Soil Acidity_ Lime and Pasture Growth

Document Sample
Soil Acidity_ Lime and Pasture Growth Powered By Docstoc
					                     Soil Acidity, Lime and Pasture Growth 


An inevitable consequence of plant growth in soil is ‘acidification’ which decreases 
soil pH. The rate of acidification in pasture soils requires between 100 and 200 kg 
lime/ha/year to neutralise it to maintain a constant soil pH and calcium content. 
Application of nitrogen fertiliser increases the rate of soil acidification and the lime 
requirement. 

Pasture fertiliser programmes are aimed at providing phosphorus, sulphur and other 
nutrients required for clover growth. Clover has the ability to ‘fix’ atmospheric nitrogen 
and convert this to protein. Organic material derived from clover plants is part of the 
‘organic matter cycle’ in pasture soils and is a source of nitrogen for the grass 
component of the sward, the basis for low input cost pasture farming systems 
however this system does not always function effectively. 

Where the soil pH is less than 5.6 there is increased probability that clover growth will 
be retarded and at pH less than 5.5 ryegrass growth is also affected due to poor root 
growth. However it is important to remember that soil test results from farms 
represent an average for the area sampled so where a soil pH of 5.6 is reported, half 
of the area will have a lower pH. The minimum soil test pH for optimum clover and 
ryegrass growth which allows for normal on­farm variation should be up to 6.0. 

Low soil calcium levels are also associated with poor soil physical structure with low 
water holding capacity which may affect late summer and autumn seasonal pasture 
production by up to 30%. Microbial activity is reduced affecting the organic matter 
cycle and reducing the supply of nitrogen to grass and development of a ‘thatch’ 
layer is common. Ryegrass/clover pastures suffer a reduction in clover content and 
ultimately reduction in ryegrass content as the pasture reverts to ‘low fertility’ grass 
species with slow growth rates. The alternative to maintain pasture productivity is to 
apply high rates of nitrogen fertiliser on a regular basis, this is not a low input cost 
farming option and may not be sustainable. 

Application of lime to achieve adequate soil calcium and pH is required and then 
regular applications should be made to compensate for the rate of acidification. 
Failure to do this will compromise the investment that farmers make in fertilisers, 
seed and other inputs aimed at achieving optimum pasture production. 

Lime in the Soil Environment: 

The effectiveness of lime is related to application rate, the ‘acid neutralising power’ or 
carbonate content and the particle size or range of particle sizes. 
Lime (calcium carbonate) has 2 effects in the soil environment: 

1 ­ The initial effect is breakdown of carbonate, increasing the pH of soil moisture. 
There is a significant effect on the soil environment while this process is happening. 
The particle size of the lime applied and the level of soil acidity are factors that 
strongly influence the speed of this reaction in moist soils. Small lime particles react 
quickly at a speed related to the surface area/volume ratio of the lime product used. 

2 ­ Soil pH is controlled by the balance of exchangeable acidic and basic cations in 
the soil, the dominant basic cation is calcium. The effect of lime application after 
carbonate decomposition has finished is related to the amount of calcium applied, 
this forms the basis for calculation of lime requirements.

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:8
posted:9/13/2011
language:English
pages:1