ARUN DISTRICT COUNCIL by benbenzhou

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									     ARUN DISTRICT COUNCIL



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      VALIDATION CHECKLIST
        NATIONAL LIST OF
         REQUIREMENTS
    Advice for officers, applicants and agents




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                                  INTRODUCTION
The following checklists have been prepared in response to the government’s
intended introduction of a mandatory application form by 6th April 2008, and the
associated changes to validation procedures. The checklists have been designed to
correspond with the government’s Model Application Types as set out below:

       Householder consents
       Full planning permission
       Outline planning permission
       Approval of reserved matters
       Listed Building consent
       Conservation Area consent
       Advertisement consent
       Consent under Tree Preservation Orders
       Lawful Development Certificates
       Applications for Prior Notification under the General Permitted
       Development Order 1995
       Removal or variation of conditions

Within each checklist, the specified ‘National Requirements’ are obligatory and must
be strictly adhered to if an application is to be accepted as valid. The specified ‘Local
Requirements’ as set out within the separate guidance note includes additional
information that may be required in respect of an application within the type of
development applied for. However, depending on the nature of the proposed
development and its location, the additional information will not always be necessary.

Where any information within the local list is deemed to be necessary, it will carry the
same weight as the national requirements. This means that if an application is
submitted without the required information the Council will be entitled to declare it
invalid. It is essential therefore that the checklists are referred to before formally
submitting an application, and that the list of requirements is carefully scrutinised to
ascertain its applicability to a particular development proposal.
Pre-application discussions, particularly in respect of major development proposals
are strongly encouraged to assist in this process.

In the event that the necessary information is not submitted, it is for applicants to
explain either why it has not been provided on a case by case basis. Failure to
provide the necessary justifications will result in applications being made invalid and
will result in delay to the decision-making process.

In addition, should it be established following validation of the planning application
that information should have been submitted prior to its validation, a request for
further information and/or clarification may result in the application being regarded as
invalid and the eight/thirteen week timescale for determination reverting back to the
date on which any revised information/clarification as deemed necessary within the
checklists is submitted. In some circumstances, a new application will be required.

It is accepted that the full 1APP form and accompanying checklist will provide a
range of requirements that may seem onerous for some of the applications to be
submitted. However having full information on all applications at the outset should
enable applications to be decided more quickly.



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This document lists the items required in the national checklist across a range of
applications and details examples where a particular plan or document will not be
accepted.




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NATIONAL LIST AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

1.    COMPLETED FORM
2.    OWNERSHIP CERTIFICATES
3.    AGRICULTURAL HOLDINGS CERTIFICATE
4.    DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT
5.    APPROPRIATE FEE
6.    LOCATION PLAN
7.    SITE/BLOCK PLAN
8.    EXISTING & PROPOSED ELEVATION PLANS
9.    EXISTING & PROPOSED FLOOR PLANS
10.   EXISTING & PROPOSED SECTIONS AND FINISHED FLOOR/SITE LEVELS
11.   EXISTING AND PROPOSED ROOF PLANS
12.   ADVERTISEMENT APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS
13.   CERTIFICATE OF LAWFULNESS APPLICATIONS
14.   LISTED BUILDING CONSENT APPLICATIONS REQUIREMENTS
15.   OUTLINE PLANNING APPLICATIONS REQUIREMENTS




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1.       COMPLETED FORM

(3 copies, this applies to all documentation specified below unless you are
     submitting your application electronically via the Planning Portal)

This is required to be completed in its entirety.


2.        OWNERSHIP CERTIFICATES

Under section 65(5) of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990, read in conjunction
with Article 12 of the DMPO, the local planning authority must not entertain an
application for planning permission unless the relevant certificates concerning the
ownership of the application site have been completed. All applications for planning
permission must include the appropriate certificate of ownership. An ownership
certificate A, B, C or D must be completed stating the ownership of the property.

It should be noted that in the event of any part of a new development including
guttering, foundations or opening windows overhanging or crossing onto a
neighbouring boundary, ownership certificate A should not be issued. Notice should
be served on the owner and an alternative certificate completed.

For this purpose an ‘owner’ is anyone with a freehold interest, or leasehold interest
the unexpired term of which is not less than 7 years.

Notice(s)

A notice to owners of the application site must be completed and served in
accordance with Article 11 of the DMPO.


3.       AGRICULTURAL HOLDINGS CERTIFICATE

This certificate is required whether or not the site includes an agricultural holding. All
agricultural tenants must be notified prior to the submission of the application. This
certificate is not required if the applicant is making an application for reserved
matters, discharge or variation of conditions, tree preservation orders, or express
consent to display an advertisement.


4.        DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

A Design and Access Statement must accompany applications for both outline and
full planning permission unless they relate to one of the following:

         Variation of conditions (s.73 TCPA 1990)

         Engineering or mining operations,

         A material change in use of land or buildings




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       Development of an existing dwelling-house (or flat) or development within the
        curtilage of the same for any purpose incidental to the enjoyment of it
        provided it is outside a designated area


       An extension to an existing building used for non-domestic purposes outside a
        designated area where the floor space created is no more than 100 square
        metres

       Any erection, construction, improvement or alteration of a gate, fence, wall or
        other means of enclosure up to 2m high (or its existing height, whichever is
        the greater) where no part of the development is within the curtilage of a listed
        building or a designated area

       Development on operational land, outside a designated area, consisting of the
        erection of a building or structure up to 100 cubic metres in volume and 15
        metres in height (or its former height, whichever is the greater)

       Any alteration of an existing building, outside a designated area, where such
        the alteration does not increase the size of the building

       The erection, alteration or replacement of plant or machinery (outside a
        designated area) where, as a result of the development, the plant of
        machinery does not exceed 15 metres in height (or its former height,
        whichever Is the greater)

       Extensions to time limits for implementing existing planning permissions

       Advertisement control

       Tree Works

       Storage of hazardous substances

       Non-material amendments

       Prior approval

However, statements are required for householder applications where any part of a
dwellinghouse or its curtilage falls within one of the following designated areas:

    – Conservation area
    – World Heritage site
A Design and Access Statement is a short report accompanying and supporting a
planning application that should seek to explain and justify the proposal in a
structured way. The level of detail required in a Design and Access Statement will
depend on the scale and complexity of the application, and the length of the
statement will vary accordingly. The Design and Access Statement should cover
both the design principles and concepts that have been applied to the proposed
development and how issues relating to access to the development have been dealt
with. What is required in a Design and Access Statement is set out in Article 8 of



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The Town & Country Planning (Development Management Procedure)(England)
Order 2010)(DMPO). Please refer to the guidance notes at
http://www.arun.gov.uk/assets/pdf/Planning/Design_and_Access_Statements_08_06
.pdf .

There is a requirement for a statement on use of measures to promote sustainable
development. This should include a statement indicating how the design of the
development incorporates energy efficiency and renewable energy and resources.
Further advice can be found within PPS1: Delivering sustainable development
http://www.communities.gov.uk/documents/planningandbuilding/pdf/planningpolicyst
atement1.pdf. and the supplement to PPS1
http://www.communities.gov.uk/documents/planningandbuilding/pdf/pps-
ecotowns.pdf

As part of consideration of access, the County Council require a Stage 1 Safety
Audit for all non-householder planning applications which require significant highway
implications. Criteria for the submission of Safety Audits are indicated on the West
Sussex County Councils website under Development Control/Safety Audit Policy.

Applications for listed building consent will also be required to be accompanied by a
Design and Access Statement. In particular, such a statement should address:

     (i)     the special architectural or historic interest of the building;
     (ii)    the particular physical features of the building that justify its designation as
             a listed building; and
     (iii)   the building’s setting.

The legislative requirements are set out in regulation 3A of the Planning (Listed
Buildings and Conservation Areas) Regulations 1990.


5.     APPROPRIATE FEE

The fee for planning submissions is variable dependent on planning type.

The Planning Portal has produced a fee calculator to enable applicants to calculate
the fee required to accompany any planning
application.http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/england/public/tools/feecalc

It should be noted that fee requirements and levels are decided by Government and
Arun District Council has to abide by National requirements.

Some categories of application are exempt from a fee.

Concessions may be available for development entirely connected with proposals for
disabled access to public buildings or for development needed solely for a disabled
person. You are advised to check with the Technical Support Unit if you believe your
application may benefit from an exemption.




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6.    LOCATION PLAN

All applications must include copies of a location plan based on an up-to-date map.
This should be at a scale of 1:1250 for an urban area or 1:2500 for a rural area.

In exceptional circumstances plans of other scales may also be required. Plans
should wherever possible show at least two named roads and surrounding buildings.
The properties shown should be numbered or named to ensure that the exact
location of the application site is clear and must include a north point.

The application site must be edged clearly with a red line. It should include all land
necessary to carry out the proposed development – for example, land required for
access to the site from a public highway, visibility splays, landscaping, car parking
and open areas around buildings. It is not acceptable to edge a plan in blue, pink or
black. Only red edged plans will be accepted.

A blue line must be drawn around any other land owned by the applicant, close to or
adjoining the application site.

We are also able to accept location plans produced via the Planning Portal.


7.   BLOCK/SITE PLAN

Copies of the block and/or site plan should be submitted. The block and/or site plan
should be drawn at a scale of 1:500 and or 1:200 and should accurately show:

a) the direction of North;
b) the proposed development in relation to the site boundaries and other existing
   buildings on the site, with written dimensions including those to the boundaries,
   with any new buildings/works clearly highlighted;
c) all the buildings, one named road and footpaths on land adjoining the site
   including access arrangements;
d) all public rights of way crossing or adjoining the site;
e) the position of all trees on the site, and those on adjacent land that could
   influence or be affected by the development;
f) the extent and type of any hard surfacing (householder applications to include
   provision of drainage)
g) boundary treatment including walls or fencing where this is proposed.
h) the red and blue edging must match that shown on the location plans (This is
   one of Arun ‘s Local Validation List requirements- see the local list)

Where all the information required by both a block plan and site plan can be provided
on one drawing, and where the scale is no greater than 1:200, we will be willing to
accept a combined site and block plan, however, it must be titled as such.


8.   EXISTING & PROPOSED ELEVATION PLANS

These should be drawn to a scale of 1:50 or 1:100 and show clearly the proposed
works in relation to what is already there. All sides of the proposal must be shown



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and these should indicate, where possible, the proposed building materials and the
style, materials and finish of windows and doors. Blank elevations must also be
included; if only to show that this is in fact the case.

Where a proposed elevation adjoins another building or is in close proximity, the
drawings should clearly show the relationship between the buildings, and detail the
positions of the openings on each property.


9.     EXISTING & PROPOSED FLOOR PLANS

These should be drawn to a scale of 1:50 or 1:100 and should explain the proposal
in detail. Where existing buildings or walls are to be demolished these should be
clearly shown. The drawings submitted should show details of the existing building(s)
as well as those for the proposed development. New buildings should also be shown
in context with adjacent buildings (including property numbers where applicable).


10. EXISTING & PROPOSED SECTIONS AND FINISHED FLOOR/SITE LEVELS

Such plans drawn at a scale of 1:50 or 1:100 should show a cross section(s) through
the proposed building(s) or advertisements. In all cases where a proposal involves a
change in ground levels. Drawings should be submitted to show both existing and
finished levels to include details of foundations and eaves and how encroachment
onto adjoining land is to be avoided.

Full information should also be submitted to demonstrate how proposed buildings
relate to existing site levels and neighbouring development. Such plans should show
existing site levels and finished floor levels (with levels related to a fixed datum point
off site) and also show the proposals in relation to adjoining buildings. This will be
required for all applications involving new buildings.

In the case of householder development, the levels may be evident from floor plans
and elevations, but particularly in the case of sloping sites it will be necessary to
show how proposals relate to existing ground levels or where ground levels outside
the extension would be modified. Levels should also be taken into account in the
formulation of design and access statements.


11.    EXISTING & PROPOSED ROOF PLANS

A roof plan for dormer extensions/roof alterations is used to show the shape of the
roof and is typically drawn at a scale smaller than the scale used for the floor plans.
Details such as the roofing material and their location are typically specified on the
roof plan.


12.    ADVERTISEMENT APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS

The drawing of the proposed advertisement can be in black and white on paper. It
should show the size of the advertisement and its position on the land or the building



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in question. For a sign, the drawing should indicate the materials to be used, fixings,
colours and height above the ground and, where it would project from a building, the
extent of projection.

The submission of photomontages may also be required.

The declaration must be dated to enable the application for advertisement consent to
be processed. You may be committing an offence if the information given in this
form is false or misleading.


13. CERTIFICATE OF LAWFULNESS APPLICATIONS

If you want to be certain that the existing use of a building is lawful for planning
purposes or that your proposal does not require planning permission you can get a
certificate called a "Lawful Development Certificate" (LDC).

It is not compulsory to have an LDC but there may be times when you need one to
confirm that the use, operation or activity named in it is lawful for planning control
purposes.

The issues involved in LDCs are complex and if you decide you need to apply for a
certificate you might benefit by obtaining professional advice. The onus is on
applicants to prove lawfulness on a balance of probabilities and it is therefore vital
that we receive all the information necessary to arrive at a decision on your
application.


14.    LISTED BUILDING CONSENT APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS

Listed Building Consent is required for any alterations or extensions which "affect the
character" of Listed Building(s). This includes internal works as well as external
(including objects and structures attached to the listed building). It may include
buildings, objects and structures within the curtilage including boundary walls and
gates.

Listed Building Consent is not required for new detached buildings within the
curtilage.

The Listed Building Regulations affect nearly all the structures within the curtilage of
a Listed Building and consent is usually required for the demolition of any of these
structures.

The presumption will be on maintaining listed buildings in their current condition. For
that reason, it will be necessary for applicants to provide full justification for any
alterations proposed – whether internal or external. Submissions will need to be
accompanied by photographs and drawings that are produced specifically by an
independent professional used to working with listed buildings.




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15. OUTLINE APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS

Applications for outline planning permission should also include a Design and
Access Statement.
http://www.arun.gov.uk/assets/pdf/Planning/Design_and_Access_Statements_08_06
.pdf

Even if layout, scale and access are reserved, an application will still require a basic
level of information. As a minimum, applications should always include information
on:

        Use – the use or uses proposed for the development and any distinct
         development zones within the site identified.
        Amount of development – the amount of development proposed for each
         use.
        Indicative layout – an indicative layout with separate development zones
         proposed within the site boundary where appropriate.
        Scale parameters – an indication of the upper and lower limits for height,
         width and length of each building within the site boundary.
        Indicative access points – an area or areas in which the access point or
         points to the site will be situated.

Further more specific information requirements are contained within the checklists.

Applications for outline planning permission generally need not give details of any
proposed reserved matters (Article 6 (3) of the DMPO) unless the matters include
layout, scale or access. However if a local planning authority receives an application
for outline planning permission, but decides that the application ought not to be
considered separately from all or any of the reserved matters, it must notify the
applicant within one month from the receipt of the application that further details
must be submitted. The local planning authority should also specify what further
details are needed (see Article 4 (2) of the DMPO). Although the DMPO allows the
local planning authority one month in which to notify the applicant that further details
are required, as a matter of best practice local planning authorities should aim to
notify applicants within 5 working days. This situation should not be confused with
applications where inadequate information is submitted




1st October 2010




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