Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out

Contents - North Lindsey College

VIEWS: 8 PAGES: 35

									Learner Equal
Opportunities Policy
                                                                                                      Contents
                                                                                                            Page
Overview                                                                                                        1
1           Summary                                                                                             1
2           Further Information                                                                                 1
3           History                                                                                             1
4           Approval                                                                                            1
                                                                                                                1
5           Review

Key Information                                                                                                 2
A simple, stand alone reference guide with outline information for all staff

1           Summary                                                                                             2
                                                                                                                2
            1.1 Purpose
                                                                                                                2
            1.2 Statement                                                                                       2
2           Responsibilities                                                                                    3
3           Legal Requirements                                                                                  3
4           Positive About Disabled People

Primary Information                                                                                             4
More detailed information for staff/learners on the College Equal Opportunities Policy

1           Definitions                                                                                        4
            1.1 Equal Opportunities                                                                            4
            2       Responsibilities                                                                           5
            2.1 Learners                                                                                       5
            2.2 Staff                                                                                          6
            3       The Five Dimensions To Equal Opportunities                                                 6
            4       Policy Guidelines                                                                          7
            4.1 Learners                                                                                       7
            5       Procedure For Dealing With Incidents Of Discrimination                                     9
            5.1 Learners On Work Placement                                                                    10
Supporting Information                                                                                        11
Detailed information for those with responsibilities for ensuring the implementation of this policy

1           Legislation                                                                                       11
            1.1 The Equal Pay Act 1970                                                                        11
            1.2 The Sex Discrimination Act 1975                                                               11
            1.3 The Race Relations Act 1976                                                                   11
            1.4 The Disability Discrimination Act 1995                                                        12
            1.5 The Protection from Harassment Act 1997                                                       12
            1.6 The Human Rights Act 1998                                                                     13
            1.7 The Public Order Act 1998                                                                     13
            1.8 The Gender Reassignment Regulations 1999                                                      14
            1.9 The Race Relations Amendment Act 2000                                                         14
            1.10 E U Employment Directive 2000                                                                14
            1.11 Special Educational Needs and Disability Act 2002                                            15
            1.12 The Employment Equality (Religion and Belief) Regulations 2003                               15
            1.13 The Employment Equality (Sexual Orientation) Regulations 2003                                15
            1.14 The Disability Discrimination Act 2005                                                       16
            1.15 The Employment Equality (Age) Regulations 2006                                               16
2           Social Diversity and Inclusive Language                                                           17
3           Equal Opportunities Procedure for Learners on work placement                                      23
4           Sources of help and advice                                                                        33


J anuar y 200 7                                                                                         R ef : P O L001 6
 Learner Equal
 Opportunities Policy
                                                                                                                 Overview
 1.        Summary

 This is an explanation for learners of the policy and procedures regarding learner rights and responsibilities in relation to
 Equal Opportunities issues.

 2.        Further Information

          Director of Learner Support Services
          Human Resources Officer
          Heads of Schools.

 3.        History
 This document was originally produced by a working party comprising:

          Vice Principal                           Julia Dingle
          Equal Opportunities Co-ordinator         Rachel Johnson
          Student Services Manager                 Graham Clarke
          TEC Programmes Manager                   Andy Gillham
          UNISON Representative                    Angela George.

 Further consultation included from:

          Principal
          Student Services Planning Group
          Equal Opportunities Committee.

 4.        Approval

           The policy was approved by the Senior Management Team on 15 November 2000.

 5.        Review
 This document will be reviewed annually by the Human Resources Officer in consultation with the Equal Opportunities
 Committee, Personnel, UCU & UNISON. 




J anuar y 200 7                                                 Page - 1 -                                           R ef : P O L001 6
 Learner Equal
 Opportunities Policy
                                                                                                             Key Information
                                                                       A simple, stand alone reference guide with outline information for all staff


 1.        Summary

 1.1       Purpose
 To ensure:

          That the college protects individuals from all forms of discrimination, harassment and victimisation i.e. Full & Part-
           time learners & those on work based training, trainees.
          That all learners are aware of their rights and responsibilities in relation to Equal Opportunities.

 1.2       Statement
 The College is committed to providing an environment that reflects and respects the diversity of individuals and ensures
 equality of opportunity for all.

          The College seeks to create an ethos and environment which reflects the diverse community at large, because we
           value the individual contributions of all people.
          We will treat all learners with respect and dignity and provide a learning environment free from unlawful
           discrimination, harassment or victimisation.
          No individual should be disadvantaged or treated less favourably because of conditions or requirements imposed,
           which can not be objectively justified by the College.
          The College will seek to make reasonable adjustments to its arrangements and premises with a view to avoiding
           any disadvantages to individuals.

 2.        Responsibilities
 Director of Learner Support Services has overall responsibility for the procedure.

 The Human Resources Officer has responsibility for staff training and dissemination of the policy information, monitoring
 systems and procedures and development and implementation of the action plan in relation to Equal Opportunities.

 Heads of Schools have a responsibility for ensuring that staff and learners understand the policy and that the policy is
 implemented within their School.

 All staff have responsibility for ensuring that both they and the learners they work with understand and implement the policy.

 All learners have personal responsibility for the implementation of the policy and must show respect and consideration for
 others within the College community. 




J anuar y 200 7                                                 Page - 2 -                                                       R ef : P O L001 6
 Learner Equal
 Opportunities Policy
                                                                                                           Key Information
                                                                     A simple, stand alone reference guide with outline information for all staff


 3.        Legal Requirements
 The College is committed to achieving equality of opportunity for all people who visit the college and recognise the
 requirements under:

                 The Equal Pay Act 1970
                 The Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974
                 The Sex Discrimination Act 1975
                 The Disability Discrimination Act 1995
                 The Protection From Harassment Act 1997
                 The Data Protection Act 1998
                 The Human Rights Act 1998
                 The Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998
                 The Public Order Act 1998
                 The Gender Re-assignment Regulations 1999
                 Special Educational Needs and Disability Act 2002
                 The Employment Equality (Religion or Belief) Regulations 2003
                 The Employment Equality (Sexual Orientation) Regulations 2003
                 The Disability Discrimination Act 2005
                 The Employment Equality (Age) Regulations 2006

 Together with associated Codes of Practice

 4.        Positive About Disabled People
 The College is an authorised user of the Positive About Disabled People logo. 




J anuar y 200 7                                               Page - 3 -                                                       R ef : P O L001 6
 Learner Equal
 Opportunities Policy
                                                                                                   Primary Information
                                                            More detailed information for staff/learners on the College Equal Opportunities Policy


 1.        Definitions

 1.1       Equal Opportunities

 The means by which disadvantage and discrimination is reduced and eliminated by legislation and positive action.

 Equal Opportunities aims to ensure that no group receives less favourable treatment, thereby enabling all people to have
 equal access to the provision of goods, services, education, training, facilities, premises and employment.

                                   IT DOES NOT MEAN TREATING EVERYONE THE SAME

 SEXISM
 All attitudes, procedures and patterns - economic, social and cultural - whose effect though not necessarily whose conscious
 intention, is to create, maintain and extend power, influence and privilege of one group of people over another. Sexism is
 prejudice or discrimination on the basis of gender.

 PREJUDICE
 An opinion or feeling about people of a different group which is formed beforehand, without informed knowledge, thought or
 reason and which is likely to be sustained even in the face of evidence to the contrary.

 SEXUAL DISCRIMINATION
 Unequal treatment of an individual or group on account of their gender or marital status.

 HARASSMENT/BULLYING
 Harassment can constitute causing another to fear violence will be used against them. It can also involve threatening,
 abusive or insulting words or behaviour. This offence can also involve the display of any writing or sign which is threatening,
 abusive or insulting. causing alarm or distress to a person also constitutes harassment.

 SEXUAL HARASSMENT
 Unwanted conduct of a sexual nature or other conduct based on sex affecting the dignity of men and women at work
 (European community code of Practice). Repeated and/or unwanted verbal or sexual advances, sexually explicit or
 derogatory statements or sexually discriminatory remarks. (TUC)

 A DISABLED PERSON
 Under the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 a disabled person is anyone with a physical or mental impairment which has a
 substantial and long term adverse effect upon their ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities.

 PREJUDICE
 Pre-judging without having correct information which leads to irrational preferences.

 DISCRIMINATION
 To single out a particular person, group, etc, for special favour often because of a characteristic such as race, colour,
 disability, sex or social class. Unfavourable treatment based on prejudice. 




J anuar y 200 7                                                 Page - 4 -                                                      R ef : P O L001 6
 Learner Equal
 Opportunities Policy
                                                                                                   Primary Information
                                                            More detailed information for staff/learners on the College Equal Opportunities Policy


 DIRECT DISCRIMINATION
 Where a person treats someone less favourably than another person is, or would be, treated on the grounds of sex or racial
 group.

 INDIRECT DISCRIMINATION
 Where an unjustifiable requirement or condition is applied equally but, whether intentional or not, has a disproportionate
 effect on one sex, racial group or disabled people because the proportion of people belonging to these groups who can
 comply with the requirement/condition is considerably smaller than the proportion of people in the opposite group who can
 comply with it.

 VICTIMISATION
 This consists of treating a person less favourably than others are or would be treated in the same circumstances because
 that person has made a complaint of allegation of discrimination, or has acted as a witness or informant in connection with
 proceedings under equality legislation.

 POSITIVE DISCRIMINATION
 When a person is appointed for a job solely on the basis of their ethnic origin, sex or disability. This is unlawful and against
 equal opportunity.

 POSITIVE ACTION
 Under the Race Relations Act 1976 and the Sex Discrimination Act 1975, positive action can be taken where a particular sex
 or ethnic group is under represented in area of employment;

          To provide facilities for special training which would help them compete on equal terms for jobs;
 or
          To encourage them to apply for posts in the organisation/those areas of employment or training.

 2         Responsibilities

 2.1       Learners

 Specific legal requirements are laid on educational establishments for whom it is unlawful to discriminate:

          In the terms on which they offer education

          By refusing to accept an application

          In the way learners are afforded access to benefits, facilities or services

          By exclusion of a learner from the establishment, or subjection to any other detriment. 




J anuar y 200 7                                                 Page - 5 -                                                      R ef : P O L001 6
 Learner Equal
 Opportunities Policy
                                                                                                    Primary Information
                                                             More detailed information for staff/learners on the College Equal Opportunities Policy


 2.2        Staff
 It is unlawful to discriminate in:
           Recruitment and selection
           Terms of employment
           Promotion or transfer
           Access to benefits, facilities or services
           Dismissal.

 Staff In College are legally obliged to:
           Act in an accordance with the Code of Conduct
           Report all incidents
           Co-operate with agreed policies.

 Managers‟ and Supervisors‟ responsibilities
           Foster a workplace free of harassment/bullying
           To intervene
           To follow appropriate College policies and procedures.


 3          The Five Dimensions To Equal Opportunities

 Discrimination
 Eliminating any discrimination in relation to staff recruitment and promotion, the purchase of goods and services, or
 curriculum management.

 Harassment/Bullying
 Ensuring that all learners, staff and visitors can go about their business in an atmosphere free of threat or abuse.

 Widening Participation
 Encouraging the maximum access to the full range of courses and other College services for people of all social
 backgrounds and cultures.

 Inclusive Learning
 Providing support to enable individual lea mers of different abilities and needs to progress through the
 curriculum towards successful achievement.

 Celebrating Diversity
 Recognising and reflecting the positive contributions of men and women of different cultures, religions, abilities, ages, and
 sexual orientation. 




J anuar y 200 7                                                  Page - 6 -                                                      R ef : P O L001 6
 Learner Equal
 Opportunities Policy
                                                                                                   Primary Information
                                                            More detailed information for staff/learners on the College Equal Opportunities Policy


 4         Policy Guidelines

 4.1       Learners

 Awareness Raising

          All learners will be given information on equal opportunities and harassment as part of the induction process and
           tutorial programme. In this way learners will be encouraged to consider the issue of discrimination in a responsible
           manner and develop and understanding of the College's stance on this and related issues.


 Ethos and Atmosphere

          In accordance with expressed policy the ethos and atmosphere of the College should show respect for the diversity
           of the learner body.


 Entry and Recruitment Procedures

          Information on equal opportunities issues should be included on enrolment forms.

 Course Publicity

          Course publicity and marketing materials will be monitored to ensure that minority groups have equal access to
           information and opportunities.
          Marketing materials reflecting a diverse college community should be encouraged alongside positive images of
           minority groups.

 Facilities and Resources

          Learning resources will be made available which support education in diverse context
          The individual needs of learners will be met by the provision of appropriate facilities.

 Curriculum Delivery

          Teaching styles will be developed which ensure that minority groups are given equal attention in diverse teaching
           situations
          Curriculum materials/presentations will be critically reviewed by course teams on a regular basis to ensure that
           they are free from any form of bias or discriminatory assumptions and images.
          To propose ways in which the curriculum can be adapted where necessary, to take account of diversity of needs,
           interests and experiences of learners and those with special educational needs. 




J anuar y 200 7                                                 Page - 7 -                                                      R ef : P O L001 6
 Learner Equal
 Opportunities Policy
                                                                                                   Primary Information
                                                            More detailed information for staff/learners on the College Equal Opportunities Policy

 Childcare responsibilities: Staff and Students

          The College recognises that, as a result of the inequality in childcare and other domestic duties parents/guardians
           suffer, it will need to undertake special measures to ensure genuine equality of access for staff and learners with
           care responsibilities.
          The College will endeavour to provide nurseries/creches at the institution for both staff and learners whenever they
           are required to be on the premises. Flexibility into timetabling will be encouraged to assist those with family
           responsibilities. Additionally, the College will provide refresher courses for those returning from career breaks and
           will make appropriate arrangements for job sharing and part-time working.

 Dietary Requirements

 The College catering facilities mananged by „Chartwells‟ will seek to ensure that all dietary requirements are catered for in
 the campus eating areas.

          Bistro
          Diner
          Cafe Trois
          Kingsway Centre
          Beacon Centre.

 Examples of special dietary requirements include:

          Vegetarian
          Vegan
          Gluten Free
          Allergies e.g. Foods containing nuts
          Halal/Kosher and other religious requirements.

 Where possible these foods will be clearly labelled and separated from other foods.

 Any special dietary requests should be communicated to either:

 Nick Parker                             Scott Wilson
 Scolarest Manager                       Human Resources Officer
 Tel: 01724 294169                       Tel: 01724 294602

 Alternatively staff/learners can complete a suggestion form and place it in one of the numerous suggestions boxes placed
 around the campus.

 Student Access

          The College will apply the principle and practice of fair selection to the recruitment and selection of learners,
           recognising that many groups in society covered by the equal opportunities policy are under-represented among
           learners, or are deterred by discrimination or stereotypes from attempting particular courses. 




J anuar y 200 7                                                 Page - 8 -                                                      R ef : P O L001 6
 Learner Equal
 Opportunities Policy
                                                                                                  Primary Information
                                                           More detailed information for staff/learners on the College Equal Opportunities Policy

          There will be an annual survey of the learner body which will provide a profile according to equal opportunities
           issues. The equal opportunities working party will use this survey to set targets for improving the position of groups
           found to be under-represented; will consider strategies for implementing the improvements and will review
           progress and strategy annually.

          The College will develop positive dialogue with local employers, community organisations, churches, trades
           unions, job centres and voluntary organisations to ascertain needs and aspirations, and to use the information
           constructively when preparing its publicity material to attract potential learners.

 5         Procedure for Dealing with Incidents of Discrimination/Harassment

 Confidential advice on the procedure and associated matters may be obtained in the first instance from the Student Advisers,
 College Counsellors, the Colleges Human Resources Officer or the Heads of Schools. Confidentiality is to be maintained, by
 all parties involved, concerning all matters referred for resolution under these proceedings.

      1    The learner should report the incident as promptly as possible, in writing or in person, to the Heads of Schools or
           the Human Resources Officer in the first instance, who will initiate an immediate inquiry, referring where necessary
           to other college polices eg grievance, harassment etc.
      2    The Head of School or Human Resources Officer will report the complaint immediately to the College‟s Director of
           Learner Support Services who shall maintain a confidential record of such complaints and how they are resolved.
      3    The learner bringing the complaint may be accompanied by a representative, possibly their Student Adviser, or
           friend of her/his choice at all stages of the procedure.
      4    The learner or member of staff against whom the complaint is made may also be accompanied by a representative
           or friend of her/his choice at all stages of the procedure.
      5    The Head of School, or in her/his absence the Human Resources Officer, shall normally interview all parties
           concerned within five working days of receipt of the complaint.
      6    Effective conciliation will be sought as a primary objective throughout the procedure.
      7    The learner and the person against whom the complaint is made shall be entitled to counselling if either party so
           wishes.
      8    Where at any stage following receipt of the complaint it appears to the Head of School, or in his/her absence the
           Human Resources Officer, that
          The complaint should be investigated as a disciplinary matter; and/or
          There may be grounds for suspension of the person against whom the complaint is made pending investigation the
           provisions and entitlements in the College's Staff and Student Disciplinary Procedures shall apply (see appropriate)
      9    Following the conclusion of the Investigation the outcome and any action taken (including any recommendation
           that a disciplinary enquiry should be held) will be communicated in writing within ten working days to the learner
           bringing the complaint and to the person against whom the complaint was made.
      10 If the learner is not satisfied with any decision regarding his/her complaint, she/he should communicate the matter
         in writing to the College's Senior Management Team, within ten working days of receiving the communication
         regarding the outcome of the investigation by the Head of School, or in her/his absence by the Human Resources
         Officer. 




J anuar y 200 7                                                Page - 9 -                                                      R ef : P O L001 6
 Learner Equal
 Opportunities Policy
                                                                                                 Primary Information
                                                          More detailed information for staff/learners on the College Equal Opportunities Policy


 5.1       Learners on Work Placement
       1   If a learner alleges that he/she has been subjected to harassment whilst on work experience, it should be reported
           to the Head of School which the learner is studying who will then inform the Human Resources Officer.

       2   The learner must immediately be withdrawn from the placement, and the placement must not be used until the
           outcome of any investigation or when the Human Resources Officer is satisfied that the placement meets the
           Colleges Equal Opportunities Policy.

       3   The Head of School or other senior member of staff should investigate and liaises with the Company/establishment
           concerned. If the allegation is welt founded and no satisfactory action is taken, the Principal should be informed
           and any future use of the placement must be terminated.

       4   Further information can be obtained from the Human Resources Officer, and a copy of the Equal Opportunities
           Procedure for Students on Work Experience can be found in the Supporting Information section of this policy. 




J anuar y 200 7                                              Page - 10 -                                                      R ef : P O L001 6
 Learner Equal
 Opportunities Policy
                                                                                                Supporting Information
                                                     Detailed information for those with responsibilities for ensuring the implementation of this policy


 1            Legislation
 1.1          The Equal Pay Act 1970
 The purpose of the Equal Pay Act is to eliminate discrimination between men and women in pay and other terms of their
 contracts of employment such as piecework, output, bonus payments, holidays and sick leave.

 It covers:
      like work
      work related as equivalent
      work of equal value.

 It does not give anyone a right to claim equal pay with another person of the same sex.

 1.2          The Sex Discrimination Act 1975
 The Sex Discrimination Act makes it illegal to treat a woman or a man less favourably on the grounds of their sex or marital
 status (ie whether they are married or not) in employment, training, education and provision of goods, facilities and services
 to members of the public.

 This includes:
      in the selection process
      the terms o which a job is offered
      choosing a successful applicant
      in opportunities for promotion
      transfers or training
      in benefits granted by an employer
      in dismissals, disciplinary hearings or other unfair treatment of employees.

 1.3          The Race Relations Act 1976 (RRA)
 The Race Relations Act 1976 makes it illegal to discriminate on the grounds of colour, race, nationality, ethnic or national
 origins in the fields of:
      employment;
      training and related matters;
      education;
      the provision of goods, facilities and services;
      accommodation.

 This includes:
      in the selection process,
      the terms on which a job is offered
      choosing a successful applicant
      in opportunities for promotion
      transfers or training
      in benefits granted by an employer, in dismissals, disciplinary hearings or other unfair treatment of employees. 




J anuar y 200 7                                                    Page - 11 -                                                        R ef : P O L001 6
 Learner Equal
 Opportunities Policy
                                                                                               Supporting Information
                                                    Detailed information for those with responsibilities for ensuring the implementation of this policy


 1.4        The Disability Discrimination Act 1995 (DDA)
 This Act makes it illegal to treat someone with a disability less favourably than other people, unless there is justifiable reason
 to do so. The courts will decide if the reason is justified.

 The DDA affects:

      employers and service providers
      disabled people
      landlords and others who are responsible for letting or selling property

 A person is disabled if they have:

      “ … a physical or mental impairment which has a substantial and long term adverse effect on his or her ability to carry
       out normal day to day activities.”

 Reasonable Adjustment

 In order to help a disabled person to do the job, employers will have to decide what changes are necessary to the workplace
 or the ways the work is done, and make any changes that are reasonable. When considering what is reasonable, employers
 will take into account how much the changes would cost and how much they would help.

 1.5        The Protection from Harassment Act 1997
 This Act makes harassment both a civil tort and a criminal offence.
 The principal aim of the Act is to deal with stalking but the legislation also provides an additional remedy for those who are
 subjected at work, or outside work, to racial or sexual harassment, or to harassment/bullying on grounds of sexual orientation
 or disability.
 To constitute harassment under the act the conduct:
      can constitute causing another to fear that violence will be used against them
      can involve threatening, abusive or insulting words or behaviour, or disorderly behaviour
      can involve the display of any writing, sign or other visible representation which is threatening, abusive or insulting
      can include alarming the person or causing them distress
      must have occurred on at least two occasions
      must be of a nature that a reasonable person in possession of the same information would consider it to be harassment.
 The act provides for:
      a maximum sentence for causing fear of violence of 5 years imprisonment and/or an unlimited fine
      a maximum sentence for causing harassment of 6 months imprisonment and/or a £5000 fine
      the Court to make an order to protect the victim of the offence, similar in its extent to a civil injunction, which, if
       breached, will constitute contempt of court and will be punishable by up to 5 years imprisonment or an unlimited fine
      the victim of the crime of harassment to take civil proceedings to obtain damages for any anxiety caused by the
       harassment and any financial loss resulting from the harassment. 




J anuar y 200 7                                                   Page - 12 -                                                        R ef : P O L001 6
 Learner Equal
 Opportunities Policy
                                                                                                Supporting Information
                                                     Detailed information for those with responsibilities for ensuring the implementation of this policy

 Identifying Harassment/Bullying

 Harassment/bullying is unwanted behaviour that is unreciprocated:

      physical contact
      verbal and written communications
      visual displays
      isolation and non co-operation
      coercion
      intrusion.

 It is important to be aware that people will not necessarily complain that they are being racially/sexually harassed It is
 therefore necessary to take account of race, gender and discrimination as factors in incidents or problems.

 Frequently, problems will surface in other ways, such as:

      absence from work/study
      under-performance
      changes in behaviour
      appearing to be 'over-sensitive' to criticism
      being quiet and/or withdrawn
      being aggressive and/or argumentative
      reluctance to be involved with a particular person, activity or service
      low recruitment in particular areas
      poor retention in particular areas.

 1.6        The Human Rights Act 1998 (HRA)
 Came into force on the 2nd October 2000.

 Article 14 of the European Convention on Human Rights states that:

 “ … the enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in this Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any
 grounds as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national
 minority, property, birth or other status.”

 All public authorities are required to adhere to the HRA.

 This means that courts, which themselves are considered public authorities, will have to interpret domestic law in line with
 the HRA. This means that issues such as sexual orientation could have been ruled unlawful despite not being directly
 covered by UK legislation until December 2003.

 1.7        The Public Order Act 1998
 Under this Act it is against the law to commit acts of racism, sexism, and other forms of discrimination in a public place. 




J anuar y 200 7                                                    Page - 13 -                                                        R ef : P O L001 6
 Learner Equal
 Opportunities Policy
                                                                                              Supporting Information
                                                   Detailed information for those with responsibilities for ensuring the implementation of this policy


 1.8       The Gender Reassignment Regulations 1999 (SDA)
 Came into force on 1st May 1999. Extends the SDA to cover discrimination in employment and vocational training on
 grounds of gender reassignment.

 “Gender reassignment” is defined by the SDA as

  “ … a process, which is undertaken under medical supervision for the purposes of reassigning a person‟s sex by changing
 physiological or other characteristics of sex, and includes any part of such a process.”

 The Regulations do not cover the provision of goods, facilities or services.

 1.9       The Race Relations Amendment Act 2000 (RRAA)
 The Race Relations Amendment Act 2000 places a „general‟ duty on all public authorities eg Local Councils, Schools,
 Colleges, the Police etc to:

      eliminate unlawful racial discrimination; and
      promote equality of opportunity; and
      promote good race relations between persons of different racial groups.

 Public authorities also have to have in place policies and action plans which set out how they are going to meet the duties
 mentioned above and other more „specific‟ duties placed upon them such as staff training, monitoring their staff and
 customers by ethnic origin and ensuring that their policies and procedures to not have an adverse impact on one group of
 people in relation to another.

 1.10      EU Employment Directive 2000
 The Directive put in place a general framework for equal treatment in employment and vocational training and guidance. It is
 commonly called the Employment Directive.

 It is designed to outlaw discrimination at work and training on grounds of age, sexual orientation, disability af religion or
 belief. It sets a framework, which will ensure that there are minimum standards for combating discrimination throughout the
 European Union.

 How a directive works, is that a member state such as the UK, passes new legislation in it‟s own country, to meet
 thimescales in the European Directive. These dates are 2003 for Religion and Sexual Orientation and 2006 for Age.

 In the UK discrimination on the grounds of Religion and Sexual Orientation became illegal in December 2003 and
 discrimination on the grounds of Age will be illegal by the end of 2006.

 There have also been changes to the Disability Discrimination Act that took effect in October 2004 to account for the
 changes introduced in the Directive. 




J anuar y 200 7                                                  Page - 14 -                                                        R ef : P O L001 6
 Learner Equal
 Opportunities Policy
                                                                                                Supporting Information
                                                     Detailed information for those with responsibilities for ensuring the implementation of this policy


 1.11      Special Educational Needs and Disability Act 2002 (SENDA)

     Also referred to as Part 4 of the Disability Discrimination Act 1995.

     SENDA is part of the DDA that relates to Education.

     It came into force in September 2002. It means that Colleges and Local Education Authorities have legal
      responsibilities:

          not to treat disabled learners less favourably; and also
          to provide reasonable adjustments for disabled learners.
          these responsibilities apply to any service, which is provided specifically for students eg all teaching, catering
           facilities, outings and trips etc.
          the responsibilities are also „anticipatory‟ which means that the likely needs of disabled learners must be
           anticipated and provision should be made in advance ie they should not just respond to the individual‟s needs of
           one learner when the situation arises.

 1.12      The Employment Equality (Religion and Belief) Regulations 2003
 The regulations apply to all employment and vocational training in respect of recruitment, terms and conditions, promotions,
 transfers, dismissals and training.

 Religion and belief is defined as:

     any religion, religious belief or similar philosophical belief
     includes those who do not have a religious belief
     extends beyond the move well known religious and faiths to beliefs such as paganism and Humanism.

 It is unlawful on the grounds of religion and belief to:

     directly discriminate against anyone
     indirectly discriminate against anyone
     subject someone to harassment
     victimise someone
     discriminate against someone after the working relationship has ended.

 1.13      The Employment Equality (Sexual Orientation) Regulations 2003
 The regulations apply to:

     all employment and vocational training
     actual or perceived sexual orientation

 In respect of recruitment, terms and conditions, promotions, transfers, dismissals and training. 




J anuar y 200 7                                                    Page - 15 -                                                        R ef : P O L001 6
 Learner Equal
 Opportunities Policy
                                                                                               Supporting Information
                                                    Detailed information for those with responsibilities for ensuring the implementation of this policy

 Sexual orientation is defined as:

 Orientation towards persons of the same sex – lesbians and gay men

 Orientation towards persons of the opposite sex – heterosexual

 Orientation towards persons of the same and the opposite sex – bisexual

 It is unlawful on the grounds of sexual orientation to:

     directly discriminate against anyone
     indirectly discriminate against anyone
     subject someone to harassment
     victimise someone
     discriminate against someone after the working relationship has ended.

 1.14      The Disability Discrimination Act 2005 (DDA)
 In April 2005 a new Disability Discrimination Act was passed by Parliament, which amends or extends existing provisions in
 the DDA 1995, including:

     making it unlawful for operators of transport vehicles to discriminate against disabled people
     making it easier for disabled people to rent property and for tenants to make disability related adaptations
     making sure that private clubs with 25 or more members cannot keep disabled people out, just because they have a
      disability
     extending protection to cover people who have HIV, cancer and multiple sclerosis from the moment they are diagnosed
     ensuring that discrimination law covers all the activities of the public sector
     requiring public bodies to promote equality of opportunity for disabled people.

 Some of the new laws will come into force in December 2005, and some in December 2006 (source: www.direct.gov.uk)

 1.15      The Employment Equality (Age) Regulations 2006
 These regulations apply to all employers, private and public sector vocational training providers, trade unions, professional
 organisations, employer organisations and trustees and managers of occupational pension schemes. In this context an
 employer is anyone who has employees or who enters into a contract with a person for them to do work. The .regulations
 cover recruitment, terms and conditions, promotions, transfers, dismissals and training. They do not cover the provision of
 goods and services.

 The regulations make it unlawful on the grounds of age to:
     discriminate directly against anyone - that is, to treat them less favourably than others because of their age – unless
      objectively justified
     discriminate indirectly against anyone - that is; to apply a criterion, provision or practice which disadvantages people of
      a particular age unless it can be objectively justified
     subject someone to harassment. Harassment is unwanted conduct that violates a persons‟ dignity or creates an
      intimidating, hostile; degrading, humiliating or otherwise environment for them having regard to all the circumstances
      including the perception of the victim 




J anuar y 200 7                                                   Page - 16 -                                                        R ef : P O L001 6
 Learner Equal
 Opportunities Policy
                                                                                              Supporting Information
                                                   Detailed information for those with responsibilities for ensuring the implementation of this policy



     victimise someone because they have made or intend to make a complaint or allegation or have given or intend to give
      evidence in relation to a complaint of discrimination grounds of age
     discriminate against someone, in certain circumstances after the working relationship has ended.

 2         Social Diversity And Inclusive Language

 As a working community, North Lindsey College is increasingly characterised by social diversity. This is partly the result of
 some of the positive policies that have been adopted in recent years; policies such as the recruitment of mature students and
 the setting of staff targets. The College is committed to promoting equal opportunities and aims to create an environment
 where people are encouraged to realise their potential, whether as employees or learners.

 One of the ways of working towards these aims is to foster a greater awareness of the role that language plays across all
 sectors of the College. Since this is an educational institution, we have a responsibility to use language in ways which make
 all members of the community feel included and to create a climate of equality, understanding and mutual respect. However,
 language can also be used in ways which exclude or discriminate against particular social groups. In these guidelines, the
 College has identified aspects of language use which can cause offence, regardless of the intentions of the speaker or writer.
 Three main aspects of language are highlighted: language which excludes, language which defines people in stereotypical
 ways, and language which degrades.

 In writing this document, the College has tried to keep in mind different dimensions of language use: spoken communication,
 informal written language, publications and visual images [such as College brochures] and non-verbal communication in face
 to face interaction. We have also tried to keep in mind language about people from different social groups as well as
 language addressed to them. In each section, we have also drawn attention to positive communicative strategies and
 inclusive uses of language.

 This is not intended to be a fully comprehensive document. The purpose of this set of guidelines is to raise general principles
 and, wherever possible, to illustrate these with examples.

 LANGUAGE AND AGE
 Ageing is something which affects all of us, yet despite this there can be negative attitudes towards older people who are
 often seen as being rigid in their views, unable to learn new things, and in the case of the very old, a burden upon society.
 Attitudes towards age are in part, conditioned by the rapid technological changes taking place in our society. Increasingly,
 people past the age of forty are deemed to be no longer employable. In reality, the vast majority of older people in our
 society are fit, active and independent and are just as capable of responding to the dictates of a technologically advanced
 society as those much younger than themselves.

 Excluding or including older people?

 All too often, older people are excluded in the images we see around us. Yet a significant number of older people are
 interested in the opportunities for personal development offered by colleges and universities whether as students or as
 employees. The images and the language of institutions of further and higher education such as ours need to reflect this
 dimension of social diversity.

 The term preferred by most older people is older people. Terms such as elderly are no longer felt to be acceptable. Many
 object to being referred to as pensioners or senior citizens. 




J anuar y 200 7                                                  Page - 17 -                                                        R ef : P O L001 6
 Learner Equal
 Opportunities Policy
                                                                                              Supporting Information
                                                   Detailed information for those with responsibilities for ensuring the implementation of this policy



 Challenging the stereotypes.

 Verbal and non-verbal images which portray older people as inflexible, clumsy, frail or dependent can be avoided and
 positive images of ageing can be found. Fitness and health need not only be associated with youth. The best images portray
 older people as rounded individuals who have as valuable a role to play in society as anyone else. Careful use of language
 can go some way towards addressing the negative images of ageing which exist in our society.

 Counteracting negative images of ageing

 Language is a powerful means of structuring attitudes about age. Images of older people can be used in very derogatory
 ways. Take, for example, sexist comments such as 'he's behaving like an old woman'; or equally sexist remarks about older
 women such as 'she looks like mutton dressed as lamb'. Other examples of terms that are very likely to cause offence are:
 old dear, old fogey, old folks, silly old cow the old dragon. Expressions such as these serve to create negative images of
 older people, and alternatives can be found.

 LANGUAGE, CLASS AND INSTITUTIONAL POSITIONING

 North Lindsey College attracts students from different parts of the country with different social class backgrounds. The
 College is a major employer in this area of North Lincolnshire and currently has a large and diverse range of employees.
 Many College staff come from local rural or working class communities. It is important for staff and students of all social
 backgrounds to feel that are afforded equality of treatment in their work and their studies at North Lindsey and to know that
 their particular contributions to college life are valued.

 Exclusive of inclusive language values?

 Many students at North Lindsey have regional accents and some say may feel reluctant to speak up in classes and in other
 types of teaching/learning activities. Some students of working class origin may feel that judgements are made about their
 academic abilities primarily from the way they speak and some feel pressure to accommodate a more middle class voice in
 both speaking and writing.

 Some staff from local rural or working class communities may also feel reluctant to speak up at meetings on campus. But
 everyone should be encouraged to participate. Since diversity enriches any academic community, we need to create a
 climate where different voices can be heard.

 Language which defines and classifies

 The nature of the work being undertaken by most staff at the College has changed dramatically in recent years, yet long
 established practices for describing and classifying staff have still not changed. Some job titles are now outmoded and need
 rethinking. Unnecessary linguistic distinctions still remain in place, such as the distinction between those who receive wages
 and those who receive salaries; between professional, semi-skilled and unskilled; between lecturers and support staff Labels
 such as these are obstacles to the creation of an equal opportunities culture.

 From exclusive thinking to inclusive thinking

 The term staff should be used to include all staff but there is still considerable variation on campus in the ways in which the
 term is used. It is important that when staff handbooks are prepared, when services to staff are offered by the College or
 when circulars are mailed out, the aim should be to be as inclusive as possible. 




J anuar y 200 7                                                  Page - 18 -                                                        R ef : P O L001 6
 Learner Equal
 Opportunities Policy
                                                                                              Supporting Information
                                                   Detailed information for those with responsibilities for ensuring the implementation of this policy



 Terms of address: Respecting preferences

 Many staff in the College are on a first name basis with their immediate colleagues, and are happy to be addressed by their
 first and last name, in speaking or writing. It is important that there should be equal treatment and mutual respect in this
 regard across different categories of staff: cleaners, librarians, people involved in administrative work, lecturers or support
 staff.

 LANGUAGE AND DISABILITY

 Avoiding stereotypes and language which can cause offence
 Over 14% (6 million) of the population in Britain have some form of disability although not all disabilities are readily
 observable. For any audience or readership, there is therefore a strong chance that some may be disabled and will thus be
 offended by the use of insensitive and outmoded statements such as handicapped or sub-normal

 Of the 6 million people with disabilities, only some 4% are wheelchair users but it is all too easy to structure attempts to
 improve facilities, services and language use around the stereotypical assumption that disabled means wheelchair user. This
 can lead to other disabilities being ignored. It is important to remember that people are more disabled by societies attitude
 than by their actual condition.

  When speaking or writing about people with disabilities, positive attributes are all to often overlooked. Words and phrases
 such as handicapped, mentally deficient or slow learner tend to predominate. Descriptions such as spastic, epileptic and the
 disabled group people together into artificial categories and encourage stereotyping by recognising only a single
 characteristic. Also people diagnosed as HIV positive are often grouped together with people who have AIDS. Comments
 like polio sufferer and wheelchair bound are seen as patronising and condescending. People with disabilities do not
 necessarily suffer except as a result of societies approach to them; For example a wheelchair user is not confined to or
 bound to their wheelchair, it is an aid to mobility and freedom. 




J anuar y 200 7                                                  Page - 19 -                                                        R ef : P O L001 6
 Learner Equal
 Opportunities Policy
                                                                                               Supporting Information
                                                    Detailed information for those with responsibilities for ensuring the implementation of this policy


 The following suggestions, made by several national organisations of disabled people, may assist in avoiding terms that are
 likely to cause offence to people with disabilities.

                     Current Preferred Use                                                    Likely to Cause Offence

      Disabled people, people with disabilities                            The Disabled
      People with a particular condition, difficulty, impairment           People with a handicap
      Wheelchair users, uses a wheelchair has impaired                     Wheelchair bound, confined to a wheelchair
      mobility

      People/person with:
      Cerebral Palsy                                                       Spastic
      Epilepsy                                                             Epileptic

      Learning difficulties/disabilities                                   Mentally handicapped/deficient

      People with severe/profound learning difficulties                    People with a mental age of ........

      Blind or partially sighted people                                    The blind, visually challenged

      People with speech difficulties                                      People who are dumb, stammers

      Person/people who has/have ...........                               Victim of, crippled by, suffering from, afflicted by.

 It is worth noting, too, that profoundly deaf people who use British Sign Language as their preferred means of communication
 regard themselves as a cultural and linguistic minority as members of the Deaf Community.

 Many people when they start to think about the use of language in the presence of disabled people find that common
 phrases are potentially offensive, but phrases such as blind spot, see you soon, deaf to all pleas are also commonly used by
 people with disabilities If you are concerned about using expressions such as these, ask a disabled person or persons if they
 find it offensive. They live with their disability and with this sort of language every day of their lives. They are unlikely to be
 offended by your interest or concern.

 Equal Access?

 Often there is no consideration of the needs of disabled people in spoken communication and in written material e.g for
 teaching purposes or for general information on college campus The result is that access is denied. Disabled students can
 get assistance in class (e.g. there are members of staff who take notes for them]. Lessons can also be audio or video-
 recorded. Those who are producing written material should consider the impact of the physical presentation on people with
 disabilities. For example, it is possible to reproduce written texts in Braille or on audio cassette for those with visual
 impairments. Video tapes can be provided with sub-titles for people with hearing impairments. Bulky publications can be
 broken down into smaller more manageable units for ease of handling. Texts can be arranged for people with dyslexia.

 The Study Services Support Staff (Manager, Janet Drinkwater - Extension 4158) will be glad to give further advice in relation
 to appropriate language and alternative media facilities or on any other matter relevant to people with disabilities. 




J anuar y 200 7                                                    Page - 20 -                                                       R ef : P O L001 6
 Learner Equal
 Opportunities Policy
                                                                                               Supporting Information
                                                    Detailed information for those with responsibilities for ensuring the implementation of this policy

 LANGUAGE AND GENDER

 There are as many women students as men students at North Lindsey College. Women also make up a substantial
 proportion of the staff. It is important to ensure that women students and staff receive equality of treatment in all aspects of
 college life. This includes equality of treatment in language used about women or in language addressed to women. As in the
 case of other social groups already discussed, three aspects of language use can cause offence: exclusion, definition,
 degradation. This may happen regardless or a speaker's or writer's intention. The first two are probably the greatest areas of
 concern in any organisation. In the following sections we identify possible ways in which exclusion, definition and
 degradation of women may occur within the College, and suggest alternatives.

 Exclusive or inclusive language

 The so-called generic terms he and man [along with men, and -man] are still heard and read across a range of workplace
 settings: "all businessmen....", Man...." In academic circles, they may be more characteristic of certain disciplines than
 others. They can rarely, if ever, be fully generic. Use of such terms also excludes by allowing a writer or speaker to slip from
 generalisations about people into generalisations about men. There is now ample evidence from research which shows that
 terms such as he and man are often not interpreted generically.       •




 Alternatives are available: people or human beings instead of man; he/she [in writing] or 'singular' they instead of 'generic'
 he. A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language (1985) notes that 'singular' they is part of current usage. The
 use of they has always been common in speech but is now also becoming common in writing, including academic writing.
 Another way to avoid the 'generic' he is to rewrite the sentence in plural.

 Language Which Defines?
 Gender stereotyping

 It is not usually necessary to specify the gender of a person in a particular role. To do this is, in effect, to define them in a
 particular way and run the risk of reinforcing gender stereotypes. It is often worth testing the effect of specifying a role by
 gender: e.g. man doctor as compared with a woman doctor? In the College most occupations are not gender-define, e.g.
 administrative assistant, lecturer. There may occasionally be a good reason to specify gender, for example in an Equal
 Opportunities statement on a job advertisement, like 'Women [Men] are currently under-represented in and are particularly
 encouraged to apply'. In addition, everyone should feel free to request a woman doctor or a man doctor at the Choices
 Health Clinic.

 Asymmetric use of titles and gender terms

 If it is felt necessary to use a title, and if a woman's marital status is not known or considered unimportant. Ms is the obvious
 solution. It is a title for a woman which is an alternative to Mrs or Miss and the equivalent of Mr, since it does not indicate
 marital status. At the same time, a woman's own wishes with regard to her title needs to be respected. For different reasons,
 some women feel uncomfortable with Ms. In some cultural groups, titles are not used at all and a woman's own wish thus
 extends beyond the above alternatives to the option of no title at all. Official College documents, such as memos, telephone
 listings and application forms should take this range of options into account.

 Many young women are happy to be referred to as girls - even in situations where the term boys would not be used for their
 male counterparts. Many, however, are not. The term woman denotes an adult female and, unless individuals concerned are
 known to prefer the term girls, the use of the term woman would seem more appropriate. The term colleague can be used
 about staff by other staff. Again if people's wishes are to be respected it is a good idea to discuss what people want to be
 called. 




J anuar y 200 7                                                   Page - 21 -                                                        R ef : P O L001 6
 Learner Equal
 Opportunities Policy
                                                                                              Supporting Information
                                                   Detailed information for those with responsibilities for ensuring the implementation of this policy



 Avoiding language which defines by gender does not mean saying one lives in Personchester or that work is being done
 down a person-hole. Such words are largely the creation of individuals who wish to trivialise the use of inclusive language.
 They are not used by those in favour of inclusive language.

 Avoiding language which degrades or offends

 Degrading labels like bimbo, slag or tart and verbs like henpecked, are more likely to occur in casual conversation than in
 meetings of classes [unless they are used to illustrate degrading language use!] Again, a speaker may use such terms
 without intending to degrade. It should be remembered, however, that regardless of intention many people are offended by
 such language. It would seem best to assume they might be offended and not to use such terms.

 LANGUAGE AND LESBIANS, GAY MEN AND BISEXUALS
 Lesbians, gay men and bisexuals come from different backgrounds and have a range of jobs with a wide variety of opinions.
 The percentage of non-heterosexual people in the population is debatable, but by any standards it is a significant minority. In
 many cases, the only shared characteristic is sexual preference.

 Even today, many people who have some understanding of other forms of discrimination still do not realise the extent of bias
 against people because of their 'sexual preference'. In fact, the very use of the term 'sexual preference' can be a problem;
 compared to the phrase, lesbians, gay men and bisexuals, it is rather euphemistic. Both the general lack of awareness of
 homophobia and a reluctance to discuss it openly mean that this type of discrimination is sometimes not taken as seriously
 as other types. Yet the extreme end result of this discrimination, both in society and the college, can be the same as with
 other forms - isolation, verbal harassment and physical attacks. It is especially important for colleges to aim to provide an
 environment in which homophobia is not manifested; many younger people are learning to discover and accept their
 sexuality and are particularly vulnerable, to hostility and victimisation.
 Exclusive or inclusive language?
 Language use can reinforce the exclusion of lesbians, gay men and bisexuals from the mainstream. Most reference to
 families or to personal relationships assume that everyone is heterosexual - so does most conversation when on the topic of
 social activities. There may also be an underlying assumption that heterosexuality is 'natural' and that any other orientation is
 by definition 'unnatural'.
 To avoid marginalising the contributions and talents of so many people, on the grounds of their sexual preference alone, we
 can consider using language that is not based on these assumptions. In speaking and in writing we can aim to be inclusive. It
 is both fair and accurate to include lesbians, gay men and bisexuals.
 Here are examples of everyday language which exclude lesbians, gay men and bisexuals.
 Alternatives are also suggested.
                               "There'll be lots of chances to meet the opposite sex at the party."
 Not much chance there for anyone who prefers people of the same sex! What about just saying:
                                 "There'll be lots of chances to meet other people at the party?"
                                    "Any husbands or boyfriends are welcome to come too"
 Be careful with such words, if you are speaking to a group of women. Lesbians obviously do not have boyfriends. A good
 solution would be:
                                            "Partners are welcome to come too". 




J anuar y 200 7                                                  Page - 22 -                                                        R ef : P O L001 6
 Learner Equal
 Opportunities Policy
                                                                                                Supporting Information
                                                     Detailed information for those with responsibilities for ensuring the implementation of this policy


 Avoiding stereotypes
 Avoiding offence also means paying attention to the assumptions that lie behind what gets said or written. Take, for example,
 the common assumption that most of society is made up of nuclear families. In a discussion about child care, one might hear
 the following:
                            "The wishes of both the child's mother and father should be considered".
 Not all children live with their biological parents, or with a heterosexual parent. The statement quoted above excludes
 children raised by a lone mother or father and, at the same time, children raised by lesbians and by gay men. This view of
 child rearing is a highly emotive issue for some, and there is often an assumption that non-heterosexual parents are 'unfit'
 parents, although research does not support this view. The exclusion of same-sex parents from examples does not help the
 case of those who are trying to challenge such views.
 An alternative to the words cited above could be:
                                 "The wishes of those caring for the child should be considered".
 Avoiding Language which can Offend of Degrade
 In casual conversations about the college campus, labels such as 'dyke', 'queer' are less likely to be used to deliberately
 cause offence than in other circles However, working to create a climate where discrimination is not manifested means
 encouraging the use of terms such as 'lesbians' and 'gay men' instead of negative and degrading language.
 LANGUAGE USE AND OTHER DIMENSIONS OF DISCRIMINATION
 The purpose of these guidelines is to raise awareness of the ways in which the language use can discriminate against
 particular social groups and affect the quality of the working relationships we are building with one another in our daily lives
 on campus. However, our main message is that people should be seen as individuals in their own right and valued beyond
 considerations such as age, disability or gender etc.
 We do acknowledge that there is considerable variation among language users in terms of values, preferences and practices
 and we need to be sensitive to those differences.
 3         Equal Opportunities Procedure For Learners On Work Placement
 It is important when arranging work experience for learners that you ensure that the employer complies with Equal
 Opportunities legislation. The organisation may have their own Equal Opportunities Policy, even so they need to be
 aware of the College Policy regarding Equality of Opportunity.
 Equal Opportunities is as important as Health & Safety and we must ensure that the organisations we use meet the college's
 minimum standards. It is therefore proposed that from September 2000 onwards we will check this before placing learners.
 PROCEDURE
 1    If the organisation has an Equal Opportunities Policy collect a copy and keep one with course records, the course file.
 2    Provide the employer with a copy of the college policy and ensure that they sign the declaration.
 3    If any learner is discriminated against, they must be withdrawn from the placement and any future placements may be
      terminated following investigation. The placement should not be used for any other learner until the Human Resources
      Officer is satisfied that the employer has become fully compliant with the College's policy.
 This process would only need to be done once per employer, regardless of number of learners on placement, and
 could also be carried over in subsequent academic years.
 Attempts will be made to record this information on a central work experience database which will be accessible on
 the network to all users. 




J anuar y 200 7                                                    Page - 23 -                                                        R ef : P O L001 6
J anuar y 200 7   Page - 24 -   R ef : P O L001 6
J anuar y 200 7   Page - 25 -   R ef : P O L001 6
J anuar y 200 7   Page - 26 -   R ef : P O L001 6
J anuar y 200 7   Page - 27 -   R ef : P O L001 6
J anuar y 200 7   Page - 28 -   R ef : P O L001 6
J anuar y 200 7   Page - 29 -   R ef : P O L001 6
J anuar y 200 7   Page - 30 -   R ef : P O L001 6
J anuar y 200 7   Page - 31 -   R ef : P O L001 6
                                                                                                                      College File
                                                         Learner Support Services


                      EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES PROCEDURE FOR LEARNERS ON WORK PLACEMENT

POLICY STATEMENT *subject to approval
North Lindsey College is committed to providing an environment that reflects and respects the diversity of individuals and ensures
equality of opportunity for all.
   The College seeks to create an ethos and environment which reflects the diverse community at large, because we value the
    individual contributions of all people.
   We will treat all individuals with respects and dignity and provide a learning environment free from unlawful discrimination,
    harassment and victimisation.
   No individual should be disadvantaged or treated less favourably because of conditions or requirements imposed, which
    cannot be objectively justified by the College.
   The College will seek to make reasonable adjustments to its arrangements and premises with a view to avoiding any
    disadvantages to individuals.

LEGAL REQUIREMENTS
The College is committed to achieving equality of opportunity for all and recognise the requirements under:
   The Equal Pay Act 1970
   The Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974
   The Sex Discrimination Act 1975
   The Disability Discrimination Act 1995
   The Protection From Harassment Act 1997
   The Data Protection Act 1998
   The Human Rights Act 1998
   The Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998
   The Public Order Act 1998
   The Gender Re-assignment Regulations 1999
   Special Educational Needs and Disability Act 2002
   The Employment Equality (Religion or Belief) Regulations 2003
   The Employment Equality (Sexual Orientation) Regulations 2003
   The Disability Discrimination Act 2005
   The Employment Equality (Age) Regulations 2006
Together with associated Codes of Practice

                                           EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES DECLARATION
Company Name

Company Address

Average number of learners on placement each year

Does your organisation have an Equal Opportunities Policy:         Yes                      No

Has your organisation received a copy of the College Policy:       Yes                      Date

Signed (on behalf of the organisation)                                                     Job Title

College representative                                                                     Date
           FOR FURTHER INFORMATION OR ADVICE PLEASE CONTACT THE HUMAN RESOURCES OFFICER,
                             SCOTT WILSON AT THE COLLEGE ON 01724 294602


              J anuar y 200 7                                         Page - 32 -                                    R ef : P O L001 6
 Learner Equal
 Opportunities
                                                                                            Supporting Information
                                                 Detailed information for those with responsibilities for ensuring the implementation of this policy


 4         Sources of help and advice
 Employers Forum on Disability                                      Equal Opportunities Commission
 Nutmeg House                                                       Arndale House
 60 Gainsford House                                                 Arndale Road
 London                                                             Manchester
 SEl 2NY                                                            M4 3EQ

 Tel:      0171 403 3020                                            Tel: 0161 833 9244
                                                                    Web Site: www.eoc.org.uk


 Remploy                                                            Fawcett Society
 415 Edgeware Road                                                  45 Beech Street
 London                                                             London
 NW2 6LR                                                            EC2Y 8AD

 Tel:      0181 235 050                                             Tel: 0171 628 4441

                                                                    Campaigning organisation for women’s equality


 The Camelot Foundation                                             National Disability Council
 1 Derry Street                                                     Tel: 01225 716304
 London
 W8 SHY

 Tel:      0171 937 5594

 An innovative funder focussed on disabled                          Royal Association for Disability and Rehabilitation
 and disadvantage people across the UK                              Tel: 0171 250 3222


 Shaw Trust
 Shaw House
 Epsom Square
 Trowbridge
 Wiltshire

 Tel: 01225 716304

 Providers employment realted support and services for people with disabilities. 




J anuar y 200 7                                                Page - 33 -                                                        R ef : P O L001 6
 Learner Equal
 Opportunities
                                                                                               Supporting Information
                                                    Detailed information for those with responsibilities for ensuring the implementation of this policy


 Department for Education and                                          New Ways to Work
 Employment (DfEE)                                                     309 Upper StreetMoorfoot
 Sheffield                                                             London
 S1 4PQ                                                                NI 2TY

 Tel:     0870 0012345                                                 Tel: 0171 2264026
 Web Site: www.dfee.gov.uk
                                                                       The leading UK organisation for
 The DfEE offer a wide range of free publications                      alternative work patterns


 Employers for Childcare                                               European Business Network for Social Cohesion
 Cowley House                                                          London Enterprise Agency
 Little College Street                                                 4 Snow Hill
 London                                                                London
 SW1P 3XS                                                              ECIA2BS

 Disability Discrimination Act helpline
 Tel: 0345 622 633

 Local Employment Services
 Placement Assessment and Counselling Team (PACT)


 Publications

 Codes of Practice issued by CRE, EOC and the Employers
 Forum on Disability


 The Equal Opportunities Guide
 Phil Clements & Tony Spinks
 2nd Edition, 1996


 Discrimination in the Workplace - A practical guide
 Edited by Julian Hemming, 1997


 Understanding Equal Opportunities Policies
 Ken Blakemore & Robert Drake


 Guidelines for Equal Opportunities Employers
 Equal Opportunities Commission, 1996. 




J anuar y 200 7                                                   Page - 34 -                                                        R ef : P O L001 6

								
To top