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ILO ACTION PLAN ON GENDER EQUALITY AND MAINSTREAMING IN THE ILO

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ILO ACTION PLAN ON GENDER EQUALITY AND MAINSTREAMING IN THE ILO Powered By Docstoc
					INTERNATIONAL LABOUR
    ORGANIZATION



Gender Mainstreaming in the ILO
Gender Mainstreaming
     in the ILO
   8 March 1999 the Director
    General declares a strong
    commitment to gender equality

   Circular and adoption of ILO
    Action Plan on Gender Equality
    and Gender Mainstreaming in the
    ILO, GB March 2000
  Gender as a cross-cutting issue in
the ILO’s four strategic areas in 1999
 Promote and realize fundamental principles and rights at
 work (freedom of association, forced labour, child labour
 and discrimination)

 Create greater opportunities to secure decent employment
 and income

 Enhance the coverage and effectiveness of social
 protection

 Strengthen tripartism and social dialogue
    GENDER MAINSTREAMING
     IN THE ILO SECRETARIAT
Director General’s Circular Dec. 1999
 Integrated approach
 Results based management

1) Representation – sex balance

2) Substance - gender analysis
   and planning in technical areas

3)   Structure – mechanisms for programming,
     implementation, monitoring, evaluation
  ILO ACTION PLAN ON GENDER EQUALITY AND
          MAINSTREAMING IN THE ILO
         Submitted to the Governing Body March 2000



Five key result areas:
1. Policy statement on gender equality and gender
    mainstreaming
2. Gender mainstreaming in the structure of the
    International Labour Office
3. Capacity building for gender mainstreaming
4. Gender mainstreaming in the work of the ILO
5. Gender-sensitive human resource development
       Implementing a gender
       mainstreaming strategy

   Enhancing the organization’s (staff and
    constituents) capacity to conduct gender
    analysis and gender planning

   Generating data disaggregated by sex and
    gender sensitive data
    ILO ACTION PLAN ON GENDER EQUALITY AND

           MAINSTREAMING IN THE ILO

   4.3 Mechanisms are in place to ensure
    gender concerns are incorporated in
    planning, programming, implementation,
    monitoring and evaluation of the ILO’s
    work, at headquarters and in the field

   4.3.3 Undertake biennial gender audits on
    ILO programmes and report results to the
    Governing Body
FIRST ILO GENDER AUDIT
       October 2001-April 2002
Participatory self –assessment
Workshops
Interviews

Assessing ILO products through global and local desk
reviews

Reviewing HRD policies and practices
        What do we want to achieve by doing
                 a gender audit?


   Organizational learning on gender mainstreaming

   Identify good practices

   Explore gender indicators

   Assess learning needs

   Pinpoint problems and challenges
FIRST ILO GENDER AUDIT

 A learning experience - how to make
  gender mainstreaming “built in” instead
  of an “add-on” for ILO staff
 Establishing a base line on where the
  Office stands on gender mainstreaming
 Identifying mechanisms to integrate
  gender in technical programmes
     A participatory process:
 Workshops at the work unit level in HQ and
  the field
 Involving Senior Management Team,
  Regional Directors, Gender Coordinators,
  Programming Staff, Human resources
  development department
 Involving the constituents and partners
 Opening a dialogue
Work-units undertaking audits
 October 2001-April 2002
   Regions – 8 offices –staff, constituents,
    implementing partners, women’s organizations
    Bangkok, Beirut, Brasilia, Budapest, Dar-es-Salaam, Kathmandu,
    Moscow, Yaoundé
   Geneva Headquarters – 7 programmes - staff
   Social dialogue, ILO/AIDS, Social finance, Crisis response,
    Cooperatives, Small enterprise development, Rights and principles at
    work

   Each audit took about 2 weeks
   450 persons involved overall
   700 documents analysed
 What the gender audit looked at:
          12 elements
1.   Current gender issues, gender debate and relationship of the
     ILO with national gender machineries and women’s
     organisations

2.   Mainstreaming of gender equality as a cross-cutting concern
     in the ILO’s Strategic Objectives, programme and budget

3.   Mainstreaming of gender equality in the implementation of
     programmes and technical cooperation activities

4.   Existing gender expertise and competence and capacity
     building

5.   Information and knowledge management
 What the gender audit looked at:
          12 elements
6.    Systems and instruments in use

7.    Choice of partner organisations

8.    Gender equality policy as reflected its products and public
      image

9.    Decision-making on gender mainstreaming in the ILO

10.   Staffing and human resources

11.   Organizational culture

12.   Perception of achievement on gender equality.
    Findings of the Gender Audit
   All work units had good examples of
    research and projects that included:
 data disaggregated by sex
 data analysis
 gender equality objectives and indicators
 conclusions and strategies for action to promote
  gender equality
    Findings of the Gender Audit
   Gender mainstreaming efforts in the ILO
    boosted by:
   Results based management system which provides for
    gender equality to be formulated as a goal as well as
    measured, monitored and reported on;

   high level managerial commitment to gender

   Gender network of specialists and focal points.
    Findings of the Gender Audit
   The majority of the 750 documents analysed were gender blind;

   Confusion on gender concepts and terminology and difference between
    actions to respond to the practical needs of women and those which
    address strategic gender needs, thereby challenging gender relations;

   Need for defining roles and responsibilities of gender specialists and
    focal points more clearly as « catalysts » and not necessarily « doers »;

   Insufficent linkages with the gender debate and organizations and
    institutions with gender expertise at the national level.
                        Challenges
   Clarifying gender concepts (gender jargon) among staff and
    constituents - gender equity, gender equality, gender mainstreaming,
    gender analysis, women’s empowerment, men and masculinities;

   Analysing, documenting and developing tools on the gender issues
    pertinent to each ILO technical area (e.g. labour standards, social
    security, safety and health);

   Strengthening collective work on gender indicators;

   Developing the male side of gender analysis (e.g. HIV/AIDS);
                        Challenges
   Addressing the issue of the low representation of women in employers
    organizations and trade unions;

   Ensuring the visibility of gender in high profile ILO and inter-agency
    frameworks: Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers (PRSP), UNDAF,
    MDGs, Global Employment Strategy, Cooperation agreements with
    countries, etc;

   Strengthening the gender network;

   Capacity building of staff and constituents on gender mainstreaming.
        The Gender Audit as an
          organizational audit
   Enabling environment – the « beyond gender »
    issues:

   Managerial practices – team work, priority setting, information
    management, political demands, decentralisation, « crisis
    management »;

   Organizational culture: overwork, quick fixes, « headless chicken »
    syndrome, lack of time for deep reflection and analysis,
    work/family/life balance; recognition of diversity;

   With managerial commitment and sound management practices gender
    mainstreaming takes off and the quality of outputs and performance is
    improved.
         LONG TERM

1. Gender audit as:
  - a diagnostic tool
  - a needs assessment tool
  - a monitoring tool on gender
    mainstreaming
2. Extending more to constituents
   and results based review
 ILO CONSTITUENTS AND
GENDER MAINSTREAMING


  ?Adoption of an Organization-wide policy on
   gender mainstreaming (2005-or 2006)

  Gender assessments in Member states

				
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