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HILLCREST STATION AREA SPECIFIC PLAN by hands2urself

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									HILLCREST STATION AREA SPECIFIC PLAN, CITY OF ANTIOCH
BRIEFING BOOK




       HILLCREST STATION AREA
            SPECIFIC PLAN
                           CITY OF ANTIOCH




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TABLE OF CONTENTS

II. THE ASSIGNMENT .................................................................................................... 4
      Summary of the problem:......................................................................................... 4
      Vision of the station built-out: ................................................................................... 4
      Challenges ............................................................................................................... 7
      Plan objectives ......................................................................................................... 9
      Top 3-5 questions to be addressed by the panel ................................................... 10
      Hillcrest Station Area Quick Facts:......................................................................... 13
III. STATUS OF PLAN................................................................................................... 14
      Approval Process: .................................................................................................. 14
      Environmental Review: .......................................................................................... 14
IV. HISTORY OF THE STUDY AREA ........................................................................... 14
V. TRANSIT- Current operations and planned upgrades: ............................................. 16
      Existing Service:..................................................................................................... 16
      Proposed Improvements: ....................................................................................... 17
VI. DESCRIPTION OF THE STUDY AREA .................................................................. 18
      Physical Description:.............................................................................................. 18
      Boundaries and Sizes: ........................................................................................... 18
      Location: ................................................................................................................ 21
      Demographics: ....................................................................................................... 24
      Economics of the Study Area: ................................................................................ 26
      Housing market: ..................................................................................................... 27
      Commercial Development: ..................................................................................... 28
VII. GOVERNMENT ...................................................................................................... 32
      Regional Planning Efforts....................................................................................... 33
      Metropolitan Transportation Commission: The....................................................... 33
      Priority Development Areas: .................................................................................. 33
VIII. PRIVATE SECTOR INVOLVEMENT ..................................................................... 34
      Planning Process and Public Outreach:................................................................. 34
      Proposed Development Projects:........................................................................... 34
      Property Ownership: .............................................................................................. 35




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BRIEFING BOOK




CITY CONTACT:

Victor Carniglia
Deputy Director of Economic Development
City of Antioch
Main: 925-779-7036
Cell: 925-360-4199
vcarniglia@ci.antioch.ca.us



Briefing Book Prepared By
Victor Carniglia, Deputy Director of Economic Development, City of Antioch
Iman Novin, BRIDGE Housing, Lead Author for TOD MarketPlace
Edited By Rick Gosalvez, TOD MarketPlace, Coordinator

This briefing book is a compilation of various Hillcrest Station Area Planning documents prepared by the
City of Antioch, Dyett & Bhatia, Fehr & Peers, and Economics & Planning Systems.

References:
City of Antioch. Hillcrest Station Area Specific Plan prepared by Dyett & Bhatia, adopted April 2009.
City of Antioch. Hillcrest Station Area Specific Plan Existing Conditions Report prepared by Dyett &
  Bhatia, May 2008.
City of Antioch. Hillcrest Station Area Specific Plan Stakeholder Interview Report prepared by Dyett &
  Bhatia, May 2008.
City of Antioch. Hillcrest Station Area Specific Plan Market Overview and Absorption Projections
  Economic & Planning Systems, July 2008.




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II. THE ASSIGNMENT

Summary of the problem: An eBART extension is planned for the redevelopment
site and the challenge is formulating a viable plan for a Transit Oriented Development
(TOD) on the 375-acre site Hillcrest Station area site; it has a significant number
development and access constraints, such as a PG&E substation and environmental
considerations. This situation is further complicated by the fact that the future eBART
Station will serve as an end of the line station for the indefinite future.




 Vision of the station built-out: The Hillcrest Station area presents a major
 opportunity to create an exciting new district for Antioch. The 375-acre site is unique in
 East County, offering large land acreage with freeway visibility at a strategic location -
 the juncture of State Route 4 (SR 4) and State Route 160 (SR 160). BART is
 scheduled to open a new eBART station in 2015, connecting into the Pittsburg/Bay
 Point line. The area has been identified as a major opportunity site for transit-oriented
 development—an opportunity to take advantage of the major public investment in
 transit infrastructure and to create a compact area with both jobs and housing.


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Over the past 18 months, community members, property and business owners, city staff
and decision-makers, regional and local agencies, and technical experts have
collaborated to create and adopt a flexible, long-range Specific Plan that will guide the
transformation of this site. They have worked to identify the numerous opportunities and
constraints that shape the land use, circulation, and open space components of the
Plan.

Due to its high-visibility location and potential accessibility from Antioch and other East
County communities, this site has the potential to become a unique destination. The
Hillcrest Station Area Specific Plan provides the framework for a pedestrian- and transit-
oriented district with tree-lined streets, conveniently-located stores and services, and
great public spaces and recreation opportunities. Employees will be able to ride eBART
to new jobs, reversing commute patterns, and reducing traffic on SR 4. Existing and
new residents of Antioch can find new types of housing options within walking distance
to transit, work, shopping, dining, and entertainment venues. East Antioch Creek is to
be improved to provide natural habitat, drainage, and a unique asset in the form of a
linear park. Together, these elements will create an attractive, livable, high-intensity,
transit-oriented community. The vision developed for the Hillcrest Station area during
the planning process is summarized as follows:

Create a vibrant signature area for Antioch, offering shopping,
restaurants, hotels, and entertainment, combined with office and
residential uses, in a compact pedestrian-oriented setting. Develop
the area as a model of “transit-oriented development”, where
residents, workers, and visitors can take advantage of transit instead
of driving, and can walk to stores, restaurants, and services.
Example of the envisioned character for Hillcrest Station Area:




Source: Santana Row, www.cooltownstudios.com, San Jose Ca (accessed June 29, 2009)




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    Challenges
    Challenges identified by stakeholders associated with the site include:

•   PERCEPTION OF ANTIOCH WITHIN THE REGIONAL MARKET: One of the major
    issues facing the City and the development of the Hillcrest Station Area is the
    perception of Antioch as a “secondary” location. Words such as “podunk” and “sprawl”
    were used to describe the perceptions of the town. A few stakeholders stated that
    Antioch is assumed to be a “low and moderate income area,” even though Antioch’s
    median income and education levels are comparable to Walnut Creek and Santa Clara.
    (The 2005 American Community Survey lists the median household income of Antioch
    as $66,755 and the Santa Clara median household income as $71,284.) Because of
    this negative perception, companies and their bosses have been less likely to move to
    Antioch.

•   SCHOOLS & “QUALITY OF LIFE” FACTORS: Comparatively poor school
    performance and lack of high quality entertainment and restaurants pose serious
    challenges to attracting both employment and multifamily residential development to the
    Hillcrest Station Area. Schools are overcrowded and have lower test scores than
    several other Contra Costa communities. The school district is implementing three new
    “academies”––law, medicine, and performing arts––in the next few years in an effort to
    specialize and improve high school performance.

    The lack of high quality dining and entertainment uses could make it difficult to attract
    the types of residents that would typically live in a transit village. Those residents are
    typically singles, young professionals, and empty nesters, all of which seek living
    environments with interesting restaurants and entertainment venues.

•   THE NEED FOR A LONG-TERM VIEW: Stakeholders mentioned the need for a long-
    term phasing plan and the importance of not letting today’s market conditions dictate the
    plan. Due to the fact that the eBART system should be complete in 2015 and the
    planning horizon is 2030, a multi-phase plan would be prudent. At this time, retail is
    saturated, but it may not be in as the Antioch area continues to grow.

    In order to attract the businesses and jobs that many stakeholders would like to see,
    Antioch will need to look at implementing a comprehensive economic development
    program. Generally businesses move to where the bosses would like to live.
    Sometimes, a company will open a satellite facility where the employees live. Some
    stakeholders are hoping that the Roddy Ranch Development will include “executive”
    housing, which would help in attracting businesses to locate in Antioch.

•   CREEKS AND WETLANDS: A few stakeholders noted the environmental constraints
    within the Planning Area, which will significantly limit the developable area of the site.
    The creek and associated wetlands are clearly areas that will need to be preserved. In
    addition, determining the required setback from the wetlands will be critical to ensure
    proper watershed management and habitat protection. Also, the possibility of
    endangered species needs to be considered.


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•   SOIL AND GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATION: The former chemical fertilizer plant
    and Chevron pipelines have been shown to have contaminated some of the soil and
    water on and near the site. Remediation could potentially be very expensive. In addition
    to hazardous materials, a few stakeholders interviewed expressed concerns about
    electromagnetic fields produced by the power lines and substation.

•   AFFORDABLE HOUSING: Many of the stakeholders are aware that the Planning Area
    will need to have an affordable housing component, particularly in view of its location
    within a redevelopment area. While some pointed out good examples such as projects
    done by Eden Housing in Rivertown, Oakland and Fremont, others would like to make
    sure that the housing is not designated Section 8. They feel that there are a sufficient
    number of Section 8 units in Antioch already – more than 1,500. The focus of affordable
    housing within the Planning Area should be on smaller units for first time home buyers
    and senior housing.

•   PARKING STRATEGY: Parking is another issue that interested many of the
    stakeholders. How to provide sufficient spaces without creating “seas” of asphalt is a
    concern. A few strategies were suggested to deal with parking: shared parking (e.g.,
    eBART and a community park with sports fields, and office and entertainment uses
    would have complimentary hours), maximum-parking standards, an area-wide
    comprehensive parking policy and strategy (perhaps a parking district), and public
    structures. Several stakeholders also recognized that substantial parking will be
    needed, because of the suburban location and the large number of spaces required for
    an “end-of-the-line” transit station. The majority of the eBART ridership is anticipated to
    be suburban commuters that drive to the station.

•   PG&E SUBSTATION: PG&E is the second largest land owner in the redevelopment
    area. A majority of their property is used for a large substation located on the north-west
    corner of the site. The City has concerns regarding the substations impact on the
    development of the Hillsdale Station Area.

•   eBART END OF THE LINE: Currently, the Antioch Hillcrest Station will function as the
    terminus for the eBART system; however, eBART my extend beyond the Hillcrest
    Station in the future. This potentially temporary situation poses several design
    constrains regarding highest and best use of the site.




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Plan objectives
Land use and development
   • Establish a signature area of Antioch with high quality development and dynamic
      pedestrian areas that add to the quality of life of the city.
   • Designate sites for new employment uses that add quality jobs and improve the
      City’s job/housing balance. Accommodate at least 5,000 jobs in order to create
      an employment center.
   • Create a transit village residential neighborhood, with a variety of high-density
      housing types within walking and bicycling distance of the transit station.
   • Designate sites for retail uses that can take advantage of the freeway visibility
      and access.

Circulation
   • Generate transit ridership to support the public investment in eBART.
   • Construct roads to serve new development.
   • Provide improved freeway accessibility to the State Route 4 corridor.
   • Minimize impacts on regional highway facilities and on surrounding residential
       neighborhoods.
   • Enhance multi-modal access and connectivity for pedestrians, bicyclists,
       automobile drivers, bus, and eBART passengers.

Environmental Protection
   • Provide appropriate protection for wildlife habitat, biological • resources, and
      other sensitive natural features of the Hillcrest Station Area.
   • Ensure that land uses and circulation routes are compatible with the surrounding
      neighborhoods.
   • Ensure that sensitive receptors such as homes and schools are adequately
      protected from noise and air emissions.

Infrastructure and Financing
    • Establish infrastructure for roads, water, sewer, storm drainage, utilities, and
        other systems needed to support development.
    • Establish parks, trails, and other community facilities necessary to • serve future
        development.
    • Ensure that the revenues generated from the area and the expenses to provide
        services do not adversely affect the fiscal stability of the City.




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Top 3-5 questions to be addressed by the panel

  i.   Pros and Cons of Station Alternatives: The approved Specific Plan depicts
       two possible locations for the planned eBART Station. These 2 locations are
       shown in Figures 2-4 and 2-5 of the Specific Plan (below), and are discussed on
       pgs. 2-6 and 2-8 of the Spec Plan. They are described as the “City Preferred
       Station location” (also referred to as the East Median Station) and the “BART
       Proposed Station Location” (referred to as the Median Station). What are the
       relative pros and cons of the two station location alternatives? What are
       the TAP’s recommendations regarding these alternatives? Are these the
       best options? NOTE: The eBART proposed station location is proposed by
       BART because it is considered the most cost effective option for construction.




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 ii.   Best Land Use Plan if the BART Preferred Station location is ultimately
       selected by BART: If the BART proposed station location is ultimately selected
       by BART what is the best land use plan for such a station location? The
       Specific Plan on pg. 3-5 contains a land use plan (below) based on the
       BART proposed station location, are there other ways of further
       “optimizing “this plan?

iii.   How to best handle parking: The Hillcrest eBART station will function as an
       end of the line eBART station for the foreseeable future. BART indicates that
       1,000 parking spaces are needed when eBART opens for service in 2015, and
       an additional 1,600 spaces (for a total of 2,600 spaces) are needed by 2035.
       Given the constraints imposed by the existing UP rail line, the existing PG&E
       substation, and other factors the amount of developable land in close proximity to
       the proposed eBART station may be limited in either of the two station location
       options. The end result would be that the demand for parking uses up much of
       the land that could be otherwise used for development and a successful TOD.
       While structured parking may be a partial solution, the City is concerned that the
       cost of structured parking may be prohibitive. What is the best strategy to
       provide the needed parking given these constraints?



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iv.    PG&E Substation Facade: There is a large PG&E substation located just north
       of the proposed eBART Station locations. Screening this huge substation from
       the station and the surrounding TOD development will be an important factor in
       the development of a successful TOD in the area. What would some strategies
       be to screen this substation from the station and nearby TOD
       development?




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     Hillcrest Station Area Quick Facts:

  ii. Size: 375-acres
 iii. Boundaries: Bounded by Hwy 4 on the south, Hillcrest Ave on the west, Oakley
      Rd. on the north, and Hwy 160 on the east.
 iv. Existing land Uses: The site is largely vacant. Tahere is an existing light industrial
      building located in the southeast portion of the study area, along with an auto
      wrecking yard, and several dilapidated homes, of which one is occupied. There is an
      existing home in moderate condition in the western portion of the study area just
      east of the BART park and ride lot. There are no federal-, State-, or County-listed
      historic sites within the Planning Area. Figure 2-6 below depicts the existing land-
      use.
  v. Topography: The site is largely level, with some partially graded hills in the eastern
      portion of the site just both of the Hwy 4/160 interchange. These hills were graded in
      the 1960’s to accommodate the construction of Hwy 4 and Hwy 160.
 vi. Transportation and access: The site currently has very poor vehicular access,
      which is the primary reason the site remains largely undeveloped. Current access to
      the site is described in detail in the first several pages of the Circulation Section 3.4
      of the DEIR.
vii. Infrastructure and Utilities: These are described in detail in Chapter 3.13 of the
      DEIR. As with access, the state of utilities in the area is very limited, with existing
      utility connection along the edge of the Study area along Hillcrest Ave. and E. 18th
      Street.
viii. Vacant land: The majority of the area is vacant. The 70 acre PG&E substation is
      the largest existing developed property.
 ix. Special Features: The most notable site features are how the exiting UP rail lines,
      East Antioch Creek and related detention basins, and the existing large PG&E
      substation create real development challenges. These challenges are aggravated by
      the narrowing of the western portion of the site.




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III. STATUS OF PLAN

   Approval Process: The Specific Plan, corresponding General Plan Amendments,
   and EIR were approve by the City Council on April 14, 2009. Planning Commission
   recommended approval of the Specific Plan and EIR on March 18, 2009. The BART
   Board approved the eBART extension to Antioch on April 23, 2009.

   Environmental Review: A Programmatic EIR was prepared for the Specific Plan,
   and was certified by City Council.


IV. HISTORY OF THE STUDY AREA




The subject 375-acre area was annexed to the City in the 1980’s. A large chemical
fertilizer plant occupied approximately 50 acres of the study area since the 1940’s. This
facility, known as the Kerley Chemical Plant, was eventually torn down and the site
cleaned back in the late 1990’s. This previous chemical operation is described in
Section 3.8 of the DEIR. The eastern portion of the study area has historically been
used as a sand borrow site, and as recently as January 2009 sand was still being



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excavated. This explains the fact that there is a large “hole’ in the eastern portion of the
property. In 2005 the Antioch City Council authorized an access study to determine how
to enhance vehicular access to the property.




East Contra Costa County (ECCC) is one of the fastest growing areas of the San
Francisco Bay Region. Between the years 2005 and 2030, more than 32,000
households and 47,000 jobs are expected to be added in the four communities of
Antioch, Brentwood, Oakley, and Pittsburg alone. To the west of Antioch are the
communities of Concord and Walnut Creek, which are major employment destinations.
To the east are the communities of Oakley, Brentwood and Discovery Bay, which have
experienced rapid growth in their residential sectors over the past ten years.

With a population of 100,500, Antioch offers a variety of employment, shopping and
recreational activities. Land remains plentiful and afford-able, compared with other parts
of the Bay Area. In 2007, the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) estimated
that Antioch will grow to a population of 128,400 (almost 30 percent increase) and will
have 40,800 jobs (almost 100 percent increase) by 2035.




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V. TRANSIT- Current operations and planned upgrades:

Existing Service: There are several bus transit routes that serve the Hillcrest Park &
Ride lot. Figure 4-5 shows the existing transit routes operated by Tri Delta Transit that
access the lot. These include Routes 300, 383, 384, 385, 386, 390, 392, 393
(weekend), and 394 (weekend). These routes operate with 15 to 60 minute headways
throughout the day. Tri Delta Transit also operates the Delta Express which stops at the
lot. Transfers to County Connection’s Route 930C, which services Pittsburg, Concord,
Walnut Creek and the Walnut Creek BART station are possible at the Hillcrest Park &
Ride lot.

During peak times about nine westbound or eastbound Tri Delta Transit buses serve the
Hillcrest Park & Ride lot and the Pittsburg/Bay Point BART station. Between six and
seven buses serve the Sutter Delta Medical Center in Antioch during the same periods.

Tri Delta Transit’s Route 300 provides express bus service between Brentwood and the
Pittsburgh/Bay Point BART Station. This all-day express service makes two stops in
Brentwood, two in Oakley, one in Antioch at the Hillcrest Park & Ride lot, and one at the
Pittsburgh/Bay Point BART Station. The bus operates from 3:15 AM to approximately
10:00 PM on 15- to 30-minute headways. The ride from Brentwood to the
Pittsburgh/Bay Point BART station takes approximately one hour.

Delta Express, the express commuter bus run by Tri-Delta Transit, serves Martinez from
the Hillcrest Park & Ride lot with one bus in the morning and one in the evening.
Another express route connects the lot with the Dublin/Pleasanton BART station, where
passengers can connect with a free shuttle to the Bishop Ranch Business Park. Two
bus runs each commute period are made for this route. The third route is between the
lot and the Lawrence Livermore National Lab. It too has two morning and two evening
runs during the week.



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Proposed Improvements: The site currently contains a roughly 5 acre BART
park and ride lot on the south western edge of the study area. BART is planning to
extend service from the Pittsburg/Bay Point Station into East Contra Costa County. A
station will be located within the Hillcrest Station area. In the 2002 feasibility study,
BART and CCTA recommended diesel multiple unit trains that would operate in the
median of SR 4 and then travel southeast to Byron. In 2007, the eBART Partnership
Policy Advisory Committee (ePPAC) identified a new Phase 1 Proposed Project, which
can be constructed with the funding secured for the project. The Phase 1 Proposed
Project consists of Diesel Multiple Unit (DMU) technology running from a transfer station
located just east of the Pittsburg/Bay Point platform and extending down the median of
SR 4. This project, called eBART, would provide an attractive, cost-effective option for
the corridor. Passengers would transfer easily to BART by crossing the platform at the
Pittsburgh Bay Point Transfer Station/Platform, approximately 3,500 feet from the
Pittsburg/Bay Point BART station. The new stations include Railroad Avenue in
Pittsburg and a terminus station near Hillcrest Avenue in Antioch. Future phases could
extend beyond Antioch to Oakley, Brentwood, Byron/ Discovery Bay and beyond.

eBART Technology: The Diesel Multiple Unit (DMU) technology is a self propelled rail
car powered by an on-board diesel engine. The rail cars have similar amenities as
classic BART vehicles but can operate on standard gauge rail track. The diesel engines
can burn ultra-low sulfur fuel, “clean diesel,” and would meet or exceed California’s air
quality standards.

eBART Route: The proposed expansion project would extend from Pittsburg/Bay Point
BART Station eastward via the SR 4 median to a terminus station near Hillcrest
Avenue, approximately 10 miles. The tracks would be at the same elevation as SR 4.
There would be three stations along the route: the BART to eBART transfer station
3,500 feet east of Pittsburg/Bay Point BART Station; the Railroad Avenue Station in
Pittsburg; and the Hillcrest Avenue Station in Antioch.

eBART Operations: During the peak periods, two-car eBART trains would be operated
on 15-minute headways. Three two-car trains would be required to provide the service,
for a total of six DMU vehicles. Two spare vehicles would also be needed, bringing the
total fleet to eight vehicles. Three-car trains may be needed in the future. The proposed
operating plan for eBART from the Pittsburg/Bay Point BART transfer station to the
Hillcrest Avenue Station is shown in Table 2-1.




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The running time for eBART is projected to be 10 minutes from the Pittsburg/Bay Point
BART transfer station to the Hillcrest Avenue Station. This time does not include the
short trip on BART from the Pittsburg/Bay Point BART platform to the transfer station
and the three-minute transfer period at the transfer station. It does include a one-minute
stop at the Railroad Avenue Station.

More information on the proposed eBART system is also available on the BART web
site www.ebartproject.org.


VI. DESCRIPTION OF THE STUDY AREA

Physical Description: The site, which is largely vacant, is characterized by its
triangular shape, which narrows dramatically to the west. The site is broken up
longitudinally by the existing Union Pacific (UP) rail line, and East Antioch Creek. These
2 features present a significant constraint to development. UP has stated that they
intend to resume train traffic on this rail line, which largely serves the Port of Oakland.
The DEIR describes the noise and other impacts of this in detail in Section 3.11. The
large PG&E substation dominates the western portion of the site.

Boundaries and Sizes: The Planning Area is a 375-acre rectangular area in
northeast Antioch that is bounded on the north generally by Oakley Road, on the east
by State Route 160 (SR 160), on the south by State Route 4 (SR 4), and on the west by
Hillcrest Avenue. A larger study area has been defined to evaluate circulation impacts.
Figure 3.4-1 shows the area context.

Refer to Figure 4-2 of the Existing Conditions report for an analysis of peak circulation
patterns (see below) and Figure 4-4 for planned roadway improvement projects. Major
roads in the study area include SR 4 and SR 160 which are state highways as well as
Hillcrest Avenue and East 18th Street. Local roads serving the site include Oakley
Road, Phillips Lane, Willow Avenue, and Viera Avenue.




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The Planning Area is located on the northern flank of
Mount Diablo at the southern edge of the Pittsburg-
Antioch Plain. The Pittsburg-Antioch Plain is an
alluvial plain that slopes gently north away from the
base of the foothills of Mount Diablo to the tidal
marshes of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. With
the exception of two hills adjacent to SR 4, the
Planning Area is a shallow valley bisected by East
Antioch Creek, which meanders in a northwest
direction across the site. The site is located in the
East Antioch Watershed Boundary. The topography of the Planning Area varies from
gentle slopes of 2-3 percent on the valley floor to 15-30 percent slopes on the hilly
areas in the southeast.




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Location: The Hillcrest Station Area is located in East Contra Costa County in
northeastern Antioch, as shown on the Regional Context map, Figure 2-1. To the west
of the Station Area are the communities of Pittsburg, Concord and Walnut Creek, which
are major employment destinations. To the east are the communities of Oakley,
Brentwood and Discovery Bay, which have experienced rapid growth in their residential
sectors over the past ten years. Figure 2-2 illustrates the Planning and Study areas for
the Specific Plan. The Planning Area is a generally rectangular 375-acre area at the
junction of Highway 4 (SR 4) and Highway 160 (SR160). A Study Area has also been
illustrated in order to evaluate circulation and access to the site and to the future eBART
station. This Study Area is defined by the major arterials that would be used to access
the Planning Area.




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CONTRA COSTA COUNTY
East Contra Costa County is one of the fastest growing areas of the San Francisco Bay
Region. Between the years 2005 and 2030, more than 32,000 households and 47,000
jobs are expected to be added in the four communities of Antioch, Brentwood, Oakley,
and Pittsburg alone. In addition, more houses and jobs will be added to the
unincorporated areas of the County (ABAG, 2007). As East Contra Costa County
continues to add households and jobs, traffic delay and congestion on SR 4 and on the
few alternative street and highway routes available to commuters are expected to
increase dramatically. Many of the East County residents travel west to get to work
each day, causing serious traffic congestion on SR 4, the only east-west highway in
East County. Caltrans and regional transportation agencies are currently expanding SR
4 and building the SR 4 Bypass to help accommodate traffic.




2009 ULI TOD MARKETPLACE                                                            22
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BRIEFING BOOK

CITY OF ANTIOCH
With a population of 100,500
people, Antioch offers a variety of
employment, shopping and
recreational activities. Land
remains plentiful and affordable,
compared with other parts of the
Bay Area. Antioch is one of the few
Bay Area communities that offers
affordable housing. There are a
variety of house styles throughout
Antioch, from condominiums to
single unit residences, priced for a
variety of income levels. New
development over the last 20 years
has been predominantly single-
family housing. The pace of development in Antioch has spurred activity for financial
and insurance institutions, contractors, and other types of service-oriented businesses.
Increased development has created increased employment in schools, hospitals, retail
and other local service sectors.

The Bay Area Association of Governments (ABAG) estimates that Antioch will grow to
124,000 population and 36,750 jobs by 2030. (2007) Major employers in the City
include Antioch Unified School District, Sutter Delta Medical Center, Kaiser
Permanente, Contra Costa County Department of Social Services, and Wal-Mart.




2009 ULI TOD MARKETPLACE                                                               23
HILLCREST STATION AREA SPECIFIC PLAN, CITY OF ANTIOCH
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Demographics: Demographics and the types of households are changing in Antioch.
As shown in Chart 2-1, the trend is towards fewer traditional households of parents and
children, and more households of singles and couples. Data from the US Census 2000
and Claritas indicate that while population has grown and is anticipated to grow at an
average rate of 7 percent between 1990 and 2012, the number of families is growing at
a slower rate (5.8 percent). Between
2000 and 2012, three demographic
groups - college and career starters
(ages 18-24), singles and couples
between the ages of 55 and 64, and
retirees (ages 65 and over) – will grow
positively, while all other age groups
will decline. Typically, these three
demographic groups are more likely to
live near transit in smaller housing
types instead of single-family
detached houses.


2009 ULI TOD MARKETPLACE                                                              24
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Population and Household
Antioch is the third largest City in Contra Costa County. Between 1990 and 2007,
Antioch’s population increased from 62,195 people to 100,150, a 61 percent increase
over a 17 year period. This growth was much faster than for the nine Bay Area counties
overall, which increased by 20 percent from 6.0 million to 7.2 million residents over the
same period. Refer to table 3-1 of the Hillcrest Station Specific Area Plan Existing
Conditions Report for population, housing, and job projections through 2035.




Following this period of rapid housing growth, the prospects for the market area have
weakened over the last two years due to the general downturn in the housing market.
According to ABAG Projections 2007, population and household growth in the ECCC
market area will slow down over the next 25 years. Specifically, an annual population
growth of 1.3 percent is projected between 2005 and 2030 compared to the historic
population growth of 3.5 percent between 1990 and 2007. It should be noted that
ABAG’s forecast is based on assumptions and policy preference for proportionally more
growth in the Bay Area’s interior urban jurisdictions and less in the exterior suburbs.
However, recent market trends indicate that these assumptions are likely to be
supportable, as foreclosure rates and housing prices show the exterior suburbs to be
weaker markets.

Consistent with the trend between 2000 and 2005, Antioch is projected to
experience the slowest population and household growth among the cities of
Antioch, Pittsburg, Oakley, and Brentwood located in East Contra Costa County
(“the ECCC Market Area”), partially attributed to the City’s land constraints
relative to other jurisdictions in the East County. Antioch is also projected to have
slower employment growth relative to the other jurisdictions in East County. As with
each of the ECCC cities, Antioch’s jobs/housing balance is projected to improve in the
future with each of the East County cities expected to outpace the County overall in
terms of employment growth rates.

Antioch’s growth by age group has not experienced any drastic shifts between 1990 and
2008, although the City’s young professionals and singles market segment, ages 20 to
34 has been gradually declining as a proportion of total population. This cohort reduced
from 26 percent in 1990 to 20 percent in 2008. Moreover, children (ages 19 and under)
and the 35 to 54 age group population have made up the majority of the City’s
population through 2008, indicating a large presence of families with children. Larger


2009 ULI TOD MARKETPLACE                                                                 25
HILLCREST STATION AREA SPECIFIC PLAN, CITY OF ANTIOCH
BRIEFING BOOK

households have also increased, while smaller households have decreased
proportionally and have grown at the slowest pace between 1990 and 2008. The decline
of the young professionals’ age group and slow growth of small households in Antioch
indicates that the City’s demographic changes have not driven demand for high-density
housing.

Median household income for the ECCC Market Area was $80,161 (in 2005 $) and in
Antioch experienced significant growth between 1990 and 2007, growing by an inflation-
adjusted average of 3.5 percent a year as wealthier households have moved to the
area. However, according to ABAG Projections 2007, average household income is
expected to grow at 1.2 percent per year (inflation-adjusted), significantly below the
historical rate. Future income patterns would depend on broader economic trends, as
the City and ECCC market area have assumed the role of a bedroom community for the
inner Bay Area employment centers.

Given the relative stabilization in household income, consumer preferences for various
housing types may be distributed more evenly in the future compared to the recent
distribution skewed toward lower density housing driven, reflecting the high incomes of
new household.

Economics of the Study Area: The market study area is defined as the cities of
Antioch, Pittsburg, Oakley, and Brentwood located in East Contra Costa County (“the
ECCC Market Area”). These cities comprise a geographic area that contains the
primary elements of demand and supply for the real estate product types being
considered. A detailed EPS report was completed June 2008 and estimates the
future absorption rate for various types of housing products.




The Hillcrest Station Area will have a strong competitive position in East County,
because it is unique in terms of transit access, highway access and visibility, and the
envisioned density and design. The proposed Specific Plan with two eBART stations
represents the strongest opportunity to create and gain value from two unique transit



2009 ULI TOD MARKETPLACE                                                                  26
    HILLCREST STATION AREA SPECIFIC PLAN, CITY OF ANTIOCH
    BRIEFING BOOK

    villages. However, there are many sites in west, central, and east Contra Costa County
    that are available for development and will compete with the Hillcrest Station Area
    development.

•   The Hillcrest Station Area development concepts reflect transit-oriented development
    (TOD) principles and include mixed-use development, a wide range of housing types
    and densities, regional and neighborhood retail, and office development. Depending on
    the alternatives, up to 3,450 residential units, 1.0 million square feet of retail, and
    1.4 million square feet of office may be developed on 375-acres around the
    eBART station.

•   The site plan alternatives in the Specific Plan represent different densities and
    land use mixes which, combined with alternative station locations, will place the
    area in a unique competitive position in East County. Numerous developable tracts
    are available in Antioch, Brentwood, Oakley, and Pittsburg, but the Hillcrest Station
    Area is unique in terms of transit access, highway access, and envisioned density and
    design. The plans with the eBART station located within the site rather than in the
    highway median represent the strongest opportunities to create and gain value from a
    unique transit village.

    Housing market: The housing envisioned in the Plan is denser than most housing
    developed in Antioch and its surrounding cities in the past two decades. About 91
    percent of the residential growth in the East Contra Costa County market area
    has occurred through development of single-family detached housing over the
    last 18 years. Single-family detached housing now makes up about 80 percent of
    the residential units in East Contra Costa County compared to less than 70
    percent in 1990. ABAG estimated that there were 20,510 jobs in the City of Antioch in
    2005. Therefore the jobs/housing ratio was about 0.61. This indicates that the majority
    of the workers living in Antioch commute out of the city to work. More than 20 percent of
    the jobs in Antioch are held by workers who don’t live in the City.1 The Hillcrest Station
    Area will provide a unique opportunity for higher density housing in East County. The
    eBART station, mixed-use amenities, highway access, and other features of the Plan
    will enable the site to capture a strong proportion of the City’s market for higher density
    housing.

    There are a number of factors that suggest that higher-density; compact product types
    such as town homes or condos can be successful in the Antioch market. Recent studies
    demonstrate national shifts in many consumers’ preferences toward compact housing in
    mixed-use neighborhoods around transit centers. Nationally, demand for compact living
    with walking distance of a transit station is projected to double over the next 25 years.
    Even though the recent downturn in the housing market has slowed growth, there is a
    lack of senior housing, apartments, condominiums, and townhouses in East County.




    1
        Bay Area Economics, Draft Socio-Economics Report for eBART Corridor EIR, 2007. (Preliminary report and information is subject to change.)




    2009 ULI TOD MARKETPLACE                                                                                                                        27
HILLCREST STATION AREA SPECIFIC PLAN, CITY OF ANTIOCH
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As the existing residents age and become
empty-nesters or retirees, they may choose
to downsize their housing and relocate
close to transit for more transportation
options. As employment growth increases,
the East County market may evolve from its
traditional orientation as a “bedroom
community” to an area that attracts a higher
proportion of young, single professionals.
However in order to attract typical transit
area residents such as young professionals
or empty nesters, there will need to be
entertainment, restaurant, and
neighborhood retail uses that create an
exciting place to live.

The Hillcrest Station Area will provide a
unique opportunity for higher density
housing in East County, but build out of the
plans’ residential components will still take
several decades. The eBART station,
mixed-use amenities, highway access, and
other features of the plan will enable the
site to capture a strong proportion of the
City’s market for higher density housing, but the relatively few households are likely to
seek such housing types in Antioch.

The market study conducted for this project indicates that demand for anywhere
from 650 to 1,200 residential units can be anticipated in the Hillcrest Station area
in the next 20-25 years. If the area becomes highly desirable and successful, that
demand could increase to 2,100 units by 2030. Additional units could be absorbed in
future years. It may take over 60 years to absorb the residential component of the plan
alternative with 3,450 housing units, much of which is at unprecedented densities in
East County. For additional information, refer to June 2008 EPS Report.

Commercial Development: The most marketable locations for office and business
park development are areas that combine convenient auto and public transit access,
existing office uses and business service firms, and urban amenities such as retail and
outdoor plazas. Users attracted to compact office buildings include primarily white collar
professions such as legal, financial and business services, high-technology (software,
telecommunications, and biotechnology), healthcare, real estate, and design, marketing
and other creative services. Employment growth in these sectors is generally linked to a
well-educated workforce, local quality of life factors, and existing industry clusters.




2009 ULI TOD MARKETPLACE                                                                    28
HILLCREST STATION AREA SPECIFIC PLAN, CITY OF ANTIOCH
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According to ABAG Projections 2007, there were over 50,500 jobs in the ECCC
market area in 2005, with about 21,200 jobs in Antioch. The Health, Education,
and Recreation category is the largest local employment sector, followed by
retail. Both of these categories are predominantly of local-serving nature, and depend
on the needs and expenditures of the local population. The City and the broader ECCC
market area have a lower proportion of financial services and diversified professional
jobs compared to the central Contra Costa County cities. Going forward, however,
Financial and Professional Service Jobs are projected to grow at the highest rate
between 2005 and 2030, followed by Health, Education, and Recreation and
Information, Construction, and Public Administration categories. Financial and
Professional Service Jobs will account for 14 percent of the employment total in
2030.

Job growth is expected to exceed population growth in East County between
2005 and 2030. Given this expected reversal of employment and population growth
rates, the jobs-housing ratio in both Antioch and the ECCC will gradually improve from
0.6 to 0.9 local jobs per household. With more jobs per resident than in the current
conditions, the need for out-commuting will be reduced. Growing employment is also
likely to increase the population of young professionals, a primary market segment for



2009 ULI TOD MARKETPLACE                                                                 29
HILLCREST STATION AREA SPECIFIC PLAN, CITY OF ANTIOCH
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higher density housing. Employment growth will also increase demand for commercial
space in the City.

About 5.3 million square feet of commercial space are either under review,
approved, or under construction in the ECCC market area, Antioch accounts for
approximately 20% of that, although traditional office space represents a small
proportion of this development activity, while retail represents the largest proportion.
Similar to the broader trend, a large portion of commercial pipeline space in Antioch is
made up of retail, confirming the strength of this retail sector in the City and the broader
area compared to the office sector. Historically, the majority of office space in the
ECCC market area has been of lower density back office and office parks. The
City’s office sector has served as a satellite submarket to the larger Interstate 680
Contra Costa County market. According to CB Richard Ellis market reports, there
are about 184,000 square feet of net rentable office space in Antioch. In
comparison, downtown Walnut Creek contains of 4.9 million square feet of office and
the Pleasant Hill BART submarket contains 1.2 million square feet of office space.
Antioch’s office space makes up less than one percent of the space in the Contra Costa
County office market.

As cities in Central Contra Costa County approach build-out and increasingly rely on
infill development to continue growing as regional office centers, East County cities like
Antioch may benefit from Central County’s land constraints. However, given the central
location and access advantage of cities like Walnut Creek, East County cities may only
partially capitalize on its availability of Greenfield development sites in attracting
regional office and retail uses.

Several major factors support the continued demand for office space in East County:
continued population growth in the region, the national transition of the labor force
towards professional and financial service jobs, long commute times, and new eBART
transit service. As the build out of this Specific Plan area occurs, including the eBART
station and other major infrastructure improvements, the Hillcrest Station Area can
attract a substantial proportion of the future office growth in Antioch. However there will
be competition from existing office space in Walnut Creek and Concord, as well as new
office space built in other East County locations.

The office market in Antioch is expected to grow, creating opportunities for new
development on the Hillcrest Station Area site. East County employment growth is
expected to outpace population growth in the next several decades (51 percent vs. 19
percent from 2015 through 2030), and traditional office tenants including finance and
professional service firms, high-technology (e.g., software, telecommunications, and
biotechnology), healthcare, real estate, and design, marketing and other creative
services, are expected to be among the fastest-growing job sectors. ABAG has
projected that the number of jobs in Antioch will almost double between 2005 and 2035.

The Hillcrest Station Area should attract a substantial proportion of the future office
growth in Antioch, but the large amount of office space in the Plan will take decades to



2009 ULI TOD MARKETPLACE                                                                   30
HILLCREST STATION AREA SPECIFIC PLAN, CITY OF ANTIOCH
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build out. The market study indicates that demand for office space in the Hillcrest
Station area could be anywhere between 200,000 and 950,000 square feet in the
next 20 years, depending on the type of development created in the Station Area
and competition from other locations. Additional absorption in future years could
increase that total as high as 1,400,000 square feet which may take up to 50 years
to develop.

East County has experienced strong activity in the retail market. The majority of recent
commercial development has been in the retail sector and can be attributed to recent
housing and population growth in East Contra Costa County, as well as increasing
income levels. The commercial pipeline data suggests that retail will remain the
strongest commercial land use sector in the near future, although eventually office
growth may outpace retail growth.

The Hillcrest Station Area should be very competitive for new retail development in
Antioch. The housing and employment density and highway and transit access will offer
unique advantages for this site as a retail location. Still, the site will compete with
numerous other potential retail locations, and the development of as much as 1.0 million
square feet of retail space on this single site may take over 30 years.

The Hillcrest site should be able to support a combination of local-serving and regional
retail. Regional retail should be highly viable, given the access and visibility of the site.
The amount of residential and office development planned for the Station Area alone
will not support a supermarket- anchored shopping center, but the neighborhoods to the
north can contribute to support for such a center. A neighborhood-serving retail
component in the Hillcrest Station Area site could create substantial competition for
several existing community shopping centers surrounding the site to the south, east,
and west.

Older regional malls like Somersville Towne Center in Antioch and Century Plaza in
Pittsburg are revitalizing and have attracted regional department stores like Macy’s.
However, much of the new retail development has concentrated in southeastern Antioch
near the most recently developed residential communities. Lone Tree Way in
southeastern Antioch has captured considerable new retail development including
grocery-anchored shopping centers, discount retailers like Wal-Mart, and other regional
serving centers. There were over 2.0 million square feet of retail space in Antioch
by 2006. The bulk of the new, high-volume retail development in the East County
cities would not be characterized as high-density but rather as more of a
traditional, auto-oriented, suburban mall or “Power Center” format. Although most
of the ECCC market area cities have traditional downtown areas with a higher density
development format, these districts are generally under-utilized and struggling to re-
establish themselves as successful shopping hubs.

To be successful, new retail in East County will need to carve out a niche that is unique,
and less formulaic than what is being provided in the rest of the market area. New
residential and office development in the Hillcrest Station area could foster an active



2009 ULI TOD MARKETPLACE                                                                   31
HILLCREST STATION AREA SPECIFIC PLAN, CITY OF ANTIOCH
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urban feel, which would support a unique type of retail. The market study estimates
that the demand for new retail space in the next twenty years in the Hillcrest
Station Area could be anywhere between 150,000 square feet and 650,000 square
feet, depending on the amount of population growth and competition from other
locations. Additional absorption in future years could increase that total to as
much as 1,000,000.

For a more detailed description of market conditions, please refer to the Hillcrest Station
Area Specific Plan Market Overview and Absorption Projections memorandum by
Economic & Planning Systems.

VII. GOVERNMENT
The primary impetus for doing the Specific Plan was to meet MTC’s land use
requirements as set out in MTC Resolution 3434, as well as the requirements of BART’s
System Expansion Policy. Table 3-5 on Pg. 3-10 of the Hillcrest Station Specific Plan
gives an analysis of how the proposed plan complies with the MTC and BART
requirements. CCTA is also involved in the process, as a significant portion of eBART
funding comes from Measure J.




The Hillcrest Station Area Specific Plan is consistent with State Law requirements. The
intent of the Hillcrest Station Area Specific Plan is consistent with the goals of the 2003
General Plan. The General Plan identifies the Planning Area as part of the SR 4
Industrial Frontage Focus Area. The General Plan policies direct this area to become a
transit-oriented development, with a mix of office, business park, light industrial, retail
commercial, and high-density residential uses, when rail transit is built. The Hillcrest
Station Area Specific Plan implements this policy direction and provides more specific
detail and implementation policies.

In April 1981, the City of Antioch adopted the East Antioch Specific Plan for the 677-
acre area bounded by East 18th Street on the north, SR 4 on the south and east, and


2009 ULI TOD MARKETPLACE                                                                  32
HILLCREST STATION AREA SPECIFIC PLAN, CITY OF ANTIOCH
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existing City limits along the eastern boundary of the PG&E parcel on the west. This
Specific Plan has been superseded by the 2003 City of Antioch General Plan, and has
been replaced by the Hillcrest Station Area Specific Plan.

City ordinances affecting the site include article 12 of the City of Antioch Zoning
Ordinance, which provides the guidelines for tree preservation and regulation. A permit
must be obtained to remove any “established tree” (any tree at least ten inches in
diameter at breast height [dbh]), any “mature tree” (any tree at least 26 inches dbh), or
any “landmark tree” (any tree at least 48 inches dbh or in excess of 40 feet in height).

Only established trees are present in the Planning Area. Established trees that will be
removed as a result of Project activities shall be replaced by two 24-inch box trees (Ord.
897-C-S, passed 10-25-94). Established trees that will be retained must be adequately
protected during grading and construction. A bond is required to ensure compliance with
replacement and protection conditions specified in the approval document. In addition, a
site plan with all established trees, including species, size, general health, and reason
for removal, must be submitted as part of the development plan.

Regional Planning Efforts
Metropolitan Transportation Commission: The introduction of a regional transit
system creates a variety of opportunities for the City of Antioch. MTC adopted a TOD
Policy in 2005 (Resolution 3434), which is designed to address multiple goals:
improving the cost effectiveness of regional investments in new transit expansions,
easing the Bay Area’s chronic housing shortage, creating vibrant new communities, and
helping preserve regional open space. The City of Antioch identified this area as a
location for an employment center as well as a transit-oriented mixed-use district in the
2003 General Plan.

Resolution 3434 establishes corridor-level thresholds to quantify appropriate minimum
levels of development around transit stations along new corridors. The eBART project is
a commuter rail project for which the threshold housing units is 6,600. At build out of the
eBART corridor from Pittsburg to Hillcrest, a total of 6,600 units (an average of 2,200
units per station) must be located within a half-mile radius of the three eBART stations:
Pittsburg/Bay Point Station, Railroad Avenue Station, and Hillcrest Avenue Station.

Priority Development Areas: The Hillcrest Station Area was identified in 2008 as a
Priority Development Area (PDA) by the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG),
Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD), San Francisco Bay Conservation
and Development Commission (BCDC), and Metropolitan Transportation Commission
(MTC). PDAs are infill development opportunities within existing communities, intended
to creating more housing choices in locations easily accessible to transit, jobs, shopping
and services. To be eligible to become a PDA, an area had to be within an existing
community, near existing or planned fixed transit or served by comparable bus service,
and planned for more housing. Planned PDAs are eligible for capital infrastructure
funds, planning grants, and technical assistance while Potential PDAs would be eligible
for planning grants and technical assistance, but not capital infrastructure funds. To


2009 ULI TOD MARKETPLACE                                                                 33
HILLCREST STATION AREA SPECIFIC PLAN, CITY OF ANTIOCH
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become a Planned PDA, Antioch will need to adopt a land use plan and a City Council
resolution of support.

VIII. PRIVATE SECTOR INVOLVEMENT

Planning Process and Public Outreach: The City of Antioch, in partnership with
the Dyett & Bhatia consulting team, led the planning process for the Hillcrest Specific
Plan. BART and Brosamer & Wall, a major property owner, also contributed to the plan
by providing data and studies relevant to the area.

The planning process began with researching the issues, opportunities, and constraints
through field visits and evaluating relevant planning documents and studies. The
Existing Conditions, Opportunities, and Constraints Report summarized the results.
Individual stakeholders were interviewed to provide additional context and
understanding of the vision for the area. The Stakeholder Interviews Summary Report
reviews the major topics and information gathered during the initial outreach phase. A
Market Overview and Absorption Projections Report was also prepared, analyzing the
market demand and absorption potential for residential, retail, and office uses. All three
documents are available for review at the City’s Economic Development Department.

The next stage involved drafting alternative land use and circulation diagrams and
evaluating potential traffic, environmental, and market impacts. This work was
summarized in the Alternative Development Scenarios Report, dated May 2008.
Meetings with the City Council, consulting team, city staff, and property owners provided
feedback in order to refine the diagrams. City Council Study Sessions were conducted
on May 20, July 8, and October 28, 2008. The alternative diagrams and draft project
description were presented to the Planning Commission as part of the Environmental
Impact Report scoping session on June 18, 2008.

A community workshop, attended by approximately 50 residents and interested parties,
was conducted on September 18, 2008. Comments and concerns expressed at the
workshop were incorporated into the plan diagrams and draft plan policies.

Another public workshop was conducted at the Planning Commission meeting on
December 3, 2008 to garner feedback from community members about the plan
policies, final plan diagrams, and the draft implementation strategy.

Proposed Development Projects:
Within the Study Area there are three approved projects, which will result in 483 new
housing units. In addition there are seven commercial projects that are likely to happen,
however, these projects have not been approved. These projects would add 280,000
square feet of retail, office, and light industrial space, plus a hotel. Figure 2-8 shows a
map of proposed development projects; and Table 2-6 describes the projects.




2009 ULI TOD MARKETPLACE                                                                  34
HILLCREST STATION AREA SPECIFIC PLAN, CITY OF ANTIOCH
BRIEFING BOOK




Property Ownership: There are fifteen different landowners in the Planning Area.
FKP Inc., a corporation owned and managed
by Brosamer & Wall, owns more than 40
percent of the site. PG&E is the second largest
landowner. Figure 2-7 shows the sites owned
by each property owner. Due to the largely
vacant nature of the property, there are no
citizen groups or associations in close
proximity to the site that have been involved in
the process. There is an organization called
CISCO, which is a more broadly based
organization that has been active in the
hearing process for the project. The major
property owner in the area is a construction
company by the name of Brosamer and Wall
based out of Walnut Creek. They control
approximately 60% of the non-government
owned land in the project area.




2009 ULI TOD MARKETPLACE                                                           35
HILLCREST STATION AREA SPECIFIC PLAN, CITY OF ANTIOCH
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2009 ULI TOD MARKETPLACE                                36

								
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