ALAMITOS BAY YACHT CLUB by dfgh4bnmu

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									ALAMITOS BAY YACHT CLUB
    Junior Sailing Program
                         Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                               Jr. Sailing Program
                             Table of Contents
Welcome letter……………………………………………………………………………………….……………Page 3
Staff, Office Hours, Officers, Junior Advisory Board……………………………..Page 4
Mission Statement………………………………………………………………………………………………Page 5
Lockers, Rack Space, and Membership….……………………………………………………….Page 6
Program/Club Rules…………………………………………………………………………………………….Page 7
Parent Responsibilities / Volunteer Needs……………………………………………………Page 8-10
Volunteer Needs………………………………………………………………………………………………….Page 11-12
Instructors…………………………………………………………………………………………………………..Page 13
Frequently Asked Questions…………………………………………………………………………….Page 14
Summer Events…………………………………………………………………………………………………….Page 15-17
Sailing Associations…………………………………………………………………………………………….Page 18
Boat and Part Dealers…………………………………………………………………………………………Page 19

SABOT CLASSES:
Naples Sabot Diagrams and info………………………………………………………………………Page 20-21
Description of Sabot A, B, C1, C2 & C3 Fleets……………………………………………..Page 22-23
Travel Procedures……………………………………………………………………………………………….Page 24
Sea Urchin Outline………………………………………………………………………………………………Page 25-28
Intro to Sailing Outline………………………………………………………………………………………Page 29-31
Beginner Sailing Outline……………………………………………………………………………………..Page 32-33
Intermediate Sailing Outline…………………………………………………………………………….Page 34-35

LASER CLASSES:
Laser Descriptions and Diagrams……………………………………………………………………..Page 36
Laser Radial Outline…………………………………………………………………………………………….Page 37

420 CLASSES:
420 Descriptions and Diagrams……………………………………………………………………….Page 38
420 Racing Outline………………………………………………………………………………………………Page 39

Life After Sabots………………………………………………………………………………………………..Page 40-45
Points of Sail & Glossary of Terms…………………………………………………………………Page 45-49
Summer Calendar…………………………………………………………………………………………………Page 50-53




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                            Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                  Jr. Sailing Program

Welcome to another summer sailing season at ABYC - we are truly excited to have you with
us!

This year‟s staff is a strong group of veteran instructors with a combined work experience of
over fifty years of instructing. This year we have brought on multiple-time sabot (junior and
senior) national champion, Mark Gaudio, to hopefully impart some of his fast knowledge to our
top end sabot sailors. We have the returning staff members of Sarah Ryan (assistant
director and coach for six years), Bradley Schoch (coach and program director for eight
years), Chuck Ullman (sabot coach for seven years), Ian Paice (third year coaching), Laura
Newton (third year), Samantha Gebb (second year), and Brad Schaupeter (12 years
coaching/directing programs). We also will be having with us for the first time, two 470
sailors who have spent the past three years on the Olympic circuit. The staff is all certified
in small boat instruction, First Aid, and CPR and is looking forward to helping your children
realize their sailing goals while creating summer memories that will last a lifetime.

Please take the time to look through this booklet as it covers our program outlines, calendar
and contact information. There is a parent contract stating that you have read this
information at the end of this booklet. That must be signed along with Code of Conduct
and Medical Release Forms before your sailor participates in the program. These forms
can also be found at the back of this book and should be returned to the Junior Sailing
Office before the program starts.

Very sincerely,

Brad Schaupeter
Director of Junior Sailing ABYC
(562) 434-9955 ext. 22
jrprogram@abyc.org
www.fleetracing.net




                                              3
                             Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                  Jr. Sailing Program
                                   7201 East Ocean Boulevard
                                  Long Beach, California 90803
                              Office Phone: (562) 434-9955 Ext. 22
                                  Email: jrprogram@abyc.org
                               Jr. Website: www.fleetracing.net
                                  Club Website: www.abyc.org


                      2010 Summer Sailing Staff:
       Brad Schaupeter                                           Junior Director
       Sarah Ryan (Sea Urchins / Intro to Sailing)               Assistant Director
       Lauren Sinclair (Double-Handed / Laser Racers)            Double-Handed Coach
       Mark Gaudio (A/B Sabot Racers)                            Head Sabot Coach
       Ian Paice (Beginning Lasers / Laser Racers)               Sailing Instructor
       Chuck Ullman (Intermediate / B & C1 Sabot Racers)         Sailing Instructor
       Bradley Schoch (Intermediate / B& C1 Sabot Racers)        Sailing Instructor
       Graham Bell (Beginner / C2 Sabot Racers)                  Sailing Instructor
       Lina Stromquist (Beginner / C3 Sabot Racers)              Sailing Instructor
       Laura Newton (Sea Urchin / Intro to Sailing / C3‟s)       Sailing Instructor
       Samantha Gebb (Intermediates)                             Sailing Instructor


                   2010 ABYC Officers & Directors:
       Commodore:                                                John Massey
       Vice Commodore:                                           Jeff Merrill
       Rear Commodore:                                           Jon Robinson
       Junior Staff Commodore:                                   Merle Asper
       Fleet Captain:                                            Mike Baumann
       Treasurer:                                                George Kornhoff
       Directors:                                                Ed Spotskey, Jim Grubbs,
                                                                 Ken Raiff, Jennifer Kurtiz
       Jr. Rear Commodore:                                       Marissa Golison
       Club Manager:                                             Kelly Whitlow

                   2010 ABYC Junior Advisory Board:
Latham Bell          Steve Bloemeke      Mark Golison            Doug Jorgensen (Chair)
Bob Kirstine         John Massey         Chas Merrill            Jeff Merrill
Tom Newton           Lydna Peoples       Jon Robinson            Brad Schaupeter
Marc Schryer Sr.     Jim Grubbs (Board Liason)




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                    Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                        Jr. Sailing Program


Mission Statement:

To provide a safe and fun learning environment that will instill,
in our sailors, a lifelong love for the sport of sailing.




Jr. Director Mantra: Safety, Fun and Skills in that order...




                                 5
                             Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                   Jr. Sailing Program

                            Lockers & Rack Spaces
How to get a locker – There are a limited number of lockers at ABYC. Members are allowed
to store items year round for $5/month for a single locker and $10/month for a double
locker. Non-members are allowed to store items for the summer program for $20/single and
$40/double but must vacate lockers on the last day of the program.

To rent a locker, you must speak with Adam Phelps in the main office of ABYC. They have
the master list and are the only ones who can assign a new locker. Members may be billed
monthly. Non-members will be billed ahead of time for the months used.

Upon completion of the summer program, non-members must remove their items or the locks
will be cut and the items will be taken out by the club. You must notify the front office when
you vacate a locker and any locker that is not paid for in over three months will have the lock
cut and the items removed.

How to get a sabot or laser rack or 420 yard spot – To receive permanent storage, you
must be a member. You may rent a sabot or laser rack or a yard space by filling out a
“Request for ABYC Dry Storage” form in the main office and returning it to Adam Phelps who
is responsible for the list of year-round member storage.

420‟s or Laser owners looking for yard spaces where the boat can be stored on a dolly should
apply for storage via the same method as mentioned above. There is also temporary rail
storage for the summer only. These spots can be rented at a premium through Adam Phelps.

If you are a non-member, you may get storage for the summer months at a higher price.
This should be done through the junior director, Brad Schaupeter and the junior program.
All non-member storage is temporary and should be vacated at the end of the season.


                                        Memberships
How to become a member – There are several types of memberships, but most often, the
junior membership is the logical first step for non-members. Applications for membership
are in the front office. They require member sponsorship, which is offered openly by our
junior advisory board (listed on page 3 of this handbook), a $50 initiation fee, and $45 per
quarter.

With a junior membership you receive a gate card (though parking in the lot is still only
permitted for regular memberships - a step up from junior membership), member prices on
programs, rack space, lockers and the ability to charge to your member account as well as
rent spaces and lockers year round. Members receive priority when applying for any of our
programs and/or rental boats. Applications are available in the front office or online at
www.abyc.org/clubinfo.cfm and we encourage you to pick one up!

                                               6
                         Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                               Jr. Sailing Program

                    Junior Program Basic Rules:
1. No swimming in the turning basin during program hours without permission.

2. The use of skateboards, bikes, roller blades, scooters, and other recreational modes
   of transportation are not allowed on ABYC grounds and will be confiscated if not
   parked in the appropriate areas at all times.

3. Juniors are not permitted in the clubhouse without permission during program hours.
   This includes the Junior Room, the Quarter Deck, and the Junior Office.

4. Sportsman-like behavior is to be demonstrated by all juniors at all times.

5. Do not use, borrow, or take equipment that is not yours unless you have received
   specific permission from the owner.

6. Water guns, water balloons, and other non-sailing related toys are not permitted
   during program hours. These toys will be confiscated and returned at the end of the
   program.

7. Shoes or some form of foot protection are required to be worn at all times.

8. Life jackets MUST fit properly, and be worn while on the dock and on the water.

9. Appropriate sailing attire must be worn during program hours.

10. Alcohol and drugs are strictly prohibited on club grounds and at junior events.


                             Additional Rules:
1. Students are not permitted to leave club grounds without supervision from when they
   are dropped off to rig until when they are picked up.

2. Boats and equipment must be put away properly at the end of each day or it will be
   sent to the impound area.

3. There is a three strike policy that may be enforced. First strike is a talk with the
   Junior Director; second strike is a call home; and third strike is expulsion from the
   program. Disciplinary action may be taken including office or yard work in place of
   sailing during any of the first two strikes.




                                           7
                             Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                    Jr. Sailing Program

                             Parent Responsibilities
What to Bring
Your child will be exposed to the elements this summer and there are a few required safety
items that will be needed every day:
       1. Sunscreen (30 SPF or higher is best)
       2. Personal Flotation Device (must fit properly) *
       3. Sunglasses *
       4. Hat
       5. Close-toed footwear *
       6. Towel *
       7. A change of clothes *

* A few notes on supplies:
Sunglasses should be of good quality. Even when it is overcast our eyes are exposed to the
harmful rays of the sun. Too much exposure at an early stage of life can affect vision in the
future. Make sure they have UV-ray protection and remember something to keep the glasses
on their heads like croakies.

Personal flotation devices are mandatory and if forgotten your child may not be allowed on
the water. All PFD‟s need to be U.S. Coast Guard approved, should fit properly, and be worn
at all times on and around the water. If a PFD does not fit right your child has a chance of
slipping out of it in the water. A lifejacket that fits snug on your child allows maximum
maneuverability in the boat and assures comfort and safety while sailing.

Close-toed footwear is a must to avoid splinters and stubbed toes. The docks and pavement
around the club are easy ways to get hurt when in a hurry and without shoes. An easy and
cheap option is Converse High Tops that dry out very quickly. You can also look into aqua
socks or sailing boots. Sandals are not good protectors from splinters and stubbed toes.

A towel and change of clothes should be brought every day as sailing is a wet sport! It will
not be every day that a student gets wet, but when it happens, it is essential to have
something warm and dry to change into. We also go sailing when it rains (with the exception
of lightning or visibility deterrents), so plan on sailing still happening if the occasion should
arise.

When to be ready
Sailing is one of the most complex sports in existence. To maximize instruction time, please
enable your child to arrive with enough time to rig their boat and be ready to sail by the
beginning of their class period. We suggest arriving at the club by 8:30 am for morning
classes and 12:30 pm for afternoon classes. Instruction will begin promptly at the scheduled
time and if your child is not ready they might miss out on some important aspects of sailing.
As the summer progresses so will your child‟s ability to rig faster. At first don‟t be
frustrated with how long it takes, but please help them stay on task so they can be ready for
their class.
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                            Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                   Jr. Sailing Program

                 Parent Responsibilities (continued):
Rigging boats
Please do not rig your child‟s sabot for them. While they may need help to get it off the
racks and to put up the mast, please encourage them to do the rest on their own only offering
assistance when they need it. Our instructors will be on hand to answer any rigging questions
during the time before a class. Our classes are structured to create the stepping-stones
necessary for your child to progress through the program, and learn the proper ways to
independently rig, launch, and sail a sabot. Please help them by not helping!

Do not interfere or disrupt
Once class has started, it is extremely important that you do not interfere. Parents are
encouraged to give their child the space to learn and the instructors space to teach. All of
our coaches have extensive sailing backgrounds and are certified to teach your children how
to sail. It is their job to provide a safe and fun atmosphere for your child to learn in. The
amount of independence you give your child is directly proportional to how fast they learn and
how confident they will become. If you have any issues regarding instructional time or
coaching techniques, please talk to the junior director.

After class
It is imperative that you pick your child up, or make arrangements to do so immediately after
class is over. The instructors will not be able to supervise your children after class.

Regattas
It is the responsibility of the parent and the student to be registered for regattas in
advance. There are Notices of Race for most events included with this handbook and they
can also be found on line at www.fleetracing.net (the ABYC Junior website).

Away regattas
Parents of sailors traveling to away regattas are responsible for transporting their boats, and
children. There will be a coach on hand to help your children grow and sail better through
each regatta planned. It is club policy that instructors cannot transport children or sabots
to away regattas. There will be no exceptions to this rule. You are also responsible for tying
your own boat to the trailer. If you have questions about how to tie your sabot to the trailer
an instructor can answer questions, but cannot tie your boat down for you. At each regatta,
home or travel, individual parents and students are responsible for storage and maintenance
of their own equipment. Each individual sailor is responsible for getting themselves out to
the course and should allow enough time to be rigged, attend the skipper‟s meeting and sail
out to the regatta location. Coaches will be available to answer questions and to help your
sailor grow and sail better through each regatta planned.




                                              9
                             Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                   Jr. Sailing Program
                 Parent Responsibilities (continued):
Who to go to with questions
There are many potential questions or concerns that come up during the program for a parent
or a sailor and there is an appropriate place to field those questions or concerns. Here is how
to do that and who to go to.

Boat Questions
      Buying/Selling (boat or parts) – Junior Program Director
      Rigging – Your sailor‟s coach
      Repairing – Junior Program Director, Chris Peoples, or Latham Bell
Moving Up Questions
      Within Sabot Fleets – This handbook first (page 25), then your sailor‟s coach
      From one boat to another – This handbook first (page 33), then the Program Director
Coaching/Curriculum
      Any concerns regarding this go first to the Junior Program Director and then to Jim
       Grubbs (Board Liaison). DO NOT approach coaches regarding this.
Regatta/Travel Procedures
      Consult this handbook first, and then the Junior Program Director.
Billing/Storage/Locker/Membership Issues
      Billing – Talk to the club book keeper Sheila regarding any billing issues first. You can
       also bring this up to the Junior Program Director.
      Boat Storage – Adam Phelps in the main office for any member boat storage needs.
       Non-member boat storage needs go through the Junior Program Director.
      Lockers – Adam Phelps in the main office.
      Membership – Ed Spotskey or Robin Townsend. Get their number from the main
       office of ABYC and pick up a membership packet there as well.
Safety/Procedural Clarification
      If you have a question regarding safety or procedures, talk to the Jr. Program
       Director
Program Suggestions
      Take all program suggestions to the Junior Program Director or Junior Advisory Board
       Chair (Doug Jorgensen). Typically, we will not make any changes to our core curriculum
       or program structure in the middle of any given program. The suggestions rather will
       be written down and reviewed when the program has ended by the Junior Advisory
       Board to see what changes should be considered and made.

For further questions or if disagreements arise
If you cannot find the answers you seek or a disagreement should arise regarding procedures
or how something is handled, you may talk to board member and Junior Advisory Board Liaison
Jim Grubbs on Fridays during the summer program after 4:00 pm in the quarter deck. His
cell phone number is (562) 897-0787.

                                               10
                            Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                  Jr. Sailing Program
                                Volunteer Needs
Volunteering
Parents can directly affect the success of a junior program by volunteering some of their
time. Some of the events we will need help for are listed below. Please get a hold of the
junior director if you will be able to help at all. Thank you!!!

Daily Duties
    Parent of the Day - Monitor lunch sessions and do minor first aid (splinter removal).
          o Elaine Bloemeke, Lynda Peoples, Gretchen Boudreau
    “Fix-it” Parent – Helps students repair small breaks and replace missing bolts.
          o Chris Peoples, Latham Bell
    Ramp Duty – Parents to help get boats out of the water at the end of morning
       sessions.
          o Kirsten Warren, Lynda Peoples,
Away Regatta/Event Duties
Trailer Towing - Drivers to tow trailers to these away events and regattas:
           Jr. Commodore‟s Cup @ LIYC (June 27th)
           Wild Rivers Drivers/Chaperones (July 5th)
           Sea Urchin Aquarium Trip (July 8th)
           C420 Nationals @ Cal YC (July 9th-11th)
           Summer Gold Cup @ Newport Harbor YC (July 10th-11th)
           Junior Olympics @ Newport Harbor YC (July 15th-18th)
           All Girls Regatta @ Lido Isle YC (July 18th)
           Dutch Shoe (July 23rd)
           Flight of the Lasers @ Newport Harbor YC (July 25th)
           Sabot Nationals @ Mission Bay YC (August 9th-12th)
Home Regatta Duties @ ABYC
Race Committee, Parking Lot & Ramp Duty (no experience needed to do RC)
           Dick Sweet Team Race (Monday, July 19th)
           Sabot 2 North (Wednesday, July 21st)
           Beach to Bay Regatta Safety Boats (Thursday, July 29th)
           Alamitos Bay Fleet Champs (Tues-Wed, Aug. 3rd-4th)
           Afternoon Bay Races (June 23rd, June 30th, July 7th and July 14th)
           Tuesday Night Twilights (June 29th, July 6th, July 13th, July 20th & July 27th)
           Jr. Laser Challenge (August 21st-22nd)
           Jr. Lido Nationals (August 28th)
Home Event Duties
           “Fix-it” / Measurement – Preseason for racers @ ABYC (June 18 tentative)
                  o Latham Bell, Jeff McDermaid, Steve Bloemeke, Tom Newton
           Measurement/Fix it - Nationals Pre-measurements @ ABYC (July 13th)
           ABYC Awards Banquet Organizers @ ABYC (August 6th)

                                             11
                            Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                   Jr. Sailing Program
                       Volunteer Needs (continued)
Junior Fund “Check the Box” Campaign
The Junior Fund is an account that the junior program can use to make larger capital
purchases that can‟t come out of our regular budget. In the last 7 years, we have turned the
6 pack sabot trailers into 9 pack sabot trailers, put together a laser charter and sabot
charter program, purchased the 17‟ junior whaler, bought more sabot dollies, purchased the
sabot overflow rack, purchased a second laser trailer, and are in the process of fixing up all
of our current trailers. Below is a note from Lynda Peoples regarding a fundraising drive we
are doing to replenish the Junior Fund in hopes of not only fixing up the trailers but also
performing many other capital improvements to our equipment. If you can, please help!

Did you know that you can support the Jr. Program every month? For the small amount of
$5.00 per month you can help replenish the Jr. Fund. The ABYC Jr. Fund began in the early
1980‟s to help pay for sabot trailers, whalers, bullhorns, white boards (chalk boards back
then), marks and anchors-the items needed by the instructors to run a successful program.
This account does not fund Jr. travel costs. At one time, as many as 200 members
contributed to the fund each month. As the children of those years grew up, the number of
members contributing to the Jr. Fund has dwindled down to 32 members. In January the
Junior Advisor Board approved the much-needed repair of the three sabot trailers so that
they are road worthy and safe. The Jr. Fund paid for the cost of refurbishing the trailers.
The fund now must be replenished. There are still projects to be completed prior to the
summer program. Both junior whalers and trailers are in need of maintenance.
      If you have a child or family member participating in the Jr. Program or would like
to support the Junior’s, PLEASE check your bill and be sure that you are donating $5.00
per month to the Jr. Fund. To have the $5.00 added to your monthly bill on a
continuous basis contact Sheila in the office. All it takes is a check in the box and an
extra $5.00 added to your payment. Don’t remember if you are contributing??? Check
your bill. The line item says Jr. Fund $5.00.
      Separate donations to the Jr. Fund are also welcome and appreciated. Checks should be
made out to ABYC with Jr. Fund written on the memo line or be accompanied by a note
designating the donation be placed in the Jr. Fund. Thank you and good sailing.
-Lynda Peoples

501-C3 Travel Scholarship Fund (tax deductible donations accepted)
We have also developed a fund that will allow for tax deductible donations that go towards
travel regatta scholarships. Events such as Orange Bowl, Ida Lewis, Youth Champs, or other
national events can be extremely costly. The Junior Board (led by Jr. Commodore Marissa
Golison) are trying to raise $1500 for this 501-C3 Travel Scholarship Fund this year and
would appreciate any help you can give. Any donations can be made out to “CISA” and given to
the Junior Director who will pass it along to Bob Kirstine and Chas Merrill.



                                              12
                         Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                Jr. Sailing Program
                                  Instructors
1. Certification - Each coach must have up to date certifications including minimum level
    1 US Sailing Instructor certification (or their country‟s equivalent), First Aid and CPR.
    Only approval by the Junior Program Director permits instructors to have non-current
    certifications in extenuating circumstances.
2. Lesson Plans – Lesson Plans are filled out each day and turned into the Junior
    Program Director who then files them for reference for future instructors.
3. Curriculum – Instructors make every attempt to follow curriculum, however it is likely
    to be regularly adjusted for the speed of the class, the weather conditions, and
    unforeseen circumstances. “Game time” decisions are made regularly on the
    adjustment of each week‟s curriculum.
4. Rigging/Unrigging – Instructors are responsible for helping flip boats primarily for
    morning non-racing classes. Most afternoon sailors should be able to rig and flip boats
    on their own, however we will have two coaches roam the yard each afternoon starting
    at 12:30pm for safety and help purposes.
5. Weekly Duties – Every week, each instructor has a “duty”. This includes
    marks/anchors, boats/boat keys, Jr. Room/Quarter Deck clean, boat boxes, yard
    sweep, and much more. The goal is to have to keep the club cleanly during the day so
    there is little to do at the end, however this is what instructors are typically doing
    before and after class.
6. Lunch – Coaches are permitted to take their lunch hour off unless they are scheduled
    to be one of the two yard helpers for afternoon classes that week.
7. Safety – Above all, coaches are responsible for the safety of the students. If this
    entails as dramatic an action as taking a student and leaving their boat (in extenuating
    circumstances), they will do that. They will make decisions based around the junior
    program mantra of Safety, Fun, and Skills
8. Fun – Coaches will try to make practice fun and if they sense that sailors are losing
    interest in racing, they may abandon formal practice for a short time to keep sailors
    enjoying what they‟re doing. This is very important for the long term success of our
    sailors and we cannot sacrifice long term goals for short term gains.
9. Skills – Every day the coaches will try to teach, review and practice a skill. Some
    days will incorporate more water time than others, however we consider water time
    the best way for sailors to get better.
10. Teaching Methods – The coaches are responsible for trying to teach independence in
    addition to skills. One example of this is that we try to teach sailors what to look for
    to decide which side of the course they feel is favored and not necessarily tell them
    which side we think is favored. Coaches may suggest what their personal feelings are,
    but the wind may change as soon as a sailor heads to the starting line. So it is much
    more effective in the long run to teach them how to decipher for themselves. This
    takes longer and is much harder than just telling them which way to go, so patience is
    important on the part of all coaches and parents throughout the learning process.

                                           13
                             Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                   Jr. Sailing Program
                        Frequently Asked Questions
When will my sailor take the swim test if they are absent the first week?
We will give the swim test to each student on their first day of class.

Is there a snack bar?
Yes. It is off limits to the children during their class time, but available to them for lunch
during their lunchtime. If you are not a member it is a cash only payment system.

What time is Lunch?
Lunch is scheduled every day from 12:00 to 1:00 pm. Afternoon sailors who eat lunch at the
galley must wait until 12:30 to order their lunches. Sea Urchins and Intro to Sailing students
typically come in a little early and eat at 11:30am.

Where can I watch without interfering with the classes?
The Snack bar is a good place to watch from a distance. The beach beside the Yacht Club is
also a wonderful place to watch, and a great venue for younger siblings to play.

What if my child’s boat flips over?
Nothing bad will happen to your child. The worst thing is they get wet. If this happens they
are to stay with their boat and an instructor will be over to help right away. Remind your
child that even though it might be scary, the worst thing that can happen is they will get wet.
Each child will be instructed and tested on their ability to right a sabot.

How can I help?
There are lots of opportunities throughout the summer for you to volunteer your time. Check
the volunteer needs on page 9 to see where you want to help out.

When should my sailor move into lasers/420’s?
Please read the “life after sabots” section on page 35 of this handbook.

Can I just pay you to fix my boat?
No, sorry.  We aren‟t expert boat fixers and don‟t usually have the time. A list of places
that can fix your boat are in this handbook, or there are some very talented parents who may
be able to help.

How can I help to get my sailor better at a faster pace?
The main thing is time on the water. Sail as many regattas and clinics as you can and
participate in the summer and off season programs. Private lessons can give the necessary
one on one time to get a sailor to break through a particular barrier. Many of our coaches
are available for private hire during off program hours.

Where can I store my sabot/laser/420?
Please see page 6.

How do I get my sailor a junior membership or our family a family membership?
Please see page 6.
                                               14
                             Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                   Jr. Sailing Program

NOTES ON A FEW OF OUR SUMMER EVENTS
T-Shirt/Picture Day @ ABYC 12:15pm, July 1st – This is a conglomerate of events put
together on the same day. Program T-shirts will be handed out and we will take one group
picture of the entire program (no individual pictures).

Bay Race Days @ Alamitos Bay, June 23rd, 30th, July 7th & 14th (All Boats) – On
Wednesdays, races are run with all programs in the Bay from 1-4 pm for racers. On a few of
the Wednesdays, we will also run special training races for the morning sabot sailors which
will take place during their normal class time. No special actions are needed to be taken to
sign up for these events. Simply show up to regular class ready to sail!

Tuesday Night Twilights @ Alamitos Bay, June 29th, July 6th, 13th, 20th & 27th (Racing
Sabots, 420’s & Laser Radials) – Twilights take place Tuesday evenings in June and July
with the first start at 5:00 PM. Anyone who can successfully get around the race course in
afternoon breeze is welcome to participate in twilights. Awards for the entire series are
presented after the last twilight regatta and there are dinners after each regatta at
Leeway, Seal Beach YC, Long Beach YC and Alamitos Bay Yacht Club.

4th of July Morning Boat Parade @ ABYC, July 2nd (Morning Sabots) – The morning sabot
classes decorate their boats with red, white & blue and parade down the bay.

4th of July Regatta, July 3rd (Racing Sabots & Laser Radials) – This one-day regatta is a
great warm up to the sailing season. It will be a regular regatta this year as opposed to last
year‟s pursuit style race. The juniors are responsible for staffing the regatta, however many
young racers are welcome and encouraged to sail this race as older students will run the
actual regatta.

Wild Rivers, July 5th (All Sailors) – The wild rivers trip is a day long trip to the water park
instead of the regular program schedule. We will leave the yacht club around 9:00 am and
return around 5:30 pm. The cost is $17 per person and is due by July 2nd. We will need
parents help with transportation and supervision. There is NO regular sailing this day.

INSA Membership Due, July 10th – INSA stands for International Naples Sabot
Association and your sailor must be a member of this organization to compete in either Sabot
2 or Sabot National Championships. For more info, see page 15.

Summer Gold Cup @ NHYC, July 10th-11th (Racing Sabots) – This is a two-day regatta held
at Newport Harbor YC. It is open to anyone who has sailed a regatta before which will
include most of our afternoon sailors. The trailer will be loaded the day before the event and
we are in need of several parent towing volunteers.




                                               15
                             Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                    Jr. Sailing Program

                         Summer Events (continued)
420 Nationals @ Cal YC, July 9th-11th – It is very fortunate that we have the 420
Nationals right in our own back yard this summer. If you can participate in this regatta by
renting a boat or with your own boat, we will be supporting it with coaching and it is a
fantastic opportunity. It is for advanced racers only.

Sabot Measurement for Nationals @ ABYC, July 13th (Racing Sabots) – This is a chance to
get pre-measured for nationals and avoid lines at the actual event. It is typically a great idea
to get a boat measured even if you are unsure whether or not your sailor will be competing in
Sabot nationals. There is need for 7-10 parent volunteers.

Junior Olympics @ Santa Barbara Y.C., July 15th-18th (Racing 420’s, Lasers & FJs) –
This event is for Laser Radial, FJ and 420 racers who feel fairly confident in their skills. It
is a competitive regatta for 18 and under hosted this year in Santa Barbara.

Pirate Day @ ABYC, July 16th (All Sailors) – This day where morning sailors and afternoon
Sabot „C‟ sailors dress as pirates, tell pirate jokes, and go hunting for treasure has become a
summer favorite.

All Girl Regatta @ Lido Isle Yacht Club, July 18th (Female Sabots) – This event, held at
Lido Isle YC, is only for female sailors. If a student can make it around a course, they are
encouraged to attend. Lasers and Sabots are welcome.

Dick Sweet Team Race Series, July 19th, 26th & August 2nd (Advanced Racing Sabots) –
This team racing series is for a coach selected team and takes place on three Mondays
throughout the summer. The first one is at ABYC, the second at SDYC, and the third at
NHYC. If your child is selected to be on the ABYC Team Racing team, he or she will be
notified prior to the event.

Sabot II North @ ABYC, July 21st (Under 11 Racing Sabots) – Any sabot sailor age 11 and
under who can get around the race course is invited to race in this qualifying series. All
afternoon sailors 11 and under should sail this event. Morning sailors should consult their
coach first. The top 10 advance to the Sabot II Invitational.

C Fleet Championships @ Alamitos Bay, July 22nd (C1, C2, or C3 Sabot Sailors) – This is
a regatta hosted out of our bay that is available to all „C‟ sailors. If your student can make it
around a course and is a „C fleet‟ student (see page 19 for explanation of fleets), they are
welcome to participate.




                                               16
                             Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                   Jr. Sailing Program
                         Summer Events (continued)
Dutch Shoe Marathon @ San Diego Y.C. to Coronado Y.C., July 23rd (Sabots) – This race
is sailed from SDYC to CorYC. The race is about six miles long. Dutch shoe provides lots of
fun and good travel experience. This event is open to Sabot sailors with the most experience
first.

Flight of the Lasers @ Newport Harbor Y.C., July 25th (Lasers) – A laid back and smaller
event for our laser sailors that will allow both morning and afternoon students to showcase
their skills.

Sabot II Invitational @ BCYC, July 28th (Qualified Sabot Racers) - This is an event only
for the top 20 sailors that are under age 11 in Southern California. You qualify by placing top
10 at the Sabot II North regatta.

Beach to Bay @ Queen Mary to Long Beach Y.C., July 29th (All Sabots) – Beach to Bay is
a race that starts at the Queen Mary and finishes at LBYC. Any sailor that can tack and gibe
and feels comfortable in their boat may attend this regatta. Remember that there will be
no regular classes on this day.

CFJ Nationals @ ABYC, July 30th-August 1st (CFJ) – For students who have some FJ
experience, an option al regatta is this double handed event. Boats can be chartered from
the US Sailing Center down the road from ABYC. If you are interested in participating,
please talk to the Program Director for details.

Alamitos Bay Fleet Championships @ Alamitos Bay, August 3rd-4th (Racing Sabots) – This
regatta is for our A, B and the top 20 C fleet championships competitors. The two day event
is designed as practice for nationals.

Alamitos Bay Y,C. Junior Program Awards, August 5th – This event recognizes all of our
junior program participants and also note the most improved, best sportsmanship, and most
outstanding for each class.

Junior Sabot Nationals @ Mission Bay Y.C., August 9th – 12th (Racing Sabots) – Junior
Nationals is a week long regatta for intermediate to advanced racers. All afternoon sailors
are encouraged to qualify for this regatta.

Sea Festival, August 19th (Racing Sabots & Laser Radials) – This event is held at Leeway
Sailing Center and takes place after the sailing season is over. It is a fun regatta for all
sailors who can make it around a course.

Jr. Laser Challenge @ Alamitos Bay Y.C., August 21st-22nd – This is our first year putting
on this regatta which will be geared completely towards allowing our entire laser program
compete in a mid to high level regatta. All laser program participants are encouraged to sail
this end of summer event.
                                              17
                            Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                  Jr. Sailing Program

                              Sailing Associations:
US Sailing
      US Sailing is the national Governing body for the sport of sailing. It establishes and
      publishes racing rules, conducts and sanctions regattas, and helps organize various
      national championships. US Sailing also oversees the Olympic Programs for The United
      States Sailing Team. US Sailing offers training for instructors and creates coarse
      material to help raise the level of junior sailing within our nation. www.ussailing.org

Southern California Youth Yacht Racing Association (SCYYRA)
      SCYYRA helps to organize and publicize youth yacht racing in southern California.
      SCYYRA promotes all junior sailing classes and helps organize junior championships.
      www.scyyra.org

California International Sailing Association (CISA)
       CISA is a non-profit organization designed to assist amateur racers in their training
       for international and Olympic events. CISA runs an annual advanced sailing clinic each
       year that is by application only.

International Naples Sabot Association (INSA)
      INSA is the one design association for the Naples Sabot class. It is responsible for
      the administration of the class and organizing various events throughout the year,
      including Junior Sabot Nationals. You must be a paid member of INSA to race in the
      Naples Sabot Class. www.naples-sabot.org

North American Laser Class Association (ILCA-NA)
      The ILCA-NA is an organization that regulates laser regattas and class compliance.
      To compete in the bigger regattas, sailors need to be a member of this organization
      which they can register for online at www.laser.org.

Club 420 Association
      The Club 420 Association regulates some 420 events and class compliance. To
      compete in the bigger regattas, sailors need to be a member of this organization which
      they can register for online at http://www.club420.org/.

Alamitos Bay Fleet (ABF)
      ABF is a conglomerate of the local junior sailing programs. They organize and run all
      of the Alamitos Bay junior sabot events. It is comprised of Alamitos Bay YC, Long
      Beach YC, Leeway Sailing Center, Seal Beach YC, Huntington Harbor YC, and the US
      Sailing Center. www.ussclb.org/abf




                                             18
                             Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                   Jr. Sailing Program

                             Boats and Parts Dealers

West Coast Sailing – Dealer of Lasers and their parts. Also is attempting to carry Naples
Sabot parts. There is no sales tax and free shipping on all items (it takes 3 business days to
ship to Southern California)
All orders can be placed at: http://www.westcoastsailing.net/
Phone: (888) 884-5536, Email: info@westcoastsailing.net

Minney’s Surplus Sales – Buys and sells used sails and parts. You can find very reasonably
priced used beginner sails and boat parts here.
1500 Newport Boulevard
Costa Mesa, CA 92627
Phone: (949) 548-4192, Fax: (949) 548-1075, Website: www.minneysyachtsurplus.com

West Marine – Chain retailer of general boat parts. Usually it does not carry sabot or laser
specific parts, but is the most convenient for “nuts and bolts” kind of parts.
251 North Marina Drive
Long Beach, CA 90803
Phone: (562) 598-9400, Website: www.westmarine.com

Sailing Pro Shop – Local dealer of small boat parts and accessories.
194 North Marina Drive, Suite 201
Long Beach, CA 90803
Phone: (562) 594-8749, Fax: (562) 594-0208, Website: www.sailingproshop.com

Quantum Sails and Boat Parts – Nancy Wheatley is a very junior friendly who owns this
store in Seal Beach. Call for group discounts on sails.
714 Marina Drive
Seal Beach, CA 90740
Phone: (562) 799-7444, Email: twheatley@quantumsails.com

Mark Gaudio – Mark is a sabot expert and has connections to local dealers in any sabot part
you need. If you can‟t find something, give him a call. He also is an authorized dealer of Gill
sailing gear and is willing to set up a group order to get discount prices.
Phone: (949) 760-2663 or (949) 280-2265, Email: gaudio@cox.net

Tony’s Boat Repair – A private owned sail boat fix it company. Tony does outstanding gel
coat and fiberglass repair.
1105 Victoria Street
Costa Mesa, CA 92627
Phone: (949) 642-7353

                                               19
                            Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                   Jr. Sailing Program

                               The Naples Sabot:
The Naples Sabot is the most commonly used boat for junior sailing in Southern California.
Simple and small enough for the young beginner and competitive enough for the most
advanced racer, the Sabot makes a good training boat. Over the years the Naples Sabot has
helped create Olympic Athletes, America‟s Cup winners, and some of the best family cruisers.

A racing sabot needs to be of a higher quality and calibration than a learning beginner sabot.
This is for the simple reason of remaining competitive. Particularly once a sailor reaches the
C1 level or higher, it becomes crucial to have a competitive boat. Here are some of the items
that a racing sabot should have.

Boats
There are many good style boats, but here is a ranking list of the most preferred and best
racing boats in order.
       1. Brian Thomas (older boat, not made anymore, very solid and fast)
       2. Surefab Corsair (the Brian Thomas mold was bought by this company)
       3. Shock Corsair (the Brian Thomas mold was transferred again)
       4. Phoenix
       5. PSI (the old Phoenix mold)
       6. Other possibilities – Hedrick, some Melcrafts, etc.
Boat tanks should be water tight and have an inspection port.

Boat Parts
    Carbon fiber, aluminum or similar mast. Similar boom is best, but wood is okay too.
    One practice sail of reasonable quality and one racing sail only used for regattas.
    Adjustable mast rake/mast can.
    Leeboard that is parallel with the centerline of the boat.
    Fair rudder and leeboard.
    Mainsheet that is long enough to ease boom to just past 90 degrees.
    Boom Vang, Downhaul and Outhaul adjustable from center thwart.
    Tell tales on practice and racing sails.
    Tiller extension and hiking strap are good length.
    Bowline is 15+ feet.
    B sailors and higher should have an adjustable stern traveler.
    Bailer tied in, sponge, and paddle are required or you may be protested at a regatta.
    C1 and higher sailors should not have a mainsheet cleat.
    Ratchet blocks are very important for smaller sailors to assure they can trim in
      heavier breeze.




                                              20
Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
   Jr. Sailing Program




           21
                             Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                   Jr. Sailing Program

                 Description of Sabot Racing Classes:
*Sailors move up a fleet when they win or place high at a regatta in their current fleet based
on the ratios on page 23. If you are unsure of what fleet your sailor should be in, please ask
an instructor.

C3 Fleet –    For the sailors new to racing. Coaching is allowed throughout the races and all
              the way around the race course. If a sailor has passed the mid fleet in a race,
              coaches are expected to let them sail on their own with only occasional
              coaching.

C2 Fleet –    This fleet is only allowed to be coached in between races. It is usually for
              sailors that have just graduated from the C3 fleet, but are still relatively
              novice to the racing world.

C1 Fleet -    The C1 fleet begins the move into advanced racing. Simply more skilled than a
              C2 sailor, they may move into B fleet upon winning in a C1 regatta. They should
              have a high level boat at this point to be competitive (see page 20).

B Fleet -     B fleet sailors are advanced racers. Coaching is only allowed in between races
              and they may move into A fleet upon winning in a B regatta. They should
              consider adjustable stern travelers at this point in their sailing career

A fleet -     A fleet sailors are the best of the best and compete at a top level. Once they
              are in this fleet, there is intense and very strong competition. A sailors must
              always carry weights according to INSA rules.

The coaches generally know where your student should be. If you are unsure, ask an
instructor before signing them up for a regatta.

WEIGHTS: All A sailors should carry required weights for all regattas as will be
carried for Junior Sabot Nationals. Gross weight of skipper, all equipment and hull
should total 220 lbs.

       a. For Junior Championship regattas, the gross weight of the skipper plus hull
          and equipment, as defined in the specifications, must equal two hundred
          twenty (220) pounds. If it does not, the skipper must add weight in the boat
          to bring it up to this minimum, except no skipper is required to carry more
          than twenty (20) pounds of added weight. Therefore, in the case of a very
          light skipper, the gross weight might not reach two hundred twenty (220)
          pounds but would still be legal if the maximum twenty pounds of weight
          were added. Any weight (ballast) added shall not destroy the 10 pound
          minimum positive buoyancy of the yacht.
                                              22
                                 Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                         Jr. Sailing Program

                        When a Sabot Sailor Should Move Up:
   The regatta or series must be coed, have a minimum of three races, have a minimum of three different yacht clubs
    represented, and must not have mixed fleets in order to be considered a move up regatta.
   If a sailor qualifies to move up, he/she MUST move up.
   A competitor/parent/program director can file a written appeal (with evidence) for a sailor to move up without
    qualifying. The appeal committee will consist of the program directors (or designee [not a parent]) from ABYC,
    LBYC, SLBYC, Leeway & HHYC. The appeal committee must vote UNAMIMIOUSLY in order to grant the appeal.
   A competitor/parent/program director can file a written appeal (with evidence) for a sailor to postpone moving up
    even if he/she qualified to move up. The appeal committee will consist of the program directors (or designee [not
    a parent]) from ABYC, LBYC, SLBYC, Leeway & HHYC. The appeal committee must vote UNAMIMIOUSLY in order to
    grant the appeal.



    SABOT B      The First Place Skipper shall move up to the Sabot A Class, if there are at least 10
                 starters in all of the races from 3 or more yacht clubs. If there are at least 20 starters in
                 all races, the First and Second Place Skippers shall move up to the Sabot A Class. (1:10,
                 Maximum of 2 move-ups)


    SABOT C1     The First Place Skipper shall move up to the Sabot B Class, if there are at least 7 starters
                 in all of the races from 3 or more yacht clubs. If there are at least 14 starters in all
                 races, the First and Second Place Skippers shall move up to the Sabot B Class. If there
                 are at least 21 starters in all races, the First, Second, and Third Place Skippers shall move
                 up to the Sabot B Class. If there at least 28 starters, the First, Second, Third, and Fourth
                 Place Skippers shall move up to the Sabot B Class. (1:7)


    SABOT C2     The First Place Skipper shall move up to the Sabot C1 Class, if there are at least 5
                 starters in all of the races from 3 or more yacht clubs. If there are at least 10 starters in
                 all races, the First and Second Place Skippers shall move up to the Sabot C1 Class. If
                 there are at least 15 starters in all races, the First, Second, and Third Place Skippers shall
                 move up to the Sabot C1 Class. If there at least 20 starters, the First, Second, Third, and
                 Fourth Place Skippers shall move up to the Sabot C1 Class. If there at least 25 starters,
                 the First, Second, Third, Fourth, and Fifth Place Skippers shall move up to the Sabot C1
                 Class. (1:5)


    SABOT C3     The First Place Skipper shall move up to the Sabot C2 Class, if there are at least 5
                 starters in all of the races from 3 or more yacht clubs. If there are at least 10 starters in
                 all races, the First and Second Place Skippers shall move up to the Sabot C2 Class. If
                 there are at least 15 starters in all races, the First, Second, and Third Place Skippers shall
                 move up to the Sabot C2 Class. If there at least 20 starters, the First, Second, Third, and
                 Fourth Place Skippers shall move up to the Sabot C2 Class. If there at least 25 starters,
                 the First, Second, Third, Fourth, and Fifth Place Skippers shall move up to the Sabot C2
                 Class. (1:5)




                                                       23
                             Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                   Jr. Sailing Program

                         Sabot Traveling Procedures
The week before each away regatta there will be an email sent home to those attending the
regatta. The email will contain:
          Notice of race, Entry form, Schedules, Towing information, Trailer Assignments

The week before the event ENTRY FORMS ARE DUE. It is the responsibility of the parent
to turn in their student‟s entry form to the host yacht club or proper location. You can
always find links to the Notice of Race, Entry Form and Sailing Instructions on our junior
website at http://www.fleetracing.net.

How to tie down sabots to the trailers
  1.   Make sure all loose lines in the boat are tied down and secured. Take any loose
      parts out of the boat. Masts go on the trailer, booms and other parts go with the
      boat owner.
  2.    Load top to bottom / Unload bottom to top. This prevents leeboard fittings from
      taking chunks out of the sabot below.
  3. There are chalks attached to the trailer that make it fairly obvious which direction
      to load the boat, however if you get confused, remember the leeboard fitting always
      goes in. This is to avoid the leeboard handle adding extra width to the trailer on the
      sides.
  4. There are two straps per sabot space. Take each strap and cross it to the opposite
      side of the boat.


                                                        Two Half Hithces




   5.    Put the strap through the ring on the end of the beams your sabot is resting on.
   6.    Run it back through the loop of the strap and tie a double half hitch. Tie as many
        half hitches as necessary to use the line up so it doesn‟t flap on the boat.

**Please remember that Instructors CANNOT tie down, tow or transport trailers, so the
sailors rely upon PARENT VOLUNTEERS to help get their boats to regattas. Also remember
that you are responsible for putting your own boats on the trailer. Boat parts such as blades
and booms are best transported in cars and you are responsible for getting all the necessary
parts to the regatta with your sailor. These parts when tied to the trailer can scratch up
boats. Try to find parents that have vans or SUV‟s to take booms. Masts (if round) can go on
the sabot trailers.




                                              24
                                 Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                         Jr. Sailing Program
                Sea Urchin Class Goals and Description
Description of Class:
Sea Urchins is for sailors aged 5-7 and is a very basic introduction to sailing and water
safety. They will participate in sailing, arts & crafts, games, and a trip to the aquarium.

Class Goals:
To acquaint these young sailors with water safety, basic sailing skills, general comfort around
and on the water, learn about ocean life and to have fun!

Key Events:
    1st of July Boat Parade (July 1st)
    Aquarium Trip (July 8th)
    Sea Urchins Pirate Day (July
    Beach to Bay (July 29th)




Sea Urchin Curriculum
Week 1:
Desired Learning Outcome: acquaintance with the yacht club, each other, the water and boats.
Tuesday—June 22
    1. Introductions: sit in a circle and play the Name Game, have each urchin say their name with a
        corresponding animal i.e. “Sarah the Sea Turtle” “Laura the Lion” “Brad the Bear” As each urchin
        says their name, age and favorite____________. Zip tie a premade name tag onto their lifejacket.
    2. Tour of the Yacht Club: including the clubhouse and the boat yard. Go over the club rules.
    3. SWIM TEST at the beach. Urchin need to go into the water and float for 30 seconds. It helps if the
        instructor goes in with them 
    4. Teach the basic parts of a rigged sabot. Play “captain says” (Simon Says).
    5. Play “Rudder, Rudder, Tiller” (Duck, Duck, Goose).
    6. Make additional name tags. Have urchin color in the sea creature, while the instructor writes their
        name inside of the animal. These will need to be laminated and zip tied onto the urchins life jacket.
    7. Craft: Draw in their sea Urchin journals. Have the urchins do an additional group-bonding project. i.e.
        painting the sea urchin tables, a sail, or a poster.
    8. Allow Urchins to eat their lunch or snack as their parents arrive. Play games with those who finish
        early.
Thursday—June 24
    1. Play a game while urchins arrive i.e. Rudder, Rudder, Tiller, the Name Game.
    2. GO SAILING! in Lido 14’s.
    3. While sailing, introduce the major parts of the boat (sail, mast, boom, tiller, rudder, starboard, port,
        bow, stern).
    4. Crafts: Draw in their Sea Urchin journals (what they did that day). Coloring sheet of the Lido 14.
    5. Allow Urchins to eat their lunch or snack as their parents arrive. Play games with those who finish
        early.
        *Aquarium Trip Permission Slips will be passed out. Remind students and parents to bring
        decorations for Thursday, they will have their own Fourth of July boat parade.
________________________________________________________________
                                 Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                         Jr. Sailing Program
Week 2
Desired Learning Outcome: learn the basic parts of a sailboat: Sail, Mast, Boom, Tiller, Rudder, Bow, Stern,
Starboard, Port, and Mainsheet.
Tuesday—June 29
    1. Warm up game, Captain Says or Rudder Tiller.
    2. Teach about wind direction: How to use flags, indicators and ripples on the water to tell direction.
         Teach the wind circle and the wind circle pizza and the basics of sailing up wind—zig zagging.
    3. Go Sailing in sabots (2-3 urchins per sabot, with an instructor). While sailing, review the basic parts
         of the boat and the wind direction. Allow urchins to steer the boat, teaching them “tiller towards
         trouble” and “when your sail begins to flap, pull the tiller towards your lap.”
    4. Craft: Draw in their Sea Urchin Journals. Make the wind circle and wind circle pizza. If time permits,
         students can also make wind indicators.
    5. Allow Urchins to eat their lunch or snack as their parents arrive. Play games with those who finish
         early.
Thursday—July 1
    1. Play a game or color/draw while urchins arrive.
    2. Go sailing, in Cal 20’s or Lido 14’s. They may decorate the boat for the Fourth of July and have their
         own parade! While sailing, review the parts of the boat , wind direction and allow each child to
         sail/skipper the boat.
    3. Craft: Draw in their Sea Urchin journals. Make their names out of code flags.
    4. Allow Urchins to eat their lunch or snack as their parents arrive. Play games with those who finish
         early.
* Sailing Program Picture Day!!! Bring a smile 
________________________________________________________________
Week 3:
Desired Learning Outcome: Familiarity with the local Sea life.
Tuesday—July 6
    1. Play a game while Sea Urchins arrive.
    2. Take a crab walk along the dock, count the number of crabs they see.
    3. Load into whalers and take a trip to Jellyfish Cove.
    4. Craft: Draw in Sea Urchin Journals. Make crabs and Jellyfish.
    5. Allow Urchins to eat their lunch or snack as their parents arrive. Play games with those who finish
        early.
Thursday—July 8
    1. Have urchins line up in their carpool groups as they arrive. Label their car seats.
    2. SEA URCHIN AQUARIUM TRIP! 
    3. Once back at the yacht club, urchins will draw in their Sea Urchin Journals and draw and paint an
        underwater sea life scene.
    4. Allow Urchins to eat their lunch or snack as their parents arrive. Play games with those who finish
        early.
________________________________________________________________
Week 4:
Desired Learning Outcome: Rigging . Basic knots (figure 8, square knot and bowline).
Tuesday—July 13
    1. Play a game while Urchins arrive.
    2. Teach the three basic knots: Figure 8, Square and bowline. The bowline may be too difficult and can
        be used as a challenge knot for those excelling at tying knots.
    3. Knot tying relay race.
    4. Go sailing in Lido’s or Cal 20’s. Have the urchins help the instructor rig the boat.
    5. Craft: Draw in their Sea Urchin journals. Make a knot reference chart out of rope, construction paper
        and markers.
    6. Allow Urchins to eat their lunch or snack as their parents arrive. Play games with those who finish
        early.
                                   Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                          Jr. Sailing Program
Thursday—July 15
   1. Play a game while Urchins arrive.
   2. Practice the knots as a group before heading to the boat yard.
   3. Spilt the children into groups of two or three and assign each group to a sabot. Each team will work
       together to rig their sabot.
   4. Go sailing in sabots!  One instructor per boat. Each urchin will have his or her turn
       sailing/skippering the sabot. Review the points of wind and parts of the boat.
   5. Craft: make sailboats out of paper, Styrofoam cups, one strip of tape and popsicle sticks. (an urchin
       “trash” boat). After designing and creating their own boats, go to the ramp and have a short “race.”
   6. Allow Urchins to eat their lunch or snack as their parents arrive. Play games with those who finish
       early.
________________________________________________________________
Week 5:
Desired Learning Outcome: Have Fun! Review Sailing terminology and the basics of sailing.
Tuesday—July 20
    1. Tell pirate jokes as urchins arrive because it is Sea Urchin PIRATE DAY! YARRG!
    2. Go on a treasure hunt! By foot, onto the beach. (Beach day). Find the treasure and play beach
        games, relay races, sand castle contest, etc.
    3. Craft: Draw in the Sea Urchin journal and paint treasure chests or pirate ships.
    4. Allow Urchins to eat their lunch or snack as their parents arrive. Play games with those who finish
        early.

Thursday—July 22
   1. Play a game while Urchin’s arrive.
   2. Sail in lido’s. While sailing, urchins will have the opportunity to watch some of the C fleet
       championships going on in the bay at the same time. Instructors can explain the basics of racing a
       sailboat and review the points of sail as the sabots sail around a triangle course (up wind, no go
       zone, reaching and down wind).
   3. craft: Draw in their Sea Urchin Journals. Create a sabot mobile, with the labels parts of the boat
       hanging down.
   4. Allow Urchins to eat their lunch or snack as their parents arrive. Play games with those who finish
       early.
________________________________________________________________
Week 6
Desired Learning Outcome: To grow more acquainted with the water and sailing different types of boats.
Tuesday—July 26
    1. Play a game while Urchin’s arrive. Sea Urchin Crazy Hair Day!!! Wear crazy hair! 
    2. Sail in Cal 20’s or some keel boat. Go for a Bay cruise and review the parts of the boat, points of sail
        and allow each urchin a turn at skippering the boat.
    3. Craft: Draw in Sea Urchin Journals. Paint a poster of themselves sailing, their photo will be added to
        the poster to be taken home at a later time.
    4. Allow Urchins to eat their lunch or snack as their parents arrive. Play games with those who finish
        early.
Thursday—July 29
    1. Have the Sea Urchins design and create a poster, “Go ABYC!”
    2. Go out in a whaler to watch the Beach to Bay Race. Also, while outside in the harbor, urchins can
        go and see the buoy with seals.
    3. Craft: Draw in their sea urchin journals. Make a “pet” whale out of paper.
    4. Allow Urchins to eat their lunch or snack as their parents arrive. Play games with those who finish
        early.
________________________________________________________________
Week 7:
Desired Learning Outcome: demonstration of what they have learned this summer with regards to sailing (parts of the
boat, wind direction, etc.)
                                  Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                          Jr. Sailing Program
Tuesday—August 3
    1. Play a game while Urchin’s arrive.
    2. Go sailing in both lido’s and sabots.
    3. While sailing the sabot, urchins will demonstrate their understanding of sailing by skippering the boat
         on their own (with an instructor). Each urchin will have their turn sailing the boat on their own (with
         the instructor). Each Urchin will sail the “lightning drill” (windward/Leeward), and the “hot dog” drill
         (reaching).
    4. Craft: Draw in their urchin journal for the last time (urchins will take home their journals).
    5. Allow Urchins to eat their lunch or snack as their parents arrive. Play games with those who finish
         early.
*Flyers for the end of summer banquet will be passed out.
Thursday—August 5
    1. Play a game while Urchin’s arrive.
    2. All morning sailing JUNIOR OLYMPICS!
    3. Sea Urchins will play various games with other morning sailors, and then head to the beach for a
         final beach day.
    4. To celebrate the last day of Sea Urchins’, we will make Sea Urchin cupcakes (cupcakes with purple
         frosting, m&m’s and pretzel sticks) * Please let Sarah know if your Urchin has any special dietary
         needs (allergies) with this craft!  we will accommodate.
    5. Allow Urchins to eat their lunch or snack as their parents arrive. Play games with those who finish
         early.
* Don’t forget the End of Summer Sailing Banquet tonight, 6pm!!! all urchins receive a special award.
                                    Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                            Jr. Sailing Program
     Intro to Sailing Sabot Class Goals and Description
Description of Class:
The Intro to Sailing Sabots class is designed for sailors 6 and 7 years old that want to get
into a sabot and sail it on their own. Because these sailors are at such a young age, there is a
higher instructor to student ratio and each student must be able to pass a swim test. The
class also moves at a much more “flexible” pace according to each student and how they are
progressing. It is designed as a completely introductory course to sailing and no previous
experience or knowledge is necessary. They will learn parts of the boat, points of sail, sail
trim, steering, tacking, jibing, docking, and water safety.

Class Goals:
The goal of the class is to have each beginner sailor conquer all points of sail, be able to tell
where the breeze is coming from and how to trim their sail to that breeze so that they can
essentially sail anywhere on the bay they want to.

Key Events:
    Morning Bay Races
    C Fleet Champs (July 22nd)
    Beach to Bay (July 29th)
   These events for sailors who are excelling…
    Tuesday Night Twilights
    Sabot 2 North for students 11 and under at ABYC (July 21st)
    All Girls Regatta (July 18th)


                               Intro to Sailing Curriculum
Things to remember…
    All intro to sailors rig together under the small hoist.
    The intro to sailing class moves at the pace of the children, (so at a 6 and 7 year old pace)
       
Week 1:
Learning Objectives: Rigging a sabot, familiarity with the parts of the boat and introduction to basic
sailing.
Monday—June 21
     1. Introductions, Name Game.
     2. Tour of the Yacht Club and go over the club rules.
     3. Swim test from the beach. Students need to tread water for at least 15 seconds with out a lifejacket
         and then put a lifejacket on when handed to them.
     4. Rig 2 sabots as a group, introducing the parts of the boat and their functions. Each instructor will
         take two intro to sailors at a time for a short sail in the basin. Each intro to sailor will have their turn at
         driving the boat.
Wednesday—June 23
     1. Teach the necessary knots (figure-8 and bowline).
     2. Knot relay race on the grass.
     3. Pair each intro to sailor up with another.
     4. Pairs work together to rig boats, if appropriate, have a rigging relay race.
                                  Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                          Jr. Sailing Program
    5. While (at least) one instructor is in a coach boat, one instructor remains on land (the dock), as each
         pair begins to sail in the basin.
    6. There will be two marks anchored in the basin, which the teams will reach around.
    7. Friendly race to de-rig the boats that were used.
Friday—June 25
    1. Review the knots and have a relay race.
    2. Partner sailing outside of the basin.
    3. Partners will work together rigging their boats.
    4. Pairs will sail the “hot dog” drill around markers C and X.
    5. During de-rigging, we will play “Captain Says” reviewing the parts of the boat.
________________________________________________________________
Week 2:
Learning Objectives: Tacking and gibing, the points of sail, specifically reaching.
Monday—June 28
    1. Teach the points of sail, the wind circle and the “wind circle pizza.”
    2. Land drill on tacking and gibing focusing on passing the mainsheet and tiller behind the back.
    3. Sailors will sail as individuals in their own boats and if necessary an assistant instructor will ride with
         them.
    4. We will sail the “hot dog drill” between markers C and X.
    5. We will then sail a smaller figure-8 drill focusing on tacking and then gibing.
Wednesday—June 30
    1. Review the wind circle.
    2. Land drill of sailing up wind, zig-zagging up the grass.
    3. Sail the hot dog drill and the lightening drill (windward leeward between marker C and the 5 MPH
         can).
* Don’t forget to remind parents that Friday is our Fourth of July Boat Parade!
Friday—July 2
    1. FOURTH of JULY BOAT PARADE!! the intro to sailing class will rig and decorate two lido 14’s and
         lead the parade.
________________________________________________________________
Week 3:
Learning Objectives: Up-wind sailing. 
Monday—July 5
    1. WILD RIVERS DAY~ no regular sailing! Students under the age of 8 need to be accompanied by a
         parent.
Wednesday—July 7
    1. Review, review, review the parts of the boat, rigging the sabot and points of sail.
    2. Students will sail as individuals or with an assistant instructor in their boat if necessary.
    3. Sail the hot dog drill between markers C and X.
    4. Sail the lightning drill between marker C and the 5 MPH can.
    5. Play “catch the tennis ball.” The instructors throw numerous tennis balls upwind and the students
         must sail up wind to grab the ball and return them to the instructor.
Friday—July 9
    1. Sail the hot dog drill twice as a warm up.
    2. Sail the lightning drill.
    3. As a challenge, have those students who are ready sail a large lightning drill between markers D and
         C.
________________________________________________________________
Week 4:
Learning Objectives: Up-wind sailing.
Monday—July 12 (Sarah is out of town)
    1. Sail in Lido 14’s.
    2. Work on sailing up-wind.
    3. Have each child skipper the boat and focus on sailing upwind.
Wednesday—July 14 (Sarah is out of town)
    1. Sail the hot dog drill for warm up.
                                 Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                        Jr. Sailing Program
    2. Sail the lightning drill.
    3. Sail the triangle drill.
Friday—July 16
    1. PIRATE DAY!!! Yarg!
    2. Treasure hunt-partner sail with intermediate students.
________________________________________________________________
Week 5:
Learning Objectives: Prepare for the Beach to Bay Race
*Please let Sarah know if your sailor is interested in sailing in the Beach to Bay, (it is challenging for
many sailors and is not required)
Monday—July 19
    1. Introduce the starting sequence.
    2. Run practice starts and short up-wind legs.
Wednesday—July 21
    1. Continue with starts and upwind sailing.
    2. Gradually increase the length of the up-wind leg.
Friday—July 23
    1. Sail various up-wind and reaching courses in preparation for the Beach to Bay.
________________________________________________________________
Week 6:
Learning Objectives: Beach to Bay preparation! 
Monday—July 26
    1. Practice starts.
    2. Sail long reaching legs from marker X to mark H.
    3. Sail upwind legs.
*Final decisions regarding partner versus individual sailing for the Beach to Bay Race will be made.
Wednesday—July 28
    1. Mock Beach to Bay race with the Beginners and Intermediates.
THURSDAY—Beach to Bay Race for those who are participating! Good Luck!
Friday—July 30
    1. Designated FUN DAY! After all of the hard work for the Beach to Bay, we will sail to Jamba Jucie
         today! yum!
________________________________________________________________
Week 7:
Learning Objectives: Demonstration of mastery of sailing all points of sail (up-wind, reaching and
down-wind). Students can tack, gybe and sail their sabot by themselves.
Monday:
    1. Sail in Lido 14’s.
    2. Each sailor will skipper the boat and demonstrate their ability to sail the different points of sail.
Wednesday:
    1. Sail in Sabots for the last time.
    2. Sail the hot dog drill as a warm up.
    3. Sail the lightning drill.
    4. Tour de Bay!
* Turn in Charter gear if you have a charter boat.
THURSDAY 6pm End of Sailing Banquet!! All intro to sailors receive an award!
Friday:
    1. Beach Day, last day of Summer Sailing!
    2. Water fight, bring squirt guns but no water balloons please.
                                 Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                        Jr. Sailing Program
           Beginner Sabot Class Goals and Description
Description of Class:
The Beginning Sabot class is designed for sailors 8 years and older and between the weights
of 40-120 pounds. It is meant as a completely introductory course to sailing and no previous
experience or knowledge is necessary. They will learn parts of the boat, points of sail, sail
trim, steering, tacking, jibing, docking, and water safety.

Class Goals:
The goal of the class is to have each beginner sailor conquer all points of sail, be able to tell
where the breeze is coming from and how to trim their sail to that breeze so that they can
essentially sail anywhere on the bay they want to.

Key Events:
    Morning Bay Races
    C Fleet Champs (July 22nd)
    Beach to Bay (July 29th)
   These events for sailors who are excelling…
    Tuesday Night Twilights
    Sabot 2 North for students 11 and under at ABYC (July 21st)
    All Girls Regatta (July 18th)

Fun Days Scheduled:
    Beginners have 7 fun days scheduled including Wild Rivers and Pirate Day.

                                   Beginner Curriculum
Week   1: (June 21-25) Team Building, Parts of the Boat, Wind Direction & Steering
  o      Team Building: Name game, swim test, folding towel game, electric fence
  o      Parts of the boat & rigging,
  o      Knots, capsize test
  o      Steering: Tiller towards trouble – pair sailing in basin
  o      Wind direction / Points of sail – pair sailing
  o      Review all of the above on Friday
Week   2: (June 28-July 2) Reaching, tacking, jibing, docking
  o      Events: Wild Rivers (July 28th), July 2nd Boat Parade
  o      Knots & rigging review
  o      Reaching: Figure 8 drill (solo sailing), timed drag race from marker x to c
  o      Trimming a sail to a destination
  o      Boat Handling: Tacking & Jibing, follow the leader
  o      Friday 2nd of July boat parade
Week   3: (July 5-9) Upwind sailing (all students solo sailing), stopping the boat and safety position
  o      July 5th – Wild Rivers (NO regular sailing)
  o      Points of sail and wind direction review
                              Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                    Jr. Sailing Program
  o Events: Le Tour De Bay
  o Boat Handling: Steering to a point of sail, safety position, stopping the boat
  o Tuning: Introduction to tell tales
  o Rules: Basic Rules (Rule 10: Starboard/Port)
  o Morning Bay Races – practice drag race for Beach to Bay
Week 4: (July 12-16) Downwind Sailing and Starting
  o Weather/Conditions: Wind – what now? What later?
  o Boat Handling: Starting, downwind sailing
  o Rules: Basic Rules (Rule 11: Windward/Leeward)
  o Regatta Procedure: Starting sequences, using a watch
Week 5: (July 19- 23) Racing for Beginners
  o Events: C Fleet Champs (July 22nd)
  o Weather/Conditions: Wind – what now? What later?
  o Tuning: Introduction to control line adjustments and tuning
  o Boat Handling: Starting, review upwind, downwind, reaching, sail trim, etc.
  o Tactics: Introduction to clean air and some very basic starting tactics
  o Rules: Basic Rules (Rule 14: Avoiding Contact)
  o Regatta Procedure: Course Charts / Sailing Instructions
Week 6: (July 26-30) Beach to Bay week
  o Events: Beach to Bay (July 29th)
  o Weather/Conditions: Wind – what now? What later?
  o Review: Tying knots
  o Boat Handling: Rounding marks and changing tuning lines
  o Tuning: Adjusting control lines from upwind to reach to run, Adjusting leeboard
  o Rules: Basic Rules (Rule 18: Mark Room)
  o Regatta Procedure: Course Charts / Sailing Instructions / Notice of Race
  o Friday Fun Day
Week 7: (August 2-6)
  o Events: Program Awards Banquet (August 5th)
  o Review via Jr. Olympics events
          o Rigging
          o Parts of the boat/sail (jeopardy)
          o Course Charts, Notice of Race, Sailing Instructions
          o Boat handling: All points of sail
          o Tuning: Downhaul, outhaul, boom vang
                               Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                     Jr. Sailing Program
       Intermediate Sabot Class Goals and Description
Class Description:
The Intermediate Sabot Class focuses on more finely tuned boat handling skills and a
beginning understanding of boat tuning and weather conditions as well as body and weight
placement and how it affects steering and boat speed.

Class Goals:
To accomplish all of the skills mentioned in the curriculum, sail C Fleet Champs and Beach to
Bay. Some students will be encouraged to participate in Tuesday Night Twilights or Sabot 2
North.

Key Events:
    Morning Bay Races
    All Girls Regatta (July 18th)
    C Fleet Champs (July 22nd)
    Beach to Bay (July 29th)
   These events for sailors who are excelling…
    Tuesday Night Twilights
    Sabot 2 North for students 11 and under at ABYC (July 21st)

Fun Days Scheduled:
    Intermediates have 7 fun days scheduled including Wild Rivers and Pirate Day.


Intermediate Sabot Curriculum
Week   1: (June 21-25) Review of the Basics
  o      Team Building Exercises; name game, towel game, broken spaceship, electric fence.
  o      Review: Capsize test, swim test
  o      Review: Rigging, parts of the boat
  o      Review: Knots
  o      Review: Points of Sail, Wind Direction
  o      Review: Reaching and basic upwind (telltales)
Week   2: (June 28-July 2) Wind/Weather and proper upwind form
  o       Weather Conditions: Wind/Tide – what now? What later?
  o      Boat Handling: “Racing position”, Hiking & weight placement, roll tacks, tiller extension
  o      Tell tales
  o      Rules: Review Rule 10 - Starboard/Port
  o      July 2nd Boat Parade
Week   3: (July 5-9) Starting / Downwind
  o      July 5th – Wild Rivers (NO regular sailing)
  o      Weather Conditions: Wind/Tide – what now? What later? Geographical affects on the wind
  o      Using a watch and basic starting techniques
                                Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                       Jr. Sailing Program
  o     Boat Handling: Starting/Stopping and docking, roll gybes
  o     Tuning: Control Lines
  o     Rule 11 – Windward/Leeward and how to use it your advantage in racing.
  o     Regatta Procedure: Notice of Race & Entry Form
Week   4: (July 12-16) Mark Rounding, boat handling
  o     Weather & Conditions: Wind/Tide – what now? What later?
  o      Proper trimming technique
  o     “Racing position”, Hiking & weight placement, roll tacks
  o      Ease-Hike-Trim, Stopping/Starting, 360/720, Holding position, roll tacks and gybes. Strong
        focus on boat speed.
  o     Boat Handling: Stopping/starting the boat, Heading up from reach to close hauled course,
        trimming hand over hand, using weight to turn boat
  o     Tuning: Review
  o     Rules: Review Rule 18.1-18.5 – Mark Room
  o     Regatta Procedure: Sailing Instructions & Course Charts
Week   5: (July 19-23) C Fleet Champs
  o     Weather & Conditions: Wind/Tide – what now? What later?
  o     Boat Handling: Roll tacks, matching angles and speed, boat heal, clean air
  o     Tactics: Playing wind shifts, picking favored side, favored tack
  o     Regatta Procedure: Filing Protests/Mock Protests
  o     Rules: Review Rule 12 - Clear Astern/Clear Ahead, Rule 13 - While tacking, Rule 14 – Contact
  o     Tuning: Control line adjustments, all boats checked for fair boards, proper mast rake, stern
        traveler, and board alignment
Week   6: Downwind beginning tactics
  o     Weather/Conditions: Wind/Tide – what now? What later? Waves vs. flat water
  o     Tuning: Downwind control line adjustments, leeboard up, changing gears
  o     Boat Handling: Windward heel, weight placement, slowing your boat downwind, covering
  o     Beginning tactics: Favored tack downwind, clean air, picking favored sides, planning 1-3 minutes
        ahead, looking back for puffs
  o     Rules: Review Rule 10-18
  o     Regatta Procedure: Flags – I, Z, Black, P, W
Week   7: Upwind/Finishing
  o     Weather/Conditions: Wind/Tide – what now? What later? Pressure and cloud systems
  o     Tuning: Changing gears
  o     Boat Handling: kinetics
  o     Jr. Olympics
                             Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                   Jr. Sailing Program

                                The Laser Radial:
The Laser class is one of the largest in the world and has been around for quite a time.
There are three types of Lasers which are distinguished simply by the size of the sail. Laser
Standard (or full-rig) has the largest sail, Laser Radial (pictured below) is a slightly smaller
sail, and Laser 4.7 is the smallest sail. To compensate for the different sail size, there is
also a separate mast bottom section for each size of laser sail (masts are composed of a
bottom and top section unlike the one piece sabot masts). Our program focuses primarily on
Lasers Radials. The class association website is www.laser.org. Your sailor should be a
registered member of this organization to sail in any large laser events.

        Basic Boat: Mast (radial bottom and top section), Boom, Sail, Rudder, Tiller,
         Dagger Board, Tiller Extension, Hiking Strap, Traveler and Traveler Blocks.
        Coast Guard approved life jacket: The life jacket must be the correct size for
         your child, and able to be worn comfortably.
        20 Foot Bow Line: To tie your boat up and to tow in emergencies.
        Control Lines (boom vang, outhaul, cunningham or downhaul, and clew tie down:
         There are two type of set ups you can have for Lasers including the new very easy
         to use laser vang system - more expensive but very effective and can be
         purchased. There is also the older model which is basically home made. If you
         have questions regarding these set ups, discuss it with a laser instructor or visit
         online rigging guides such as http://www.lasersailboat.com/rigging.php
                             Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                   Jr. Sailing Program
                              Laser Radial Outline
        Boat handling as pertains to a laser

        Boat tuning and rigging as pertains to a laser

        Boat speed maximization.

        Starting

        Racing in lasers

        Learn in-depth racing rules

        Ocean sailing – waves & chop

        Learn about tides and currents

        Geographical affects on the wind

        Wind shifts

        Learn the principles of sportsmanship

        Proper form in a laser

        Competing in regattas

Class Goals: To accomplish all of the above skills, sail in at least one major regatta and gain
confidence in boat handling and control of a laser.

Key Events: Junior Olympics (July 15th-18th), Jr. Laser Challenge @ ABYC (August 21st-22nd),
All Girls Regatta (July 18th), Flight of the Lasers (July 25th), Bay Races, and Tuesday Night
Twilights.

Fun Days
Afternoon Laser Class Fun Days (2 total)
Morning Laser Class Fun Days (4 total)
                             Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                    Jr. Sailing Program
                                     The Club 420:
The Club 420 is a high performance double-handed dinghy. It‟s flat hull allows for planing in
higher wind conditions. It has a trapeze which allows the crew to hang out over the water
off a wire to keep the boat flat. The ABYC program currently does not support charter
420‟s and it is extremely important to put in for yard storage for their private boat very far
in advance (possibly a year or more) if sailors are interested in getting involved in this racing
program. Find our more at the class website at www.club420.org. Contact the Program
Director as soon as possible if you do not have storage for your 420.
                             Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                   Jr. Sailing Program
                               420 Racing Outline
        Boat handling as pertains to a 420

        Boat tuning and rigging as pertains to a 420

        Boat speed maximization. – getting on a plane and maintaining

        Advanced starting and starting tactics

        Racing in 420‟s

        Learn in-depth racing rules

        Ocean sailing – waves & chop

        Learn about tides and currents

        Geographical affects on the wind

        Wind shifts

        Trapezing properly

        Skipper-Crew communication

        Competing in regattas



Class Goals: To accomplish all of the above skills, sail in at least one major regatta and gain
confidence in boat handling and control of a 420.
Key Events: 420 Nationals @ Cal YC (July 9th-11th), Junior Olympics @ Newport Harbor YC
(July 15th-18th), CFJ Nationals @ ABYC (July 30th-August 1st)
                                  Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                         Jr. Sailing Program

                          Life After (and during) Sabots
Introduction
         The life of a young sailor often starts off very complex with jumping into a sabot for the first
time. There are several lines to deal with, it’s the first time they have actually steered a vehicle of
any sort, and there are a huge amount of variables that create difficulties along the way to top it all
off! However, as time goes on it gets easier and easier as the young sailor masters each skill until
eventually they are a very competent and accomplished sailor.
         With the time that passes, most young sailors find that their knowledge is not the only thing
that is growing though, and they discover that they themselves are getting physically bigger too.
The harsh truth sets in…they just mastered the sabot and now it’s too small for them!
         Fortunately, there are a lot of options for them as they continue on in their dinghy sailing.
This article’s goal is to provide not only their options, but concrete suggestions and guidelines that
will help sailors decide how to continue on in their sailing career and what is the most beneficial
route for each sailor personally. It will address several stages of a sailor’s skill level, age, strength,
and physical size, taking into account also the culture of sailing in Long Beach, Southern California
and the United States. Taking all this into consideration will help decipher what boat your sailor
should be in and when they should make the jump. Get ready for life after sabots!

       *This document is organized with an essay first, followed by a chart that will point a sailor in a direction
       to the specific boats they may want to consider.

A Timeline for Junior Sailing
        While there is no written rule anywhere for when a sailor should move into certain boats,
there are some distinct patterns for when sailors tend to do it in Southern California.
Here is a time line for what sailors tend to do…
1st-5th grade: Sabots only
6th-7th grade: Primarily Sabots and dabble in FJ’s in the US Sailing Center’s August program
8th-12th grade: Summer = 420’s, Lasers, Sabots, and FJ Nationals
                Fall, Winter & Spring = High School FJ Program, Shadden FJ Series, Perry 420
                Series, Frost Laser Radial Series or Ullman Laser Full Rig Series, North Sabot
                Series
        When looking at this, 1st through 5th grade is a pretty simple choice (hint: sail sabots! ).
       th
Even 6 and 7th grade is pretty obvious (Sabots most of the time with FJ’s mixed in). Its 8th grade
and older that gets complicated. There are also some occasional sailors who outgrow sabots far
before 8th grade and they too can sometimes fall into the complicated grouping. For right now,
let’s focus on the first two groups and then tackle the complicated group.
                               Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                      Jr. Sailing Program
                          Life After Sabots (continued)
1st Through 5th Grade…GO SABOTS!
        Sabots are hands down one of the best learning boats that exist and they can be sailed long
into your life. Just ask the senior saboteers at ABYC, some of whom are in their 80’s and still
going strong! They additionally are fairly easy to control and don’t require a heavy weight to hold
them down. Even still, you can sail the boat competitively all the way until you are 130 plus lbs.
and in fact many Sabot National Champions weighed around that when they won it.
        For these reasons, there really is no need to focus on much more than sabot sailing and
learning the fundamental skills of sailing and racing. Master these in a sabot and you’re ready for
anything. As the saying goes, “if you can sail a sabot, you can sail anything!”

6th and 7th Grade: Flying what?
        As sailors enter middle school, some of their older sailing buddies will begin to do high
school sailing in Flying Juniors or more commonly known as FJ’s. While sailors in 6th and 7th
grade technically cannot do high school sailing yet, they can get involved in some ways.
        The US Sailing Center in recent years has begun to offer a late summer one or two week FJ
program to introduce sabot students of all skill levels to this boat and effectively prep them for their
future in high school sailing. Students can do the FJ program in August and if they are feeling
pretty good about the boat, they may want to try the Shadden Series in FJ’s - a regatta series
consisting of four 2-day regattas spread throughout the school year. Beyond that, they may feel so
confident that they want to try FJ Nationals during the summer season as well. There’s no rush
though as these are the boats that students will get to sail all through high school and most likely
college as well. Boats can be rented from the US Sailing Center to do the Shadden Series or FJ
Nationals and they overlap with a minimal amount of sabot events so that these sailors can do both.
        Some sailors at this age have already hit 130 lbs. plus and these sailors may have to consider
moving into Laser Radials or 420’s for the summer season. They can still do one of those boats and
dabble in FJ’s if they want during the off season.
        How heavily any given sailor gets into FJ’s during these developmental years should be
based a lot on their size, skill and desire, but in general the primary focus should definitely remain
on Sabots with the occasional dabble in FJ’s.

8th Grade and Up: “The High School Years”
The Very Serious…
         As mentioned earlier, these are the most complicated years for picking which boat to sail.
Probably one of the bigger shockers about this complicated group is that the best suggestion is not
to sail just one boat, but two or three boats in a given season! That’s right, it’s a good idea to sail
more than one boat if possible. Why would it be suggested to make life so complicated (isn’t high
school complicated enough)?
         Most of the recommendations that are being made in this article have to do with what other
very successful sailors have done. When looking at some of the local legends such as Chris
Barnard, Mac Mace, Tyler Sinks, and even our very own Sydney Bolger, they all sailed several
boats along the way. In fact, some of them sailed Lasers, 420’s, FJ’s and Sabots all in the same
year! That doesn’t suggest all sailors can or should do that. In reality, it comes down to how
seriously you want to do sailing in the long term alongside the balance of the financial obligations
that go along with the sport.
                                Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                       Jr. Sailing Program
                          Life After Sabots (continued)
       For sailors who are very serious, a logical path would be to sail Sabots through 8th grade as
their primary focus. They would most likely not be big enough for a Laser yet, however they could
certainly sail an FJ in the High School program at the US Sailing Center and do the Shadden FJ
series during the school year. They could also do the 420 program at ABYC in the fall and the
Perry 420 series during the school year. They may also decide to do the North Series in Sabots that
also occurs during the school year. In the summer, they might sail 420’s as a primary focus with a
dabble in Sabots or vice versa.
        As they get bigger, Laser Radials or Full Rigs may become an option and then they would
have a trifecta of 420’s, Lasers, and FJ’s. Note that nearly all of the junior events for all four boats
mentioned do not overlap and therefore, you can sail pretty much every weekend in a different boat!
The names I mentioned above pretty much did that and then eventually went on to compete
nationally and internationally at events such as 420 Worlds, Orange Bowl, Laser Radial Worlds,
and many more. If you are very serious about sailing and hope to do it in college and beyond, this
may be the path for you.
Still Serious, but Not That Serious!
        The reality for some serious sailors may be that their schedule or budget (or both) may not
afford sailing three boats during a given year. After all, lots of high schoolers are doing more than
one or two sports/activities. In that case, a wise choice may be to do High School FJ program
(boats are provided with the program) and either Lasers or 420’s during the summer at ABYC. This
option allows you to own one boat and have that be the primary focus for the summer season and
FJ’s be the primary boat for the school season. There are also opportunities to sail 420’s and Lasers
during the school year that do not overlap with high school sailing.
        If that still seems to be a little too serious or an individual is just a summer sailor, finding
either a laser or 420 is a sensible option as both boats are supported in ABYC’s summer program
and there are clinics in the off season and a Southern California regatta circuit as well year round.
The Local Sailor
        Despite the focus that sometimes goes into the highly competitive racers; that typically is the
smallest group of sailors. The largest group and the true bread and butter of the sport of sailing is
the local sailor. These are the people who sail “Wet Wednesdays” in Lido 14’s or Cal 20’s or sail
the holiday series at ABYC in Lasers. The large majority of sailors fall in this category and one of
the decisions that usually takes place when sailors reach high school is which group do they want to
be in one day? This is a decision that can be made by evaluating skill sets and desire. While a
certain skill set can be important to do well at a high level, the desire is really the determining factor
in deciding what group to be in. How important is it to be the best versus just having fun? The
mission statement of the ABYC Junior Program doesn’t even mention winning or being the best,
but we do strive to help every sailor reach their individual goals, and those can vary widely.
        When making the decision about what path a sailor wants to follow, it is worthwhile to
consider that sailing is incredibly social and many sailors want to do it for the rest of their life as
much as possible as long as their friends are there.
                               Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                      Jr. Sailing Program
                          Life After Sabots (continued)
         Laser Radials or Full Rigs may be a good option for sailors who feel this way. Ironically
these are Olympic class boats, but the reason they get the recommendation here is because of the
local fleet and the support at ABYC for this boat. There is storage, racing on the bay and in the
ocean and enough local talent that a good regatta is right in your back yard. Sailors in this group
may also want to do High School Sailing in FJ’s, but the nice thing about Lasers is that there is a
fleet waiting for you to come join them right after high school graduation. If a sailor isn’t going to
sail in college, FJ’s will never be sailed post high school and definitely not post college.

College and Beyond!
         Many colleges have sailing teams but most do not. One can be started fairly easily however.
I was a founding member of Indiana University’s Sailing Team and all it took was finding some
students that were interested in being a part of the team and had a little experience and getting
school approval to start the club. These teams are usually completely walk on and anyone is
welcome and encouraged to participate. Some colleges have these teams established already and
are fairly strong and then there are a reasonable amount of colleges that have very competitive FJ
and 420 sailing programs. These tend to be on the East Coast though some are found in the South
and occasionally on the West Coast. It is really fun to be part of any college team no matter how
competitive and very much encouraged.
         During this time and beyond the college years, sailors will spread into one of three basic
categories: Olympic level sailor, Professional Level Sailor or Coach, Local/Leisure Sailor. These
are all more amplified versions of the 8th-12th grade classifications made earlier in this article. By
this point 95% of the sailors will fall in the Leisure/Local Sailor category and so the focus of this
section is on that.
         Finding a local fleet with good competition is a great way to keep cultivating one’s love of
the sport of sailing. In Long Beach and Southern California, Lasers and Lido 14’s are great
dinghies to race and believe it or not, Sabots as well! These fleets are strong and tend to have
numerous events during the year that range from high competition to just for fun. There are also a
plethora of keel boat regattas and opportunities that occur all throughout the year. This is all being
brought up here, because some young sailors may already be getting involved with these fleets and
that is wonderful! These fleets are where they will end up having life long sailing friends and
sailing is a lifelong sport. Even past Olympians often end up in this group after they’ve hung up the
professional sailor gig.
                                               Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                                         Jr. Sailing Program
                                     Life After Sabots (continued)
     First rank these items for yourself (circle one):

     Sailing Skill Level (1 is beginner, 10 is high end racer):

                      1     2       3         4      5     6      7     8       9     10

     Size (weight): under 120 lbs. (small)                        120-150 (medium)                       150+ (big)

     Size (height): under 5’4” (small)                            5’4”-5’9” (medium)                     5’9” + (tall)

     Age (grade): 1st         2nd       3rd        4th   5th     6th    7th     8th   9th     10th   11th     12th

     Strength (1 is has difficulty pulling in a sabot sail in gusty conditions, 10 is water polo strong):

                      1     2       3         4      5     6      7     8       9     10


                                                                                                                         Laser     Laser
            420 Skipper                 420 Crew                FJ Skipper                 FJ Crew         Laser         Radial     4.7
 Skill           7+                           3+                       6+                    Any             6+            5+        5+
 Level
             Any (crew +              Any (crew +                Any (crew +            Any (crew +
           skipper should =         skipper should =           skipper should =       skipper should =      160+         130-160   100-130
Weight        220 lbs.+)               220 lbs.+)                 220 lbs.+)             220 lbs.+)
             Any (crew +              Any (crew +                Any (crew +            Any (crew +
                                                                                                                      Medium to    Small to
           skipper should =         skipper should =           skipper should =       skipper should =      Tall
                                                                                                                        Tall        Tall
Height        220 lbs.+)               220 lbs.+)                 220 lbs.+)             220 lbs.+)

             7th or older                     Any                7th or older                Any            Any           Any        Any
  Age

                 5+                           5+                       5+                    3+              8+            7+        6+
Strength




     (Continued on next page)
                               Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                      Jr. Sailing Program

                          Life After Sabots (continued)
FJ’s When to consider sailing a Flying Junior
Age: Going into 8th grade
Weight/Height: Any weight/height
Strength: Reasonable physical strength (Wall sits for 1 minute should be relatively simple)
Skill Level: Skipper – C1 or higher, Crew – No sailing experience necessary!

420’s: When to consider sailing a 420
Age: Does not matter
Weight/Height: Any weight/height
Strength: Reasonable physical strength (Wall sits for 1 minute should be relatively simple).
Pulling in main sheet can be an issue for smaller sailors
Skill Level: Skipper – C1 or higher, Crew – Some sailing experience is a plus

Laser Radials: When to consider sailing a Laser Radial
Age: Middle school or older would be recommended for these higher performance boats
Weight/Height: 130+ lbs. / the taller the better
Strength: Should be able to do 10 pull ups and wall sits for 5+ minutes without lots of struggling.
Skill Level: Should have at least one year experience sailing, though an older student could step
into this boat his/her first time sailing.

Lasers Full Rig
Age: High School or older is recommended
Weight/Height: 150+ lbs. / the taller the better (at least 5’5”)
Strength: Should be able to do 20 pull ups and wall sits for 10+ minutes without lots of struggling.
Skill Level: Should have sailed laser radials before or had some experience sailing.

Laser Full Rig vs Laser Radial vs Laser 4.7:
Laser Full Rig has the biggest sail and the tallest mast, followed by the Laser Radial and then the
Laser 4.7. This all comes down to skill and size. If you weigh more than 150 lbs., it is time to
consider a full rig. If you are between 130 and 150 lbs., sail a radial and less than that, you should
sail Laser 4.7’s.

OTHER OPTIONS
Keel Boats
Lido 14’s
29er’s
Wind Surfing
Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
   Jr. Sailing Program
                        Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                               Jr. Sailing Program
Glossary of terms:
Bailer          A bailer is a required piece of equipment for a Sabot. It is used to “bail”
                out water after capsizing. It is easy to make a bailer out of an old bleach
                bottle. Simply cut out the bottom and make sure the cap is tightly sealed.

Batten          Thin fiberglass or wood slats that are inserted in the leech of the sail for
                added support.

Block           A pulley that is encased in its own housing. A block will help to add
                purchase when pulling on a line.

Boom            Horizontal spar that supports the bottom of a sail.

Boom Vang       A line that runs from the boom to the base of the mast. The boom vang
                helps pull the boom down.

Bowline         Also known as a painter. The bowline is used to tie the boat to the dock. It
                is recommended that bowlines be 12 to 15 feet in length and at least ¼
                inch in diameter.

Burgee          The emblem for each yacht club.

Cat Boats       Sail boats with only one sail (i.e. Sabots & Lasers) are known as cat boats.

Centerboard     A blade projecting through the bottom of the hull in the center of the boat.
                This blade helps to keep the oat from going sideways in the water. It
                serves the same purpose as a daggerboard or a leeboard.

Class           Similar boats are grouped together to form a class.

Cleat           Fitting in which a line can be secured.

Clew            The outermost lower corner of a sail is the clew. It is where the foot and
                the leech of the sail meet. The outhaul is attached to the clew.

Clew Tie Down    Both Sabots and Lasers have a small line that goes through the clew of the
                 sail and around the boom. This line holds the sail to the boom.

Dagger Board     Very similar to a centerboard, but typically a dagger board can be pulled out
                 completely up and out of the boat where as a centerboard may retract into
                 the boat but does not usually come completely out. FJ’s and 420’s have
                 centerboard, Lasers have dagger board, and sabots have leeboards.

Dolly           A trailer that is used to move boats from their storage place to the docks.
                           Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                  Jr. Sailing Program
Glossary of terms (continued)
Downhaul           A line attached to the tack of the sail that pulls the sail down.

Duct Tape          A heavy duty tape that works well around water.

Fiberglass         Most Sabots and Lasers are made of fiberglass. It is a woven material
                   impregnated with a liquid resin that is very stiff when the resin dies.

Fleet              For racing purposes, sailors are grouped in fleets according to experience.
                   “A” fleet is usually the advanced group while “B” fleet is a more
                   intermediate.

Flying Junior      The FJ is a two-person boat used primarily by colleges on the west coast. It
                   is also used in many junior regattas as a training boat.

Foot               The bottom edge of the sail between the tack and the clew.

Gooseneck          A hinged fitting on the mast that connects the boom to the mast.

Grommet            A metal ring in a sail that allows lines to be connected to the sail. Both the
                   clew and the tack have grommets.

Gudgeon            A “U” shaped fitting on the back of a boat used to connect the rudder to the
                   hull. Most sailing dinghies have at least two gudgeons.

Head of the Sail   The top of the sail. It is the part of the sail where the luff meets the leech.

Hiking Out         The action of hanging over the side of the boat in order to keep it from
                   tipping over while sailing.

Hiking Boots       Boots used to help protect sailor’s feet. They also provide extra support while
                   hiking out.

Hiking Strap       A strap attached to the bottom of the boat under which a sailor places his/her
                   feet in order to hold the sailor in the boat when they are hiking out.

Hull               The actual body or shell of the boat.

Inspection Port    A hole in the hull of the boat which allows the skipper to reach inside the hull
                   to make repairs.

Jib                On boats with two or more sails the jib is the forward of the two sails.

Jibe (Gybe)        Turning the boat away from the wind so the stern passes through the wind.
                           Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                  Jr. Sailing Program
Glossary of terms (continued)
Laser              A one person training boat. Designed for larger junior sailors and adults.

Laser Radial       The same as a Laser with a smaller sail.

Leech              The outside edge of the sail is called the leech. The leech connects the head
                   and the clew.

Leeward            The side of the boat away from the wind.

Life Jacket        All juniors must wear a US Coast Guard approved Personal Floatation
                   Device. (PFD) This will keep them afloat in the water

Luff               The forward edge of the sail that connects the tack and the head of the sail.

Luffing            When the boat turns its bow toward the wind the sails are shaking back and
                   forth, the sail is said to be luffing.

Mainsheet          The line that brings the sail in and lets it out.

Marine Tex         A putty that can be used to fix small cracks and holes in boats.

Mast               The vertical spar that supports the sail.

Mast Tube or Can   A tube in the bottom of the boat into which the mast fits.

One-Design         Classes of boats that have specific requirements for design of the boat, sails
                   and equipment in order to keep the boats equal. Sabots and Lasers are
                          one-design boats.

Outhaul            The line that pulls the sail to the end of the boom. The outhaul is
                   connected to the clew of the sail.

Paddle             A device to help move the boat in case of emergency or lack of wind.

Pintles            The pins on the rudder that are inserted into the gudgeons on the stern of a
                   boat to connect the rudder to the hull.

Port               Port refers to the left side of the boat. Port also refers to a tack the boat is on.
                   If a boat is on port tack then the wind is coming over the left hand side of the
                   boat. The color red also indicates port.

Ratchet Block      Most commonly found in lasers. Ratchet blocks are used for the mainsheet in
                   Lasers and some Sabots. They aid in relieving pull on the mainsheet.
                              Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
                                    Jr. Sailing Program
Glossary of terms (continued)
Rudder                 Blade on the transom that steer the boat.
Sabot                  The Naples Sabot is a one person sailing dinghy. Sabots are 8 feet long and
                       are a one-design class.
Sail                   The part of the boat’s equipment which is usually made from cloth and
                       which is attached to the mast and is the primary reason for movement.
Sailing Instructions   At each regatta, sailing instructions are made available to all competitors.
                       These instructions tell the sailors the schedule for the day, the starting order,
                       and any special rules for the races.
Shackle                A “U” shaped hook containing a pin which is used to connect objects
                       together.
Sheets                 All the ropes or lines on boats which are used to control sails are referred to
                       as sheets (i.e., mainsheet)
Silicon                A liquid or gel rubber substance which when hardener is used to create a
                       waterproof seal.
Skippers Meeting       All regattas begin with a skippers meeting. This is a time where special
                       instructions will be given to the competitors. Competitors will also be able
                       to ask questions to clarify uncertain topics.
Starboard              Starboard refers to the right side of the boat. Starboard also refers to the
                       tack the boat is on. If the wind is coming over the right side of the boat than
                       it is on starboard tack. The color green also denotes starboard.
Tack                   1. Changing of direction when sailing. If a boat’s bow passes through the
                       wind then it is said to be tacking. 2. The direction the boat is sailing (see
                       starboard and port) 3. The lower front corner of the sail where the luff and
                       the foot of the sail meet.
Thwart                 The seat in the center of a sabot.
Tiller                 The long, horizontal piece of wood that is connected to the top of the
                       rudder, which changes the boats direction when moved from side to side.
                       The tiller helps you steer the boat.
Tiller Extension       Hinged extension attached to the tiller that allows the skipper to steer the
                       boat while sitting forward and hiking out. This is a must for all boats!
Transom                The very back edge of the boat is called the transom or the stern.
Traveler               A line or track running across the boat that the mainsheet is attached to.
Windward               Towards the wind.

								
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