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World History Studies First Semester Understanding CBE EA

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					                  World History Studies, First Semester

Understanding CBE/EA requirements
Before you take the World History Studies, First Semester Credit by Examination/Examination
for Acceleration from The University of Texas K-16 Education Center, here are some things you
need to know. You have sixty days from the date of registration to take the exam.

Successfully completing the exam will earn you one-half unit of high school credit for the
course. This review sheet can help you prepare for the exam, by giving you an idea of what you
need to study, review, and learn. To succeed, you should be thoroughly familiar with the subject
matter before you attempt to take the exam.

Please note that exams and review sheets are updated regularly. When you take the exam, you
need to bring your confirmation letter, because it contains the unique number that indicates
which edition of the exam you will take. Your grade will be available two to three weeks after
you take the exam.

When you take the exam, please be prepared to show your competence and understanding of the
Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) that the Texas Education Agency has specified
for this course. Because this CBE/EA review sheet may not refer to all the material that will be
in the exam, you should use the complete TEKS for World History Studies, First Semester to
guide your exam preparation. You can view these TEKS online at http://www.tea.state.tx.us/teks/

Preparing for the exam
The exam covers the first semester of World History Studies.

To review this material, you may use any Texas state-adopted textbook for World History
Studies. The exam does not refer to any particular text, but it requires that you know the
important concepts and objectives covered in the course, as outlined by the TEKS.

Concepts and objectives
The World History Studies, First Semester, covers world history from ancient civilization to
approximately 1850. For the period from about 1750 to 1850, the exam covers events in Europe
and the United States; events in the rest of the world for this period are covered in World History
Studies, Second Semester.

Time for the exam
You will be allowed 3 hours to take the exam.

Types of questions
There are two parts to the exam. Part One consists of sixty multiple-choice questions worth one
point each. The multiple-choice section will account for 60 percent of your grade. Part Two
requires that you select five out of eight questions, which you will answer in paragraphs
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composed of complete sentences. One of the five essay choices must be #8, for which your essay
response is required. The essay section will account for 40 percent of your grade.

Part One: 60 multiple-choice questions                                                        60%
Part Two: 5 essay questions                                                                   40%
                                                                                       Total 100%

Sample exam
Be sure to take the sample exam, for a better idea of the types of questions you will find on the
exam.

Following are examples of essay questions, very similar to those appearing on the exam for
World History Studies, First Semester. Use these questions to help prepare yourself for the exam.

   1. “The Roman Catholic Church greatly influenced the revival of learning and culture in
      Europe during the Middle Ages.” Is this statement true or false? Explain.

   2. The Catholic Counter-Reformation was made up of these parts; explain each.
      A. The Council of Trent
      B. The Jesuits
      C. The Inquisition

   3. Describe how Martin Luther’s beliefs differed from those of the Roman Catholic Church.
      Consider the following questions:
      A. What were the causes of the Protestant Reformation?
      B. What did Luther believe people had to do to gain salvation?
      C. With what practice of the church did Luther most disagree?
      D. What did Luther believe about the powers of the pope and bishops?

   4. Compare the city-states of Athens and Sparta. In your essay, describe the government,
      society, and culture of each.

   5. Describe the major issues in conflict between the Stuarts and Parliament.

   6. Describe the Neolithic Revolution. Consider the following questions:
      A. What was the impact of the Neolithic Revolution on civilization?
      B. What characteristics developed in civilization as a result of the Neolithic Revolution?
      C. How was each of these characteristics dependent on the Neolithic Revolution?

   7. Why, do you think, did Christianity flourish in the troubled atmosphere of the Roman
      Empire in the third century A.D.? In your answer briefly explain the political and social
      problems that faced Rome during this period and tell how Christianity addressed them.

   8. English historian Thomas Carlyle wrote that the essence of history is made of
      innumerable biographies. Select five historical personalities that you consider to be
      outstanding and explain your choices.
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 9. What significant religious ideas did the Hebrews contribute? How did these ideas have a
    lasting influence on world religions?

10. Explain the differences between the following.
    A. Conservative
    B. Liberal
    C. Radical
    D. Reactionary

11. Describe the democratic system in Athens. Consider the following questions:
    A. What were the major characteristics of Athenian democracy?
    B. How did Athenian democracy protect the people against injustices      by their
       leaders?
    C. What was a major deficiency in the Athenian system of democracy?

12. Compare the civilizations of the Olmecs and the Mayans. Explain their similarities and
    differences.

13. Describe how Europeans were affected by the Crusades. Consider the following
    questions:
    A. What new military techniques did Europeans learn?
    B. How did the Crusades change the power structure in Europe?
    C. How did the Crusades change relationships between Europeans and peoples of other
       lands?

14. Define mercantilism and explain how it influenced trade policy. Consider the following
    questions:
    A. Why was it important for a country to gain a favorable balance of trade?
    B. How could a nation attain a favorable balance of trade?
    C. What role did colonies play in mercantilism?
    D. What effect did this policy have on colonies in the Americas?

15. What changes took place during the Renaissance in art, literature, and science? Give one
    example of each.

16. Many European countries were more troubled than France in 1789. Why, then, did the
    first revolution in Europe break out in France?

17. What was the impact of Napoleon’s rule on France and on other countries he conquered?
    Include in your answer both positive and negative effects of his years of power.

18. What were the major contributions of Greece and Rome?

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 19. If you had lived during the early Middle Ages, would you have preferred to be a vassal or
     a serf? Why? In your answer, explain the good and bad points of each.

 20. Describe important contributions Egyptians made to civilization. Consider the following
     questions:
     A. How did Egyptians use architecture and art to make a lasting record of their beliefs
        and everyday life?
     B. What advancements did the Egyptians make in science and in medicine?

 21. Describe the effects that geography had on the early civilizations of Greece. Consider the
     following questions:
     A. What were the geographical features of Greece?
     B. How did geography affect the unity of the Greek people?
     C. What industries sprang up in Greece as a result of its geographic features?

 22. Discuss two cultures that served as “parent cultures,” meaning that they had a strong
     influence on later civilizations. Give details to explain your answer.

 23. Explain the economic reasons that led to the period of Exploration and Discovery in the
     1400s and 1500s. Discuss how political and scientific developments helped to bring
     about this period of overseas empire building.

24.   Explain the differences between Hinduism and Buddhism.

25.   Review the map on the next page and be able to locate the following:
      A. The Battle of Trafalgar*
      B. Elba*
      C. Waterloo*
      D. Corsica*
      E. France
      F. Spain
      G. Great Britain
      H. English Channel
      I. Strait of Gibraltar
      J. Belgium




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*You should know their importance as well as their locations.




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Vocabulary Review
Listed below are terms and personalities that are important to the understanding of the material
covered in the exam. It would be more effective to review this material orally rather than in
writing. Test yourself on whether you know the term and whether you can recall the
circumstances surrounding it and its results.

Age of Enlightenment                                 Hanseatic League
Age of Pericles                                      Hellenistic Age
Alexander the Great                                  hieroglyphics
Alfred the Great                                     Hinduism/Confucianism/Buddhism/ Islam
Aristotle                                            Hohenzollern
artifact                                             House of Commons
Aztecs                                               Ice Age
Babylonians                                          indulgences
Battle of Tours                                      Jacobin
Benedictine Order                                    John Locke
Bering Strait                                        Louis XIV and Louis XVI
Bologna                                              Magna Carta
Bourbons                                             manor/manorial system
Bourgeoisie                                          Mayans
Buddhism                                             mercantilism
Bushido                                              Metternich System
Byzantine Empire                                     Michelangelo
Calvinism                                            Mogul Empire
caste system                                         monotheism/polytheism
characteristics of civilization                      Napoléon Bonaparte
city-state                                           nationalism
civilization                                         Neolithic revolution
Code of Hammurabi                                    Old Stone Age
Confucianism                                         Opium War
Congress of Vienna                                   Pax Romana
Constitutional monarchy                              Peloponnesian War
Crusades                                             Philip of Macedon
cuneiform                                            Phoenicians
Demosthenes                                          Puritans
Diamond Sutra                                        Reign of Terror
direct democracy                                     Renaissance
Divine right of kings                                Romanesque/Gothic Architecture
estates-general                                      Salerno
feudalism                                            Sepoy Mutiny
Frederick II                                         serf
fresco                                               Shintoism
Fujiwara                                             Stuarts
Galileo                                              Swahili
Golden Age                                           Taoism
guilds                                               Tudors
Habeas Corpus Act                                    Leonardo da Vinci
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Bringing identification and materials for the exam
Required photo identification
Students must present an official ID (driver's license, school ID, an ID from the Department of
Public Safety, or passport) with photo and signature.

For more information about acceptable forms of identification, you can call the K-16 Education
Testing Center at 512-232-5000 or 1-888-232-4723.

Authorized materials for the exam
Bring several sharpened number 2 pencils and a ballpoint pen to use for the exam. Use a pencil
for the multiple-choice section and a pen for the essay section.

You will not be allowed to bring any other items into the exam area.

Meeting requirements for taking the exam
Required score (CBE)
If you have had previous instruction in the grade or course and are testing to complete
requirements and gain credit, you must score a minimum of 70%.

Required score (EA)
If you are taking the Examination for Acceleration (skipping a grade or a required course), you
must score at least 90% to earn credit in the state of Texas.

Refund policy
The $45 fee for the Credit by Examination or Examination for Acceleration is not refundable or
transferable to another person or another subject.

Test proctor and location
You are responsible for arranging a testing time, in advance, with the counselor or test supervisor
in your school or alternate test site.

If you plan to test in the K-16 Education Center at The University of Texas at Austin, please
register for your exam at least 24 hours in advance of your desired testing date. Schedule your
exam so that you will have plenty of time to take the test in one sitting.

The times for sitting are listed at the Testing link of the K-16 Education Center's Credit by
Examination/Examination for Acceleration web link.

Saturday testing is available once a month, by appointment only. Please call 512-232-5000 or 1-
888-232-4723 to schedule an appointment for a Saturday testing session.

Obtaining grades by phone
In compliance with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), no information will
be released over the telephone without your assigned Personal Identification Number. You will
find this PIN on your enrollment receipt.
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Re-examination
If you score less than the minimum of 90% required to pass an Examination for Acceleration, a
re-examination is available for a $45 fee. Re-examination will be administered only after you
have received an official notification that the first exam score was below 90%.

If you score less than the minimum of 70% required to pass a Credit by Examination, a
re-examination is available for a $45 fee. Re-examination will be administered only after you
have received an official notification that the first exam score was below 70%.




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