnership, which has already begun to create a comprehensive School-To-Career system to provide
opportunities for ALL students in the district to learn and to demonstrate mastery of a common core of
academic skills. Addressing the development of specific academic standards, the school will provide a
structured sequence of inter-connected, integrated work and learning activities beginning at the elementary
level and continuing into postsecondary education.

Within the school system, the curriculum will address career awareness at the elementary level through the
7th and 8th grades with students involved in the acquisition of information about the world of work.
Beginning in the 8th grade and continuing through the 12th grade, students will be administered a career
interest inventory, will have access to a computerized guidance system with a strong career component, and
will have access to individualized counseling with information on careers, the needs of the workforce, and
the labor market available for their use.

CHARACTERISTICS OF A CAREER PATHWAY
               SCHOOL                                                       WORKSITE
     Grade 9   Career & Personal Development                                Worksite Visits
               Worksite Readiness Skills                                    - Students
               Community Service Projects                                   - Teachers


                                                   - 12 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
        Grade 10   Multi-year sequence of classes taught within Career     Job Shadows within Career
                   Pathways                                                Pathways

        Grade 11   Same as above                                           Worksite Rotations
                                                                           Internships

        Grade 12   Post Graduation Planning                                Internship within Career
                                                                           Pathways

STEP Program
The STEP Program provides an opportunity for high school students to take credit and/or non-credit courses at
North Shore Community College. Most students choose to take credit courses as they more closely match high
school requirements. Furthermore, students who choose to take credit courses are able to complete part of or
all of their remaining high school requirements while simultaneously earning college credit. The completed
college-level, credit course(s) may be eligible to be applied towards a degree at NSCC or transferred to a four
year College/University.

Participation in the STEP program and any subsequent course selection(s) requires the approval of the high
school and the STEP Program Coordinator. Eligible STEP Program students usually take NSCC courses for the
following reason(s):

        Students are interested in taking college-level courses to complete remaining high school requirements
         (these courses may also be applicable towards a degree at NSCC or other four year College/University)
        Students are in need of make-up credit for a course they have failed at the high school.
        Students are interested in taking college-level courses for enrichment.

STEP students are mainstreamed into the college student population and can avail themselves of any services
available to NSCC students. These services include academic services such as tutoring, advising, counseling,
and use of the computer lab and the Learning Resource Center (Library).

Application and Registration Process
1. A High School official (e.g. Guidance Counselor or Principal) identifies a student as a potential candidate
   for the STEP Program.
2. The High School official determines which courses are appropriate for the student’s individual academic
   requirements.
3. The student and parent(s) attend a STEP Program orientation session at NSCC.
    Students should bring a copy of their high school transcript and SAT scores if they have taken the exam;
        however, SATs are not required to participate in STEP. At the orientation session:
    If the student wishes to enroll in the STEP program, he/she submits an application.
    An NSCC official will determine if the student needs to take placement testing to determine math
        and/or communications placement (based on course prerequisites and any available SAT scores).
4. Once math and/or communications proficiency is determined (either by placement testing at NSCC and/or
   by SAT scores), the student and parent will meet with an NSCC official to select the appropriate courses.
5. The appropriate courses are then written on the STEP agreement form, which the student, parent (if
   student under 18 yrs of age) and NSCC official will sign.
6. The student will have the High School official sign the STEP agreement form and the student will return the
   signed form to the NSCC official who signed the form. This constitutes the agreement between the High
   School and the Student.


Financial Information
Students and/or parents are responsible for the costs of tuition, fees, and books.

                                                    - 13 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
There are several ways to pay for courses:

        The student may pay via the NSCC Campus Pipeline with a MasterCrd, VISA, or Discover credit card
        (every student receives a free Campus Pipeline Account upon acceptance to NSCC. Students also
        register for courses via Campus Pipeline).
        The student may send payment via mail in the form of a check, money order, or certified check.
        The student may come into the Student Accounts Office at the Danvers Campus or Lynn Campus to
        make payment (cash is not accepted).
        The student may pay in installments. An Installment Plan Application is available in Enrollment
        Services at the Lynn or Danvers Campus, or the application can also be down loaded from their web
        page: www.northshore.edu.

Contact Information
For further information, please direct inquiries to the STEP Program Coordinators:
Danvers Campus                           Lynn Campus
Maryanne Atkinson                        John Duff
(978)762-4000, Ext. 4169                 (978)762-4000, Ext. 6223


New Admissions Standards for the Massachusetts State Colleges & Universities

Freshman Applicants
The new admissions standards for freshman applicants have two parts:
1. sixteen (16) required academic courses; and
2. a minimum grade point average (GPA) earned in those required courses.
Academic Course Requirement
 Sixteen college preparatory courses distributed as follows are required. (A course is equivalent to one full
    year of study.)

     English: 4 courses
     Mathematics: 3 courses (Algebra I & II and Geometry or Trigonometry, or comparable coursework)
     Sciences: 3 courses (including 2 courses with laboratory work)
     Social Sciences: 2 courses (including 1 course in U.S. History)
     Foreign Languages: 2 courses (in a single language)
     Electives: 2 courses (from the above subjects or from the Arts and Humanities or Computer Sciences)
Minimum Grade Point Average (GPA)
 The new minimum GPA, calculated at the end of the seventh semester, must be achieved in the required
    academic courses completed at the time of application and should be weighted for accelerated (Honors,
    A.P., etc.) courses. The minimum GPA requirement at both state colleges and universities is a 3.0.

   If a student’s GPA falls below the minimum required, the following sliding scale will apply. This scale
    should be used only when a student’s GPA falls below the minimum required for the State Colleges or
    University, as outlined on the GPA table.

                                                    State College
                                             SAT must equal or exceed
                                             GPA                  SAT
                                             2.51-2.99            920
                                             2.41-2.50            960
                                             2.31-2.40            1000
                                             2.21-2.30            1040
                                             2.11-2.20            1080

                                                     - 14 -
                                      Program of Studies 2008-2009
                                           2.00-2.10            1120

Homework Requests
Student Absence from School (Beginning with the third absence)
When a student is expected to be absent, parents should request by 9:00 a.m. homework assignments from the
guidance office. Parents can pick up assignments no earlier than 2:00 p.m. on the afternoon following the
request.

Tutorial Policy
Student Absence from School (Absence more than 14 school days for medical reasons) - Relationship
Between Tutors and Classroom Teachers
This section attempts to clarify the relationship between students’ regular classroom teachers and tutors who
work with students who are not able to attend their regular programmed activities in the public schools. The
need for this section results from the lack of clarity regarding the prerogative of the tutor with regard to
evaluation and management of student progress. Procedures regarding the eligibility and maintenance of
tutorial programs and the procedures regarding the evaluation of students is addressed.

Initiation
 Once the school nurse has been notified of the student’s extended absence from school and she has
     initiated the appropriate forms, the school nurse will inform the guidance counselor of the circumstances of
     the student’s illness.
   The special education liaison will, upon review of the student’s program and receipt of appropriate forms,
    arrange tutorial services.
   All referrals for tutors must be processed through the pupil service office.
   The special education liaison will contact the teachers involved in the tutorial and will coordinate an
    understanding between the tutor and the teachers regarding a schedule for their contacts.
   The regular classroom teacher will inform the tutor of the curriculum to be followed including tests,
    assignments, and materials. The tutor and the teacher will maintain contact regarding the progress of the
    child in the tutorial program.
The tutor, once having received the curriculum and appropriate materials, should be capable of functioning
independently and able to exercise good judgment with regard to the delivery and pacing of the material. The
classroom teacher should not become involved in ―tutoring the tutor‖.

The tutor will be responsible for conducting the tutorial: instructing, administering quizzes and tests,
monitoring attendance, and giving the student feedback on progress. Tutors will correct tests and quizzes at
the discretion of the classroom teacher.

The tutor will take the initiative in maintaining contact with the regular classroom teacher.

The tutor is not autonomous in the selection of curriculum or in the final evaluation of student progress.

Teachers will be responsible for evaluating the student’s progress in light of the results of homework, projects,
and quizzes. Teachers may exercise discretion concerning the amount of information which they need to make
those evaluations. The teacher should review tests results and/or written works of the student on a quarterly
basis. Teachers may consider the subjective opinions of the tutor in making evaluations of student progress.

Evaluation
At the end of progress report or grade periods, the regular teacher will be responsible for grading the student
based on his/her evaluation of the student’s progress as determined by test results, assignments, and the
recommendations of the tutor concerning the student’s effort and performance.

                                                    - 15 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009


Ninth Grade Teams
The major goal of the ninth grade team program is to provide ninth graders with the additional support, skills,
and confidence necessary to complete a successful high school experience. Specific goals of the program
include:

1. Provide a smooth transition from the middle school to the high school and offer a comprehensive and
    ongoing orientation.
2. Implement and expand the reading and writing program in all curricular areas to reinforce reading and
    writing skills.
3. Identify early the ―at risk‖ student by developing accurate student profiles, determining appropriate
    placement, and reviewing and monitoring student progress regularly.
4. Develop close and consistent communication among team teachers, guidance, administration, and home.
5. Actively involve parents in the education of their child.
6. Reinforce the readiness concept.
7. Provide for intellectual, social, physical, and emotional well-being of the student.
8. Foster respect for self, peers, and adults and instill the value of personal and community property.
9. Periodically assess the ninth grade teams program to make additions, modifications, and/or deletions.
10. Teach study and organizational skills.
11. Emphasize homework as an essential part of the learning process.
12. Introduce career awareness and exploration.
13. Provide a structured and supportive environment where the student can succeed.
14. Develop consistency.
15. Reflect upon practice.
16. Discuss student work.

Teams of teachers will work together to monitor student academic, social, emotional, and behavioral progress.
The major advantages of this teaming are:

1. A consistent team of teachers will work with the same group of students, allowing students and teachers to
   get to know each other better;
2. Teachers are given the opportunity to work collegially as a team, reducing isolation many may face;
3. Teachers have the opportunity to develop a more integrated curriculum and,
4. Teachers are empowered by gaining more decision-making control and responsibility.

If scheduling permits, some ninth grade courses may be co-taught in order to:

1. Address IEP issues;
2. Provide additional support.

Title IX and Chapter 622
It is the policy of the Danvers Public Schools not to discriminate on the basis of sex, sexual orientation,
pregnancy, race, religion, color, and national origin in its educational programs and activities as required by
Title IX of the 1972 Education Amendments and Chapter 622 of the Acts of 1971. Students who have questions
regarding their civil rights should see Mr. Mark Strout, Civil Rights Coordinator.

Students’ Rights
The Danvers School System subscribes to and safeguards the laws, regulations and guidelines pertaining to
Students’ Rights, under those chapters concerning themselves with suspension and exclusion from public schools
and under Chapter 71, Section 34D and 34F which concern themselves with students’ rights pertaining to
students’ records. The suspension procedures of the Danvers Public School System are matters of school
committee policy as listed in the Policy Handbook on pages 47 and 48 as voted on April 28, 1975, and have been
judged consistent with the laws of the Commonwealth.
                                                   - 16 -
                                      Program of Studies 2008-2009


Extended Block
An extended block of time will be offered before or after school to allow students the opportunity to take
additional electives or courses that provide academic support. Actual course offerings will be based on student
subscription and teacher availability. A list of possible courses will be provided as part of the course selection
process.

Summer School
A summer program is operated by the Danvers Public School System and its purpose is to enable those students
who have failed courses during the school year to establish credit for the same through summer study.

To be eligible for participation in the summer program, a prospective enrollee must be entering grades seven
through twelve in September following the summer session.

Students seeking to establish credit for summer study must satisfy the following requirements:

    1.   A grade between 60 and 64 earned during the regular school year is an automatic recommendation into
         summer school.
    2.   Students with a grade below 60 must have the recommendation of the teacher whose course was
         failed. In the case where the student has not been recommended by the teacher, the parent may
         appeal to the principal.
    3.   A perfect attendance record during the summer session must be maintained in order to receive credit.
    4.   The student must be recommended for credit by his summer school teacher.
    5.   Students must receive a grade no lower than a C- to pass.
    6.   The recommendation for credit is accepted by the principal of the school granting such credit.
    7.   A mandatory homework policy is applicable, and acceptable conduct must be displayed at all times.

Plans are underway to offer remediation courses/enrichment courses in certain subject areas, specifically to
include disciplines assessed via MCAS.

NOTE: No student who fails sequenced English courses may take more than one English class per year in 9th,
10th, or 11th grade. Any student who fails 9th, 10th, or 11th grade English may make up credits in summer
school if the above criteria are met.




                                                    - 17 -
                                    Program of Studies 2008-2009
COURSE OFFERINGS

ENGLISH
The purpose of the Danvers High School English Language Arts program is to help students become more
effective readers, writers, and critical thinkers. Students analyze texts that represent a variety of genres
including fiction, drama, poetry, and non-fiction. Through a process writing approach, students plan, compose,
revise, edit, and share their writing. The Danvers High School academic expectations for writing, speaking, and
independent learning have been adopted by the English Department as primary areas of emphasis.

                                      Recommended Sequence of Study

         Freshman          111 English H          112 English CP      114      118        119 English
           Year                                                       ESL    Reading     Fundamentals
                                                                            Strategies
        Sophomore          121 English H          122 English CP      124      128        129 English
           Year                                                       ESL    Reading     Fundamentals
                                                                            Strategies
        Junior Year      180 A.P      131         132 English CP      134      138        139 English
                         English     English                          ESL    Reading     Fundamentals
                        Language        H                                   Strategies
        Senior Year     181 A.P.      141         142 English CP      144      148        149 English
                         English    English                           ESL    Reading     Fundamentals
                       Literature      H                                    Strategies
         Electives         150 Writing I        156 Rhetoric and      160 Journalism I    170 College
                           151 Writing II         Persuasion in        162 Advanced         Reading
                                                  Contemporary          Journalism
                                                     Culture H
                         171 Reading for             172 Study        173 MCAS English     178 Public
                            Enjoyment           Skills/Writing Lab      Preparation         Speaking
                         179 Shakespeare       900 SAT Preparation



ENGLISH – Grade 9                                          process approach to writing, students will maintain
111 ENGLISH (H) – The purpose of this course is to         an individual writing folder that will document and
help students become highly effective readers and          guide their growth as writers. Students will also
writers. This course investigates the main elements        complete reading assignments, some focusing on
of language and communication, including literary          the theme of tolerance.
genres, expository writing, and an introduction to         5 credits – college preparatory level
the basic tools and techniques of research. Using a
process approach to writing, students will maintain        114 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE -
an individual writing folder that will document and        Instruction in English as a Second Language is
guide their growth as writers. Students will also          available to students with limited English
complete reading assignments at a faster pace,             proficiency. After referral, each student’s English
some focusing on the theme of tolerance.                   proficiency is assessed using formal and informal
5 credits – honors level                                   measures. Annual reassessment of skills occurs for
                                                           each student. The purpose of ESL classes is to build
112 ENGLISH (CP) - The purpose of this course is to        facility with spoken and written English. This class
help students become more effective readers and            is taken in lieu of grade level English class.
writers. This course investigates the main elements        Students are encouraged to enroll in grade
of language and communication, including literary          appropriate English classes when comprehension of
genres, expository writing, and an introduction to         the language is at a level to ensure success.
the basic tools and techniques of research. Using a        5 credits
                                                  - 18 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
                                                            and will build on the research skills gained in Grade
118 READING: STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVEMENT –                   9.
The purpose of this course is to help students              5 credits – college preparatory level
become successful readers and writers. Through a
workshop approach, students receive individual              124 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE -
instruction in the skills and strategies used by            Instruction in English as a Second Language is
effective readers and writers.         This course          available to students with limited English
emphasizes independent reading and writing within           proficiency. After referral, each student’s English
the context of the Massachusetts Department of              proficiency is assessed using formal and informal
Education English Language Arts Frameworks.                 measures. Annual reassessment of skills occurs for
NOTE:     Students enrolled in this course must             each student. The purpose of ESL classes is to build
receive prior approval of the course instructor.            facility with spoken and written English. This class
2.5 or 5 credits                                            is taken in lieu of grade level English class.
                                                            Students are encouraged to enroll in grade
•119 ENGLISH FUNDAMENTALS - This course is                  appropriate English classes when comprehension of
designed for students with significant weaknesses in        the language is at a level to ensure success.
reading,    fluency,    comprehension,     spelling,        5 credits
vocabulary, and written expression. Individualized
instruction may involve a multi-sensory approach,           128 READING: STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVEMENT –
slower pace, and consistent review of information.          The purpose of this course is to help students
Strategies are designed to enable students to               become successful readers and writers. Through a
improve communication skills.                               workshop approach, students receive individual
                                                            instruction in the skills and strategies used by
• This course is designed for students who are              effective readers and writers.         This course
assigned to a special education class through the           emphasizes independent reading and writing within
Special Education Team process.                             the context of the Massachusetts Department of
5 credits                                                   Education English Language Arts Frameworks.
                                                            NOTE:     Students enrolled in this course must
ENGLISH – Grade 10                                          receive prior approval of the course instructor.
121 ENGLISH 10 (H) - The focus of this course is            2.5 or 5 credits
the continued development of each student as a
critical reader, writer, and thinker. Through the           •129 ENGLISH FUNDAMENTALS - This course is
close reading of literary works organized around            designed for students with significant weaknesses in
common themes, students will examine the                    reading,    fluency,    comprehension,     spelling,
connection between a writer’s purpose, form, and            vocabulary, and written expression. Individualized
content. Spelling, usage, and mechanics will be             instruction may involve a multi-sensory approach,
investigated as tools for clear and understandable          slower pace, and consistent review of information.
written communication.          Students will be            Strategies are designed to enable students to
responsible for long and short-term supplementary           improve communication skills.
reading assignments and will build on the research          • This course is designed for students who are
skills gained in Grade 9.                                   assigned to a special education class through the
5 credits – honors level                                    Special Education Team process.
                                                            5 credits
122 ENGLISH 10 (CP) - The focus of this course is
the continued development of each student as a              ENGLISH – Grade 11
critical reader, writer, and thinker. Through the           131 ENGLISH 11 (H) – The focus of this course is
close reading of literary works organized around            the continued development of each student as a
common themes, students will examine the                    critical reader, writer, and thinker. Through the
connection between a writer’s purpose, form, and            close reading of selected American authors,
content. Spelling, usage, and mechanics will be             students will examine the connection between a
investigated as tools for clear and understandable          writer’s purpose, form, and content. Spelling,
written communication.          Students will be            usage, and mechanics will be investigated as tools
responsible for supplementary reading assignments           for creating clear and understandable writing.
                                                   - 19 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
Students will be responsible for long and short-term        • This course is designed for students who are
supplementary reading assignments and will expand           assigned to a special education class through the
their research skills.                                      Special Education Team process.
5 credits - honors level                                    5 credits

132 ENGLISH 11 (CP) – The focus of this course is           180 A.P. ENGLISH: LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION
the continued development of each student as a              – The A.P. course in Language and Composition
critical reader, writer, and thinker. Through the           engages students in the study of rhetoric: the
close reading of American literature tracing key            structure and style of writing. Unlike traditional
themes from Colonial times to the present,                  English courses, this course will focus primarily on
students will examine the connection between a              the reading and writing of non-fiction (though
writer’s purpose, form, and content. Spelling,              students     will    fulfill  American     literature
usage, and mechanics will be investigated as tools          requirements      through    independent      reading
for creating clear and understandable writing.              assignments). Through close readings of non-fiction
Students will be responsible for long and short-term        texts, students will develop a keener sense of the
supplementary reading.                                      methods and rhetorical strategies at work in
5 credits – college preparatory level                       successful writing. Throughout the year, students
                                                            will read a variety of essays from a range of
134 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE -                          historical contexts. Furthermore, students will
Instruction in English as a Second Language is              immerse themselves in the process of writing as
available to students with limited English                  they try their hands at personal, narrative,
proficiency. After referral, each student’s English         argument, and analysis essays. Extensive reading
proficiency is assessed using formal and informal           and writing are expected from students throughout
measures. Annual reassessment of skills occurs for          the course. Moreover, students are expected
each student. The purpose of ESL classes is to build        to carry a rigorous summer workload.
facility with spoken and written English. This class        NOTE: All students must take the A.P. Language
is taken in lieu of grade level English class.              and Composition Exam. See “Criteria for A.P.
Students are encouraged to enroll in grade                  Courses.”
appropriate English classes when comprehension of           6 credits - A.P. level
the language is at a level to ensure success.
5 credits                                                   ENGLISH - Grade 12
                                                            141 ENGLISH 12 (H) – The focus of this course is
138 READING: STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVEMENT –                   the continued development of each student as a
The purpose of this course is to help students              critical reader, writer, and thinker. Through the
become successful readers and writers. Through a            close reading of selected British and world authors,
workshop approach, students receive individual              students will examine the connection between a
instruction in the skills and strategies used by            writer’s purpose, form, and content. Grammar,
effective readers and writers.          This course         usage, and mechanics will be investigated as tools
emphasizes independent reading and writing within           for creating clear and understandable writing.
the context of the Massachusetts Department of              Students will be responsible for long and short-term
Education English Language Arts Frameworks.                 supplementary reading assignments. As part of this
NOTE:      Students enrolled in this course must            course, all seniors will complete the Senior Project
receive prior approval of the course instructor.            requirement.
2.5 or 5 credits                                            5 credits - honors level

•139 ENGLISH FUNDAMENTALS - This course is                  142 ENGLISH 12 (CP) – The focus of this course is
designed for students with significant weaknesses in        the continued development of each student as a
reading,    fluency,    comprehension,     spelling,        critical reader, writer, and thinker. Through the
vocabulary, and written expression. Individualized          close reading of British and world literature,
instruction may involve a multi-sensory approach,           students will examine the connection between a
slower pace, and consistent review of information.          writer’s purpose, form, and content. Spelling,
Strategies are designed to enable students to               grammar, usage, and mechanics will be
improve communication skills.                               investigated as tools for creating clear and
                                                   - 20 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
understandable writing.        Students will be             language to provide both meaning and pleasure for
responsible for long and short-term supplementary           their readers. As they read, students will consider
reading assignments. As part of this course, all            a work’s structure, style, and themes as well as
seniors will complete the Senior Project                    such elements as the use of figurative language,
requirement.                                                imagery, symbolism, and tone. Extensive reading
5 credits – college preparatory level                       and writing are expected of the student.
                                                            NOTE: All students must take the A.P.Language
144 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE -                          and Literature Exam.          See “Criteria for
Instruction in English as a Second Language is              A.P.Courses.”
available to students with limited English                  6 credits - A.P.level
proficiency. After referral, each student’s English
proficiency is assessed using formal and informal           ENGLISH ELECTIVES
measures. Annual reassessment of skills occurs for          150 WRITING I – Students may opt to take Writing
each student. The purpose of ESL classes is to build        Workshop I, II, or both as a full year course only
facility with spoken and written English. This class        once.     Using the writing process, individual
is taken in lieu of grade level English class.              conferences, and peer review procedures, students
Students are encouraged to enroll in grade                  will draft, revise, rewrite, and edit their work.
appropriate English classes when comprehension of           There will be an emphasis on different types of
the language is at a level to ensure success.               writing, along with a review of key aspects of
5 credits                                                   grammar and proper sentence structure. Students
                                                            will have the opportunity to publish their writing in
148 READING: STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVEMENT –                   the high school literary magazine.
The purpose of this course is to help students              2.5 credits – Students may contract for honors
become successful readers and writers. Through a            level.
workshop approach, students receive individual
instruction in the skills and strategies used by            151 WRITING II –This course may be taken as a
effective readers and writers.         This course          semester course or as a continuation of Writing
emphasizes independent reading and writing within           Workshop I. The writing process is reviewed,
the context of the Massachusetts Department of              including drafting and revising student work. A
Education English Language Arts Frameworks.                 focus of the course will be on reading and writing
NOTE:      Students enrolled in this course must            poetry.     Students also will experiment with
receive prior approval of the course instructor.            different writing styles. Common grammar/usage
2.5 or 5 credits                                            problems will be reviewed. Students will have the
                                                            opportunity to publish their writing in the high
•149 ENGLISH FUNDAMENTALS - This course is                  school literary magazine.
designed for students with significant weaknesses in        2.5 credits – Students may contract for honors
reading,    fluency,    comprehension,     spelling,        level.
vocabulary, and written expression. Individualized
instruction may involve a multi-sensory approach,           155       MULTICULTURAL/MINORITY           STUDIES:
slower pace, and consistent review of information.          EXPLORING THE ―OTHER‖ - In order to grasp the
Strategies are designed to enable students to               importance of multicultural/diversity issues,
improve communication skills.                               students will discuss film, literature, poetry, and
• This course is designed for students who are              articles dealing with issues of racism, homophobia,
assigned to a special education class through the           sexism, and ethnocentrism. Through an in-depth
Special Education Team process.                             analysis of these important issues, students will
5 credits                                                   develop a language for discussing how society
                                                            treats its assumed ―other‖. The focus of the course
181    A.P.    ENGLISH:         LITERATURE      AND         will be to help students discuss their own opinions
COMPOSITION – The A.P.course in Literature and              and explore those of others in order to prepare for
Composition engages students in the careful                 the world they will face when entering college or
reading and critical analysis of literature. Through        the work force. Requirements for the class will
close reading of selected texts, students will              include keeping a detailed journal, reading,
deepen their understanding of the ways writers use          writing, and working on a long-term project.
                                                   - 21 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
2.5 credits – grades 11, 12 - Students may                  reading challenges they will face in college and
contract for honors level.                                  college level courses. Improvement of reading
                                                            techniques involving vocabulary, comprehension,
156      RHETORIC         AND    PERSUASION       IN        critical analysis, speed, and flexibility will be the
CONTEMPORARY CULTURE (H) - In order to                      focus of this course. Participants will learn the
understand the world around us, students must               sophisticated reading strategies they will need to
learn how cultural forces (media, government, etc.)         use with college level texts, and the skills
use various rhetorical techniques to persuade them          necessary for improved scores on the PSAT, SAT,
in their development of certain beliefs. This course        and college entrance examinations. It is highly
is designed for juniors and seniors who seek to             recommended that this course be taken by college
improve their writing skills while learning about           bound students.
contemporary culture. Students will learn the               2.5 or 5 credits – Grades 9 – 12 - Students may
foundation of traditional rhetorical strategies with        contract for honors level.
an emphasis on persuasion.         Assignments will
consist of multiple writing assignments in various          171 READING FOR ENJOYMENT – The more you
genres (description, personal writing, formal               read, the stronger reader, writer, and thinker you
argument), as well as frequent presentations and            become!      Course participants will have the
debates.     Course content will be taken from              opportunity to read as well as expand their abilities
editorials,    political    speeches,    government         to read, comprehend, and enjoy literature.
documents, T.V. and radio advertisements, and               Discussion topics include vocabulary, theme,
film.                                                       reading strategies, character development, and
NOTE: Students who have taken or plan to take 180           advanced reading skills. A range of assessments
A.P. English Language and Composition should not            will be used to facilitate reading improvement;
also enroll in this class.                                  however, the central focus of this course is to enjoy
2.5 credits—grades 11,12 - Honors level                     reading, and to read, read, read!
                                                            2.5 or 5 credits – Grades 9 – 12 - Students may
160 JOURNALISM (fall semester) – This course is             contract for honors level.
designed to introduce students to the fundamentals
of print journalism.        Participants will learn         172 STUDY SKILLS/WRITING LAB - This course will
interviewing skills and research techniques, as well        focus on organizational strategies and study skills
as editing and design skills using Quark Express.           to help prepare students for work in their high
Writing will span a range from news and sports              school courses, college, and/or the world of work.
articles to features and editorials. One of the             In addition to organizational strategies, identifying
products of this course is the weekly publication of        main ideas, note taking, outlining, and webbing,
The Flying Onion in the Danvers Herald.                     students can receive help on writing assignments
2.5 credits – Students may contract for honors              and further refine their writing skills.
level.                                                      2.5 or 5 credits

162 ADVANCED JOURNALISM – In this course,                   173 MCAS ENGLISH PREPARATION - This course is
students build on the skills learned in Journalism.         designed for students who need extra support in
Students take on leadership roles in the school             order to achieve the proficient level on MCAS. The
newspaper and refine their writing, editing, and            course will review test-taking strategies and key
design skills. Writing will span a range from news          concepts and will reinforce skills in literature,
and sports articles to features and editorials. One         language, and composition.           Skills include
of the products of this course is the weekly                comprehending a variety of texts, analyzing how an
publication of The Flying Onion in the Danvers              author’s language choices shape a work, and
Herald.                                                     writing a logical, well-supported composition.
Prerequisite: 160 Journalism                                NOTE: Teacher recommendation is required.
2.5 or 5 credits – Students may contract for                2.5 credits—Pass/Fail
honors level.
                                                            178    INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC SPEAKING -
170 SEMINAR IN COLLEGE READING – The emphasis               Students in this course will make oral presentations
of the course is on preparing students for the              that demonstrate appropriate consideration of

                                                   - 22 -
                                      Program of Studies 2008-2009
audience, purpose, and the information to be                  from post-Reconstruction to the present day.
conveyed.     Public speaking students will learn             Students in grade 12 are required to select a full
techniques for succeeding at college and job                  year of social studies from the wide range of social
interviews, class presentations, and a variety of             studies electives offered.
formal and informal speaking situations. Classroom
activities will include preparing and delivering              The Social Studies Department has adopted Danvers
instructional and persuasive speeches, debates,               High School Academic Expectation #9: Students will
speeches of introduction, and more. Students will             demonstrate an understanding of the foundations,
learn the process of speaking, from first draft to            values, and perspectives of the United States and
the final product, and leave this course with the             other nations. All students in the 11th grade U.S.
skills they need to speak in public with confidence           History II course will be assessed on whether or not
and polish.                                                   they have achieved this expectation. Through the
2.5 Credits. Students may contract for honors                 Introduction to Economics course, the department
level.                                                        will also support academic expectation #8:
                                                              Students     will    develop    personal   financial
179 SHAKESPEARE (H) - This course is designed to              management skills. All other social studies courses
give upperclassmen an opportunity to further their            will also support the writing and speaking
background in Shakespeare by exploring texts that             expectations, #1A and #1B, as well as the reading
are not read in other English courses at the high             and the creative, analytical, and critical thinking
school. Through close reading, discussion, and                expectations, #2 and #3.
dramatic interpretation, students will practice
important analytical skills, explore possible                         Recommended Sequence of Study
historical and literary influences on Shakespeare,
and ultimately present their ideas in formal                                     Honors Level      College Prep
analytical essays. In this seminar-style course,                                                       Level
grades will assess students’ knowledge of various              Freshman             World              World
plays, as well as their abilities to make thematic               Year              History II        History II
connections between texts.                                    Sophomore          U.S. History I    U.S. History I
2.5 credits – grades 11, 12, honors level                        Year
                                                              Junior Year        U.S. History II    U.S. History II
900 SAT PREPARATION - This course focuses on the
different types of test items for both the verbal and
math portions of the SAT.          Verbal analogies,                 Grade 11 and 12 Electives (full year)
vocabulary, and reading comprehension will be
covered as well as mathematical concepts including             A.P. Courses         Honors Level          College Prep
arithmetic, algebra, and geometry. In addition,                                                               Level
students will be taught test-taking strategies and            A.P. US History      America: The
the use of logical reasoning.                                                       1960’s and
2.5 credits – grades 11, 12 – Pass/Fail                                               Beyond
                                                               A.P. European       Global Studies        Global Studies
SOCIAL STUDIES                                                    History
The Danvers High School social studies program is             A.P. Psychology      History in Film       History in Film
                                                              (Recommended
aligned with the Massachusetts Social Studies
                                                              but not required
Curriculum Frameworks. In grade 9, students will                prerequisite
successfully complete a yearlong World History II             Psychology 264)
course that builds upon the World History I course                                 Introduction to      Introduction to
that they studied in grade 8. In grade 10, students                                   Economics            Economics
will complete a year long U.S. History I course that                                  Sociology            Sociology
focuses on the period from the American Revolution
through Reconstruction, with an extensive focus on                                   Psychology            Psychology
national, state, and local government. In grade 11,
all students will expand their knowledge of the
                                                                                    Local History         Local History
United States in U.S. History II, studying the periods
                                                     - 23 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
                                                           political reform in Western Europe, and imperialism
      Grade 11 and 12 Electives (half year)                in Africa, Asia, and South America.
                                                           • This course is designed for students who are
     Honors Level            College Prep Level            assigned to a special education class through the
    Service Learning          Service Learning             Special Education Team process.
                                                           5 credits
      Legal Issues               Legal Issues
                                                           SOCIAL STUDIES - Grade 10
    Introduction to            Introduction to             226 U.S. HISTORY I (H) – This honors level course
  Philosophy: Politics       Philosophy: Politics          traces the political, economic, geographic, social,
    Introduction to            Introduction to             and cultural growth of our country from the
   Philosophy: Ethics         Philosophy: Ethics           American Revolution to Reconstruction.         The
 Women in America and       Women in America and           intensive use of maps, charts, graphs, tables,
Around the World: What     Around the World: What          readings and supplementary texts will provide the
   Defines a Woman?           Defines a Woman?             student with a better understanding of his/her
 Women in America and       Women in America and           American heritage and the place of the United
Around the World: Issues   Around the World: Issues        States in the world. This course expects students
        of Power                   of Power                to work at a demanding level.
                                                           5 credits - honors level

SOCIAL STUDIES – Grade 9                                   227 U.S. HISTORY I (CP) - This course presents a
207 WORLD HISTORY II (H) - This course is a                survey of U.S. history from the American Revolution
comprehensive survey of World History that                 to Reconstruction.      In a structured classroom
examines the rise of the Nation State in Europe, the       environment, the students will investigate the
French Revolution, and the economic and political          economic, political, social and diplomatic aspects
roots of the modern world. Students will examine           of our country’s history. The use of maps, charts,
the origins and consequences of the Industrial             reference materials and extensive vocabulary
Revolution, 19th century political reform in               reinforcement will give the students a more
Western Europe, and imperialism in Africa, Asia,           comprehensive knowledge and better understanding
and South America. Students will learn to ask and          of American history and the place of the United
answer important questions, construct reasoned             States in the world.
arguments through guided research, and engage in           5 credits – college preparatory level
discussion and debate.
5 credits - honors level                                   228 U.S. HISTORY I -. This basic course covers the
                                                           major events in U.S. history from the American
208 WORLD HISTORY II (CP) - This course is a               Revolution to Reconstruction.
comprehensive survey of World History that                  This course is designed for students who are
examines the rise of the Nation State in Europe, the       assigned to a special education class through the
French Revolution, and the economic and political          Special Education Team process.
roots of the modern world. Students will examine           5 credits
the origins and consequences of the Industrial
Revolution, 19th century political reform in               SOCIAL STUDIES – Grade 11
Western Europe, and imperialism in Africa, Asia,           235 U.S. HISTORY II (H) - This honors level course
and South America. Students will learn to ask and          traces the political, economic, geographic, social
answer important questions, construct reasoned             and cultural growth of our country from post-
arguments through guided research, and engage in           Reconstruction to the present. The intensive use of
discussion and debate.                                     maps, charts, graphs, tables, primary source
5 credits – college preparatory level                      readings, and supplementary texts will provide the
                                                           student with a better understanding of his/her
•209 WORLD HISTORY II - Students will survey the           American heritage. This course expects students to
major names and events of World History including          work at a demanding level .
the rise of the Nation State in Europe, the French         5 credits - honors level
Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, 19th century
                                                  - 24 -
                                      Program of Studies 2008-2009
236 U.S. HISTORY II (CP) - This course presents               2.5 credits - Students may contract for honors
through     a    combined     thematic-chronological          level.
                   approach a survey of American
                   history from post-Reconstruction           202 – WOMEN IN AMERICA AND AROUND THE
                   to the present. In a structured            GLOBE: ISSUES OF POWER - (Spring Semester) This
                   classroom     environment     the          course will examine key historical events and
                   students will investigate the              contemporary issues in Women's History. Students
                   economic, political, social and            will seek to answer the question "What is power-
diplomatic aspects of our country's history. The use          and how have women acquired it?" through the
of maps, charts, reference materials, primary                 examination of primary source readings such as
source readings, and vocabulary reinforcement will            advertisements,    children’s  stories,   women’s
give the students a more comprehensive knowledge              magazines, religious texts, and historical objects.
and better understanding of American history.                 Students may enhance their study of Women’s
5 credits – college preparatory level                         History by taking Women in America and Around
                                                              the World: What Defines a Woman in the fall
237 U.S. History II - This is a basic course                 semester.
covering the major events in America’s history from           2.5 credits - Students may contract for honors
post-Reconstruction to the present.                           level.
 This course is designed for students who are
assigned to a special education class through the             203 HISTORY IN FILM - Film has been a medium
Special Education Team process.                               that has influenced great masses of people over
5 credits                                                     several generations. This course will explore how
                                                              various historical periods are depicted in film.
271 A.P. U.S. HISTORY - This challenging course is            After careful analysis of a specific historical topic,
designed to provide students with the analytical              students will compare the various degrees of
skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal                accuracy of the film with a variety of historical
critically with the recurring problems and essential          data. Writing is an important component of this
questions of United States history. Students will             course. Students are expected to critique the
learn to assess historical materials - their relevance        various films discussed.
to any given interpretative problem, their                    5 credits – Students may contract for honors
reliability and their importance - construct their            level.
own conclusions and make informed judgments.
NOTE: Students are expected to take the A.P.                  204 GLOBAL STUDIES - This course introduces
test. See “Criteria for A.P.Courses.”                         students to global themes critical to the well-being
6 credits - A.P. level                                        of the international community. Through the study
                                                              of current challenges confronting the world,
SOCIAL STUDIES ELECTIVES                                      students will gain an appreciation of the
These electives are designed for and offered to               perspectives of individual nations as they pursue
juniors and seniors. Seniors have priority in the             their national self-interests. Students will conduct
selection of these courses.                                   in-depth research on topics such as global trade,
                                                              human rights, genocide, global warming, AIDS,
201 – WOMEN IN AMERICA AND AROUND THE                         nuclear proliferation, and terrorism.            The
GLOBE: WHAT DEFINES A WOMAN? - (Fall                          expression of national viewpoints will be considered
Semester) This course will examine key historical             in light of a country’s social, cultural, and
events and contemporary issues in Women's History.            economic evolution. Students will be asked to
Students will consider how various cultures have              present the results of their study and research to
sought to answer what defines a woman through                 their peers and to broader audiences as
the examination of primary source readings such as            opportunities arise. At the end of the course,
advertisements,    children’s   stories,   women’s            students will have a better understanding of the
magazines, religious texts, and historical objects.           issues that will shape our world in the twenty-first
Students may continue their study of Women’s                  century.
History by taking Women in America and Around                 5 credits – Students may contract for honors
the World: Issues of Power in the spring semester.            level.

                                                     - 25 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
                                                            247 INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS - This course
240 AMERICA: THE 1960’S AND BEYOND - This                   introduces students to key economic terms and
course combines contemporary history with current           concepts.    Topics covered include comparative
events in an exploration of the role that the United        economic systems, economic choice and scarcity,
States plays in the world today. Students will gain         supply and demand, labor, markets, national and
a greater understanding of our increasingly global          international economics, and personal finance.
economy and the reasons for our military                    Students undertake a stock market simulation that
commitments in various parts of the world. With             introduces them to the vocabulary and processes of
an emphasis on topics from the past 50 years, this          the stock market. With the advice of local business
course includes units on the Middle East crises, the        consultants, students organize a not for profit
end of the Cold War, the rise of international              company and donate the proceeds to the charity of
terrorism, and the growth of globalization. The             their choice. In the process, students learn the
course will utilize films, primary sources and              elements of business organization and business
current events to enhance the understanding of              finance.     The company acts as a unifying
these themes.                                               experience between the theory and practice of
Note: This course replaces 241 Twentieth Century            economics.
History                                                     5 credits - Students may contract for honors
5 credits – Students may contract for honors                level.
level.
                                                            251 LOCAL HISTORY – This course explores the rich
243 SERVICE LEARNING – This interdisciplinary               history of Danvers, formally Salem Village, and the
course is designed for students who have a strong           surrounding area. An emphasis is placed on the use
commitment to improving their community and are             of primary source documents and methodology in
motivated to create and implement service                   order to gain a better understanding of the past.
projects that meet community needs. Students                Some of the topics will be colonial settlement, the
learn about pressing local, national, and                   origins of the Salem Witch Trials, the American
international issues such as the environment,               Revolution, Essex County and maritime trade, and
violence, social class, and health/wellness through         the abolition movement. Students will participate
literature, newspaper articles, documentaries, and          in hands-on projects, work with local historians,
guest speakers. The objective of the course is for          and attend site visits.
students to research a problem, develop a solution,         5 credits - Students may contract for honors
and implement their solution collaboratively with           level.
peers and community partners.        Through their
service projects, students will develop their               254 – INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY: ETHICS -
research, writing, public speaking, and critical            (Fall Semester) - Over 2000 years ago, the Greek
thinking skills.                                            thinker and teacher, Socrates, said, ―The
2.5 credits – grades 11 & 12. Students may                  unexamined life is not worth living.‖ With that
contract for honors level.                                  phrase in mind, he embarked on a personal
                                                            philosophical quest seeking answers to the essential
246 LEGAL ISSUES - This course introduces students          questions of life. This course will continue the
to basic legal concepts and issues and the various          tradition begun by Socrates and explore such issues
methods of conflict resolution. The course will             as the nature of ethical conduct.             Great
focus on relevant aspects and applications within           philosophers will be studied from both the Western
the criminal law. Students will be expected to              and Eastern traditions, but the ultimate goal is for
develop a theoretical understanding of legal                the students to develop their own philosophical
principles and apply them to factual situations.            viewpoint so as to lead a life of introspection and
The overall goal of the course is to gain a better          moral understanding. Students may continue their
understanding of how the law contributes to the             study of philosophy in the spring by taking
structure of society and how it can affect one’s            Introduction to Philosophy – Politics.
individual life.                                            2.5 credits – Students may contract for honors
2.5 credits - Students may contract for honors              level.
level.
                                                            255 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY: POLITICS -

                                                   - 26 -
                                      Program of Studies 2008-2009
(Spring Semester) - Over 2000 years ago, the Greek            European History Exam.        See “Criteria for A.P.
thinker and teacher, Socrates, said, ―The                     Courses.”
unexamined life is not worth living.‖ With that               6 credits – A.P. level
phrase in mind, he embarked on a personal
philosophical quest seeking answers to the essential          291 A.P. PSYCHOLOGY - This academically
questions of life. This course will continue the              challenging course will introduce students to the
tradition begun by Socrates and explore such issues           systematic and scientific study of behavior and
the parameters of political association. Great                mental processes. Students will be exposed to the
philosophers will be studied as to the issue of the           psychological facts, principles and phenomena
nature of man and how to balance the needs of                 associated with each of the major theories and
individual freedom and social stability.        The           theorists within psychology.          The methods
ultimate goal is for the students to develop their            psychologists use in their research and practice will
own philosophical viewpoint so as to lead a life of           also be examined.          PSYCHOLOGY 264 IS A
introspection and social understanding. Students              RECOMMENDED BUT NOT REQUIRED PREREQUISITE.
may enhance their study of philosophy by taking               COMPLETION OF A SUMMER READING LIST IS
Introduction to Philosophy – Ethics in the fall               EXPECTED OF ALL PARTICIPANTS.            NOTE: All
semester.                                                     students must take the A.P. Psychology exam.
2.5 credits – Students may contract for honors                6 credits - A.P. level
level.

263 SOCIOLOGY – This course is an introduction to             SCIENCE
the subject (history and theories of sociology).              The goal of the science program is to develop
Attention is given to such concepts as role, status,          scientifically literate students.     The Science
society, culture, institution, personality, social            Department works with students to understand
organization, the dynamics of change, the social              scientific information that they encounter in their
roots of behavior and attitudes, social control,              daily lives and use critical thinking for decision-
deviance, socialization, and the dialectical                  making.      In developing scientific literacy, the
relationship between individual and society.                  Science Department has students engage in the
5 credits - Students may contract for honors                  following:      identifying problems, employing
level.                                                        multiple approaches, researching appropriate
                                                              resources, evaluating and assessing data, and
264 PSYCHOLOGY - This is an elective course in                communicating understandings.          Along with
psychology for those students with a serious                  cultivating scientific literacy, the Science
interest in the study of human behavior. This                 Department’s program prepares students for the
course will introduce basic psychological terms and           range of college majors that require a strong
theories of development. Some of the topics will              science background.
be mental health, theories of personality, the
influence of biology on behavior, and perception.             The Science Department is responsible for assessing
5 credits - Students may contract for honors                  creative, critical, and analytical thinking.     In
level.                                                        addition, the Science Department will also
                                                              contribute    to    the    following   school-wide
281 A.P. EUROPEAN HISTORY -. A.P. European                    expectations:       oral/written    communication,
History is an academically challenging course that            technology, reading and independent learners.
will examine cultural, economic, political, and
social developments that played an essential role in                Recommended Sequence of Study
shaping the world in which we live. Students will
develop an understanding of some of the major                                 Honors Level     College Prep
themes of modern European history.            At the                                               Level
completion of this course the ability to analyze                Freshman         Biology          Biology
historical evidence and historical interpretation will            Year
be realized. Finally, students will develop the                Sophomore        Chemistry        Chemistry
ability to express historical understanding in                    Year
writing. NOTE: All students must take the A.P.

                                                     - 27 -
                                    Program of Studies 2008-2009
Junior Year     Physics, A.P.    Physics or                reasoning, encouraging new questioning as well as
                 Elective, or     Elective                 seeking answers to established questions.      To
                   Elective                                accomplish    this,  underlying   concepts    and
Senior Year        Elective       Elective                 understandings are stressed while making real life
                                                           applications.
  Electives      Biology II     The Human
                                                           • This course is designed for students who are
                                   Body
                                                           assigned to a special education class through the
                Chemistry II    Biotechnology
                                                           Special Education Team process.
                A.P. Biology       Marine                  5 credits
                                   Biology
                    A.P.         Ecology &                 SCIENCE – Grade 10
                  Physics B     Field Biology              331 CHEMISTRY (H) – This course emphasizes the
                    A.P.           General                 fundamental concepts of general inorganic
                 Chemistry         Zoology                 chemistry. The primary objective of this course is
                   Amazon       Engineering                to teach science as a method of reasoning,
                   Ecology       the Future                encouraging new questioning as well as seeking
                   Marine                                  answers to established questions. To accomplish
                   Biology                                 this, underlying concepts and understandings are
                Anatomy and                                stressed while making real life applications.
                 Physiology                                Student work is centered in the laboratory. The
                                                           unit topics include composition and interactions of
                                                           substances, chemical equations, acids and bases,
                                                           solubility, the periodic table, and conservation of
SCIENCE – Grade 9
                                                           matter and energy. Prerequisites: Successful
321 BIOLOGY (H) – This course emphasizes the
                                                           completion of Algebra I.
unifying themes of biology. The primary objective
                                                           5 credits - honors level
of this course is to teach science as a method of
reasoning, encouraging new questioning as well as          332 CHEMISTRY (CP) - This
seeking answers to established questions.        To        course      emphasizes       the
accomplish     this,  underlying   concepts     and        fundamental      concepts     of
understandings are stressed while making real life         general inorganic chemistry.
applications. Student work is centered in the              The primary objective of this
laboratory. The unit topics include living and non-        course is to teach science as a
living, structure and function of cells, evolution,        method of reasoning, encouraging new questioning
genetics/heredity, and ecosystems.                         as well as seeking answers to established questions.
5 credits - honors level                                   To accomplish this, underlying concepts and
                                                           understandings are stressed while making real life
322 BIOLOGY (CP) - This course emphasizes the              applications. Student work is centered in the
unifying themes of biology. The primary objective          laboratory. The unit topics include composition
of this course is to teach science as a method of          and interactions of substances, chemical equations,
reasoning, encouraging new questioning as well as          acids and bases, solubility, the periodic table, and
seeking answers to established questions.        To        conservation of matter and energy.
accomplish     this,   underlying   concepts    and        Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra I.
understandings are stressed while making real life         5 credits – college preparatory level
applications. Student work is centered in the
laboratory. The unit topics include living and non-        SCIENCE – Grade 11
living, structure and function of cells, evolution,
                                                           331 CHEMISTRY (H) - This course emphasizes the
genetics/heredity, and ecosystems.
                                                           fundamental concepts of general inorganic
5 credits – college preparatory level
                                                           chemistry. The primary objective of this course is
                                                           to teach science as a method of reasoning,
329 BIOLOGY        - This course emphasizes the
                                                           encouraging new questioning as well as seeking
unifying themes of biology. The primary objective
                                                           answers to established questions. To accomplish
of this course is to teach science as a method of
                                                           this, underlying concepts and understandings are
                                                  - 28 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
stressed while making real life applications.               learning. The unit topics include measurement and
Student work is centered in the laboratory. The             motion, motion and force in one dimension, motion
unit topics include composition and interactions of         and force in two dimensions, energy and
substances, chemical equations, acids and bases,            momentum, waves and sound, light and optics, and
solubility, the periodic table, and conservation of         electricity and magnetism.
matter and energy. Prerequisites: Successful                Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology,
completion of Algebra I.                                    Chemistry, Algebra I, and Geometry. Students
5 credits - honors level                                    should be concurrently enrolled in Algebra II, Pre-
                                                            calculus, or Calculus.
332 CHEMISTRY (CP) - This course emphasizes the             5 credits – college preparatory level
fundamental concepts of general inorganic
chemistry. The primary objective of this course is          SCIENCE – Grade 12
to teach science as a method of reasoning,                  351 PHYSICS (H) - This course emphasizes the
encouraging new questioning as well as seeking              physics concepts of mechanics, light, sound, and
answers to established questions. To accomplish             electricity. The primary objective of this course is
this, underlying concepts and understandings are            to teach science as a method of reasoning, to
stressed while making real life applications.               encourage new questioning as well as seeking
Student work is centered in the laboratory. The             answers to established questions. To accomplish
unit topics include composition and interactions of         this, underlying concepts and understandings are
substances, chemical equations, acids and bases,            stressed while making real life applications.
solubility, the periodic table, and conservation of         Student work is centered in the laboratory. The
matter and energy.                                          unit topics include measurement and motion,
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra I.          motion and force in one dimension, motion and
5 credits – college preparatory level                       force in two dimensions, energy and momentum,
                                                            waves and sound, light and optics, and electricity
351 PHYSICS (H) – This course emphasizes the                and magnetism.
physics concepts of mechanics, light, sound, and            Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology,
electricity. The primary objective of this course is        Chemistry, Geometry, and Algebra II. Students
to teach science as a method of reasoning, to               should be concurrently enrolled in Pre-calculus or
encourage new questioning as well as seeking                Calculus.
answers to established questions. To accomplish             5 credits - honors level
this, underlying concepts and understandings are
stressed while making real life applications.               352 PHYSICS (CP) - This course emphasizes the
Student work is centered in the laboratory. The             physics concepts of mechanics, light, sound, and
unit topics include measurement and motion,                 electricity.   Although basic algebra is used in
motion and force in one dimension, motion and               problem solving, this course will stress an
force in two dimensions, energy and momentum,               understanding as well as an application of the
waves and sound, light and optics, and electricity          concepts. The student work will be centered in the
and magnetism.                                              lab. Experiments will allow students to explore
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology,            ideas as well as develop new approaches to
Chemistry, Geometry, and Algebra II. Students               learning. The unit topics include measurement and
should be concurrently enrolled in Pre-calculus or          motion, motion and force in one dimension, motion
Calculus.                                                   and force in two dimensions, energy and
5 credits - honors level                                    momentum, waves and sound, light and optics, and
                                                            electricity and magnetism.
352 PHYSICS (CP) - This course emphasizes the               Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology,
physics concepts of mechanics, light, sound, and            Chemistry, Algebra I, and Geometry. Students
electricity. Although basic algebra is used in              should be concurrently enrolled in Algebra II, Pre-
problem solving, this course will stress an                 calculus, or Calculus.
understanding as well as an application of the              5 credits – college preparatory level
concepts. The student work will be centered in the
lab. Experiments will allow students to explore             371 A.P. PHYSICS - This second year physics course
ideas as well as develop new approaches to                  emphasizes the topics of mechanics, electricity,
                                                   - 29 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
and magnetism. The primary objective of this                biology, this course will further investigate DNA,
course is to teach science as a method of                   genetics, proteins, and other topics related to
reasoning, encouraging new questioning as well as           biotechnology. Basic biotechnological techniques
seeking answers to established questions.      To           will be introduced through student lab work and
accomplish     this,   underlying concepts    and           project-based assignments.       Units include DNA
understandings are stressed while making real life          synthesis, transcription, translation, genetic
applications. Student work is centered in the               engineering,     genetic    basis    for   diseases,
laboratory.                                                 immunology, uses of biotechnology in criminal
NOTE: See Criteria for A.P. course selection.               investigations, and bioethics.
Taking the A.P. exam is required.                           2.5 credits – college preparatory level
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Physics
and Algebra II or Pre-Calculus.                             341 BIOLOGY II (H) – This is an upper level lecture
7.5 credits – A.P.level                                     and laboratory course designed to investigate and
                                                            explore advanced biological concepts and
381 A.P. BIOLOGY - This second year course in               principles. This course is designed for students who
biology emphasizes the topics of molecular,                 intend to further their studies in the biological
cellular, organism and population biology. It is            sciences.     The course topics include botanical
designed for those students who plan to continue            diversity, plant anatomy and physiology, zoological
their studies in biology. The primary objective of          diversity, invertebrate and vertebrate anatomy and
this course is to teach science as a method of              physiology, the biosphere, communities and
reasoning, encouraging new questioning as well as           ecosystems, and animal behavior.
seeking answers to established questions.         To        Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology
accomplish     this,   underlying   concepts     and        and Chemistry.
understandings are stressed while making real life          5 credits - honors level
applications. Student work is centered in the
laboratory.                                                 342 MARINE BIOLOGY (CP) - This course will focus
NOTE: See Criteria for A.P. course selection.               on the ecological processes along the New England
Taking the A.P. exam is required.                           coastline from Long Island Sound to the gulf of
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology.            Maine.     The course will explore biological,
7.5 credits - A.P.level                                     chemical, and physical aspects of these salt water
                                                            environments and will examine several marine
391 A.P. CHEMISTRY - This course emphasizes the             ecosystems: offshore banks, rocky and sandy
theoretical aspects of college-level general                shores, tidal flats, and salt water marshes.
chemistry through a quantitative and analytical             Through direct observations, species collection, and
approach. The primary objective of this course is           water analysis, the students will develop an
to teach science as a method of reasoning,                  understanding of how processes such as species
encouraging new questioning as well as seeking              interaction, energy transfer, and population growth
answers to established questions. To accomplish             all impact upon these environments. Topics to be
this, underlying concepts and understandings are            studied are ocean currents and upwelling, the
stressed while making real life applications.               benthic realm, the intertidal zone, the pelagic
Student work is centered in the laboratory. The             realm, plankton, necton, marine mammals, and
unit topics include atomic structure and theory,            deep sea adaptations.
chemical bonding, states of matter and major                Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology
chemical principles.                                        and Chemistry.
NOTE: See Criteria for A.P. course selection.               2.5 credits – honors level
Taking the A.P. exam is required.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Chemistry.          344 MARINE BIOLOGY (H) - This course will focus
7.5 credits - A.P. level                                    on the current ecological processes along the New
                                                            England coastline from Long Island Sound to the
SCIENCE ELECTIVES                                           gulf of Maine. The course will explore biological,
340 BIOTECHNOLOGY (CP) – This elective course               chemical, and physical aspects of these salt water
will focus on the field of biotechnology and its            environments and will examine several marine
current advances. Building on core concepts from            ecosystems: offshore banks, rocky and sandy
                                                   - 30 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
shores, tidal flats, and salt water marshes.                animal life. The course topics include animal
Through direct observations, species collection, and        architecture, classification and phylogeny of
water analysis, the students will develop an                animals, the animal-like protista, phylum porifera
understanding of how processes such as species              (sponges), radiate animals (cnidarians and
interaction, energy transfer, and population growth         ctenophores), acoelomate animals (flatworms and
all impact upon these environments. Topics to be            ribbon worms), molluscs, segmented worms,
studied are ocean currents and upwelling, the               arthropods, echinoderms, fishes, amphibians,
benthic realm, the intertidal zone, the pelagic             reptiles, birds, and mammals. Laboratory will
realm, plankton, necton, marine mammals, and                involve the classification and dissection of
deep sea adaptations.                                       invertebrate and vertebrate specimens.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology             Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology and
and Chemistry.                                              Chemistry.
2.5 credits - college preparatory level                     5 credits – college preparatory level

343 ENGINEERING THE FUTURE - This full-year                 362 THE HUMAN BODY (CP) - A full year course
technology/engineering course is designed for the           emphasizing human anatomy and physiology for
science student interested in exploring the field of        students interested in how their body functions in
engineering. The goal of the course is to build             the everyday world. It is designed to help the
technological literacy by providing a practical             student have a better understanding of their body
understanding of how we all are influenced by               and how it functions. It will emphasize health and
technology, and how we all influence future                 preventing injuries. This course will encourage new
technological developments by the choices we                questioning of the body and teach science as a
make as workers, consumers, and citizens.                   method of reasoning in an effort to answer these
Students participating in this course will take the         questions. Units of study will include the cell,
Science    MCAS     test    in    the    field    of        human anatomical systems, injury prevention and
Technology/Engineering instead of Chemistry or              therapy, and maintenance of health.
Biology.                                                    Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology.
Prerequisites: None                                         5 credits – college preparatory level
5 credits – Students may contract for honors
level.                                                      350 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY (H) - This is an
                                                            upper level lecture and laboratory course designed
347 ECOLOGY AND FIELD BIOLOGY (CP) – This is a              to investigate and explore the structure and
lecture, laboratory, and field oriented course              function of the human body. The course topics
designed to investigate and explore basic ecological        include Cytology, Histology, human symmetry,
concepts and principles. The course topics include          anatomical terminology, the integumentary system,
the meaning and scope of ecology, the organism              skeletal system, articulations and movement,
and its environment, components of ecological               muscular system, nervous system, endocrine
systems, energy transfer in ecosystems, ecosystem           system, blood, cardiovascular system, lymphatic
comparison, ecological competition, predator/prey           system and immunity, digestion and nutrition,
relationships, symbiotic relationships, terrestrial         respiratory system, urinary system, male and
and aquatic ecological succession, and ecological           female reproductive systems, and developmental
laboratory and field techniques. Students will visit        patterns in humans.        Laboratory will involve
and analyze a terrestrial forest ecosystem,                 microscopy, dissection, handling of models and live
coastal/dune      ecosystem,   freshwater     lentic        specimens. Writing in the biological sciences will
ecosystem, freshwater lotic ecosystem, and a bog            also be emphasized. The Princeton Review Anatomy
ecosystem.                                                  Coloring Workbook is required.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology             Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology and
and Chemistry.                                              Chemistry.
2.5 credits – college preparatory level                     5 credits – honors level

349 GENERAL ZOOLOGY (CP) - This is a lecture and            361 CHEMISTRY II (H) - This second year course in
laboratory course designed to investigate and               chemistry emphasizes the theoretical aspects of
explore the structure, function, and diversity of           college-level general   chemistry    through    a

                                                   - 31 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
quantitative and analytical approach. It is designed
for those students who plan to continue their
studies in chemistry. The primary objective of this
course is to teach science as a method of
reasoning, encouraging new questioning as well as
seeking answers to established questions.         To
accomplish     this,  underlying    concepts     and
understandings are stressed while making real life
applications. Student work is centered in the
laboratory.     The unit topics include atomic
structure and theory, chemical bonding, states of
matter and major chemical principles.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Chemistry.
5 credits - honors level

AMAZON ECOLOGY WILL NOT BE OFFERED UNTIL
SPRING 2010.
363 AMAZON ECOLOGY (H) – This is an upper level
lecture and field oriented expedition course
designed to investigate and explore the flora,
fauna, and ecology of the tropical rain forests
surrounding the Rio Negro, Rio Branco, and Amazon
River.       The course topics include tropical
ecosystems, the structure and function of tropical
rainforests, evolutionary patterns in the tropics,
neotropical botany, neotropical zoology, expedition
travel skills, and conversational Portuguese. Writing
in the biological sciences will also be emphasized.
Following the semester long course, students may
embark on a field expedition to the tropical
rainforests of Brazil. Each student must attend the
spring information session and interview with the
instructor before enrolling into the course. This
course will be offered on even calendar years.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology and
Chemistry. Ecology, Biology II or AP Biology is
recommended.
2.5 credits – honors level




                                                    - 32 -
                                      Program of Studies 2008-2009


MATH
The goal of the mathematics program in Danvers is to teach mathematics for understanding and appreciation.
To achieve this goal, we employ the following mathematical processes: problem solving, reasoning and proof,
oral and written communication, connections within the discipline/across the disciplines/to the real world, and
the use of multiple representations.

The mathematics department requires all students to purchase a graphing calculator for use in their
mathematics classes. Although we can provide some for use in the classroom, we require each student to have
his or her own personal graphing calculator for use at home and on critical tests. It is important to note that
the graphing calculator is permitted for use on the MCAS, PSAT, SAT, SAT II, AP, and ACT exams.

The mathematics department at Danvers High School is responsible for assessing creative, analytical and critical
thinking for the high school. In addition, the mathematics department will also contribute to the following
school-wide expectations: oral/written communication, technology, and independent learners.

                                         Recommended Sequence of Study

  Freshman             Geometry                Algebra (H)            Algebra (CP)              Integrated
                          (H)                                                                  Algebra I (CP)
Sophomore            Algebra II (H)           Geometry (H)           Geometry (CP)         Integrated Geometry
                                             * Geometry and                                        (CP)
                                             Algebra II can be
                                                   taken
                                            simultaneously to
                                              gain access to
                                                 advanced
                                               mathematics
                                                 courses.
Junior              Pre-Calculus (H)           Algebra II (H)        Algebra II (CP)       Integrated Algebra II
                  May simultaneously                                                               (CP)
                         take:
                     A.P. Statistics
Senior             *A.P. Calculus AB         *Pre-Calculus (H)      *Pre-Calculus (CP)     *Integrated Advanced
                           Or                        Or                     Or                     Algebra
*=                    Calculus (H)            A.P. Statistics       A.P. Statistics (H)               Or
Recommended                Or                        Or                     Or              Mathematical Ideas
Course               A.P. Statistics       Intro to Probability    Intro to Probability              (CP)
                           Or               and Statistics (CP)     and Statistics (CP)               Or
                  Intro to Probability               Or                     Or            Intro to Probability and
                   and Statistics (CP)     Mathematical Ideas      Mathematical Ideas          Statistics (CP)
                                                    (CP)                   (CP)                       Or
                                                     Or                     Or             Advanced Algebra (CP)
                                            Advanced Algebra        Advanced Algebra                  Or
                                                    (CP)                   (CP)            Math Problem Solving
                                                     Or                     Or                       (CP)
                                               Math Problem       Math Problem Solving
                                                Solving (CP)               (CP)

                                                     Electives




                                                     - 33 -
                           Program of Studies 2008-2009
Electives       Math Skills Lab       SAT Prep (semester     Got Math? (H)     Accounting I-Junior
            (semester or full year)         course)        (semester or full           Year
                                                                 year)         Accounting II-Senior
            MCAS Math Preparation                                                      Year
              (semester course)                                                 (equivalent to one
                                                                                   math course)




                                         - 34 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
                                                             •419 BASIC MATH - This course emphasizes the
MATH – Grade 9                                               study of fundamental math including place value,
411 ALGEBRA I (H) - This course emphasizes the               fractions, decimals, percents and solving equations.
discovery of first year algebra through the                  The primary objective of this course is to teach
recognition of patterns. The primary objective of            math as a method of reasoning and problem
this course is to teach math as a method of                  solving. To accomplish this, underlying concepts
reasoning and problem solving. To accomplish this,           and understandings are stressed while making real
underlying concepts and understandings are                   life applications.
stressed while making real life applications. The            • This course is designed for students who are
unit topics include operations with real numbers,            assigned to a special education class through the
expressions,     equations    and     inequalities,          Special Education Team process. Appropriate use of
polynomials,     quadratic   equations,    rational          technology is encouraged throughout the course
expressions and exponents, and simultaneous                  and students are required to have a graphing
equations.    Appropriate use of technology is               calculator. (TI-84 Plus preferred)
encouraged throughout the course and students are            5 credits
required to have a graphing calculator. (TI-84 Plus
preferred)                                                   421 GEOMETRY (H) - This course emphasizes the
5 credits - honors level                                     use of theorems, postulates and definitions and
                                                             their applications to original problems while
412 ALGEBRA I (CP) - This course emphasizes the              integrating solid geometry with plane geometry.
discovery of first year algebra through the                  The primary objective of this course is to teach
recognition of patterns. The primary objective of            math as a method of reasoning and problem
this course is to teach math as a method of                  solving. To accomplish this, underlying concepts
reasoning and problem solving. To accomplish this,           and understandings are stressed while making real
underlying concepts and understandings are                   life applications. The unit topics include basic
stressed while making real life applications. The            geometric terms and notation, congruence,
unit topics include operations with real numbers,            parallelism, circles, area and perimeter, similarity,
expressions,      equations     and   inequalities,          right triangles, 3-D figures, and quadrilaterals.
polynomials, quadratic equations, exponents, and             Appropriate use of technology is encouraged
simultaneous equations. Appropriate use of                   throughout the course and students are required to
technology is encouraged throughout the course               have a graphing calculator. (TI-84 Plus preferred)
and students are required to have a graphing                 5 credits - honors level
calculator. (TI-84 Plus preferred)
5 credits – college preparatory level                        MATH – Grade 10
                                                             421 GEOMETRY (H) - This course emphasizes the
413 INTEGRATED ALGEBRA I (CP) - This course                  use of theorems, postulates and definitions and
emphasizes the fundamentals of algebra, data                 their applications to original problems while
analysis    and    geometry      using  real   world         integrating solid geometry with plane geometry.
applications. The primary objective of this course           The primary objective of this course is to teach
is to teach mathematics as a method of reasoning             math as a method of reasoning and problem
and problem solving. The unit topics will include            solving. To accomplish this, underlying concepts
patterns in data, linear equations and inequalities,         and understandings are stressed while making real
dimensional shapes, perimeter, area, surface area,           life applications. The unit topics include basic
volume, the Pythagorean Theorem, polygons and                geometric terms and notation, congruence,
their properties, symmetry, and isometric                    parallelism, circles, area and perimeter, similarity,
transformations         (reflections,      rotations,        right triangles, 3-D figures, and quadrilaterals.
translations, glide reflections).      Prerequisites:        Appropriate use of technology is encouraged
Teacher Recommendation. Appropriate use of                   throughout the course and students are required to
technology is encouraged throughout the course               have a graphing calculator. (TI-84 Plus preferred)
and students are required to have a graphing                 5 credits - honors level
calculator. (TI-84 Plus preferred)
5 credits - college preparatory level                        422 GEOMETRY (CP) - This course emphasizes the
                                                             use of theorems, postulates and definitions and
                                                    - 35 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
their applications to original problems while                topics, roots and powers, and polynomial functions
integrating solid geometry with plane geometry.              round out their mathematical skills and prepare
The primary objective of this course is to teach             students for future coursework in Pre-calculus.
math as a method of reasoning and problem                    Appropriate use of technology is encouraged
solving. To accomplish this, underlying concepts             throughout the course and students are required to
and understandings are stressed while making real            have a graphing calculator. (TI-84Plus preferred).
life applications. The unit topics include basic             5 credits - honors level
geometric terms and notation, congruence,
parallelism, circles, area and perimeter, similarity,        432 ALGEBRA II (CP) - This course builds on the
right triangles, 3-D figures, and quadrilaterals.            student’s previous course work in Algebra I and
Appropriate use of technology is encouraged                  Geometry. Students gain an understanding of
throughout the course and students are required to           patterns and structure in Algebra before moving on
have a graphing calculator. (TI-84 Plus preferred)           to quadratic functions and relations. Discrete math
5 credits – college preparatory level                        topics, roots and powers, and polynomial functions
                                                             round out their mathematical skills and prepare
423 INTEGRATED GEOMETRY (CP) – This course is a              students for future coursework in Pre-calculus.
continuation of the Integrated Algebra I course.             Appropriate use of technology is encouraged
This course emphasizes the fundamentals of                   throughout the course and students are required to
geometry using real world applications to teach the          have a graphing calculator. (TI-84Plus preferred).
geometric concepts. The use of problem solving,              5 credits – college preparatory level
communication, connections, representation and
reasoning skills will be an integral part of the             MATH – Grade 11
course. The unit topics will include polygons,               431 ALGEBRA II (H) - This course builds on the
similarity and scaling, right triangle trigonometry,         student’s previous course work in Algebra I and
circles, and 3-D geometry. Appropriate use of                Geometry. Students gain an understanding of
technology is encouraged throughout the course               patterns and structure in Algebra before moving on
and students are required to have a graphing                 to quadratic functions and relations. Discrete math
calculator. (TI-84 Plus preferred)                           topics, roots and powers, and polynomial functions
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Integrated           round out their mathematical skills and prepare
Algebra I                                                    students for future coursework in Pre-calculus.
5 credits – college preparatory level                        Appropriate use of technology is encouraged
                                                             throughout the course and students are required to
•429 BASIC MATH - This course emphasizes the                 have a graphing calculator. (TI-84Plus preferred)
study of fundamental math including place value,             5 credits - honors level
fractions, decimals, percents and solving equations.
The primary objective of this course is to teach             432 ALGEBRA II (CP) - This course builds on the
math as a method of reasoning and problem                    student’s previous course work in Algebra I and
solving. To accomplish this, underlying concepts             Geometry. Students gain an understanding of
and understandings are stressed while making real            patterns and structure in Algebra before moving on
life applications.                                           to quadratic functions and relations. Discrete math
• This course is designed for students who are               topics, roots and powers, and polynomial functions
assigned to a special education class through the            round out their mathematical skills and prepare
Special Education Team process.                              students for future coursework in Pre-calculus.
Appropriate use of technology is encouraged                  Appropriate use of technology is encouraged
throughout the course and students are required to           throughout the course and students are required to
have a graphing calculator. (TI-84 Plus preferred)           have a graphing calculator. (TI-84Plus preferred)
5 credits                                                    5 credits – college preparatory level

431 ALGEBRA II (H) - This course builds on the               430 ALGEBRA/GEOMETRY REVIEW (CP) - This
student’s previous course work in Algebra I and              course emphasizes selected topics in algebra and
Geometry. Students gain an understanding of                  geometry based on the individual needs of the
patterns and structure in Algebra before moving on           students. The primary objective of this course is to
to quadratic functions and relations. Discrete math          teach math as a method of reasoning and problem
                                                    - 36 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
solving. To accomplish this, underlying concepts            polynomial functions, rational functions, polar
and understandings are stressed while making real           coordinates, parametric equations, logarithmic
life applications. Appropriate use of technology is         functions, and exponential functions. Appropriate
encouraged throughout the course and students are           use of technology is encouraged throughout the
required to have a graphing calculator. (TI-84 Plus         course and students are required to have a
preferred)                                                  graphing calculator. (TI-84Plus preferred)
Prerequisites: Open only to juniors who have                5 credits - honors level
passed Algebra I and Geometry but could benefit
from more in-depth work in these areas before               442 PRE-CALCULUS (CP) - This course emphasizes
progressing to Algebra II.                                  plane trigonometry and functions and topics from
5 credits – college preparatory level                       Analytic Geometry. The primary objective of this
                                                            course is to teach mathematics as a method of
433 INTEGRATED ALGEBRA II (CP) - This course is a           reasoning and problem solving. To accomplish this,
continuation of the Integrated Geometry course.             underlying concepts and understandings are
This course emphasizes the fundamentals of algebra          stressed while making connections to real life
using real world applications to teach the algebraic        applications. The unit topics include trigonometry,
concepts.       The use of problem solving,                 polynomial functions, rational functions, polar
communication, connections, representation and              coordinates, parametric equations, logarithmic
reasoning skills will be an integral part of the            functions, and exponential functions. Appropriate
course. The unit topics will include linear systems         use of technology is encouraged throughout the
and matrices, quadratic functions, exponential              course and students are required to have a
functions and logarithms, trigonometric functions,          graphing calculator. (TI-84Plus preferred)
and an introduction to polynomial functions.                5 credits – college preparatory level
Appropriate use of technology is encouraged
throughout the course and students are required to          443 ADVANCED ALGEBRA (CP) – This course
have a graphing calculator. (TI-84 Plus preferred)          emphasizes the study of advanced topics in algebra.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Integrated          The primary objective of this course is to teach the
Geometry                                                    different families of functions. The unit topics
5 credits – college preparatory level                       include rational expressions and functions,
                                                            exponential       and     logarithmic      functions,
434 MATHEMATICAL IDEAS (CP) – This course is                trigonometric functions, statistical sampling and
designed to teach students how to model and solve           probability, and discrete mathematics and models.
real world problems using the mathematics they              Appropriate use of technology is encouraged
have learned up through Algebra II. This course will        throughout the course and students are required to
emphasize problem solving and reasoning skills.             have a graphing calculator. (TI-84 Plus preferred)
The goal is to improve a student's ability to               Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra II.
interpret, apply, and communicate mathematical              5 credits - college preparatory level
ideas. Appropriate use of technology is encouraged
throughout the course and students are required to          460 A.P. STATISTICS – This course is equivalent to
have a graphing calculator. (TI-84 Plus preferred)          a one-semester college statistics class.        The
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra II          purpose of the A.P. course in statistics is to
college prep or honors level with a C or better             introduce the major concepts and tools for
5 credits – college preparatory level                       collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from
                                                            data.     The following topics will be explored:
441 PRE-CALCULUS (H) – This course prepares                 summarization and graphing of data, use of the
students for AP Calculus or Honors Calculus by              normal     distribution   and    other   probability
emphasizing plane trigonometry and functions from           distributions to model data, the central limit
analytic geometry. The primary objective of this            theorem, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing,
course is to teach mathematics as a method of               regression and correlation calculations, and
reasoning and problem solving. To accomplish this,          mathematical models. Appropriate use of
underlying concepts and understandings are                  technology is encouraged throughout the course
stressed while making connections to real life              and students are required to have a graphing
applications. The unit topics include trigonometry,         calculator. (TI-84 Plus preferred)

                                                   - 37 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra II          443 ADVANCED ALGEBRA (CP) – This course
honors with a B+ or better or Pre-Calculus with a           emphasizes the study of advanced topics in algebra.
B- or better                                                The primary objective of this course is to teach the
6 credits – A.P. level                                      different families of functions. The unit topics
                                                            include rational expressions and functions,
MATH – Grade 12                                             exponential       and     logarithmic     functions,
441 PRE-CALCULUS (H) - This course prepares                 trigonometric functions, statistical sampling and
students for AP Calculus or Honors Calculus by              probability, and discrete mathematics and models.
emphasizing plane trigonometry and functions from           Appropriate use of technology is encouraged
analytic geometry. The primary objective of this            throughout the course and students are required to
course is to teach mathematics as a method of               have a graphing calculator. (TI-84 Plus preferred)
reasoning and problem solving. To accomplish this,          Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra II.
underlying concepts and understandings are                  5 credits - college preparatory level
stressed while making connections to real life
applications. The unit topics include trigonometry,         444 INTEGRATED ADVANCED ALGEBRA (CP) – This
polynomial functions, rational functions, polar             course is a continuation of the Integrated Algebra II
coordinates, parametric equations, logarithmic              course. This course emphasizes the fundamentals
functions, and exponential functions. Appropriate           of advanced algebraic concepts using real-world
use of technology is encouraged throughout the              applications.     The use of problem solving,
course and students are required to have a                  communication, connections, representation and
graphing calculator. (TI-84Plus preferred)                  reasoning skills will be an integral part of this
5 credits - honors level                                    course. Unit topics include: periodic functions,
                                                            exponential functions, polynomial functions, linear
442 PRE-CALCULUS (CP) - This course emphasizes              programming, and trigonometry. Appropriate use
plane trigonometry and functions and topics from            of technology is encouraged throughout the course
Analytic Geometry. The primary objective of this            and students are required to have a graphing
course is to teach mathematics as a method of               calculator. (TI-84 Plus preferred)
reasoning and problem solving. To accomplish this,          Prerequisites: Algebra II, access to a computer and
underlying concepts and understandings are                  a graphing calculator.
stressed while making connections to real life              5 Credits – college preparatory level
applications. The unit topics include trigonometry,
polynomial functions, rational functions, polar             451 CALCULUS (H) - This course emphasizes the
coordinates, parametric equations, logarithmic              study of differential and integral calculus with their
functions, and exponential functions. Appropriate           many applications. The primary objective of this
use of technology is encouraged throughout the              course is to teach math as a method of reasoning
course and students are required to have a                  and problem solving.          To accomplish this,
graphing calculator. (TI-84Plus preferred)                  underlying concepts and understandings are
5 credits – college preparatory level                       stressed while making real life applications. The
                                                            unit topics include functions, limits, derivatives,
434 MATHEMATICAL IDEAS (CP) – This course is                maximum and minimum theory, integral calculus,
designed to teach students how to model and solve           and exponential and logarithmic functions.
real world problems using the mathematics they              Appropriate use of technology is encouraged
have learned up through Algebra II. This course will        throughout the course and students are required to
emphasize problem solving and reasoning skills.             have a graphing calculator. (TI-84 Plus preferred)
The goal is to improve a student's ability to               5 credits - honors level
interpret, apply, and communicate mathematical
ideas. Appropriate use of technology is encouraged          459 A.P. CALCULUS AB - This course is designed to
throughout the course and students are required to          develop the student’s understanding of the
have a graphing calculator. (TI-84 Plus preferred)          concepts of calculus and provides experiences with
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra II          its methods and applications. The course
college prep or honors level with a C or better.            emphasizes a multi-representational approach to
5 credits – college preparatory level                       calculus with concepts, results, and problems being
                                                            expressed geometrically, numerically, analytically,

                                                   - 38 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
and verbally. Appropriate use of technology is              underlying concepts and understandings are
encouraged throughout the course and students are           stressed while making real life applications.
required to have a graphing calculator. (TI-84 Plus         Appropriate use of technology is encouraged
preferred)                                                  throughout the course and students are required to
Note: See ―Criteria for AP courses‖. Taking the             have a graphing calculator. (TI-84 Plus preferred)
AP exam is required.                                        Prerequisite: Algebra II, access to a computer and
6 credits - A. P. level                                     a graphing calculator
                                                            5 credits – college preparatory level
460 A.P. STATISTICS – This course is equivalent to
a one-semester college statistics class.        The         453 PRACTICAL MATH APPLICATIONS - This course
purpose of the A.P. course in statistics is to              is designed to give the student the experience of
introduce the major concepts and tools for                  working out business problems involving interest,
collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from         discounts, payroll, depreciation, retail selling, and
data.     The following topics will be explored:            checking accounts. Through a series of math
summarization and graphing of data, use of the              fundamentals, the student learns how to apply
normal     distribution   and    other   probability        these operations of math to job-related skills and
distributions to model data, the central limit              real-world experiences. Appropriate use of
theorem, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing,          technology is encouraged throughout the course
regression and correlation calculations, and                and students are required to have a graphing
mathematical models. Appropriate use of                     calculator. (TI-84 Plus preferred)
technology is encouraged throughout the course              5 credits
and students are required to have a graphing
calculator. (TI-84 Plus preferred)                          454 MATH SKILLS LAB – This course will focus on
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra II          increasing student achievement in math through
honors with a B+ or better or Pre-Calculus with a           additional practice in using algorithms, problem
B- or better.                                               solving, and communicating. (This course should be
6 credits – A.P. level                                      taken in conjunction with another math course as a
                                                            means for giving students more time to understand
MATH ELECTIVES                                              the essential math concepts.) Appropriate use of
435 MATH PROBLEM SOLVING (CP) – In this                     technology is encouraged throughout the course
course, students will think about problems, solve           and students are required to have a graphing
them and write about their solutions. Through real          calculator. (TI-84 Plus preferred)
world problem solving, students will develop a              2.5 or 5 credits – Pass/Fail
more in-depth understanding of mathematics, will
be able to explain their reasoning and will be              456 GOT MATH? (H) - Most high school students
better prepared for taking the SAT and other                never see the interesting things that motivate
standardized tests. Appropriate use of technology           mathematicians to study the subject. This course is
is encouraged throughout the course and students            designed to enrich motivated students’ math
are required to have a graphing calculator. (TI-84          experience by nurturing their interest and talent.
Plus preferred)                                             Material from all areas of mathematics - algebra,
2.5 credits – college preparatory level                     geometry, number theory, probability, calculus,
                                                            combinatorics, topology, fractals and chaos - are
450 INTRODUCTION TO PROBABILITY AND                         meant to pique students’ curiosity and fascination
STATISTICS (CP) - This course uses investigation,           with the subject. In addition, students will prepare
projects, group work, student presentations and             and compete in various regional and national math
the student’s writing to focus on probability,              contests and competitions. This course gives
setting up statistical investigations, interpreting         students a glimpse that mathematics is full of
data, normal distribution and standard deviation,           interesting ideas, patterns, and new modes of
the chi-square test, counting principles, sampling,         thinking. Students in the spring program will run a
the central limit theorem, confidence levels and            middle school math competition for local middle
margin of error. The primary objective of this              schools. A passion for math is a plus! Appropriate
course is to teach math as a method of reasoning            use of technology is encouraged throughout the
and problem solving.        To accomplish this,
                                                   - 39 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
course and students are required to have a
graphing calculator. (TI-84 Plus preferred)
Semester Course 2.5 credits, Full year course 5
credits – honors level

457 MCAS MATH PREPARATION – This course is
designed for students who need extra support in
order to achieve the proficient level on MCAS. The
course will review test-taking strategies and key
concepts from the core content strands: number
sense; patterns, relations, and algebra; geometry;
measurement; and data, statistics, and probability.
Appropriate use of technology is encouraged
throughout the course and students are required to
have a graphing calculator. (TI-84 Plus preferred)
NOTE: Teacher recommendation is required.
2.5 credits – grades 10 – 12 – Pass/Fail

900 SAT PREPARATION - This course emphasizes
the study of mathematical concepts of arithmetic,
algebra and geometry in preparation for the SATs.
The primary objective of this course is to teach
math as a method of reasoning and problem
solving. To accomplish this, underlying concepts
and understandings are stressed through the
application of test-taking strategies and the use of
logical reasoning. Appropriate use of technology is
encouraged throughout the course and students are
required to have a graphing calculator. (TI-84 Plus
preferred)
2.5 credits – grades 11, 12 – Pass/Fail




                                                   - 40 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009


WORLD LANGUAGES
Introduction
Achieving proficiency in a world language is an essential life skill in our rapidly changing and shrinking world.
Therefore, we highly recommend that students take three or four consecutive years of study in a second
language. Successful completion of two consecutive years of the same world language is a requirement. Most
universities and colleges make a similar recommendation. Students should consider learning an additional
second language as their schedule permits. Currently French and Spanish are offered at all grade levels. Italian
is offered as an elective for upperclassmen and sophomores who are enrolled in another language.

Through the use of a departmental speaking rubric, all students at all levels will be given oral assessments. All
World Language students will sign a pledge to speak in the target language. The Department of World
Languages has adopted Danvers High School Academic Expectation #1A: Students will demonstrate effective
communication skills in speaking. All students in their second year of foreign language study will be assessed
on whether or not they have achieved this expectation. The department will also support the writing
expectation, #1A, as well as four other expectations: reading (#2), creative, analytical, and critical thinking
(#3), independent learners (#4) and foundations, values, and perspectives of the United States and other
countries (#9).

                                      Recommended Sequence of Study

521 Spanish I H  531 Spanish II H  541 Spanish III H  551 Spanish IV H            571 Spanish AP
                                                                          
                                                                                           561 Spanish V H

522 Spanish I CP  532 Spanish II CP  542 Spanish III CP  552 Spanish IV CP  553 Spanish Youth


532 Hispanic Cultures I          533 Hispanic Cultures II


518 Italian I Conversational  519 Italian II Conversational

                                                             512 FRENCH II (H) - This second-year course will
                                                             continue to strengthen the skills and abilities
                  BONJOUR!                                   developed in French I in speaking, reading, writing,
                                                             and understanding. Drills and dialogues in the
511 FRENCH I/FRANCOPHONE CULTURES (H) - This                 classroom further develop speaking ability. With an
is a beginning course designed where each student            emphasis on thematic units, increased knowledge
will develop the ability to speak, read, write, and          of the French culture is acquired through reading
understand simple French. Through thematic units             selections about everyday situations in France.
and the use of dialogues, narratives, crafts,                Communication in French is the ultimate goal.
children’s books, music, and videos, the students            Students will view videos to develop their listening
are introduced to contemporary life in the                   comprehension. The Allez Viens 2 textbook is used
francophone world. Students will create flags and            as a primary resource.
crafts from all 49 francophone countries, sing the           5 credits – honors level
―capitalaise‖, and taste regional specialties with
the ultimate goal of communication in French. The            513 FRENCH III (H) - This third-year course stresses
Allez Viens 1 textbook is used as a primary source.          reading and writing while continuing to develop
5 credits – honors level                                     reading, writing, listening and speaking skills.

                                                   - 41 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
Grammar lessons focus on advanced constructions              practice exams from previously released French
in order to enrich the student’s writing. Reading,           A.P. Language exams. Discussions, readings, and
which continues at a more advanced level, further            videos covering literature, current events, the arts,
explores French customs and civilization. Writing is         politics, history and culture are incorporated in the
strengthened by compositions. Students will view             curriculum. Oral and written projects are assigned.
videos to develop their listening comprehension.             All class discussion is in French as students enhance
Students will be asked to sign a pledge to speak             their communication skills.
only French during class time, as oral proficiency is        NOTE: Students in this course take the A. P.
stressed at all times. The Allez Viens 3 textbook is         French Language Test.
used as a primary resource.                                  6 credits - A. P. level
5 credits – honors level
                                                                        BUON GIORNO!
514 FRENCH III INTERMEDIATE (H) – This course,
normally taken after French III, is designed for             518 ITALIAN I CONVERSATIONAL – The purpose of
students who wish to increase their proficiency in           this beginning course is to introduce students to the
French but are not yet ready to perform at the               study of Italian. The course begins developing
level of French IV 515.                                      proficiency in the four essential language skills:
5 credits – honors level                                     reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Heavy
                                                             emphasis will be placed on pronunciation,
515 FRENCH IV FRENCH LITERATURE AND                          vocabulary, and correct grammatical forms. The
LANGUAGE I (H) – This course assimilates all the             students will also receive an insight into the life
skills acquired in the first three years. Through            and customs of the people in Italy through the use
discussions of literature, current topics, and               of videos, cultural readings, and classroom
articles from French newspapers and the Internet,            discussion. Ciao! is used as a primary resource.
the students will enhance the ability to speak               5 credits – grades 10 – 12 - Students may contract
freely. Written communication skills are further             for honors level.
refined by means of compositions, journal writing,           Note: This course may not meet state college or
and grammar review.        An intensive review of            university entrance requirements.
grammar will also be included to prepare students
for the SAT II in French Language. Listening                 519 ITALIAN II CONVERSATIONAL – This second-
comprehension is developed through the use of                year course continues the development of the
class discussion and videos.                                 ability to understand, speak, read, and write Italian
5 credits – honors level                                     with the emphasis on speaking, listening, and
                                                             vocabulary development. Further insight into the
516 FRENCH V – FRENCH LITERATURE AND                         life and customs of the people in Italy through the
LANGUAGE II (H) – This advanced course continues             use of videos, cultural readings, and classroom
the work in French IV in the development of                  discussion will be an integral part of this course.
proficiencies in listening, speaking, reading, and           Ciao! is used as a primary resource.
writing. Ability to converse freely in French is             5 credits – grades 10 – 12 - Students may contract
developed through class discussions and oral                 for honors level.
presentations. Students participate in discussions           Note: This course may not meet state college or
about readings and videos about current events,              university entrance requirements.
art, politics, and culture. Students continue study
of French literature, culture, and history. Essential
grammatical structures are also reviewed.
                                                                                  HOLA!
5 credits – honors level
                                                             521 SPANISH I (H) - The purpose of this beginning
517 A.P. FRENCH – This advanced course enables               course is to introduce students to the study of
students to develop their reading, writing,                  Spanish. The course begins developing proficiency
speaking, and listening skills. Intensive review of          in the four essential language skills: reading,
grammar is covered during semester I. The course             writing, listening, and speaking. Heavy emphasis
is designed around the College Board course                  will be placed on pronunciation, vocabulary, and
description. During semester II, students will take          correct grammatical forms. The student will also

                                                    - 42 -
                                    Program of Studies 2008-2009
receive an insight into the life and customs of the        542 SPANISH III (CP) - This third-year course
people in Spanish-speaking countries through the           continues the development of vocabulary,
use of videos, cultural readings, and classroom            grammar, and the four essential language skills.
discussion. The Paso a Paso 1 textbook is used as a        There is an increased emphasis on reading and
primary resource.                                          writing. Through readings, journal writing, and
5 credits – honors level                                   class participation, students will strengthen their
                                                           oral and written communication skills. Videos,
522 SPANISH I (CP) - This beginning course is              tapes, CD’s, and the multimedia program ―La
designed to introduce students to the Spanish              Catrina‖ will help students’ knowledge of our
language and to build proficiency in the areas of          Hispanic neighbors.
speaking, listening, reading, and writing.     The         5 credits – college preparatory level
course expects students to be active participants,
especially in speaking and understanding Spanish.          551 SPANISH IV (H) - This fourth-year course offers
Simple grammar structures will be introduced and           an introduction to the geography, history, culture,
practiced.     Oral dialogues, stories, and class          and literature of Spain from the Middle Ages to
discussions will help the student understand the           modern times. Readings will include such classics
people and the customs of Spain and Latin America.         as Lazarillo de Tormes or Don Quijote. There will
Either the Paso a Paso 1 textbook or the Ya Veras,         be increased emphasis on reading, writing, and
Book A textbook is used as a primary resource.             speaking in Spanish. An intense review of grammar
5 credits – college preparatory level                      will also be included to prepare students for the
                                                           SAT II in Spanish Language.
531 SPANISH II (H) - This second-year course               5 credits – honors level
continues the development of the ability to
understand, speak, read, and write Spanish with            552 SPANISH IV (CP) - This course, normally taken
the emphasis on speaking, listening, and vocabulary        after Spanish 542 or Spanish 541, is designed for
development. Rules of grammar and composition              students who wish to increase their proficiency in
are introduced through basic dialogue and pattern          reading, writing, and speaking in Spanish. Through
drills. The Paso a Paso 2 textbook is used as a            writing weekly journals, analyzing movies, reading
primary resource.                                          stories, doing projects and skits, students will
5 credits – honors level                                   increase their proficiency in the language. In
                                                           addition, students will learn a variety of new verb
532 SPANISH II (CP) - This second-year course              tenses and grammatical concepts. Students will be
continues the development of proficiency in                prepared to take Spanish Literature or Spanish IV
understanding and speaking Spanish. Many basic             honors the following year.
grammatical forms will be introduced to help               5 credits – college preparatory level
develop the ability to write Spanish. Students will
continue to learn about the lives and customs of           553 SPANISH YOUTH LITERATURE - This course is
Spanish-speaking people through dialogues, stories,        designed to introduce students to the variety of
and videos. The Ya Veras, Book B textbook with its         Hispanic Youth Literature.        Students will be
extensive support materials is used.                       expected to compare and contrast the different
5 credits – college preparatory level                      cultural perspectives in the stories at a personal,
                                                           historical, and social level.
541 SPANISH III (H) - This third-year course               NOTE:      Prerequisite: successful completion of
continues the development of the four essential            Spanish IV (CP) or Spanish IV (honors)
language skills: reading, writing, listening, and          5 credits – Students may contract for honors
speaking. Students will strengthen their oral and          level.
written communication skills with videos, pictures,
CDs, and the multimedia program ―La Catrina‖. The          561 SPANISH V (H) - This advanced course offers an
Paso a Paso 3 textbook is used as a primary                introduction to Latin American history and culture
resource with an emphasis on an expanded                   from early civilizations to the present day. Ability
vocabulary and detailed grammatical system.                to converse freely in Spanish is developed through
5 credits – honors level                                   class discussions and oral reports. Videos about
                                                           civilization, art, politics, and history are used to

                                                  - 43 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
enhance student listening comprehension and                  handout packets will be used in place of a textbook
spontaneous discourse.        Students will read             to teach Hispanic traditions and basic vocabulary.
authentic poetry, legends, and short stories of Latin        Students will enhance their understanding and
America.                                                     appreciation     of     multiculturalism.      Class
5 credits – honors level                                     participation is a major component of this course.
                                                             Class discussion is held in English.
571 A.P. SPANISH - This advanced course continues            NOTE: Teacher recommendation is required.
the development of proficiencies in listening,               NOTE: This course may not meet state college or
speaking, reading, and writing. Ability to converse          university entrance requirements.
freely in Spanish is developed through class                 5 credits – college preparatory level
discussions and oral reports. Discussions, readings,
and videos covering literature, current events, art,         533 HISPANIC CULTURES II (CP) – This second year
politics, and culture are incorporated into the              course continues the active, student-centered, and
curriculum.     Summer reading and writing are               project-based approach to exploring Spanish
mandatory as part of the A.P. contract.                      culture introduced in Hispanic Cultures I. Videos
NOTE: Students taking this course take the A. P.             and thematic handout packets will be used in place
test in Spanish Language.                                    of a textbook to teach Iberian and Latin America
6 credits - A. P. level                                      traditions and basic Spanish vocabulary. Students
                                                             will enhance their understanding and appreciation
554 TEACHING SPANISH TO ELEMENTARY SCHOOL                    of the multiculturalism and diversity of Spain and
STUDENTS (H) - This course is designed for future            Latin America.      Class participation is a major
teachers who will create, plan, and teach full               component of this course. Class discussion is held
lessons of thematic vocabulary, cultural events,             in English.
songs, poems, geography, etc., of Spain and Latin            NOTE: Teacher recommendation is required.
America to elementary-age students. Maintaining a            NOTE: This course may not meet state college or
plan book with objectives, standards, instructional          university entrance requirements. Prerequisite:
strategies, and assessment tools, as well as                 Hispanic Cultures I
reflection journals, will be an integral part of this        5 credits – college preparatory level
course. Offered to seniors who have completed
Spanish 3 or higher.
2. 5 credits – honors level

555 COMMUNITY SERVICE LEARNING FOR THE
LATINO COMMUNITY (CSL) – The objective of this
hands-on, interdisciplinary course is for students to
learn about important issues in the Latino
community of the North Shore and to participate in
service learning projects. Students will research
the needs of the Latino population and create a
project to improve their issues.          Community
service, reflection, and learning will help students
to understand their commitment to their
community and to our multicultural society.
Students are expected to use their Spanish skills in
speaking and writing. Offered to seniors who have
completed Spanish 3 or higher.
2.5 credits – Students may contract for honors
level.

523 HISPANIC CULTURES I (CP) – This course will
take an active, student-centered, and project-
based approach to explore the Spanish-speaking
cultures in the Americas. Videos and thematic

                                                    - 44 -
APPLIED TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION
The objective of the Applied Technology Department is to ensure that our high school graduates will be ready
to meet the demands of college or the high-tech work force of today. The courses have been designed to
prepare students to become:

    Creative and active users of technology as a communication, problem solving, presentation, connectivity,
     and learning tool.
    Assist the student in making decisions that will benefit their personal and professional lives.
    To instill in our students the desire for life long learning.

Expectations to be assessed:
 Students will demonstrate competency in technology.
 Students will use creative, analytical, and critical thinking skills.
 Students will be creative producers in at least one area of the visual and performing arts.
 Students will develop personal financial management skills.

Engineering Technology        Media Technology         Computer Technology         Business Technology
    Engineering and         Television Production I   Computer Applications I      Career Development
Architecture Technology
         Wood I               Advanced Television     Computer Applications II       Personal Finance
     Manufacturing                Production
      Technology
    Introduction to           Television Seminar      Computer Programming I           Sports and
 Computer-Aided Design                                         C++                   Entertainment
                                                                                      Management
    CAD for Architecture       Selected Topics in      Computer Programming        Marketing Principles
                                   Television                 II Java
Robotics and Computer                                    Computer Science              Accounting I
   Control Systems
                                                          Web Page Design              Accounting II

                                                                                  Introduction to Business

                                                                                   Cooperative Training
                                                                                         Option

                                                            NOTE: Passing this course meets the computer
BUSINESS AND COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY                            literacy graduation requirement.
600 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I – This course                   2.5 credits
teaches the student how to use the MS-Word, MS-
Excel and MS-PowerPoint components of MS-Office             601 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II – This course is
to complete school, personal, and business tasks            designed for the college-bound student as well as
and projects. This enables students to save time            the student who wants to learn the more advanced
and effort while increasing their sense of                  features of MS-Office. College-bound students will
accomplishment. Following an introduction to the            find the advanced knowledge of Excel and
keyboard through keyboarding software, MS-Word              PowerPoint necessary in college.        Emphasis is
will be learned. MS-Excel concepts include using            placed on critical thinking in the creation and
formulas to solve problems, designing charts and            design    of     documents,      spreadsheets    and
graphs to represent data, and creating and                  presentations. Advanced features of MS-Word, MS-
managing a database. Students will learn to use             Excel, and MS-PowerPoint will be covered. An
MS-PowerPoint    to    create   effective   slide           introduction to MS-Access is also included.
presentations.                                              Integration activities will show students how to use
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
the components of MS-Office for problem solving             607 WEB PAGE DESIGN - This course is intended for
and organizing data.                                        those students who wish to have a hands-on
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Computer            experience in designing, creating, and editing a
Applications I.                                             web site. Topics include a review of the basic
2.5 credits – grades 10, 11, 12 – Students may              components and technologies surrounding the
contract for honors level.                                  Internet and World Wide Web, site file
                                                            management, developing web pages, formatting
                                                            text, and using cascading style sheets, using and
603 COMPUTER SCIENCE - This course is an                    managing images, creating links and navigation
introduction to computer technology, including              bars, and working with tables and layers.
computer hardware, software, communications                 2.5 credits – grades 10, 11, 12 - Students may
concepts, data security, and privacy. A hands-on            contract for honors level.
component will encompass systems software as well
as applications software such as word processing,
spreadsheets, and presentation software. This               612 CAREER DEVELOPMENT – Career Development
course will attempt to define what computer                 provides students with the opportunity to identify
science is and open the minds of students to the            personal interests through a complete self-
possibilities of a career in this field.                    assessment. Along with being able to define future
2.5 credits                                                 occupations,      students    will     develop     an
                                                            understanding of the workplace, time-management
605 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING I – Visual Basic is                skills, goal-setting, teamwork, and employer
one of the most exciting programming languages in           expectations. The proper assembly of employment
use today. This course is designed to give students,        portfolios will be a major focal point of the course.
who are interested in pursuing a career in                  All students will prepare a professional resume, use
programming or are college bound, experience in             career tracking information software, and
programming in a high level language. This course           participate in mock interviews.
does not assume that the student has any previous           2.5 credits – grades 11, 12
experience in programming. The student will be
introduced to the basic requirements to write               613 MARKETING PRINCIPLES - This course focuses
useful Windows programs. The concepts learned in            on all aspects of marketing, from its foundations
this course will prepare the student to learn other         through its functions. Exploration of marketing and
programming languages (C++) offered by Danvers              career opportunities within the field is achieved
High School.                                                through careful examination of product and service
Prerequisite: Algebra I                                     planning, distribution, financing, risk management,
2.5 credits – Students may contract for honors              selling, promotion, pricing, purchasing, and market
level.                                                      information management.          This class offers
                                                            opportunities for group and individual enrichment
606 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING II – This course is                activities as well as the chance for students to
designed to give experience to students who are             identify their roles in the area of marketing by
interested in pursuing a career in programming              examining local, national, and international use of
using C++ or Java. Topics will include data types,          marketing strategies. This course is for students
arithmetic and logic operations. Simple input and           who are interested in pursuing business/marketing
output, control structures, functions and an                studies or careers upon graduation.
introduction to files will be included. Emphasis is         5 credits – grades 10, 11, 12 – Students may
placed on problem solving techniques, stepwise              contract for honors level.
refinement and top down programming style, and
on documentation and debugging of students’                 614 ACCOUNTING I – Accounting I is for students
programs.                                                   with a serious career interest in business
Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra.                        administration or accounting.          In first-year
2.5 credits – Students may contract for honors              accounting, the pupil is taught the fundamentals of
level. – TECH PREP COLLEGE CREDIT                           double-entry accounting covering the complete
                                                            accounting cycle. The student learns how accurate
                                                            records become the basis of reports that show the

                                                   - 46 -
                                      Program of Studies 2008-2009
financial condition of a business. Special journals,          promotes the ability to perform precise
subsidiary    ledgers,    the     worksheet    with           computations and to gain mastery in problem
adjustments, reports, and closing entries are                 solving. Topics covered include bank services,
studied. A unit in computerized accounting will be            financial records and statements, accounting
introduced, and upon completion, the students will            practices, payroll, taxes, insurance, interest,
be able to output the accounting cycle.                       credit, loans, business analysis and statistics, profit
Prerequisites: A student should have successfully             and loss, and international issues. It opens career
completed Algebra I.                                          pathways to accounting, auditing, and finance.
5 credits – grades 11, 12 – Students may contract             5 credits – grade 10, 11, 12
for honors level. TECH PREP COLLEGE CREDIT
                                                              618 PERSONAL FINANCE – Each day students are
615 ACCOUNTING II –Accounting II is a course for              surrounded by new choices for shopping, watching
those who plan to continue to study or enter the              television, and many other activities. Students
workplace in the field of accounting. Departmental            have many choices about how to spend their
accounting,     accruals,     payroll    procedure,           money. Personal Finance can help students make
partnership and corporation records are covered.              the right decisions. Students will develop financial
Units in computerized accounting will review skills           literacy through integrated academics, real-world
developed in Accounting I, and units in payroll, tax,         examples, and practical advice. By learning how to
and other areas will be developed.                            make informed decisions related to spending,
NOTE: This course satisfies the math requirement.             saving, borrowing, and investing, students can build
Students must have successfully completed                     a solid foundation for financial security now and in
Accounting I with a minimum grade of a C.                     the future.
5 credits – grade 12 – Students may contract for              2.5 credits – grades 11, 12
honors level. - TECH PREP COLLEGE CREDIT
                                                              619 SPORTS AND ENTERTAINMENT MANAGEMENT –
616 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS – This course                    The field of sports and entertainment management
provides an understanding of the characteristics,             is rapidly growing. Many universities, colleges, and
the organization, and the operations of all types of          high schools now offer specializations in sports and
businesses. This course covers concepts necessary             entertainment     management      and    marketing.
to manage a small business or to operate a large              Managers create, oversee, and expand the
corporation. It exposes students to the activities,           operations of a business. The basic principles of
decisions, problems, and successes involved in                management will be taught through this course:
business, from entrepreneurship to the global                 leadership, finance, product management, people
economy. Topics include business operations and               management, marketing information management,
structures, social responsibility and business ethics,        legal and ethical issues, customer relations, sales
international business, governmental impact, small            management, managing change, and career
businesses, human resources, technology in                    development.
business, financial institutions, credit regulations,         2.5 credits – grades 10, 11, 12
investment strategies, and risk management. It
opens a career pathway to management,                         665 COOPERATIVE TRAINING OPTION - Any senior
entrepreneurship, accounting, and finance.                    may contract, and receive, credits for a
5 credits – grade 11, 12 – Students may contract              cooperative training experience within the local
for honors level.                                             employment community. Students must commit to
                                                              a minimum of 10 hours per week during the school
617 APPLIED BUSINESS – Applied Business allows                year in this employment.        Contracts must be
students the opportunity to develop the essential             formalized, and enrollment will cease by October
mathematical skills required in business situations           15th.
and for personal financial success. This course is            NOTE: Workstudy credits do not count toward
designed to provide the skills and knowledge                  extracurricular eligibility. Credit will be given for
necessary to enable students to become informed               only one cooperative program.
consumers and to provide them with basic                      10 credits – grade 12
understandings of the economic and business
principles needed to function in today’s society. It          TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION

                                                     - 47 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
Technology education is an activity-based, essential         work in small groups to design and build jigs and
learning experience for all students so that they            fixtures so parts can be cut safely and accurately.
may use, manage, and understand technology. All              2.5 credits
courses promote academic, technical, and social
growth through concrete experiences that result              726 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN
from the integration of mathematics, science,                (CAD 1) - This course introduces students to 3D
humanities, and a creative problem solving process.          modeling. Using Pro Engineering software, students
Student projects involve the safe use of tools,              design and create 3D models using the same design
materials and procedures in a congenial                      tools and techniques used by professionals.
atmosphere.                                                  Students will acquire sketching and drawing skills,
                                                             create single and multi-view drawings, draw
Expectations to be assessed:                                 geometric figures to scale, and create and
 Students will use creative, analytical, and                manipulate three-dimensional drawings and plans.
   critical thinking skills.                                 An excellent choice for students considering careers
 Students will demonstrate competency in                    in engineering, architecture, and design.
   technology.                                               2.5 credits – Students may contract for honors
                                                             level.
604 ROBOTICS AND COMPUTER CONTROL SYSTEMS
– This course will explore the theory, technique,            727 CAD FOR ARCHITECTURE – Students will design
and practice behind mobile robotic systems. The              and draw in-depth house plans for their dream
course uses hardware, software, and mechanical               home using the architectural software program
tools to investigate the issues and ideas associated         Vectorworks. Plans will consist of a plot plan,
with these systems, including robot design and               elevations, foundation and footing plans, as well as
construction techniques, software design, and                doors, windows, electrical and plumbing locations.
collaboration. Students will participate through             The completed drawing will consist of door and
research, lab work, and personal group projects.             window schedules with spreadsheets to cover
2.5 credits – Students may contract for honors               building, electrical, and plumbing materials.
level.                                                       2.5 credits – Students may contract for honors
                                                             level.
705      ENGINEERING        AND       ARCHITECTURE
TECHNOLOGY - This is a project-based learning                TELEVISION
experience that is rich with activities. Classes are         The philosophy of the media department is to
conducted in a laboratory environment where                  develop in students the necessary skills and
students actively participate in the research, design        understanding which will enable them to actively
and development of projects relevant to the fields           participate in the arts through the process of
of engineering and architecture. A wide range of             creating, performing, and responding.
topics involves the study of creative invention,
building construction, transportation system and             Expectation to be assessed:
communication technology. Student projects may                Students will be creative producers in at least
include the construction of submersible remote                  one area of the visual and performing arts.
controlled vehicle, a gliding hovercraft, a basic
radio, a model skyscraper, an automotive type                770 TELEVISION PRODUCTION I - This course
engine and much more.                                        introduces students to television as a means of
5 credits – TECH PREP COLLEGE CREDIT – Students              communicating concepts and ideas. Students are
may contract for honors level.                               divided into smaller production companies that
                                                             then focus on developing written, verbal, technical,
715 WOOD I: MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY –                       and problem-solving skills through a series of
This is an introductory course in the science of             production exercises and assignments.         These
wood forming and fabrication. Students will set-up           assignments may include the production of simple
and run two different manufacturing lines. One               commercials, demonstrations, music videos, and
manufacturing process will focus on ―Toys for                limited location shooting. Units on lighting, audio,
Tots,‖ and the second will manufacture a piece of            cameras, computer graphics, writing for television,
furniture for students to take home. Students will           editing, and careers in communication are covered.
                                                    - 48 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
Students who successfully complete this course will          NOTE: Permission of the instructor is required.
be better able to understand the complexities and            5 credits – grades 11, 12 – Students may contract
significance of this powerful medium.     Students           for honors level.
will be introduced to the fundamentals of Final Cut
Express editing software.                                    777 SELECTED TOPICS IN TELEVISION – This
2.5 credits – grades 9 - 12                                  independent study course offering is tailored
                                                             around the individual interests of the student and
775 ADVANCED TELEVISION PRODUCTION -                         the programming needs of Falcon Communications.
Students who have successfully completed                     The major emphasis of the Selected Topics course
Television Production I and are considering a career         will be to provide both the academic community
in communications are invited to select this second          and educational access viewers in Danvers a level
course in the television sequence. The production            of programming not typically available. Students
company format introduced in TV I will be                    who are chosen for this course must demonstrate a
expanded to include contracting for both individual          keen desire to generate programming which is both
and group production assignments. Assignments                substantive and relevant. Particular emphasis will
may       include      documentaries,      dramatic          be placed on shooting for cablecast a wide variety
presentations, music videos, curriculum support,             of high school athletic events.
and skills development. These assignments will               NOTE: Permission of the instructor is required.
provide students with the means to further develop           2.5 credits – grades 9 – 12 - Students may
their    writing,   shooting,    editing,   lighting,        contract for honors level.
interviewing, performance, and problem-solving
skills.  Additionally, students will help provide            VISUAL ART
crews for certain community access programs as               The philosophy of the Unified Arts Department is to
well as school concerts, assemblies, athletic, and           provide students with knowledge and a variety of
other special events. Students may also have the             experiences in order to develop an appreciation for
opportunity to be increasingly involved in location          the arts. This will enrich the lives of students and
and independent production exercises as they                 enhance their lifelong learning experience. The arts
demonstrate both skill and maturity. The use of              are intrinsic to everyone’s life and are a universal
Final Cut Express editing software will be                   language.
broadened to include the graphics application, Life
Type.                                                        Expectation to be assessed:
NOTE: Permission of the instructor is required.              Students will be creative producers in at least one
2.5 credits – grades 10, 11, 12 – Students may               area of the visual and performing arts.
contract for honors level.
                                                             804 STUDIO ART (CP) - Studio Art encompasses
776 TELEVISION SEMINAR - The Television Seminar              work in two and three dimensions with emphasis on
is designed for the student who has successfully             art as a means of personal expression. This course
completed the first two courses in the television            of study is comprised of sixteen (16) units offered
sequence. Specific course content will include               over four (4) years, with four (4) different units
advanced     production    techniques,     research          offered each year. Rotating units enable students
methods, and current media trends. The Television            to enroll in art more than once during high school
Seminar will be project centered. The course will            and to be exposed to entirely new experiences
encourage the integration of knowledge acquired to           every time.
date with specific emphasis on providing the school
and community with programming that has both                                      ROTATING
substance and sophistication. It is expected that a                                 UNITS
portion of the production work will be on location           Unit 1                    Unit 2
and may involve evening and weekend shooting.                Still Life Drawing        Perspective
Each student will develop a portfolio suitable for           Color Theory              Printmaking
college or career placement. In addition to Final            Relief Sculpture          Sculpture
Cut Express and Live Type, students will have                Acrylics                  Watercolors
available for their use the Final Cut Studio
production suite.

                                                    - 49 -
                                       Program of Studies 2008-2009
Unit 3                      Unit 4                             851 A.P. PORTFOLIO ART – This course will follow
Nature/Landscape Drawing    Figure Drawing                     the A.P. curriculum as outlined by the College
Painting                    Illustration                       Board. Students will be involved in both the
Book-Making                 Visual Communications              drawing and general portfolio. This course allows
Carving                     Collage                            highly motivated students to do college-level work
Successful completion of one course in Studio Art is           while still in high school. Students will have a
required to register for A.P. Art courses. Unit 3 will         variety of experiences with the formal, technical,
be taught during 2008-2009.                                    and expressive means available to an artist.
2.5 credits – grades 9 – 12 - college preparatory              Through these experiences, students will develop a
level                                                          sense of excellence in art as well as a sense of
                                                               commitment to the study of art. Students will
805 ADVANCED ART (H) – Advanced Art is a                       prepare for the A.P. exam in the spring semester.
continuation of Studio Art with a focus on                     The A.P. Portfolio Art exam requires the following:
technique and the development of personal style.               Breadth: 12 pieces (submitted in slide form) that
Students work on fundamentals skills like drawing              show a range a drawing experiences and use of a
and design, as well as exploring a variety of media            variety of art forms, concepts and techniques.
such as watercolor, sculpture, and acrylics.                   Concentration: 12 pieces (presented in slide form)
NOTE: Prerequisite: Students must have passed                  that are based on a personal commitment to a
Studio Art with a B or better or bring in a portfolio          specific visual idea or mode of working.
of work for teacher approval.                                  Quality: 4 original pieces that exemplify the
2.5 or 5 credits.                                              student’s finest work. The actual work will be sent
                                                               in to the College Board.
806 PORTFOLIO ART (CP) – This class works with                 NOTE:        Students should have successfully
students who have completed the Advanced Art                   completed a year of high school art or have taken
course. During the first semester, two dimensional             a course in art outside of the school. See “Criteria
black and white drawing, two dimensional color                 for A.P. Course Selection.”
drawing and painting, three dimensional design,                5 credits - A.P. level
and computer graphics will be covered. Second
semester will focus on more independent work. The                 Drawing Portfolio - The drawing portfolio
premise of the class is to help talented students                  allows for a specific course of study that
further their artistic skills and techniques as well as            parallels specialized drawing curriculum and
develop their own style. The end result of the class               programs in colleges as well as art schools.
will be a group of the student’s work, a portfolio,                Technical skills, cultural theories, and systems
that can be shown to any college or potential                      of ―seeing‖ are taught as well as the use of
employer.                                                          drawing to express personal feelings. The A.P.
NOTE: Prerequisite: Advanced Art and teacher                       Portfolio exam includes 12 pieces that show a
approval or a strong group of artwork created by                   range of drawing experiences and media.
the student.                                                      General Portfolio - This course parallels the
2.5 or 5 credits                                                   basic foundation programs offered in colleges
                                                                   and art schools. It covers drawing, design
811 PHOTOGRAPHY (CP) – Students will learn the                     theories, painting, photography and computer
art of black and white photography through the use                 design. Students are expected to work outside
of a 35 mm camera. They will learn how to create                   the classroom, as well as in it. They have
well-composed images that capture the attention                    required homework and are expected to keep a
of their audience. Through the use of correct                      sketchbook.
photography techniques students will incorporate
design into their portfolio by scanning their                  853 GRAPHIC ARTS (CP) – Students will create
photographs and combining their works with type,               through computer design original products. The
color and special effects.       Students will be              elements and principals of design will be studied
responsible for film and development paper.                    and incorporated into their works. Projects will
2.5 credits – grades 10, 11, 12 – college                      include logo design stationery, envelopes, business
preparatory level                                              cards, posters, advertisements and package design.
                                                               2.5 credits – grades 10, 11, 12 – college
                                                      - 50 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
preparatory level                                           5 credits – Students may contract for honors
                                                            level.
855 CERAMICS I (CP) - This course introduces
students to different techniques with clay.                 861 WOMEN’S CHORUS (CP) – This choral class is
Students will learn hand building, sculpting,               open to beginning and advanced female singers who
throwing on the wheel and experience the firing             are interested in learning a varied musical
and glazing process. Students will create artistic          repertoire written specifically for women’s voices.
pieces that are functional as well as conceptual            Students can expect to improve their singing while
pieces from their own invention and design.                 participating in a musical experience. Performance
2.5 credits – grades 9 – 12 – college preparatory           requirements include several evening concerts
level                                                       during the year at Danvers High School. Town
                                                            concerts and exchanges with other area high
856 CERAMICS II (CP) - Ceramics II is a continuation        schools may also be part of the performance
of Ceramics I and offers the opportunity to create          requirements for this course.         A variety of
functional and decorative art pieces. Students will         assessment tools will be used to measure student
learn advanced hand building, wheel building, and           progress and achievement.
glazing techniques. Emphasis will be on the use of          5 credits – college preparatory level
design and form to establish a personal style.
NOTE: Prerequisite: Students must have passed               862 MIXED CHORUS (CP) – This choral class is open
Ceramics I with a B or better.                              to beginning and advanced singers who want to
2.5 credits – grades 10-12—college preparatory              explore all kinds of music, improve their voices,
level                                                       and participate in a musical experience.
                                                            Performance requirements include several evening
MUSIC                                                       concerts during the year at Danvers High School.
The Music Department seeks to provide students              Town concerts and exchanges with other area high
with knowledge and a variety of experiences to              schools may also be part of the performance
develop a lifelong appreciation of the arts.                requirements for this course.         A variety of
Expectations to be assessed:                                assessment tools will be used to measure student
  Students will be creative producers in at least          progress and achievement.
    one area of the visual and performing arts.             5 credits – college preparatory level
  Students will be independent learners.
  Students will use creative, analytical, and              863 CHAMBER SINGERS (H) – Chamber Singers is
    critical thinking skills.                               open to those students selected by audition in the
  Students will demonstrate competency in                  spring of 2008. Repertoire will reflect a variety of
    technology.                                             musical periods and styles with an emphasis on
  Students will demonstrate an understanding of            acapella singing. In addition to concerts at Danvers
    the foundations, values, and perspectives of            High School, many concerts throughout the
    the United States and other nations.                    community are a performance requirement of this
                                                            course.    Auditioning for the Northeast District
860 BAND - The band provides its members the                Chorus will be required during the fall semester.
opportunity to play a variety of the finest band            5 credits – honors level
literature.     Performance requirements include
football half-time shows, concerts, school and civic        865 THEATRE ARTS I (CP) - This course, which
events, and concert tours. A one week band camp             combines elements of theatre arts, public speaking,
is required during the month of August in                   and movement, is designed for students who wish
preparation for marching season as well as                  to explore traditional and non-traditional forms of
Wednesday night and Saturday morning rehearsals             self-expression, while improving their public
during the months of September and October.                 presentation. Students will create and present
Membership is open to all woodwind, brass, and              speeches, monologues, short scenes, and movement
percussion players of any grade level with approval         pieces within the classroom setting. Elements of
of the director. A variety of assessment tools will         this class will include improvisation, role-playing,
be used to measure student progress and                     movement, basic acting, and speech. Students will
achievement.
                                                   - 51 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
be assigned reading and homework. Performance-               memorization of short songs. Beyond the topics
based assessment will be employed.                           within basic vocal technique, students will
2.5 credits – college preparatory level                      experiment with musical interpretation: bringing a
                                                             song ―to life‖ for an audience. This class presumes
866 THEATRE ARTS II (CP) - This course is designed           no prior experience with singing, and reading
for the student who is interested in developing and          musical notation will not be a class requirement.
honing the skills of public speaking and acting.             2.5 credits—college preparatory level
Students will improvise, write, and refine scripts;
develop, communicate, and sustain characters in              871 A.P. MUSIC THEORY – Preparation for the A.P.
classroom presentations; compare and demonstrate             Music Theory Exam is the thrust of this rigorous
various classical and contemporary speaking and              course. While prior music theory coursework is not
acting techniques and methods; and analyze,                  necessary to be successful, students who have some
critique and construct meanings from formal and              background in performance (instrumental or choral)
informal presentations. Students in Senior Seminar           will be better prepared to meet the challenges
are strongly encouraged to elect this course.                involved in mastering the material.
Performance-based assessment will be employed.               NOTE: Students are expected to take the A.P.
Prerequisite: Theatre Arts I or permission of                test. See “Criteria for A.P. Courses.”
instructor.                                                  6 credits – A.P. level
2.5 credits – college preparatory level
                                                             872 PIANO LAB – This course is designed to
867 STAGING FOR SINGERS (H) (Fall semester) -                introduce students to the basic skills needed to play
The purpose of this class is to provide students with        piano.     Instruction will be tailored to the
opportunities to learn and improve upon solo                 experience and skill level of each student. Group
singing skills on the performance stage. Students            and individual activities will be utilized to
will grow more comfortable as an onstage                     accommodate varying skill levels with the class. No
performer through experience and the application             previous experience is necessary.
of basic acting technique.           More advanced           2.5 credits – college preparatory level
techniques for stage movement, blocking, and
character interaction will be offered. Students will         873 MUSIC AND MEDIA (CP) - Music and Media is a
learn specific strategies to combat performance              class designed to help students gain a basic
anxiety and mental blocks.           Opportunity for         understanding of and proficiency in the
experimentation with onstage improvisation will              fundamentals of music and digital recording.
also be provided. Major assessments will be based            Students will develop an understanding of the basic
on fully-staged solo and ensemble cast scenes from           concepts of the science of sound and digital audio,
a varied repertoire of song literature and stage             demonstrate an understanding of microphones and
works. Students registering for this class should            microphone placement, record and edit audio using
have some singing experience, but no formal stage            digital audio software, burn audio to a CD, convert
experience is necessary. Students should also have           audio files to different formats, create MP3 files,
a basic ability at music reading and memorization            create podcasts, and create a sound track for a
of lines/songs.                                              short film clip. Most of the class work and final will
2.5 credits—honors level                                     be project-based. Students will create an audio
                                                             portfolio and burn a complete portfolio to a CD as
868 EXPLORING THE SINGING VOICE (CP) - This                  part of a final project.
class is designed to offer interested students a             2.5 credits – college preparatory level
comfortable environment for learning and
experimenting with their singing voice. In a group           877 WORLD MUSIC (CP) – What is the role of music
setting, students will learn about the care and              in the lives of people throughout the world? This
proper use of their individual voice. Through                global survey course explores how music says who
encouragement      and     team-based    initiatives,        we are as human beings and how we express
students will gain more confidence matching pitch            ourselves though it.       Music in its historical,
and singing in front of others. Students will also be        sociological, and cultural context will be examined
given tools to link physical movement with the               through readings, listening, and hands-on classroom
basic gestures of musical melody, enabling the               activities.

                                                    - 52 -
                                        Program of Studies 2008-2009
5 credits – college preparatory level                         GRADE 9
                                                              329 BIOLOGY        - This course emphasizes the
GUIDANCE                                                      unifying themes of biology. The primary objective
A Developmental Guidance Program is offered to                of this course is to teach science as a method of
students in grades 9-12. Topics include:                      reasoning, encouraging new questioning as well as
                                                              seeking answers to established questions.      To
GRADE 9 - Freshman seminars will focus on                     accomplish    this,   underlying   concepts   and
adjustment to the demands and expectations of                 understandings are stressed while making real life
high school, course selection, and planning for the           applications.
high school years.                                            5 credits

GRADE 10 - Sophomore seminars will focus on                   GRADE 9
course selection, career expectation, and the                 419 BASIC MATH - This course emphasizes the
alignment of academic planning with career goals.             study of fundamental math including place value,
                                                              fractions, decimals, percents and solving equations.
GRADE 11 - Junior seminars will focus on the                  The primary objective of this course is to teach
college application and selection process with                math as a method of reasoning and problem
specific directions for essay writing and personal            solving. To accomplish this, underlying concepts
statements and career options.                                and understandings are stressed while making real
                                                              life applications.
GRADE 12 - Senior seminars will focus on post-                5 credits
secondary planning and separation from high
school.                                                       GRADE 10
                                                              129 ENGLISH FUNDAMENTALS - This course is
SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES                                    designed for students with significant weaknesses in
The Special Education Department provides services            reading,    fluency,    comprehension,     spelling,
to identified students through specific co-taught             vocabulary, and written expression. Individualized
classes with regular education teachers, self-                instruction may involve a multi-sensory approach,
contained classrooms, and consultation.     Study             slower pace, and consistent review of information.
skills and academic support are also available.               Strategies are designed to enable students to
Students in these programs must have a valid IEP              improve communication skills.
in accordance with Ch. 766 procedures.                        5 credits

GRADE 9                                                       GRADE 10
119 ENGLISH FUNDAMENTALS - This course is                     228 US HISTORY I - This basic course covers the
designed for students with significant weaknesses in          major events in U.S. history from the American
reading,    fluency,    comprehension,     spelling,          Revolution to Reconstruction.
vocabulary, and written expression. Individualized            5 credits
instruction may involve a multi-sensory approach,
slower pace, and consistent review of information.            GRADE 10
Strategies are designed to enable students to                 429 BASIC MATH - This course emphasizes the
improve communication skills.                                 study of fundamental math including place value,
5 credits                                                     fractions, decimals, percents and solving equations.
                                                              The primary objective of this course is to teach
GRADE 9                                                       math as a method of reasoning and problem
209 WORLD HISTORY II - Students will survey the               solving. To accomplish this, underlying concepts
major names and events of World History including             and understandings are stressed while making real
the rise of the Nation State in Europe, the French            life applications.
Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, 19th century           5 credits
political reform in Western Europe, and imperialism
in Africa, Asia, and South America.                           GRADE 11
5 credits                                                     139 ENGLISH FUNDAMENTALS - This course is
                                                              designed for students with significant weaknesses in

                                                     - 53 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
reading,    fluency,   comprehension,     spelling,         Students also learn how to spell at the same time
vocabulary, and written expression. Individualized          that they are learning to decode.
instruction may involve a multi-sensory approach,           5 credits – pass/fail
slower pace, and consistent review of information.
Strategies are designed to enable students to               950 JOB SKILLS - This course is designed to expose
improve communication skills.                               students to the wide range of employment
5 credits                                                   opportunities   appropriate    for   high    school
                                                            graduates. Students will visit various job sites in
GRADE 11                                                    the community and meet with employers and job
237 U.S. HISTORY II - This is a basic course                counselors. Topics to be covered include resume
covering the major events in America’s history from         writing, job search strategies, interviewing
post-Reconstruction to the present.                         techniques, and work attitudes and behaviors.
5 credits                                                   5 credits

GRADE 12                                                    951 TRANSITION PROGRAM - The transitional
149 ENGLISH FUNDAMENTALS - This course is                   program offers an integrated approach to identified
designed for students with significant weaknesses in        special education students who will enter the work
reading,    fluency,    comprehension,     spelling,        force upon completion of their high school career.
vocabulary, and written expression. Individualized          The program will include class work and
instruction may involve a multi-sensory approach,           experiences in functional academics; life skills;
slower pace, and consistent review of information.          career awareness; health; hygiene; fitness and
Strategies are designed to enable students to               recreation; job placement and training; and
improve communication skills.                               community connections. Students would be fully
5 credits                                                   enrolled and awarded 35 credits per year. Some
                                                            students may choose to be enrolled up to 5 years.
925 ACADEMIC SUPPORT—ENGLISH/LANGUAGE                       Students will be placed upon recommendation of
ARTS – Academic support is offered to students              the team. Details of the program will be available
identified as having a disability that affects their        through the special education department.
abilities in English/Language Arts. Compensatory
strategies are taught through curriculum content.           HEALTH
Consultation between the special education and the          The philosophy of the Health Department is to
regular classroom teacher aids in curriculum                provide students knowledge and skills necessary to
modifications and monitoring of student progress.           develop personal habits that encourage lifelong
5 credits                                                   healthy lifestyle choices.      The program will
                                                            encourage the skills needed to promote healthy
926     ACADEMIC     SUPPORT—MATH/SCIENCE         –         bodies, relationships, families, schools, and
Academic support is offered to students identified          communities.
as having a disability condition that affects their         Expectation to be assessed:
abilities in math and/or science. Compensatory               Students will demonstrate knowledge of
strategies are taught through curriculum content.               behaviors that affect the health, safety and
Consultation between the special education and                  well being of themselves and others.
regular classroom teacher aids in curriculum                 Students will develop personal financial
modifications and monitoring of student progress.               management skills.
5 credits
                                                            011 HEALTH IS BASIC I - This course is designed to
927 PHONETIC READING – The phonetic reading                 guide students in making responsible health
class is designed for students with dyslexia. These         decisions. Topics to be covered include human
students have not internalized sounds and word              reproduction and puberty, conception and birth,
structure.    The class uses the Wilson Reading             sexually    transmitted   infections,   responsible
Program. The program provides students with a               decision making regarding human sexuality,
systematic, multisensory approach to teach                  understanding stress in the high school setting,
students to decode accurately and fluently.                 managing stress and maintaining health.         The
                                                            course utilizes among other materials the following
                                                   - 54 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
from The Teenage Health Teaching Modules: ―Living            022 ON YOUR OWN - This course is a study of the
with Feelings and Handling Stress,‖ ―Respecting              rights and responsibilities associated with living as
Healthy Sexuality,‖ ―Preventing AIDS,‖ ―Struggling           an independent adult. The course will include
with Stress,‖ and ―Our Whole Lives Sexuality                 instruction in decision-making skills, career
Education.‖                                                  planning, management of income, housing options,
2.5 credits – grade 9                                        personal health topics, and other related
                                                             independent living skills.
012 HEALTH IS BASIC II – The course is divided into          2.5 credits – grades 11, 12
two primary units. The first is the American Heart
Association Heartsaver First Aid with CPR & AED for          023 CONFLICT RESOLUTION/MEDIATION - This
adults, children, and infants. Students will learn           course focuses on understanding how conflicts
how to perform these lifesaving techniques and               develop in the high school setting and on peaceful
have the opportunity to receive a course                     alternatives to conflict resolution, including
completion card that certifies they have                     training material for peer mediation. The class will
successfully completed the national cognitive and            work through various conflict scenarios to
skills evaluation in accordance with the curriculum          understand conflict management styles, dealing
of the American Heart Association. The second unit           with our own anger, diffusing someone else’s
of study is ―Class Action,‖ part of the research-            anger, understanding problem-solving prerequisites
based Project Northland school alcohol prevention            and the basics of the mediation process.
program. ―Class Action‖ uses interactive, peer-led           2.5 credits – grades 11, 12 – Students may
sessions to discuss and debate the consequences of           contract for honors level.
substance abuse by dividing the class into legal
teams who research and then argue hypothetical               PHYSICAL EDUCATION
civil cases as described in the materials provided.          The philosophy of the Physical Education
Each legal team must then present arguments to               Department is to provide students knowledge and
the class. The class, in turn, serves as the jury and        skills necessary to develop personal habits that
renders a verdict.                                           encourage lifelong healthy lifestyle choices. The
2.5 credits – grade 10                                       program will encourage the skills needed to
                                                             promote healthy bodies, relationships, families,
020 INTRO TO CHILD DEVELOPMENT, Part I - This                schools, and communities.
course is designed as an introduction for students
to the basic concepts of child development,                  Expectations to be assessed:
parenting, and child care.      It is designed to             Students will demonstrate effective
combine      basic  information    with   practical             communication skills in (a) writing and (b)
application to ensure that knowledge gained can be              speaking.
put to use. Part 1 will cover the importance of               Students will use creative, analytical, and
studying children and parenting, pregnancy and                  critical thinking skills.
birth, and the physical, emotional, social and                Students will be independent learners.
intellectual development of the child from birth to           Students will demonstrate competency in
age three.                                                      technology.
2.5 credits – grades 11, 12                                   Students will demonstrate knowledge of
                                                                behaviors that affect the health, safety, and
021 INTRO TO CHILD DEVELOPMENT, Part 2 - This                   well-being of themselves and others.
course will continue with the study of the physical,
emotional, social, and intellectual development of           GRADES 9 - 12
the child from ages four to six. The class will then
focus on four areas of study which expand on                 001   Personal Fitness & Wellness
important topics relevant to children of all ages:           002   Competitive Team Activities
health and safety, parenting skills, problem                 003   Team/Group Activities
situations and career options.                               004   Lifelong Activities
2.5 credits – grades 11, 12                                  008   Project Adventure



                                                    - 55 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
The high school physical education curriculum                will work together in a cooperative manner in order
offers over forty activities and units of instruction        to accomplish a common goal. The course is
during a student's four years of participation.              designed to increase self-confidence, develop
Physical education is a graduation course                    communication skills, increase mutual support for
requirement for all students. Students must receive          each other, gain better appreciation for individual
a passing final grade in the course each year.               differences, learn to trust oneself and others, and
Students may enroll in only one course each year.            learn how to better cooperate in a group.
Each course will have a fitness, skill, knowledge,           2.5 credits – grade 10
and participation requirement. Students are
required to take the personal fitness and wellness           ELECTIVES
course before they graduate.                                 002 COMPETITIVE TEAM ACTIVITIES - Students will
                                                             receive instruction and information in the area of
Students may petition for a waiver in either grade           skills and knowledge in a selection of team
11 or grade 12 physical education if they meet the           activities such as touch football, speedball,
following requirements:                                      volleyball, basketball and indoor hockey. This
 Students must be fully scheduled; ―fully                   course will be structured for those students who
     scheduled‖ means that students are carrying no          enjoy participating at a high level of competition.
     study halls.                                            *Structured for those students who consider
 Students must be involved in some type of                  themselves to be highly motivated physical
     physical activity program with a time                   education students.
     equivalent to a semester of physical education.         2.5 credits - grades 11, 12
 The physical activity program must be
     documented by a supervisor.                             003 TEAM/GROUP ACTIVITIES - Students will
                                                             receive instruction and information in the area of
Students who wish to petition for a waiver must              skills and knowledge in a selection of activities such
complete an application stating the program in               as touch football, speedball, soccer, team handball,
which they are involved and method of                        volleyball, basketball and indoor hockey. This
documentation.     Applications are available in             course will be structured for those students who
guidance and should be completed/submitted along             enjoy participating in team/group activities, but
with student course selection sheets.                        not necessarily at a high level of competition.
                                                             Activities offered will be determined by the season
REQUIRED                                                     of the year and facilities.
001 PERSONAL FITNESS & WELLNESS - All students               2.5 credits – grades 11, 12
must take the Personal Fitness and Wellness course
before they graduate. Students will design their             004 LIFELONG ACTIVITIES - This course includes
own fitness program based on sound principles of             the learning of knowledge and skills in
training and exercise. Information relative to the           individualized and lifetime activities including
practice of lifelong wellness will be presented              racquet sports, archery, yoga, Pilates, aerobics,
through the course of instruction.                           and fitness walking. Golf will be offered if space
2.5 credits – grade 9                                        and facility are available. Students will develop
                                                             strategies to monitor their fitness performance.
008 PROJECT ADVENTURE – All students beginning               2.5 credits – grades 11, 12
with the Class of 2011 must take the Project
Adventure course before they graduate. Students




                                                    - 56 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
990 STUDENT ASSISTANTSHIPS

Description and Philosophy - The assistantship program offers students the opportunity to participate in a
variety of training experiences that may not be offered as part of the traditional curriculum for academic
credit. The program is open to students in good standing and is not meant to replace required courses (e.g.,
physical education). The program is limited to eleventh and twelfth grade students. Students can earn a
maximum of five credits through the assistantship program.                 Students assume the roles as
mentors/assistants/tutors. Assistantships exist in many areas. The following are some examples:

   Main office                                                 Music
   Guidance office                                             AV/TV production
   Library                                                     Tutoring
   Science labs                                                Mentoring to middle school students
   Physical education/health student leader                    Middle school assistants
   Art                                                         English
   Technology education                                        Peer program/buddy system

Application Procedure/Selection of Students - Students must complete an application stating the assistantship
for which they wish to apply. Applications are available in the main office. Students are responsible for
securing their assistantships. Completed applications must be submitted to the principal for approval and
interview. The assistant principal in charge of juniors and seniors will supervise the program. After completing
the application form, teachers/mentors should keep a copy of the form for their records. Exact details of the
student assistantship responsibilities should be discussed with the student as well. Applications must include (1)
two recommendations from teachers and one from the assistant principal, (2) a short essay explaining why the
assistantship is valuable to them and what relationship it has to their future, and (3) an interview with the
mentor who will provide a job description.

Attendance - It is the responsibility of the student to report to the site at the arranged time. The
teacher/mentor should report the names of those students absent to the high school office as soon as possible
(at the beginning of the time the student is expected to report) by calling the high school office 777-8925,
extension 2203.

Student Responsibility - It is the responsibility of the student to follow the rules, policies, and procedures
outlined in the Danvers High School Guide, as well as the rules of the site, while engaged in an assistantship.
Students should not leave the site of the assistantship during the assigned time unless they have been directed
by the teacher/mentor to complete a task as part of their responsibility. Students who do leave the site are
required to carry appropriate identification issued by the main office. Students should complete the student
assistantship log daily stating what task(s) they have accomplished. In the event that the teacher/mentor is
absent, students should report to the main office for an assignment. If a student has a teacher/mentor in
another building and there is a change in the daily schedule, the student is responsible for informing the
teacher.

Teacher Responsibility - It is the responsibility of the teacher/mentor to provide the student with a significant
learning experience setting limits for acceptable and appropriate behavior and academic performance. If the
mentor has a change in the daily schedule, the mentor is responsible for notifying the student.
Teachers/mentors should ensure that the student is engaged for the entire time period under teacher
supervision. Teachers/mentors should report disciplinary issues to the assistant principal’s office at the high
school, extension 2215 or 2204. Teachers/mentors who would like to discuss any aspect of this program should
contact Thomas Murray at extension 2200.

There must be a mutual understanding that confidentiality is mandatory for both students and teachers
engaged in this program.


                                                    - 57 -
                                     Program of Studies 2008-2009
Progress Reports - Halfway through the term, teachers/mentors will receive grade entry sheets and a comment
sheet. Teachers/mentors should write in two comments from the comment sheet and return the completed
grade entry sheet to the student data recorder by the designated date. Teachers/mentors also have the option
of using a narrative report if they choose.

Report Cards - Students are to be graded P(pass)/F(fail). Teachers/mentors should complete grade sheets by
writing in P or F and also two comments. Grades should also be submitted to the student data recorder by the
designated date.

Prerequisite Procedure- Students must complete an application stating the assistantship for which they wish to
apply. Applications are available in the guidance office. Students must submit the completed application
along with their course selection sheet during the course selection process. Guidance counselors will process
the applications and forward them to the curriculum director in charge of the content area or administrative
assistant in charge of the office area.

High School Clubs and Activities

Students in the following groups are selected by the staff:
 National Honor Society                                       National Music Honor Society
 French National Honor Society and Tutors                     National Art Honor Society
 Spanish National Honor Society and Tutors

Students in the following groups are selected by the groups they represent or belong to:
 Class Officers         - Senior                                      Student Representative to School
                        - Junior                                          Committee
                        - Sophomore                                    Student Council
                        - Freshman                                     P.R.O.T.E.C.T.
 School Council

Students may join the following groups through course selection:
 Band
 Chamber Singers
 Mixed Chorus
 Women’s Chorus

Students may join the following groups through independent      sign-up interest:
 Amnesty International                                         Math Team
 Chess Club                                                    Media Club
 College Bowl Team                                             Model U.N.
 Color Guard                                                   Rotary Interact Club
 Debate Team                                                   School Newspaper (through Journalism class)
 DECA                                                          Science Club/Science Team
 Diversity Club                                        
 Environmental Club                                           Tomorrow’s Teachers Club
 French Club                                                  Yearbook Business Staff
 Gentlemen’s Club                                             Yearbook Staff
 Junior State                                                 *Jazz/Rock Ensemble (Audition required)
 Key Club - Community Service Club sponsored                  *Percussion Ensemble (Audition required)
    by Kiwanis Int.                                            Academy Theatre (Audition required)
 Ladies’ Club

    *Requires membership in band. Exception: Piano, guitar or bass players.

                                                   - 58 -
Program of Studies 2008-2009




             - 59 -

				
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