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ANNUAL FACULTY ACADEMIC QUALITY ASSURANCE AND ENHANCEMENT REPORT

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					                                                                      Quality Monitoring Committee
                                                                                  25 February 2009
                                                                                          Paper 3.3

    ANNUAL FACULTY ACADEMIC QUALITY ASSURANCE AND ENHANCEMENT REPORT
                            FOR SESSION 2007/08

                                   FACULTY OF EDUCATION

The Annual Faculty Academic Quality Assurance and Enhancement Reports are the mechanism
for providing the Quality Monitoring Committee with assurance that robust quality assurance and
enhancement procedures are in place in each of the five faculties. The information provided in
these reports informs reports to Senate, UMC and Court as well as the Quality Assurance Agency
and the Scottish Funding Council. The Reports also form part of the documentation provided for
Enhancement-led Institutional Review.

1     INTRODUCTION

1.1   Please provide an overview of the Quality Assurance structure at Faculty Level.

      Within the Faculty of Education academic quality overview is provided by the Faculty
      Academic Committee (FAC) which considers issues of strategic and operational quality. The
      FAC then makes recommendations to the Board of Study (BoS) which, in turn, reports to
      University Senate.

      The Faculty has developed Quality in Learning and Teaching Guidelines (QILTG) which
      provide detailed advice on the development of new modules and courses and also on review
      of existing classes and courses. The QILTG content is updated annually and the guidelines
      are in regular use. The procedures and papers required for quinquennial Departmental
      Review and the procedures for the Annual Departmental Quality Reports which feed into the
      Annual Faculty Quality and Enhancement Report are also detailed in the QILTG booklet.
      The content of the QILTG is stored on the Faculty Intranet where staff can access the most
      up to date version of the Guidelines. A flow chart is also available to provide “at a glance”
      support. Feedback is sought annually on the procedures and, in response to the feedback,
      changes made to the Guidance which is why staff are directed to an electronic version rather
      than a paper based manual which could become rapidly out of date. Any updates to these
      guidelines are developed and approved by FAC and communicated to course teams and
      departments. All of the Guidelines were updated for the 20 credit reviews and a booklet
      prepared which gathered together information on Enhancement Themes. This provided
      essential information for Course Directors preparing for review and was well received.
      Access to the Intranet has been problematic and so the Faculty are exploring the use of the
      University Content Management System. Discussions with the University Web Team are on-
      going.

      The case for any new course should be made to FAC members to consider the academic
      aspects of adding the course to the Faculty portfolio and also to Planning and Resources
      (PRC) members to consider the financial and staffing issues. While most would not
      associate financial data with course quality, the quality of the future student learning
      experience could be detrimentally affected if there were too few students to interact with, if
      classes could not be run due to a shortage of appropriately qualified staff to deliver the
      course or if the course was not viable and had to close. Approval from both committees is
      required before the course can be progressed to the Board of Study and Senate. Approval is
      based on the alignment of the proposal with both Faculty and University strategic priorities.

      A new class proposal would be scrutinised by an independent (i.e. not involved in the
      delivery of the class or the course with which the class will be associated) academic member
      of staff prior to being considered by the FAC members. The class outline form and the report
      from the scrutiniser is submitted to the FAC.

      Each department is asked to report annually on the courses and modules delivered by its
      staff. Annual Departmental Quality and Enhancement Reports are scrutinised by 2 members
      of staff from another department before being discussed at a Faculty Scrutiny meeting. This
      provides peer review and helps the Faculty to identify and disseminate good practice, areas
      for future development and areas of concern. In addition, this Faculty-wide involvement in
      scrutiny assists in generating key issues for this report and for communication to the wider
      academic community through meetings, seminars and workshops. The Annual Faculty
      Quality and Enhancement Reports also undergo peer scrutiny before submission.

      The course reports for collaborative courses were, for the first time, considered separately by
      the Vice-Dean (Academic) and the Faculty Officer to ensure that the details in the Agreement
      were current, the term of the Agreement was current and the course was being managed
      appropriately. Collaborative courses will receive an individual report from this process which
      will be discussed with appropriate staff at a meeting of collaborative partners to be held in
      February/March each year.

1.2   Please comment on how the actions identified in the Faculty’s last Academic Quality
      Assurance and Enhancement Report have been carried forward and on the impact
      these have had on the academic quality of the Faculty’s programmes.

      Video streaming was identified as good practice in the Department of Curricular Studies.
      Video streaming is now used more widely across the Faculty as a direct result of the
      dissemination of this good practice by the PGDE(S) course team. The video streaming has
      further developed now includes captions and is therefore more accessible to students with a
      disability as well as providing support for more flexible learning. This good practice has been
      reported to the Academic Policy Committee and the Teaching Infrastructure Strategy Group.

      Previous good practice identified in the articulation with James Watt College to deliver the
      Diploma and BA in Education and Social Services resulted in the Diploma delivery being
      introduced at Motherwell College and at Langside College in 2008/09. The Collaborative
      Agreements and the development of course materials was carried out during 2007/08 to
      ensure that the materials were in place on time. The Faculty strategically transferred funded
      places into the BA course to support the expansion of this development. This will enable the
      Faculty to widen the geographical area over which it offers wider access to this course.

      The BA in Adult Literacies pilot course received very positive feedback from review. As a
      result of this the University, in consortium with other institutions, was awarded a further
      contract to develop a Professional Graduate Diploma in Education (Adult Literacies). The
      PGDE has been developed and approved and will be delivered from January 09. This
      provides a qualification in a specialist area which had not been recognised before.

      During 2007/08 the entry requirements for the majority of the Faculty courses met or
      exceeded the University minimum of 4 “B”s. The only course below that minimum is the BA
      (Hons) in Community Education at 3 “B”s. It is argued that this course aligns with the
      enhancement theme of wider access and with the Faculty research theme of social
      wellbeing. The Faculty is therefore aligning with the University strategic aim to increase entry
      tariff.

      During 2007/08 the support for research students was reviewed. As the Faculty delivers the
      MSc in Applied Educational Research which has provisional approval by the ESRC, it was
      agreed that all students should be offered the content of these modules to underpin their
      research training. This was approved at Senate for delivery 2008/09 onwards. This means
      that all Faculty research students will be supported by the MSc AER materials.



AFQER 2007/08                                2                                              February 09
      Partly in response to student feedback regarding the speed of response to research student
      applications, the Faculty formed the Faculty Research Office to provide support to students
      and staff and to support the application process. The EdD admissions had been a particular
      problem. The EdD was now classified as a research degree and was now supported by the
      Research Office. Research Office had introduced a number of measures to improve the
      speed and quality of feedback to PGR applicants which should improve the conversion rate
      from applicant to student. This will be monitored for impact.

      The delivery of the Postgraduate Certificate in Design and Technology was suspended due
      to a change in Course Director when the existing course director moved to another institution.
      All students on the course were supported to completion and the new course director will
      review the course with a view to offering a revised version at a later date. Viability had
      previously been an issue and it was expected that the revised course would address this.

      Responding to issues raised about the consistency of course review panel reports, a Faculty
      guidance booklet was issued to all Panel Chairs. This was seen as good practice. There will
      also be a meeting of Chairs called following the reviews in 2008/09 to discuss consistency
      issues and update the guidance for future years.

      Staff development issues for distant and part time staff had been highlighted in the delivery of
      the MSc in Autism. This was overtaken by staff development seminars and support provided
      by video conferencing. The feedback from these courses has been positive.

      The extensive round of course reviews provided an opportunity to involve staff who had not
      been involved in quality assurance before and to provide experienced staff with the
      opportunity to chair events. The guidance documents contained comprehensive information
      about enhancement themes which was seen as helpful by the course teams developing the
      courses and by the scrutiny panels alike.

2     CYCLICAL REVIEWS

2.1   Please list the Departmental Reviews and Excellence Reviews carried out in session
      2007/08 (and attach Executive Summaries).

      During 2007/08 three Faculty departments were the subject of Excellence Reviews:

      The Department of Curricular Studies (Appendix 1)
      The Department of Creative and Aesthetic Studies (Appendix 2)
      The Department of Sport, Culture and the Arts (Appendix 3)

2.2   Please detail any significant developments or issues other than those in learning and
      teaching (which should be dealt with under section 7) arising out of Departmental
      Reviews or Excellence Reviews conducted in session 2007/08, including any follow up
      and the Faculty’s proposed response to these.

      In 2004, the Faculty had re-structured into 5 departments plus the Glasgow School of Social
      Work, a Joint Department with the University of Glasgow for which Strathclyde was
      administering University. In 2007/08 the University Senior Officers identified 3 Faculty
      departments to under

      As a direct result of the three Excellence Reviews which were conducted in September 2007
      a significant number of issues common across the Faculty were identified. When the
      University Management Committee considered the reports, it was agreed that a Faculty
      Change Management and Restructuring Group should be formed to take forward the
      recommendations.




AFQER 2007/08                                3                                              February 09
      In Curricular Studies, the fact that subject specific groupings of academic staff were not co-
      located had led to divisional identities being maintained despite the merge to a single
      Department in 2004. The Department had not diversified course delivery or source of income
      and was dependent on the delivery of the Professional Graduate Certificate in Education
      (Secondary). Due to the method of delivery of this course which was very time intensive,
      there was very limited research being carried out. The Review Panel felt that this was not
      sustainable in the longer term. The intake to the PGDE(S) was dependent on Government
      Workforce Planning for teachers and the numbers could fluctuate year on year which made
      staffing difficult. Curricular Studies has since appointed a Professorial Head of Department
      who is research active and has also appointed (in 2008/09) a Reader with expertise in
      Knowledge Exchange. The review of the ITE courses will be undertaken in 2009/10 and
      meetings have been ongoing since January 2008 to gather information and research on
      which to base radical change and harmonisation of delivery.

      Creative and Aesthetic Studies was a very small Department formed in 2004. At that time,
      the sustainability of such a small Department was of concern and the Faculty and Senate had
      agreed that this should be monitored. The Review indicated that there was a diverse range
      of interests in the 8 staff, and that there were 3 staff who were research active. The lack of
      focus, lack of research culture and the small number of staff made the Department
      vulnerable. The Department offered 1 course (the BA (Hons) in Applied Music). The course
      could not be expanded due to the cost of the delivery of individual music tuition to students.
      The staff contributed to ITE courses. The Department had not diversified into postgraduate
      courses or CPD although they had carried out scoping exercises. The Review Panel felt that
      this was not sustainable in the longer term and urged talks with other departments and other
      institutions.

      Sport Culture and the Arts delivered the BSc (Hons) in Sport and Physical Activity, the BA
      in Outdoor Education which was closing, the BA (Hons) in Community Arts and the joint MSc
      in Medicine and Science for Sport and Exercise which was also closing. The Department
      was home to a very research active group of staff in the area of health and physical wellbeing
      however, the other areas of the Department were not generating research. The staff also
      contributed to ITE courses. While the Department currently delivered 3 undergraduate and 1
      postgraduate degree the portfolio was shrinking. This Department was also encouraged to
      talk to other departments and institutions. The Department should develop a clear academic
      and research strategy which aligned with the University strategy.

      The Departments of Creative and Aesthetic Studies and Sport Culture and the Arts closed on
      31 July 2008 and both joined a new Department (as yet formally untitled) on 1 August 2008.
      The formal name of the new Department has not yet been determined as others in the
      Faculty have expressed an interest in joining this group.

      Faculty wide outcomes - In all three reviews issues of research leadership and culture were
      identified. Differentiated workloads for staff are being introduced based on Personal
      Research Plans and this should encourage development of a research culture. The Faculty
      has also opened a Faculty Research Office, as previously mentioned, to support staff and
      students.

2.3   Please list any accreditation visits/reviews by Professional and Statutory Bodies that
      took place during session 2007/08 and report the outcome. If these have made any
      recommendations in respect of improvements to learning and teaching, how are they
      to be addressed? If these have highlighted areas of good practice which might be
      applicable elsewhere in the University, please note these below.

      QAA Audit of University provision in Greece
      In March 2008 the QAA visited the University to audit collaborative course provision with
      Greece and Cyprus. The University had only one course which met the criteria and this was
      managed in the Faculty. The Faculty Collaborates with the Institute for Counselling and


AFQER 2007/08                               4                                              February 09
      Psychological Studies in Athens to validate the Institute‟s delivery of the Postgraduate
      Certificate and Diploma in Person Centred Counselling.
      During 2007/08 QAA visited the University and the Institute of Psychological Studies in
      Greece to carry out an audit of the collaboration. While the quality of the course and the
      partner institution were commended, the Collaborative Agreement was found not to reflect
      practice. Considerable work was then undertaken to resolve this issue and the revised
      Collaborative Agreement was approved in early 2008/09.

        As a result of this audit outcome, a new quality process was added to the Faculty annual
      scrutiny (see final paragraph in 1 above) and the Board of Study, University Senate and
      University Academic Policy Committee would be directly involved in taking forward the
      actions identified in the audit.
      The report highlighted good practice in student support by the staff of the Institute.

      However, issues relating to the terms of the agreement were raised as the agreement
      document did not match practice. Considerable work has been undertaken to re-write the
      agreement and have the agreement approved and signed by both parties.

      As a direct result of the audit, the annual quality assurance process has been expanded to
      include annual scrutiny of the agreements by the Vice-Dean (Academic) and the Faculty
      Office and to provide feedback to the collaborative partners regarding the agreement and
      quality issues arising from their reports.

      CeVe
      In April 2008 the BA in Community Education was reviewed. The Community Education
      Validation Endorsement (CeVe) accrediting body attended the University review and
      accredited the course for future delivery.

      Health Professionals Council
      The Health Professionals Council (HPC) continued to accredit the BSc in Speech and
      Language Pathology.

3     UNIVERSITY GUIDELINES, POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

3.1   Are there any areas in which Faculty practice was not consistent with the University’s
      Policies and Procedures for Teaching and Learning or with any of the supplementary
      Guides listed below? If so, please give details and the reasons for deviating from
      normal University practice in each instance.

             Academic Strategy 2006-09 (May 2006)
           √Policyand Code of Practice for Collaborative Courses leading to    Award or Joint
           Awards of the University and Flexible and Distributed Learning (including e-learning)
           (June 2005)
            Procedures and Guidelines for Course and Class Approval (December 2003)
            Dealing with Applications from Students with Criminal Convictions (November 1999)
            Dealing with Instances of Possible Academic Dishonesty (November 2001)
            Procedures and Guidelines for Faculty Board Reports to Senate (March 2004)
            Internal Review of Learning and Teaching and Annual Faculty Academic Quality
              Reports (February 2006)
            Guidelines and Procedures for the Management of Support for Undergraduate and
              Postgraduate Disabled Students (March 2005)
            Policy and Code of Practice for Postgraduate Research Programmes (May 2005)
            Procedures and Guidelines for Postgraduate Instructional Programmes (December
              2003)
            Guidelines for Examiners of Research Degrees (October 2005)
            Policy, Procedures and Guidelines for Summative Assessment (May 2005)
            Framework for Professional Doctorates (December 2005)



AFQER 2007/08                             5                                            February 09
               Procedures and Guidelines for External Examiners (October 2005)
               Student Complaints Procedure (May 2007)
               Policy on Students‟ External Engagement (November 2006)

       The Faculty did not knowingly deviate from any of the above however the issues raised by
       the QAA audit mentioned above has caused the Faculty and the University to reconsider
       this policy and code of practice.

 3.2   Are there any aspects of the guides to policies and procedures which the Faculty
       believed required reviewing? If so, please give details.

       As an outcome of the QAA report on the Collaborative Agreement between the University
       and the Institute of Counselling and Psychological Studies in Athens it is recommended that
       the Policy and Code of Practice for Collaborative Courses should be re-examined during
       2008/09.

4       ADMISSIONS

In completing this section, Faculties should refer to the standard annual datasets produced
by the Planning Office.

4.1    Please comment on trends in respect of Undergraduate, Postgraduate Instructional
       and Postgraduate Research admissions. Within this analysis please comment
       specifically on the following for session 2007/08:

        -   the breakdown of entrant students (mature, overseas, ethnic origin, gender
            balance, disability, intake from non-standard backgrounds – i.e. Wider Access
            programmes/FE colleges etc);

            From course reports
            Due to the nature of Faculty courses the percentage of mature students is greater that
            that of other Faculties. Professions such as Social Work and Community Education
            attract a more mature applicant with life experience. The one year Professional
            Graduate Diploma in Education courses attract graduates straight from University but
            also those who have been in employment for some time and wish to change career.

            The Faculty struggles to attract students from overseas. The curriculum is currently
            geared for professionals who will work within Scotland and this needs to change. The
            review of courses in 2008/09 will result in a 20 credit curriculum which should help
            engage with European institutions. It is planned that a review of internationalisation of
            the curriculum is undertaken during 2008/09.

            There are few students declaring a disability. Only 3.6% of awards (81 of the 2256
            awards) made to students in 2007/08 were made to a student who had declared a
            disability. With the number of old buildings that there are on the Jordanhill campus,
            there are some areas which are not accessible to people with a physical disability
            however staff are sensitive to this issue and make sure that classes are timetabled
            accordingly.

            24 students entered the third and only year of the BA in Education and Social Services
            having completed the Diploma level at James Watt College. This is an expanding area
            of wider access and inter disciplinary teaching for the Faculty.

            The number of research students from overseas has increased and this is welcomed.
            There has been an enhanced web site presence and the new Faculty Research Office is
            supporting the application process. Issues such as “women only” work areas have been
            provided to support students from particular religious backgrounds.


AFQER 2007/08                                6                                              February 09
       -   changes in mode of study (ft/pt/dl) required by students;

           Modes of study have not changed in 2007/08. The Faculty had previously introduced
           part time delivery of the 1 year ITE courses and both were proving popular. Evening
           delivery of the BA in Childhood Practice matched the sector requirement.

       -   general entrance standards.

           The University Excellence Strategy aims for an intake tariff of 400. Those at the lower
           levels tend to have HNC or HND qualifications plus poor higher results and as it is the
           poor higher results that count, this brings down the average tariff.

           The Faculty recruited 50% of students at 360 plus in 2007/08. The tariff is improved by
           the high entry tariff in Speech and Language Pathology which recruits the majority of
           students at 400 plus. Social Work, Community Arts, Music and Community Education
           have a much wider spread. 21% of the student intake appear to have no entry
           qualifications however this will represent those who enter with Further Education
           qualifications.

           Since 2005, the Faculty has increased the number of students recruited from GOALS
           schools – 2005(21), 2006(34) 2007(53). 12%, 13% and 19% respectively of the
           University intake from Goals schools. It is hoped that this positive trend will continue.

4.2    Please note any specific proposals or initiatives on admissions at Departmental
       and/or Faculty level that arose following experience in 2007/08 (i.e.
       increasing/lowering entrance requirements).

       In general the Faculty moved to raise entry standards during 2007/08 to align with
       University and Faculty strategy. The BA(Hons) in Community Arts moved to an entry level
       of 4 “B”s and was still oversubscribed. As mentioned before the BSc in Speech and
       Language Pathology exceeded 400 points and continued to be oversubscribed.

       In the postgraduate research area, due to an initiative by the Malaysian Government, an
       increased number of students from Malaysia were recruited. This initiative was supported
       by the International and Graduate Office. Student feedback is very positive and it is likely
       that the Faculty will attract additional students due to the positive experience reported by
       their colleagues.

       Good practice – PGR on-line applications set a turn around time limit of 72 hours which
       was, in most cases, achieved while postal applications were turned around in 7 to 10 days.
       This was a significant improvement on previous years. The Research Degrees Coordinator
       has become more central to the admissions process. The impact of the improvements to
       the PGR recruitment process will be monitored.

       Recruitment of male students and ethnic minority students to the BEd is being addressed
       by a range of initiatives including peer support groups, gender research groups,
       involvement in REMIT (Recruiting Ethnic Minorities into Teaching) and GOALS projects and
       connection with RITeS an organisation which supports refugees who were formerly
       teachers get back into the profession.




AFQER 2007/08                               7                                              February 09
5      PROGRESSION/COMPLETION

In completing this section, Faculties should refer to the standard annual datasets produced
by the Planning Office.

5.1   Please comment on trends in respect of Undergraduate, Postgraduate Instructional
      and Postgraduate Research progression and completion. Within this analysis please
      comment specifically on the following for session 2007/08:

      2005/06 – first year 373/429 – 87% (Uni 90%)
      2006/07 – first year 369/414 – 89% (Uni 90%)
      2007/08 – first year 379/429 – 88% (Uni 89%)

      Retention on the “first” Faculty courses has for the past 3 years (05/06, 06/07 and 07/08) run
      at a level slightly lower than the University average. There appears to have been no effect
      on first year retention as a result of the first year initiatives although retention in later years
      improved.

      The year on year progression reflects the Faculty degree structure which operates as 3+1
      with many students leaving at the end of 3rd year for employment. The Faculty has no 5 year
      degrees.

      In the earlier years retention in second year is poorer that in first year however, in 07/08, that
      trend is reversed with the percentage retained in second year increasing. The Faculty
      attribute this to the structure of the curriculum which clearly shows progression and allows
      students who progress through first year to further develop in second year. Problem based
      learning contributes to a sense of collegiate working which in turn allows the student to settle
      into future years.

      First Year experience projects include the BA in Sport and Physical Activity which introduced
      a First Year Coordinator who was responsible for all first year students. This was seen as
      good practice. Any future effect on retention will be monitored.

      With the Initial Teacher Education courses in particular, and with other professional practice
      courses, students may realise when they experience their first period of placement that the
      career choice is not what they had expected. Sometimes a first experience in a classroom
      can bring the realisation that the student is not suited to this particular career. Therefore, a
      great deal of effort is put into the application process to try to ensure that students have some
      relevant experience prior to being accepted on to the course to reduce the number of
      students affected in this way.

       - specific issues/developments in respect of ethnic minority students

       The majority of the students are white British or Scottish and so it is not statistically
       significant to measure trends in percentages. However, the intake in 2006/07 appears to
       have a higher number of students from ethnic backgrounds than other years. This will be
       closely monitored.

       The Faculty hosts the RITeS centre which brings refugees and asylum seekers who had
       previously been teaching professionals but who have had to flee without proof of
       qualification or experience, back into the profession.

       - postgraduate research submission and completion rates.

       In the postgraduate research area there were 7 completions (5 PhDs and 2 EdDs). the
       newly formed Faculty Research Office undertook a full review of all PGR students and
       ensured that reviews were up to date and progress was being carefully monitored.


AFQER 2007/08                                 8                                                February 09
6     FEEDBACK FROM STUDENTS AND OTHER STAKEHOLDERS

6.1   Please comment on any significant issues raised by external examiners at
      class/course level in their 2006/07 reports and the actions taken in 2007/08 in response
      to them.

      In 2006/07 the issues raised by External Examiners were for general enhancement.

      Issues ranged from:
      Undergraduates
       Comments about feedback consistency, for which guidelines were issued and staff
          development provided (BEd)
       Set up of an event where student poster presentations could be showcased – the year 4
          course conference was used for this purpose. (BEd)
       Poor referencing by students – a booklet providing guidance has been issued. (DipHE
          Nursing, UWS)
      Postgraduate
       There requires to be an evaluation of the portfolio and a consistency in how tutors mark it
          – discussions about harmonisation across institutions is expected to allow national
          developments will lead to greater standardisation. PGDE(S))
       Development of self awareness of students queried – course team considered the
          options and were taking actions forward. (PG Cert Counselling Skills and PG Dip
          Counselling)
       Some classes cover too much – modules were reviewed and learning outcomes wording
          reconsidered. (MSc Advanced Social Work Management)

6.2   Please comment on any significant issues raised through the 2007 National Student
      Survey and actions to be taken.

      Feedback – In Social Work responses to certain elements of the survey were disappointing.
      While achieving higher scores than the Strathclyde average in “teaching on my course”
      “academic support” “learning resources” and “personal development” there were scores less
      than the average in “assessment and feedback” and “organisation and management”. A
      particular feature of these results is that the students were on the final year of the first run
      through of a new degree and it is believed that this affected responses. At Board of
      Examiner meetings GSSW academic staff are often praised for the detail of the feedback
      however this adds time to the marking process and students want results turned around
      faster. Students have been issued with a schedule of submission dates and marks return
      dates to manage expectations. The provision of a schedule which indicates hand in dates
      and also mark return dates is seen as good practice. It is also believed that the low
      organisation and management score was affected by the national shortage of practice
      placements.

      Student support from tutors also arose as an inconsistency issue. This was pointed out to
      Heads of Department and Course Directors to take action. Course Teams considered the
      ways in which support was provided and this will be monitored.

      Different expectations from different tutors on the same course was also an issue which
      arose more than once. When this was considered in departments, more frequent Course
      Team briefings were instigated. This has also been reinforced through the course review and
      development process.




AFQER 2007/08                                9                                              February 09
6.3   Please comment on any significant issues raised through the Postgraduate Research
      Experience Survey which are relevant to the Faculty and actions to be taken.

      This information is not yet available.

6.4   What steps did the Faculty and its departments take in session 2007/08 to obtain
      effective student feedback? Did student feedback in the Faculty identify any issues
      that had implications at University level or areas of good practice which might be
      applicable elsewhere in the University? If so, please detail.

      All courses have a staff/student committee which meets at least twice per annum and the
      minutes of the meeting are sent to the Vice-Dean (Academic). Student evaluation of
      modules is recorded. Responses are collated and commented on by the Course Director
      who reports to the Head of Department to compile the Annual Departmental Quality Report
      which is, in turn, considered by the Faculty Academic committee and is used to compile the
      Faculty report. The course directors meet once a term with the Vice-Dean (Academic) to
      discuss common issues. Departmental Administrators are encouraged to attend Faculty
      Committees to ensure that they are fully aware of current issues.

      Previous good practice has been noted when the staff/student committee is chaired by an
      academic member of staff from another department.

      Student feedback is gathered through module evaluation and course evaluation. Students
      nominate members of the Students‟ Union to positions on Faculty Committees to ensure that
      their views are represented. Departmental Review also includes a session with students and
      the new format of Departmental Review includes a student member on the Review Panel.

6.5   How did the Faculty monitor issues arising out of Staff/Student committees? How
      were actions communicated back to the student body?

      The notes of the student committee meetings were displayed on notice boards within
      departments. At present, there is no Faculty mechanism in place to feed back to students
      however, the Vice-Dean (Academic) has been considering the set up of a Faculty equivalent
      of the Student Experience Committee in 09/10. This is felt to be good practice which should
      be mirrored at Faculty level.    A centrally (to the Faculty) located auditable process for
      listening and responding to feedback is required.

6.6   Please note any specific follow-up action and monitoring arrangements in relation to
      feedback from students and other stakeholders.

      Student feedback is also gathered via the complaints and appeals and the Faculty Office
      monitors this. For example, there was a particular issue with a student which identified
      course management issues. The Dean recognised that there was an issue and in 2008/09 a
      review of management and support provision for this course has been discussed with course
      leaders and with the Head of Department. It is expected that the change in course
      management structure and the raising of awareness of University procedures which has
      taken place as a result of the complaint will provide the basis for full resolution.

      Feedback from External Examiners is reported to the Vice-Dean (Academic) and the Course
      Director response is also scrutinised centrally. Some examples have been listed above.

      The Faculty is a member of the Western Consortium, a group of Local Authorities who
      manage school placement experience for students on Initial Teacher Education courses. It is
      through this forum that the national harmonisation of school placement assessment recording
      is being developed.




AFQER 2007/08                                  10                                       February 09
      The BA in Education and Social Services has a Steering Group comprising members from
      each of the three FE Colleges who deliver the validated Diploma in Education and Social
      Services and appropriate staff from the Faculty. The Group receive regular reports from
      each course and respond accordingly.

7     TEACHING, LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT

7.1   Please describe any changes to the Faculty’s portfolio of degree programmes that
      were implemented in session 2007/08 (additions/deletions). Please outline the
      rationale behind any such changes.

      In 2007/08 the successful link with FE to deliver the Diploma and BA in Education and Social
      Services was expanded. The successful link with James Watt College was maintained and
      Langside and Motherwell Colleges were added to the list of those approved to deliver the
      Diploma, which is validated by Strathclyde by Collaborative Agreement. The three FE
      colleges are geographically distant from each other and so provide a wider geographical
      spread for applicants.

7.2   Please highlight any major external factors (government initiatives, policies of specific
      client groups) that impacted in 2007/08 on the Faculty’s degree programmes and
      indicate how the Faculty dealt with them.

      “Changing Lives” the report of the 21st Century Review of Social Work has set a challenging
      agenda for the transformation of social work services in Scotland. Social work education
      must address these demands and this has been considered in the enhancement and
      development of the BA (Hons) in Social Work and the Master in Social Work. Reflecting the
      curriculum development, these awards are approved by the Scottish Social Services Council
      under the protected title “social worker”

      Nationally, shortages of social work practice learning opportunities led to problems on the BA
      (Hons) and Master in Social Work. Work with local authorities and support from the Scottish
      Government eventually provided sufficient places. This resulted in one student appeal which
      used the shortage of placements as the grounds for appeal. This appeal was, however,
      rejected as all students had been in similar circumstances.

      As a result of the national policy standards which had been influenced by members of
      University staff, the BA in Childhood Practice was designed. The degree (formerly the BA in
      Early Childhood) had attracted a good deal of attention and was proving to be popular with
      individual students and also with employers who sought to develop arrangements for cohort
      delivery. The degree was approved at levels 8 and 9 to provide flexibility of entry level and
      was also approved for delivery in UHI as a validated course. This provided a larger
      geographical spread.

7.3   Please comment on any significant changes in Teaching Learning and Assessment
      (for example in curriculum design and/or modes of delivery/assessment) in session
      2007/08.

      During 2007/08 a great deal of preparatory work was undertaken to prepare the Faculty
      portfolio of courses for the revised 20 credit framework revision of courses in early 2008/09.
      Faculty Office produced a collation of all of the enhancement themes and regulatory
      requirements to support course teams and scrutiny panels prepare for the Review meetings.

      On the BA (Hons) in Social Work the age limit for entry was reduced in 2004/05 when the
      course moved to a four year honours. A system of support for younger students has been
      put in place to improve retention and progress in the first year.




AFQER 2007/08                               11                                             February 09
      The teaching model on the Social Work courses is designed to offer substantial support and
      guidance in the early stages of the course moving steadily toward self directed study. As part
      of this SIMPLE has been introduced (SIMulated Practice Learning Environment) in particular
      modules. Simulations site learners in a practice context where they are aggregates of
      transactions, perhaps multiple solution paths, and where their work is, as it will be in the
      workplace, distributed between tools, colleagues, resources, anticipated and unanticipated
      problems and individual constructions of knowledge and experience. (McKellar 2007) this is
      a “transactional” learning environment as opposed to a virtual learning environment and has
      involved GSSW in a partnership with a local authority in order to provide an authentic
      professional practice context.

      The series of TALQIC seminars which focussed on the enhancement themes was of
      particular value in 2007/08 given the number of courses which would undergo review in
      2008/09. A TALQIC seminar series linked course review with enhancement themes and
      particular work was focussed on the work of David Nicol‟s assessment group.

7.4   Please comment with respect to 2007/08 on

         the Faculty’s approach to embedding employability in the curriculum and in its
          teaching, learning and assessment strategies, and generally to developing
          graduate attributes

      The Faculty Research Degrees Coordinator continued to act as the representative for the
      Faculty of Education on the University‟s Graduate Skills Training Group which has been
      examining ways to take forward the proposals for the use of the Roberts funding as a means
      of enhancing PGR graduates employability skills. The Faculty‟s pilot initiatives in 2006/07
      were successful and resulted in two new programmes which are sustainable for the future. In
      addition, the Faculty was successful in securing additional funding of £10k for the extension
      of one of the programmes (the Postgraduate Research Skills Development Programme) and
      also began to pilot a new initiative (Postgraduate Shadowing Project). These initiatives
      provide new opportunities to enhance students‟ employability skills and opportunities for
      graduate employment.

      The Faculty courses generally prepare students for particular employment opportunities
      however all courses are linked to professional standards and benchmarks and deliver skills
      which are transferable regardless of profession. The development of a reflective practitioner
      is of value to any profession.

         the Faculty’s engagement with the quality enhancement themes (The First Year,
          Flexible Delivery, Integrative Assessment, Research-Teaching Linkages)

      Integrative Assessment
      Assessment has been a key focus of discussion over 2007/08 with course teams becoming
      more aware of the need for formative as well as summative assessment and the need to
      make assessment useful and relevant for both students and staff. Given the University‟s
      recent new assessment policy the developments in this area will be on-going.

      The First Year
      In relation to the BA (Hons) in Social Work, the web site advertises pre-course information
      sessions which are held on campus. Many applicants take advantage of these sessions and
      feedback suggests that these are a successful way to start to induct students before they
      start the course. The induction programme is shaped from feedback from the previous year‟s
      students. Classes take attendance and this can provide early warning of disengagement at
      an early stage. There is a Learning to Learn module which links strongly with First Year
      Experience themes and provides a foundation for learning throughout the course.




AFQER 2007/08                               12                                             February 09
      The BA in Applied Music appoints an Advisor of Study to each student who meets new
      students within the first 4 weeks of the course. There is also a comprehensive induction
      programme and feedback via the staff student committee was positive.

      Research/Teaching Linkages
      In relation to research-teaching linkages the development of GSSW‟s research culture and
      the involvement of research active staff impacts on teaching across the courses. Modules
      across GSSW courses contain learning outcomes which require students to use research in
      their academic and practice work.

      General
      During 2007/08 the Faculty presented seminars from David Nicol (assessment), Jim Boyle
      (Research into teaching linkages), Cherie Woolmer (employability) Anne Simpson (Disability)
      in addition to a number of TALQIC seminars to ensure that the enhancement themes were
      discussion in some detail during the formative stage of course development.

      The Department of Childhood and Primary Studies carried out an audit of Internationalisation
      activity. Much of this was in the area of collaboration and research. A key example would be
      the European Masters in Early Education. 2007/08 saw 24 students from 6 European
      Universities complete the European Masters culminating in an intensive programme at
      Strathclyde.

      Flexible Delivery
      Modules from the BA in Childhood Practice and the postgraduate courses in Maths Recovery
      and Autism were delivered by outreach to increase flexible delivery.

      The Postgraduate Certificate in Genealogy and a number of modules on the MSc in Equality
      and Discrimination delivered on-line learning.

      Previous good practice identified in the articulation with James Watt College to deliver the
      Diploma and BA in Education and Social Services resulted in the Diploma delivery being
      introduced at Motherwell College and at Langside College in 2008/09. The Collaborative
      Agreements and the development of course materials was carried out during 2007/08 to
      ensure that the materials were in place on time. The Faculty strategically transferred funded
      places into the BA course to support the expansion of this development. This will enable the
      Faculty to widen the geographical area over which it offers wider access via this route.

         any changes made in respect of learning and teaching arising from the
          recommendations of departmental reviews undertaken in the previous two
          sessions (i.e. 2005/06 and 2006/07) and evaluate their success in addressing the
          issues raised by the review.

      The main teaching and learning issues arising from the Reviews dealt with the delivery of the
      Initial Teacher Education courses and the viability of the suite of Masters courses. The
      student feedback and External Examiner comment was positive in all cases and there were
      no issues of academic quality raised.

      Curricular Studies (Reviewed 2007/08)

      The Department had been viewed as being creative and effective in its use of teacher
      practitioners on secondment to help meet the teaching demands of the high student numbers
      of recent years.

      The Department was not thought to have a sustainable portfolio of courses as it relied on
      delivery of the PGDE(S) and did not deliver any undergraduate courses or have many
      research students.



AFQER 2007/08                              13                                             February 09
      The recruitment process for students on to the PGDE(S) was considered to be too labour
      intensive for staff. Efficiency should be maximised without quality being compromised. This
      challenge would also be addressed at the time of the course review in 2009/10. Research
      into the value of interviews should be gathered.

      The assessment of placement visits was resource intensive. It was agreed that a more
      streamlined and efficient approach was required.

      The Review panel found that broadly, the student experience appeared to be satisfactory
      although some attention might be paid to workload expectations being placed on students at
      different stages in the joint degree programmes with Science. This would be taken forward
      by the Joint Courses Board which comprised academic members from each Faculty and
      considered issues relating to the academic content of the courses, quality issues and
      timetabling.

      Since the review a research active professorial Head of Department had been appointed and
      development days held to considered new ways to deliver ITE across the Faculty to give staff
      headroom to carry out research. The review of the PGDE(S) will not take place until 2009/10
      however, by then, support for ITE across the Faculty will be co-located and a number of “blue
      sky” delivery workshops will have taken place.

      Creative and Aesthetic Studies (Reviewed 2007/08)

      This Department also relied on the delivery of a single course. Although staff provided input
      to other courses, the Department did not have control over that input. This was not seen as
      sustainable.

      In the past, there had been problems with student feedback being heard and acted upon
      appropriately. In response to this issue, the Department had put in place a student feedback
      mechanism by which a member of staff from another department chaired the staff/student
      committee. The Panel met several students and specifically asked them to comment on
      feedback and response. The students who met with the Panel expressed their satisfaction
      with the mechanisms in place and spoke highly of the course and of the staff delivering the
      course.

      Sport Culture and the Arts (Reviewed 2007/08)

      The course portfolio of this Department was shrinking. One undergraduate degree and the
      only postgraduate degree offered by this Department were closing. High teaching workloads
      were reported and the Department was asked to consider the method of delivery of courses.
      The Department has since reviewed the BA in Sport and Physical Activity and re-launched it
      as a BSc. The revised curriculum will be significantly influenced and enhanced by in-house
      strengths and areas of research.

      Students spoke positively about their experience on Departmental courses.

      Education and Professional Studies (Reviewed 2006/07)

      The main issue raised relevant to teaching and learning was the high number of Masters
      courses delivered with a small intake of students. The Faculty carried out a review of student
      numbers and limited recruitment to courses which were recruiting viable intakes. As a result,
      Heads of Department were more aware of the viability issues. In 2008/09 a full review of the
      Masters courses is being carried out. A limited number of courses have been delivered and
      a scholarship scheme to encourage students to undertake their first module has been
      introduced.




AFQER 2007/08                               14                                             February 09
         the steps taken in the Faculty to enhance teaching, learning and assessment in
          accordance with the strategic aims identified in the Academic Strategy?

      A range of seminars to provide support for postgraduate research students has been offered
      on both a full time and part time basis. The students clearly gained a great deal from
      bringing PhD, EdD and MPhil students together. It complemented the existing development
      provision within their particular programmes of study. This supported the strategic aim to
      increase the number of research students and improve progression and completion rates.

      Modules from the professional doctorate programme are offered to postgraduate research
      students. The students presented their work and shared their insight into different challenges
      associated with the early, middle and alter stages of working towards a research degree. In
      addition, seminars have continued to provide a forum for students to interact with peers,
      exchange conceptual insights and establish support networks. They have also assisted
      students to progress their studies by providing a supportive climate. As above this provides
      support to research students to increase completion rates and support improved retention.

      Earlier comments about inviting enhancement theme champions into the Faculty to present
      to and engage in discussion with staff and a number of TALQIC seminars and research
      seminars which are open to all staff were offered in support of the Academic Strategy. This
      supported the strategic aim to enhance the Faculty course portfolio.

7.5   Please provide examples of good practice in teaching, learning and assessment that
      came to light in session 2007/08 through annual monitoring which might have
      relevance to other parts of the University.

      Changes to the BEd 4th year delivery adopted a workshop approach. This allowed more
      personalisation and choice and to some extent broke down the “my tutor”/”my group” way of
      working.

      The BEd nursery placement changed in nature requiring students to produce a “big book”
      charting children‟s learning and evaluating their own learning. Students were not visited by
      tutors on placement. This was evaluated very positively by the students, tutors and nursery
      staff.

      The effective use of technology in year 1 Educational Studies, blended learning on the BEd.
      This development has led to conference presentations and other public outputs by staff.

      The laptop initiative on the PGDE(P) continues to support students. Students have also
      welcomed the opportunity to borrow electronic whiteboards to use on school placements.

      The articulation with FE colleges to deliver the Diploma (validated) and BA in Education and
      Social services is good practice widening access and providing a workforce which aligns
      directly with inter-professional policy initiatives.

      Action has been taken in Childhood and Primary Studies to increase problem based learning,
      encourage more self directed learning, encourage use of the VLE, LearnOnline and First
      Class.

      GSSW operate a personal tutor system. Year 1 students are initially seen in a group and are
      then invited to make individual appointments. Attendance is monitored and students who
      attendance level falls is then invited to meet with their tutor.

      Sport Culture and the Arts hold an internal assessment session in February. This is attended
      by the External Examiners and they consider Semester 1 assessments and meet students.
      This informal “board” is an important element of the quality assurance process within this
      Department.


AFQER 2007/08                               15                                             February 09
      The generic application for ethical approval adopted within the Counselling Unit has been
      noted by the University‟s Ethics Committee as good practice.

7.6   What issues arose from annual monitoring? What actions were taken to deal with
      them?

      PGR students raised the issue of access to general support and resources. As a result the
      Faculty Research Office has taken the role of general support while the resources available
      have been enhanced to include Writers Workshops, seminars in Being and Becoming
      Research Active and Postgraduate Skills Development Programme and the creation of
      dedicated web space where seminar materials are posted as is information about other
      events.

      Issues of technical support and catering for students who study flexibly and are not on
      campus during the “normal” opening hours between 9 and 5 is an issue. Some progress has
      been made by offering students the option to pay in advance for catering which can then be
      booked however this issue has not progressed significantly.

      In Sport Culture and the Arts the number of part time associate teachers being used to
      support the delivery of courses was discussed. The balance of established staff to part time
      staff is an issue as there is a burden on established staff to mentor associate lecturers. This
      has been overcome by the development of guidelines on assessment and regular meetings.
      It is felt that bringing in associates who are often practitioners adds a valuable element of to
      the assessment process.

7.7   Did the Faculty identify any issues to do with undergraduate, postgraduate
      instructional or postgraduate research programmes which might have implications at
      University level? If so, please detail.

      None

7.8   Please comment on the Faculty’s approach to monitoring Continuing Professional
      Development/Lifelong Learning and highlight any significant issues that arose in
      session 2007/08.

      The Faculty of Education operates a number of Continuing Professional Development
      courses. Those which are accredited are included in the quality assurance procedures as for
      all award bearing programmes.

      On occasion, a module which would be delivered as part of an accredited course may be
      delivered as CPD with no requirement for the attendees to undertake assessment. This
      method of delivery is not included in the standard quality assurance process.

      Quality assurance of the delivery of non accredited short courses is managed within
      departments and by individuals. There is no formal process of quality assurance for such
      delivery.

7.9   Please comment on examples of good practice in Continuing Professional
      Development/Lifelong Learning that might have relevance to other parts of the
      University.

      Please see above.




AFQER 2007/08                               16                                              February 09
8     COLLABORATIVE ARRANGEMENTS

8.1   Please check and update the summary list of all active collaborative agreements active
      in 2007/08 by type (validated, jointly delivered, articulations).

      A list of Collaborative Agreements is attached as Appendix 4.

8.2   Was the Faculty satisfied with the continued validity and viability of its collaborative
      agreements? If not, what was done to address any concerns?

      This issues raised in the QAA audit in 2007/08 highlighted flaws in the process of checking
      agreements however, the Faculty was content with the continued validity of the collaborative
      agreements as all of the partners undertook work in areas which aligned with research and
      teaching delivered within the Faculty.

      The size of some cohorts was raised as an issue which will be addressed during discussion
      with the collaborative partners. Small cohort size can impact on student experience and also
      have a significant impact on the viability of the course.

      For the first time, the Annual Course Reports from collaborative partners have been centrally
      collated and considered by the Vice-Dean (Academic) and the Faculty Officer. As this is the
      first time that this has been managed in this way, the report is attached for information
      (Appendix 5). Also, as indicated, the Vice-Dean (Academic) and the Faculty Officer will meet
      collaborative partners in February/March each year.

8.3   Did the Faculty identify any issues arising from these collaborative agreements which
      needed to be addressed at Faculty level?

      It is clear that Collaborative partners are enhancing their programmes and engaging with
      current research although it is also clear from the reports that the collaborative partners are
      not familiar with the enhancement theme terminology. At the collaborative partner seminar
      in 2009, a briefing will be organised to explain the themes and the role of the academic in
      developing and implementing enhancements. The set up of regular briefing sessions is to be
      welcomed as this will provide a forum for the Collaborative agreements to be monitored and
      will provide the Faculty with the opportunity to find out more about the research being carried
      out by Collaborative partners in their own organisations. The development of job
      specifications for the Verifier and Course Team member, one of the outcomes of the QAA
      audit, should also clarify and strengthen the links.

8.4   Did the Faculty identify any issues arising from these collaborative agreements which
      needed to be addressed at University level?

      The Collaborative partners all raise the issue of access to the University library. As the
      students of partners are not students of Strathclyde, the regulations which determine whether
      or not an individual can have access to the on-line provision offered by the University library
      preclude membership. The University licence agreements with on-line journal provided insist
      that only those who are staff or students of the University can gain access. Any breach of
      this condition would result in the loss of the preferential rate. Therefore, the University would
      stand to lose a great deal of money should any of the large providers who grant significant
      academic discount to those who work and study in the University find that others were being
      permitted to access their products. However, perhaps a different definition of students who
      study with Collaborative partners could be developed which could overtake this obstacle.

      It should be noted that all Collaborative partners provide their students with access to
      resources to support their study. Indeed, the main request for access to the University library
      comes from those who already have access to a national NHS journal library which is of
      excellent quality.


AFQER 2007/08                                17                                              February 09
      The issues arising from the QAA audit of the University collaboration in Greece have been
      dealt with elsewhere in this report. It is a significant issue which requires response. The
      Collaborative Agreement with the Greek partners has been revised to reflect the actual
      operational circumstances and the role of the Verifier and Course Team member have been
      drafted and circulated for discussion and approval.

9     RESOURCES

9.1   Was the University’s provision of learning resources (library/IT provision, teaching
      accommodation etc) adequate? If not, were improvements sought and effected?

      The provision of learning resources during 2007/08 was adequate and in some cases very
      good. The library received positive endorsement from all departments.

9.2   Were any specific staff development requirements highlighted?

      The need for Faculty staff to develop relevant continuing professional development
      opportunities so that academic staff could acquire and maintain the necessary expertise to
      take on higher degree supervision roles led to the development of a programme of
      supervision training.

      Both Autism and PGDE(P) courses identified the need for staff development for those who
      were part time or who delivered outreach. Seminars and video conferencing support was
      provided.

      Staff in Childhood and Primary Studies attended two staff development seminars on the
      Curriculum for Excellence.

      A number of staff across the Faculty are registered on research degrees or are registered on
      the MSc in Applied Educational Research with a view to progressing to a research degree.

      As mentioned before in section 7.6, issues relating to support for teaching associates was
      highlighted. Established staff mentored associates and regular meetings took place.

      Staff have, over the period, become much more familiar with being filmed while lecturing and
      making use of the WebCT resource. WebCT can be used simply to deliver course materials
      or can be used in more innovative ways. There is some good practice in the development of
      use of WebCT which will be disseminated through TALQIC events.

10    GRADUATE EMPLOYMENT

In completing this section, Faculties should refer to the standard annual datasets produced
by the Careers Service.

10.1 Please comment on any developments in respect of the employment of the Faculty’s
     graduates (undergraduate, postgraduate instructional and postgraduate research).

      The annual data provided by the Careers Office provides graduate destinations 6 months
      after completing their course. The teaching courses delivered by the Faculty have almost
      100% employment as all students are guaranteed a probationary year in a school following
      completion. The job market thereafter is uncertain and the recent publicity about the lack of
      posts for teachers who have completed their probationary period has had some effect on the
      number of students applying.

      Graduates from courses such as Applied Music tend to work as session musicians and so do
      not record as employed.


AFQER 2007/08                              18                                             February 09
      A number of graduates from undergraduate degrees in the Faculty then go on to undertake
      the 1 year Professional Graduate Diploma in Education and become teachers.

      The market is short of social workers and so employment rates are high.

      With the exception of the PGDE courses, the Faculty portfolio of postgraduate instructional
      courses is delivered by part time study. The graduates are usually already in employment.

      Students in the Department of Sport Culture and the Arts are finding employment
      opportunities in part due to the rounded education that the students are perceived to have
      benefited from and partly due to the placement elements on the BA in Community Arts, the
      BA in Sport and Physical Activity and the BA in Outdoor Education. A number ofstudents
      who were capable of continuing to the Honours year of the course, left with a BA and a good
      job due to their performance on placement. The experience offered by placement also set
      these students in good stead when applying for jobs. As the physical activity agenda gathers
      momentum the Sport students are increasingly finding employment in local authorities and
      the private sector. In addition, some students will enter PGDE programmes in Physical
      Education.

11    ACCESS FOR DISABLED STUDENTS

11.1 Please comment on the ways in which the Faculty progressed with the duty to provide
     access to the curriculum for disabled students and on the Faculty’s strategies for
     implementing the Disability Equality Scheme.

      The Faculty has an Equality Working Group. This group organised a seminar programme on
      curricular design for students with a disability and has also run seminar programmes on other
      equality issues.

      Video streaming was identified as good practice in the Department of Curricular Studies.
      Video streaming is now used more widely across the Faculty as a direct result of the
      dissemination of this good practice by the PGDE(S) course team. The video streaming has
      further developed now includes captions and is therefore more accessible to students with a
      disability as well as providing support for more flexible learning. This good practice has been
      reported to the Academic Policy Committee and the Teaching Infrastructure Strategy Group.

      Each department has a designated disability coordinator who is responsible for meeting with
      each student who declares a disability to ensure that their needs are being met.

11.2 For all academic departments within the Faculty, please note those that completed
     Teachability reviews of access to the curriculum for disabled students in session
     2007/08 and summarise the main action points which emerged.

      The Department of Childhood and Primary Studies undertook a pilot teachability review in
      2007/08. Staff awareness was raised through staff development seminars and students were
      interviewed about their experiences. Close collaboration took place between departmental
      staff and Disability Services staff. These positive relationships and the growing staff
      awareness of policies and practices should contribute to future development and compliance
      on all courses.

11.3 Was the Faculty confident that information regarding the needs of disabled students
     was being conveyed to relevant staff and dealt with appropriately?

      The Faculty received a complaint regarding the needs of one disabled student not was being
      conveyed to relevant staff. It appeared that not all members of staff who came into contact
      with the student had been made aware of the required adjustments and that part time


AFQER 2007/08                               19                                             February 09
      associate tutors did not have access to Pegasus. All departments have a disability
      coordinator who is responsible for meeting students who have declared a disability and
      monitoring their support. The Head of the Disability Services also made presentations to
      course directors and administrators to reinforce systems and to pass on information about
      good practice.

11.4 For each department within the Faculty, note the arrangements that were in place for
     seeking feedback from disabled students about accessibility of teaching and teaching
     materials, and summarise the key points made by disabled students.

      In each department there is a Disability Coordinator whose role is to contact students
      studying within their department who has disclosed a disability. Due to the student complaint
      identified in 11.3, the Dean has asked that all departments audit this service and provide a
      paper trail to ensure that students are being contacted and are providing feedback which is
      then appropriately responded to. The outcome of this audit will be communicated to the
      Disability Services staff who may then wish to offer additional support and advice.

12    STUDENT APPEALS/STUDENT COMPLAINTS

      Please provide summary information on student appeals and student complaints dealt
      with at Faculty level in session 2007/08 (number of instances, outcomes).

      There were 21 Appeals heard by Appeals Committee and of that 21, 11 were upheld.

      The new process, Vice-Deans Appeals Allowed, to simplify the process of appeal where the
      Course Director fully supports the student case has been developed and is managed within
      Faculty Office. 21 Vice-Dean‟s Appeals Allowed proposals were progressed in this manner
      rather than being dealt with by Appeals Committee meetings. This is a significant saving in
      time for Faculty staff and makes the decision making process significantly faster for students.

      14 complaints were investigated of which 7 were upheld.

      It should be noted that some student complaints may be partially upheld. This cannot be
      adequately explained without more details so for the purpose of this report, those which were
      partially upheld have been included in the number upheld.

13    INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

      Please comment on any issues specific to international students.

      The Faculty continues to have a very small percentage of overseas students.
      On the PGDE courses there would normally be c 50 Canadian students however this fell to
      23 in 2008/09 which is poor. IGO staff have been involved in discussions with the overseas
      agent to see why this happened. Speed of response to applications seems to have been an
      issue at times and this has been discussed with Course Directors. Significant effort will be
      put into the recruitment visits in 2008/09 to bring the number of overseas students up to
      previous levels at least.

      The Faculty has a number of student exchange programmes although students tend to come
      to the Faculty rather than student from the Faculty going out to other institutions.

14    CONCLUSION

      Please summarise all required follow-up action for the session under review and any
      additional academic quality assurance and enhancement actions required to align with the
      Excellence Agenda.



AFQER 2007/08                               20                                             February 09
      Follow up:
        The Faculty will continue to increase entry standards.
        The Collaborative Agreements with the University managed by the Faculty will be
           examined to ensure that the agreement matches the operational reality and feedback
           will be provided to collaborative partners.
        The Faculty portfolio of courses will continue to be examined to ensure that the courses
           align with the University and Faculty strategy.
       Enhancement:
        A full review of the modular postgraduate courses will be undertaken.
        Preparation for the radical review and harmonisation of ITE courses will continue in
           2008/09 with a view to informing the review in 2009/10.
        The support for ITE will be co-located in the summer of 2009 which will provide a “one
           stop shop” for students and improve communication.
        The Faculty Internationalisation Implementation Group will be formed in 2008/09 and
           will start to influence strategy and curriculum.
        The Faculty and Registry will work together to clarify the registration process which
           seems to be a problem particularly for those on modular courses.
        The Faculty will continue to provide input and comment on the design for the teaching
           and learning space in the new Jordanhill building.


BG/LD February 2009




AFQER 2007/08                              21                                           February 09
                                                                                            Appendix 1

                                     University of Strathclyde

                                        Faculty of Education

      Executive Summary of Recommendations following Excellence Review of Curricular
                                       Studies

5. Conclusions:

The Panel wishes to thank the HoD, Henry Maitles, and all his colleagues across the Department
(academic, administrative, technical) for their involvement in the review process. Discussions at
all of the meetings were open, honest and candid. The Panel hopes that this level of Department
engagement will continue as we move to the implementation phase.

The Panel was satisfied that, across all the meetings that had taken place and the paperwork (and
oral information) that had been supplied, that it had a good basis on which to make its
recommendations. These are aimed at addressing the issues contained in the Panel‟s original
remit. There is no doubt that the recommendations have implications for the Department, the
Faculty and the University.

6. Recommendations:

The recommendations that follow have been divided into two main sections: Faculty Action, and
Departmental Action. This arrangement is intended to assist both the Department and the Faculty
to identify where the primary locus for any follow-up activity should be, with respect to the issues
that have been raised by the Curricular Studies Excellence Review Panel, for the sake of effective
coordination of any subsequent action that might be required. Clearly, however, it is the Panel‟s
expectation that the Department and the Faculty will need to work together in an appropriate
partnership with respect to all the recommendations.

It should be noted that some of the recommendations that are contained in the Faculty section
have been placed there because of the likelihood (in the Panel‟s opinion) that there will be Faculty-
wide dimension (or knock-on implication) to the recommendation. This is not least in order to
recognise the types of areas where it seems possible that the Faculty will also need to consider a
range of recommendations from the other excellence reviews in order to decide the best unified,
Faculty-led, strategy/approach to adopt.

The recommendations have been further divided into two sub-sections under each main section
heading. The first relates to Generic Management Issues and the second relates to the Research
Development Agenda more specifically.

6.1 Faculty-Led Action

i) Generic Management Issues:

R1.     The appointment of a strong HoD, who has a good track record of research success, is
        required as a priority. The post should be filled by appointment, advertised externally.

R2.     The appointment of a Research Leader, who has strong research credentials, ideally
        including international level excellence, is required as a priority. This post should be filled
        by appointment, advertised externally.

R3.     There is a need to strengthen inter- and cross-departmental links, particularly with respect
        to research. There should be appropriate congruity between the Departmental specific
        needs in this regard and also the requirements of the Faculty, particularly as the Faculty
        develops its own strategic and operational plans for the future. Within this, there is a key
        role for the Vice-Dean (Research) to play at both the Faculty and Departmental levels.

AFQER 2007/08                                22                                              February 09
                                                                                          Appendix 1


R4.    The Faculty should ensure that there is appropriate provision of support staff in an efficient
       and effective arrangement that is adequate for the delivery of excellence in research,
       education and knowledge exchange.

(Note: The Panel believes that the academic leadership of the Department requires to adopt a
more managerial style and focus. The two posts noted in recommendations 1 and 2 should be
appointed as soon as possible, with funding predicated on future retirements and/or staff moves.)

ii) Research Development Agenda:

R5.    The Department must develop an appropriate methodology for balanced workload
       planning, in order to make the necessary provision for research. This should be developed
       in discussion and agreement with the Faculty and will need to include an element identified
       as a Personal Research Plan. This will have the following consequences:

       -   There will need to be one-to-one meetings between academic members of staff in
           Curricular Studies and Faculty/Departmental managers to develop Personal Research
           Plans and agree achievable targets and thereafter to monitor progress.

       -   There will be differentiated workloads for staff in the Department which, in aggregate,
           will cover all the bases correctly, including a critical and focused emphasis on research
           activity and outputs.

       -   An appropriate arrangement for research study leave for the Department’s active
           researchers should be established. This should be provided on a competitive basis on
           the basis of assessments of specific proposals for research activity that have clear and
           measurable aims and objectives and which will lead to published output.

R6.    The panel welcomes the Department’s recognition that a harder-edge to research
       development is required. Further details on this will be required, however, as the
       Departmental Research Strategy document is further strengthened and refined in the light
       of the Excellence Review and in discussion and agreement with the Faculty there will be a
       need for more precise information on how this will be exemplified in terms of targets and
       subsequent measurement.

       In addition, there must be appropriate alignment between the research priorities and
       specific projects of the Department and the Faculty. There is also a critical need to develop
       and articulate arrangements for research mentoring of staff, with particular reference to new
       appointees and early career academic staff.

R7.    The Panel welcomes the steps that have been taken recently to streamline both student
       recruitment and placement (i.e. visit) activity and would encourage strongly further review
       and implementation of approaches to teaching activity to ensure greater improved
       efficiency and effectiveness and the release of time for research. Within this, the following
       is also required:

       -   A review of ITE models within the Department and across the Faculty as a whole, in
           order to secure efficiencies in delivery across the full gamut of Primary and Secondary
           teacher education.

       -   Urgent consideration of how current structures for the primary delivery and
           management of all ITE programmes could be reconfigured in order to create a centre
           for excellence for the delivery and management of ITE, through the creation of a cross-
           Faculty support facility which is not department specific.



AFQER 2007/08                               23                                             February 09
                                                                                          Appendix 1

       -   A further review of the curriculum in order to ensure that content and delivery are
           framed within the context of developments that are taking place across the teacher
           education sector in Scotland and internationally (where relevant).

       -   The potential for extension of Masters-level provision should be explored with the
           Department.

6.2 Department-Led Action

In addition to acting in partnership with the Faculty with respect to the above noted
recommendations, the Review Panel believes that action with respect to the following
recommendations should be led by the Department.

i) Generic Management Issues:

R8.    The Department must undertake a fundamental review of the current committee structure,
       which the Panel believes is not sustainable for the Department’s needs in the future. The
       new structure must ensure that there is a proper and prominent place for research within it,
       and also for the further development and exploitation of education and knowledge
       exchange functions.

       In the first instance, there is a requirement to establish an appropriate Management Group,
       with respect to operational management issues across the whole Department. This should
       be constituted in such a way as to ensure that the key functions of the Department are
       properly represented in the management structure, particularly research.

       In due course, the Panel believes that the establishment of a separate Executive
       Committee, dealing with policy and strategic issues, should be considered by the incoming
       HoD, whenever s/he is appointed and takes up his/her post.

ii) Research Development Agenda:

R9.    Whilst welcoming the creation of research groups within the Department, which is already
       underway, the Panel recommends that these should be configured and operate in a way
       that is consistent with the priorities of the external funding bodies from which they will be
       seeking resource, and consistent with Faculty aims and objectives. Once established, the
       activities and focus of the groups must be regularly monitored, with sufficient flexibility to
       enable them to adapt to changing requirements in the future and thereby to take advantage
       of developments in new areas of research activity.

       Within the above, the Panel believes it is essential that plans are developed to ensure that
       research support staff (e.g. (short-term) research assistants and research students) are
       attached to the research activity that will be undertaken within the research groups that are
       established. Funding for this should be secured from a variety of sources, both internal
       (Departmental, Faculty and University) and external (e.g. ESRC), and these should be
       sought proactively by the Department.

R10.   Whilst the Panel recognises that Continuing Professional Development (CPD) and Other
       Services Rendered (OSR) activity undertaken by the Department in and with schools
       generates financial resource, this activity needs to be better understood in the context of,
       and more closely aligned to, the University’s expectations for excellence in the area of
       Knowledge Exchange.

       The Panel also recommends that the bulk of the Department’s share of the income derived
       from this activity should be used directly, as a priority, to help support Departmental
       research activities.


AFQER 2007/08                               24                                             February 09
                                                                                        Appendix 1

R11.   It should be a clear and consistent requirement that any new staff appointed to an
       academic post must have a research profile. This means that for appointments to such a
       post, the successful candidate should possess either an existing track record in research
       publications or the potential for developing this. The Department (and the Faculty) should
       ensure that all relevant arrangements for supporting, developing and mentoring the nascent
       research potential of staff recruited on this basis should be made available to them.

       Within this recommendation it is acknowledged that situations might exist where the
       appointment to a non-academic post is necessary, for example to cover temporary
       shortfalls in teaching. In these cases it might be appropriate to appoint either on a fixed-
       term basis or through the use of secondments.




AFQER 2007/08                              25                                             February 09
                                                                                         Appendix 2

                                    University of Strathclyde

                                      Faculty of Education

   Executive Summary of Recommendations following Excellence Review of Creative and
                                Aesthetic Studies

5. Conclusions:

The Panel wishes to thank the HoD, Dr Allan Hewitt, and all his colleagues across the Department
(academic, administrative, technical) for their involvement in the review process. Discussions at
all of the meetings were open, honest and candid. The Panel hopes that this level of Department
engagement will continue as the implementation phase progresses.

The Panel wished it noted that there was a sense of real energy and evidence of genuine
achievement in this Department.

The Panel was satisfied that, across all the meetings that had taken place and the paperwork (and
oral information) that had been supplied, that it had a good basis on which to make its
recommendations. These are aimed at addressing the issues contained in the Panel‟s original
remit. There is no doubt that the recommendations have implications for the Department, the
Faculty and the University.

The Panel unanimously agreed that the status quo was not considered to be viable in achieving
the University‟s aims expressed in the Strategic Plan. The Department relied substantially on the
income from one course and contributions to courses managed by other departments. This was
not sustainable. While applications for places on the course were significant, competitors were
beginning to gain ground. There was only one current plan to diversify into a joint course with the
Business School; however, no student funded numbers were available and it was not clear what
academic input the Department would have. The Department did not appear to be able to form a
research strategy which would align with the Faculty and the University and would require
assistance.

Follow up to the Review Panel Recommendations

Given the assessment by the Panel for the Department‟s need for assistance in developing a
research strategy, Professor Love was asked to take on the role of support to the department in
following up the Review Panel‟s recommendations.

A meeting with the CaAS Department was Chaired by Professor Love on 14 November 2007,
attended by Professor Bourne and departmental staff. The focus of this meeting was on the
University strategy, the general alignment of the Faculty and the consequent effects on individuals
and departments.

A further meeting on 10 December was Chaired by Professor Love and attended by Professor
Bourne and the Head of Department. This meeting focussed on the departmental strategic plan.

Dr Hewitt confirmed that the Department intended to pursue the development of professional
practice as the main research theme as a number of staff already had established output in this
area. This theme was aligned to the Faculty research themes.

The Department had modelled the draft workload model proposed by the Dean and established
that there was currently significant capacity to undertake research within the staff group. However,
the individual confidence and capability to undertake research now had to be developed and
supported.



AFQER 2007/08                              26                                              February 09
                                                                                          Appendix 2

Discussions had taken place with staff in the Department of Sport Culture and the Arts. While
there was similarity of interests and in delivery of classes, there was no clear link between
research areas.

Staff had agreed to concentrate on the delivery of CPD in Music Technology and in Instrumental
Teaching and these areas linked to the development of the professional practice research theme.
The BA in Applied Music alignment to this theme should be considered when the course was
revised in 2008/09.

Staff could not see a research link being developed with the RSAMD however it was stressed that
the staff group should have developed a collective view of where Strathclyde wished to be
positioned before the meeting with RSAMD staff took place. Links within the University,
particularly with Alan Tavener, should be progressed.

Professor Love requested that the plans should be further developed to include credible targets
and time scales for the External Panel members to consider when they return in February 2008.

Discussions had been encouraging and provided a sound basis for the considerable amount of
work which still had to be undertaken.

It should be noted that the recommendations in this report have Faculty-wide implications. The
Faculty will also need to consider a range of recommendations from the other excellence reviews
in order to decide the best unified, Faculty-led, strategy/approach to adopt.

Actions

Given the assumption that it would be detrimental to the University’s profile and contribution to the
City and to education in Scotland to disinvest from music education, together with a recognition
that high quality teaching and some RAE-able research activity is taking place, and that therefore
the benefits of continuing the activity outweigh the necessary costs of music education provision,
action is recommended as follows:

R1.    The Faculty needs to engage in early discussion with RSAMD. The discussion would be
       led by Professors Love and Bourne. There would appear to be potential for collaborations
       such as the shared use of facilities, cross-teaching in music practice between the RSAMD
       and the Faculty, and for music in education input from the Faculty to RSAMD, all of which
       could usefully be explored.

R2.    Contact should also be followed up with other potential partners both external and internal
       to the university, as identified by the Review Panel. The potential with respect to the Hunter
       Centre, the Ramshorn, the Collins, the Director of Music, and potential links with Glasgow
       Cultural Enterprises needs to be further explored. The exploration of potential collaboration
       with the visual arts and drama staff currently located in the Department of Sport Culture and
       the Arts, who have also identified the development of professional practice in arts education
       to be their primary research theme, should also continue to be explored.

R3.    Diversifying the teaching portfolio of music education courses from the BA Applied Music
       should continue to be explored strategically, in connection with external partners, and a
       business plan produced indicating staffing, equipment and running costs against income for
       any new course suggested.

R4.    The current departmental structure is not viable in the longer term. Unless other productive
       partnerships were created, the group would need to be located within a larger department
       within the Faculty of Education. The Departmental location of the group needs to depend
       upon the primary research theme focused on by the group (from among the 3 Faculty
       themes of Wellbeing, Social Justice/Equity and the Development of Professional Practice).
       The Review Panel strongly recommended a focus on music education and creativity linked

AFQER 2007/08                               27                                             February 09
                                                                                           Appendix 2

       to educational policy, given the existing research strengths of the Department. There are
       also important links to be made with community education through the creativity agenda.
       This might suggest locating the group in the Department of Educational and Professional
       Studies.

R5.    An implication of any integration process would be the need for succession planning within
       whichever department the group integrated with, to ensure strong research leadership and
       an appropriate managerial focus and style in driving forward the excellence agenda.

R6.    The important role of the current Head of Department in taking forward the Review
       implementation process needs to be recognized by the Faculty, which will need to provide
       support in any integration process.


Research Development Agenda:

The Faculty must support all its departments in developing an appropriate methodology for
balanced workload planning, in order to make the necessary provision for research. For
individuals this will need to include an element identified as a Personal Research Plan.

These considerations will have the following consequences:

R7.    There will need to be one-to-one meetings between academic members of staff in Creative
       and Aesthetic Studies and Faculty/Departmental managers to develop Personal Research
       Plans in alignment with Faculty Strategy, agree achievable targets and thereafter to monitor
       progress. These meetings should also involve examination of the credibility of achieving
       research aspirations and ambitions.

R8.    There will be differentiated workloads for staff which, in aggregate, will cover all the bases
       correctly, including a critical and focused emphasis on research activity and outputs, and
       which will recognise that a high proportion of staff are expected to be research-active.

R9.    An appropriate arrangement for research study leave for active researchers should be
       established. This should be provided on a competitive basis on the basis of assessments
       of specific proposals for research activity that have clear and measurable aims and
       objectives and which will lead to quality published output. Research plans should be
       consistent with the priorities of the external funding bodies from which they will be seeking
       resource, and consistent with Faculty aims and objectives. Once established, the activities
       and focus of the group and individuals must be regularly monitored, with sufficient flexibility
       to enable them to adapt to changing requirements in the future and thereby to take
       advantage of developments in new areas of research activity.

R10.    Within the above, plans should be developed to ensure that research support staff (e.g.
       (short-term) research assistants and research students) are attached to the research
       activity that will be undertaken. Funding for this should be secured from a variety of
       sources, both internal (Departmental, Faculty and University) and external (e.g. ESRC),
       and these should be sought proactively.

R11.   It should be a clear and consistent requirement that any new staff appointed to an
       academic post must have a research profile. This means that for appointments to such a
       post, the successful candidate should possess either an existing track record in research
       publications or the potential for developing this. Within this recommendation it is
       acknowledged that situations might exist where the appointment to a non-academic post is
       necessary, for example to cover temporary shortfalls in teaching. In these cases it might be
       appropriate to appoint either on a fixed-term basis or through the use of secondments.



AFQER 2007/08                               28                                              February 09
                                                                                      Appendix 2

R12.   There is a critical need to develop and articulate arrangements for research mentoring of
       academic staff, with particular reference to new appointees and early career academic
       staff.

R13.   In addition, any Knowledge Exchange activity should be related to the group‟s research
       themes, and in both research and Knowledge Exchange the issue of what can be covered
       viably by a small group has to be a central component of thinking about the range of
       themes.




AFQER 2007/08                             29                                           February 09
                                                                                         Appendix 3

                                    University of Strathclyde

                                      Faculty of Education

  Executive Summary of Recommendations following Excellence Review of Sport, Culture
                                   and the Arts

5. Conclusions:

The Panel wishes to thank the HoD, Dr Angus McWilliam, and all his colleagues across the
Department (academic, administrative and secretarial) for their involvement in the review process.
Discussions at all of the meetings were open, honest and candid. The Panel hopes that this level
of engagement will continue as the implementation phase progresses.

The Panel wished it noted that there was evidence of genuine achievement within the Department
and also that there was a willingness to engage with the Excellence Review process.

6. Recommendations

The Panel was satisfied that, across all the meetings that had taken place and the paperwork (and
oral information) supplied, it had a good basis on which to make its recommendations. These are
aimed at addressing the issues contained in the Panel‟s original remit. There is no doubt that the
recommendations have implications for the Department, the Faculty and the University.

The Panel unanimously agreed that the status quo was not considered to be viable in achieving
the University‟s aims expressed in the Strategic Plan. The Panel recommended that the
Department of Sport, Culture and the Arts consider and explore various potential strategies and
options for development. Issues relating to departmental infrastructure should be set aside until
the outcomes of the initial explorations were known.

A strategy for the disciplinary areas of Sport, Physical Activity for Health and Wellbeing should be
explored taking into account the following issues:
   -       links with the Centre for Sport & Recreation;
   -       location and role within the new Sports Building;
   -       links with sports related activity in other University departments e.g. in Faculty of
           Engineering;
   -       requirements in terms of academic investments.

Furthermore, a strategy for creative and community arts should be explored taking into account the
following issues:
     -      the exploration, as one of a variety of options, should include exploration of potential
            collaboration between these staff and staff in the Department of Creative and Aesthetic
            Studies.
     -      links with Collins Gallery; links with Ramshorn Theatre; links with external cultural
            centres e.g. Glasgow School of Art and RSAMD.


It should be noted that the following recommendations by the Panel in this report have Faculty-
wide implications. The Faculty will also need to consider a range of recommendations from the
other excellence reviews in order to decide the best unified, Faculty-led strategy/approach to
adopt.

6.1 Faculty-Led Action

(i) Generic Management Issues:



AFQER 2007/08                              30                                              February 09
                                                                                            Appendix 3

R1.    The Faculty needs to engage in early discussion with RSAMD. The discussion would be
       led by Professors Love and Bourne. There would appear to be potential for collaborations
       such as the shared use of facilities, cross-teaching between the RSAMD and the Faculty,
       and for arts in education input from the Faculty to RSAMD, all of which could usefully be
       explored.

R2.    Contact should also be followed up with other potential partners both external and internal
       to the University, as identified by the Review Panel. The potential with respect to the
       Ramshorn, the Collins Gallery and potential links with Glasgow Cultural Enterprises needs
       to be further explored. The exploration of potential collaboration with the arts staff currently
       located in the Department of Creative and Aesthetic Studies should also continue.

R3.    The Panel unanimously agreed that the status quo was not considered to be viable in
       achieving the University‟s aims expressed in the Strategic Plan. The Panel recommended
       that the Department of Sport, Culture and the Arts consider and explore various potential
       strategies and options for development. Issues relating to departmental infrastructure
       should be set aside until the outcomes of the initial explorations were known. The Faculty
       should support and facilitate the development of these strategies.

R4.    Once the above-mentioned strategy or strategies are finalized and agreed, the Faculty
       needs to consider an appropriate infrastructure to underpin the implantation and delivery of
       strategic change. An implication of any proposed departmental infrastructure would be the
       need for strong research leadership and an appropriate managerial focus and style in
       driving forward the excellence agenda.

(ii) Research Development Agenda:

R5.    The Faculty must support all its departments in developing an appropriate methodology for
       balanced workload planning, in order to make the necessary provision for research. This
       will need to include an element identified as a Personal Research Plan:

R6.    There will need to be one-to-one meetings between academic members of staff in Sport,
       Culture and the Arts and Faculty/Departmental managers to develop Personal Research
       Plans in alignment with Faculty Strategy, agree achievable targets and thereafter to monitor
       progress.

R7.    There will be differentiated workloads for staff which, in aggregate, will cover all the bases
       correctly, including a critical and focused emphasis on research activity and outputs.

R8.    An appropriate arrangement for research study leave for active researchers should be
       established. This should be provided on a competitive basis on the basis of assessments
       of specific proposals for research activity that have clear and measurable aims and
       objectives and which will lead to published output. Research plans should be consistent
       with the priorities of the external funding bodies from which they will be seeking resource,
       and consistent with Faculty aims and objectives. Once established, the activities and focus
       of the group and individuals must be regularly monitored, with sufficient flexibility to enable
       them to adapt to changing requirements in the future and thereby to take advantage of
       developments in new areas of research activity.

R9.    Within the above, plans should be developed to ensure that research support staff (e.g.
       (short-term) research assistants and research students) are attached to the research
       activity that will be undertaken. Funding for this should be secured from a variety of
       sources, both internal (Departmental, Faculty and University) and external (e.g. ESRC),
       and these should be sought proactively.

R10.   It should be a clear and consistent requirement that any new staff appointed to an
       academic post must have a research profile. This means that for appointments to such a

AFQER 2007/08                               31                                               February 09
                                                                                                Appendix 3

         post, the successful candidate should possess either an existing track record in research
         publications or the potential for developing this. Within this recommendation it is
         acknowledged that situations might exist where the appointment to a non-academic post is
         necessary, for example to cover temporary shortfalls in teaching. In these cases it might be
         appropriate to appoint either on a fixed-term basis or through the use of secondments.

R11.     There is a critical need to develop and articulate arrangements for research mentoring of
         academic staff, with particular reference to new appointees and early career academic
         staff. If necessary, such mentoring might be secured from elsewhere in the Faculty or
         University.


7. Follow up to the Review Panel Recommendations

Given the assessment by the Panel for the Department‟s need for assistance in developing a
forward strategy, Professor Love was asked to take on the role of support to the department in
following up the Review Panel‟s recommendations.

A meeting with the Sport, Culture and the Arts Department was Chaired by Professor Love on 14
November 2007, attended by Professor Bourne and departmental staff. The focus of this meeting
was on the University strategy, the general alignment of the Faculty and the consequent effects on
individuals and departments.

A further meeting on 30 November was Chaired by Professor Love and attended by Professor
Bourne, Angus McWilliam (Head of Department), Professor Nanette Mutrie and Mr Glen Coutts.
This meeting focussed on the Department‟s newly developed Excellence Review Action Plan
which, reflecting the initial conclusions of the Panel above, outlined two proposed strategies, one
for the area of Applied Arts and one for Sport, Physical Activity for Health and Wellbeing.

Professor Love acknowledged that there were a number of generic issues across the University
where Excellence Reviews were taking place. These included workload issues and models and
issues of prioritisation in relation to departmental portfolios and activities. One of the main
purposes of an Excellence Review was to help department‟s identify their priorities in line with the
University Strategic Plan. Furthermore, the reviews were designed to assist departments in
identifying the activities which were excellent or had the potential to become excellent with
appropriate support and investment.

Professor Love indicated that any future structure(s) would need to be led and informed by an
agreed strategy or strategies. The action plans being developed for both the areas of Applied Arts
and Physical Activity for Health and Wellbeing were making good progress, but further
development was required.

Both strategies should outline key priorities, who will be responsible for taking them forward,
timelines for achievement of objectives and the criteria on which success will be measured.
Furthermore, they need to identify how resources, including staffing, will be aligned to reflect the
key priorities. The following points are raised to assist the further development of the action plans:

       Applied Arts
       The Applied Arts group (2 in drama, 2 in art and design, one in dance and one media) was
       asked to consider whether, given their current capacity and skills, it is feasible for them to
       achieve everything that they outlined in the strategy plan. The key priorities/activities need to
       be identified along with identifying responsibility for taking the priorities forward, timelines for
       achievement of objectives and the criteria on which success would be measured.
       Furthermore, the strategy should identify how resources, including staffing, would be aligned
       to reflect the key priorities that had been identified.



AFQER 2007/08                                  32                                                February 09
                                                                                             Appendix 3

     The Applied Arts group in SCA appeared to have two possible future directions: either to see
     future research contributing to the area of „wellbeing‟, and thus working within the leadership
     of the existing research unit on Physical Activity for Health or to focus on the development of
     professional practice in art education. Department members in the area of Applied Arts
     reported that they had come to the conclusion that their strongly preferred orientation was to
     the Faculty research theme on „The Development of Professional Practice‟. They saw
     themselves first and foremost as „art educators‟. They reported that they had held useful
     discussions with music education colleagues in the Department of Creative and Aesthetic
     Studies who were committing to the same theme.

     With no staff researcher within the arts education group entered into the RAE 2008, the
     group‟s plans for developing research had no identified leadership. The group identified
     research as „our weak area‟. Clarification was required with regard to how research mentoring
     would be implemented and whether there was sufficient expertise to undertake the mentoring
     within an applied arts group. Registering staff for higher degrees was one way forward, but
     this is a long term development process. In this context, achieving a 70% return to the next
     RAE did not appear credible and it was not clear how far the group might move forwards to
     that level.

     The group recognised that their strengths lay in their expertise in and commitment to
     innovation in teaching and creativity in education. They made an important contribution to
     initial teacher education and CPD/Chartered Teachers Programmes. They stressed their
     commitment to the quality of student experience. In this, the group has similarities with
     members of the Curricular Studies Department, currently also undergoing Excellence Review,
     and may benefit from similar considerations in relation to the potential of non-active research
     staff operating within a high quality, teaching-focussed, cross-faculty facility to support initial
     teacher training and CPD.

     Further consideration should also be given to identifying and developing key strategic
     collaborations and partnerships (for example with the Collins and Ramshorn venues, RSAMD
     and Glasgow School of Art) in relation to the creativity agenda. However, the group would
     need to be clearer about the benefits of collaboration, partnerships and the role of any visiting
     professors.

     Arts teaching infrastructure requirements are expensive in terms of space and materials. The
     group and Faculty would need to explore the possibilities of shared facilities in the move to
     the city centre site. The arts group propose the development of an „Arts Hub‟, „a place where
     the arts, including music, can not only be taught, performed and enjoyed, but which promotes
     participation by students and staff throughout the University and by individuals and groups in
     the wider community.‟ The group needs to explore this further and clarify what the
     responsibilities and anticipated outcomes would be.

     Structural issues for the group will need to be addressed as its priorities for future activities
     become clearer.


     Sport, Physical Activity for Health and Wellbeing
     The sports grouping had come together around a single research theme „Physical Activity for
     Health‟, aligned with the Faculty Wellbeing research theme. The Action Plans in this area
     were well developed, the research theme is highly relevant to current policy development in
     the UK, and the grouping already has strong research leadership following the strategic
     appointment of Professor Mutrie and her research team. Five members of the group were
     entered into the 2008 RAE.

     The group has already produced a detailed action plan for research, mapping out
     responsibilities and with a realistic timetable. Systematic research mentoring was being put
     into place.

AFQER 2007/08                                33                                               February 09
                                                                                              Appendix 3


     The group were enthusiastic about the potential of links with groupings in arts and in
     community education around research and knowledge exchange on culture, physical activity
     and wellbeing. They referred to the government action plan „Living Places‟, aiming to bring the
     benefits of culture and sport to communities, working alongside architects and town planners,
     for example, to build culture and sport into communities from the start. They welcomed
     potential future linkages with groupings in arts and with community education.

     The infrastructure for Physical Activity for Health planned in the new Sports Building has the
     potential to give the group an international profile, attracting the very best students and staff in
     future years. Plans for the building include research as well as teaching space.

     The group are already working with a number of FE colleges in developing the plans for
     developing and using the facilities, and this offers the potential for future research and
     teaching collaborations as well as efficiencies in teaching timetables.

     The group proposes the development of a revised BSc in Sport and Exercise Science,
     rewritten to match the expertise of the group, and an MSc in collaboration with its extended
     SPARColl Partners. Both the BSc and MSc complement the research and knowledge
     exchange agendas of the group.

     The alignment of this proposed new degree with existing undergraduate courses and to the
     research interests of staff is a potentially positive development. However, although the plans
     include elements of joint presentation with the current BA, the group need to consider
     carefully the benefits of undertaking a second undergraduate degree as well as continuing
     necessary contributions to initial teacher education programmes against the need to provide
     headroom for staff to develop research.

     In view of this, the group was requesting the phasing in of 3 new members of staff over three
     years, funded by increased student numbers and future staff retirements. This would require
     significant initial investment in the group by the Faculty.

     An issue which would need to be clarified before progressing plans further was that of the
     student FTE numbers involved when the BSc in Sport and Exercise Science was transferred
     from Education some years ago. An alternative was continuing with the current BA degree
     alone, but using retirement opportunities to align it more closely with research.

     There are management issues to address if the group is to remain as a distinct department.
     With a small group, links with the colleges and the infrastructure entailed by the new Sports
     Hall suggests, a different departmental alignment might have merits. The current Head of
     Department is due to demit in July 2008. The Department has within it a strong and research
     active potential HoD, but that member of staff, although willing, would require research
     support to enable her to take on the extra role. Alternatives would be either external
     appointment or the merging of the group into a larger department.


Professor Love will meet with representatives of the Department again in January 2008 to discuss
and review progress in relation to the development of the strategies and to explore support
mechanisms as thinking on activities develops. The external panel members will be invited back
early in 2008 to facilitate and support strategy development.




AFQER 2007/08                                34                                                February 09
                                                                                        Appendix 4

                                     University of Strathclyde

                                       Faculty of Education

                   Annual Faculty Quality and Enhancement Report 2007/08
                                   List of Collaborations

CURRENT
Consortium of Local Authorities    Joint delivery   Scottish Qualification for Headship –
(valid for 5 years from 01.08.05                    postgraduate Diploma and School Leadership
– signed on 01.09.05)                               and Management

Scottish Institute of Human        Validation           MSc/Diploma/Certificate in Therapeutic
Relations                                                Skills with Children and Young People
(valid for 5 years from 01.04.02                        MSc/Diploma/Certificate in Family
– signed 12.07.04)                                       Therapy and Systemic Practice

Notre Dame Centre                  Validation       MSc/Diploma/Certificate in Play Therapy
(valid for 5 years from 01.08.03
– signed by Principal on
12.07.04 – unsigned by Notre
Dame Centre)
Institute of Counselling and       Validation       Postgraduate Certificate/Postgraduate
Psychological Studies (Athens)                      Diploma/MSc in Person Centred Counselling
(valid for 5 years from
01.08.08 – signed by Principal
on 01.12.08 – unsigned by
ICPS)
UHI Millenium Institute            Validation        MSc/Diploma/Certificate in Chartered
(valid for 5 years from 01.08.03                     Teacher Studies
– signed 12.07.04)

UHI Millenium Institute            Validation       BA in Childhood Practice
(valid for 5 years from 1 August
2008 signed December 2008
by both parties)
Dumfries and Galloway              Validation       Postgraduate Certificate in Additional Support
Council                                             Needs
(valid for 5 years from 01.08.05
– signed on 01.09.05 –
unsigned by D&G Council)
James Watt College                 Validation       DipHE in Education and Social Services
(valid for 5 years from 01.08.05
– signed on 01.09.05)
Langside College                   Validation       DipHE in Education and Social Services
(valid for 3 years from 01.08.08
– signed 21.09.08)
Motherwell College                 Validation       DipHE in Education and Social Services
(valid for 3 years from 01.08.08
– signed 25.09.08)
Glasgow Caledonian University      Joint Award          Doctor of Psychology/Master of
 (valid for 3 years from                                Science/Postgraduate
    01.09.07 – signed on                                 Diploma/Postgraduate Certificate in
    05.12.07)                                            Counselling Psychology
                                                        Postgraduate Certificate in Mental Health
                                                         Social Work (new in 2009/10)

AFQER 2007/08                                35                                          February 09
                                                                                    Appendix 4


British Association for Adoption   Validation    Postgraduate Certificate in Securing
and Fostering – new in                           Children‟s Futures
2008/09



Closing Down
University of the West of          Validation    BA Nursing Studies
Scotland (former Bell College                    BSc and Dip HE Nursing (Adult)
courses)                                         BSc and Dip HE Nursing (Mental Health)
University wide agreement                        BSc and Dip HE Midwifery
                                                 MSc in Advanced Health Studies

University of Glasgow and          Joint Award   Diploma and MSc in Medicine and Science in
Glasgow Caledonian University                    Sport and Exercise
(valid for 5 years from 01.08.02
– signed 16.04.02)




AFQER 2007/08                               36                                          February 09
                                                                                        Appendix 5

                                     University of Strathclyde

                                        Faculty of Education

                           Annual Faculty Quality and Enhancement

                Scrutiny of Annual Collaborative Partner Reports January 09

                                  For the Academic year 2007/08


MSc in Family Therapy and Systemic Practice (SIHR)

The period of the Collaborative Agreement validating this course is from 1 April 2002 until 31
March 2007. It was signed by the Principal on 12 July 2004.

Requires renewal in 2008/09. [Action Faculty Office]

Course Director – Kirsty Darwent
Course Team member/Verifier – Dr Graham Connolly

The external environmental changes resulting in reduced funding have been discussed with the
University and the revised Collaborative Agreement which will be considered during 2008/09 will
include a fee for the Project module which does not equate directly to four times the single module
fee. This Project module fee will be considered in all validation agreements however, the SIHR
degrees are currently the only ones with Masters level students.

It was noted that there is no comment under the impact of enhancement initiatives. This will be
explored with the course director at the collaborative partner meeting in February/March 09. It is
likely that the University has not provided sufficient information about the enhancement themes for
the course director to be able to comment however enhancements to the course and the student
support are contained within the report.

Good practice – high progression rates.

Graduate employment is not an issue given the students remain within their current posts while
studying.

External Examiner report – this should be pursued.

Student feedback has been sought and has been responded to.

Staff development is being delivered by SIHR.

Summary
The course admits a small number of students and this could be contributing to their financial
pressures. It is well managed and the students a very well supported.


MSc in Therapeutic Skills with Children and Young People (SIHR)

The period of the Collaborative Agreement validating this course is from 1 April 2002 until 31
March 2007. It was signed by the Principal on 12 July 2004.

Requires renewal in 2008/09. [Action Faculty Office]

Course Director – Debbie Hindle/Janet Sherrard

37                 AFQER Collaborative Partner Report Scrutiny January 2009
                                                                                           Appendix 5

Course Team member/Verifier – Dr Graham Connolly

Good practice - The response to the issues raised in the previous report and the analysis of the
outcome was exemplary.

Good practice - The proposal on blind marking seemed entirely appropriate given the
circumstances. The revisions to the assessment for the named classes has been managed and
communicated well.

The Course Team had considered student feedback and had responded appropriately.

Students are recruited in geographically distant groups and the group size is small. As tutorial
group size has been raised as a student feedback issue, this should be closely monitored and
consideration given to merging groups which are not too distant from each other.

Progression is slow given the competing pressures on students however the measures put in place
to support students to prioritise appear to be having a positive outcome.

The External Examiner report had been received and noted that the quality of work was of a high
standard. Dr Shaw also suggested that the guidance handbook issued to staff would also be
helpful for students. Consistency of feedback should be taken forward for the next session

Staff development is carried out by SIHR.

Summary
The course is well managed and responds appropriately to student feedback.

The size of tutorial groups is a potential issue which could impact on student experience. This is
recognised by the Course Team and measures have been put in place to off APL for CPD delivery
which could widen the applicant background.

The attached summary of teaching staff and the continuing professional development a
scholarship undertaken by each individual. Some of the events noted may be of interest to Faculty
staff and this should be explored.


MSc in Play Therapy (Notre Dame)

The period of the Collaborative Agreement validating this course is from 1 August 2003 until 31
July 2008. It was signed by the Principal of University of Strathclyde on 12 July 2004 but is
unsigned by Notre Dame Centre.

Requires renewal in 2008/09. [Action Faculty Office]

Course Director – Janet Barr to summer 08/Dorothy Brownlie summer 08 onwards
Course Team member/Verifier – Heather Baldry

The distinctiveness of the course and its unique place in Scotland was noted.

While the need for qualified graduates in the specialised field was increasing, it was also noted that
funding was becoming more difficult and many independent agencies which employed graduates
had had their funding threatened.

Membership of the HPC for Play Therapy professions is being actively pursued.

The mini review in January 07 had resulted in changes to the course in 2007/08 which had been
well received.

38                  AFQER Collaborative Partner Report Scrutiny January 2009
                                                                                              Appendix 5


Good practice – use of triads in strengthening the clinical practice element of the course.

The intake in 2007/08 was 12 which is a small group. Any study deferral or withdrawal causes the
student experience to be at risk. Not many students continue to Masters level.

Good practice – issue of course information to ethnic minority groups and voluntary sector
information exchanges.

Access for students with a disability is a significant issue. However, the course team are aware of
the issue and have considered how they would adapt to attempt to offer a good students
experience for a student with a disability.

Difficulties regarding disclosure requirements for overseas students should be discussed with the
Faculty Officer as these can be overcome.

Good practice – emphasis on research and BAPT website information.

Support for students is excellent and progression reasonable. Student feedback is gathered and
responded to appropriately.

The stalling of the development of Play Therapy posts is disappointing.

Feedback from the external Examiner regarding marking should be discussed with the Vice-Dean
(Academic) who can provide support.

Staff development is carried out by the Notre Dame Centre.

Summary

The University wishes to thank Janet Barr for her 10 year of invaluable service to the course.

Intake numbers and funding for students is obviously an issue which the Course Team are aware
of. They are also engaging with Policy makers and with professional bodies such as the HPC, the
support the status of their graduates.

In dealing with issues relating to Disclosure and data protection, the Course Team should seek
advice from the University as there is expertise which could be called upon.

The request for students to have access to the University Library is echoed by all collaborative
partners and should again be explored by the Faculty.


Postgraduate Certificate in Additional Support for Learning (Dumfries and Galloway)

The period of the Collaborative Agreement validating this course is from 1 August 2005 until 31
July 2010. It was signed by the Principal of University of Strathclyde on 1 September 2005 but is
unsigned by Dumfries & Galloway Council.

Requires signing by Dumfries and Galloway. [Action Faculty Office]

Course Director – Mary Thomson
Course Team member/Verifier – Frances Ross-Watt

The course has a good intake size to support the student experience.

Good practice – progression on the course is good.

39                  AFQER Collaborative Partner Report Scrutiny January 2009
                                                                                           Appendix 5


Feedback from students is sought and is responded to appropriately.

The issue of access to University Library resources is raised in this and in other reports for Faculty
to again explore.

Good practice – the course delivery is enhanced by external practitioners to keep issues current.

The External Examiner Report is being sought.

Summary

The course is well managed and student progress good. Access to the University library has been
raised as an issue for the Faculty to explore.


BSc Midwifery (Hamilton Campus, former Bell College)

The Joint Courses Board comprising the Vice-Dean (Academic), an academic responsible for
assessment, an academic responsible for subject expertise and the Faculty Officer plus
appropriate staff from UWS. The minutes from these meetings are recorded and each course
submits an annual course report which is considered by the JCB. The comments on this course
are noted below.

Good Practice noted in External Examiner comments

Discussion points:
Page 4 – 3. Outcome – is this feedback now available?
Page 5 – Is there any information about why some decline an offer?
Page 9 – Strathclyde would look at anything below 75% therefore Emphasis at 71% would need
some investigation.
Page 9 – Good practice re ILS certification
Page 10 – SMOTS ad Noelle – very good practice.
Page 11 – Paragraph 1 - Research Teaching Linkage – good practice.


DipHE/BSc in Nursing (Adult) or (Mental Health) (former Bell College)

The Joint Courses Board comprising the Vice-Dean (Academic), an academic responsible for
assessment, an academic responsible for subject expertise and the Faculty Officer plus
appropriate staff from UWS. The minutes from these meetings are recorded and each course
submits an annual course report which is considered by the JCB. The comments on this course
are noted below.

Discussion points:
Page 2 – Interesting outcome in 1. We are trying to move to online evaluation with mixed return.
Any tips would be very useful!
Page 3 – SMOTS development very positive
Page 20 – Good research/teaching linkages – paragraph 4
Page 21 – ILS course positive
Page 22 – The clinical simulation software upgrades to provide consistency across 4 campus sites
is a huge benefit from the merger.
Page 23 – more research/teaching linkages – very good practice.
Page 25 – Discipline and Profession Module – less than 75% but explanation provided.
Page 26 – Family and Health – 70%?
Page 26 – Prevention, Control & Management of Infection – 65%?
Page 28 – Cell Dysfunction – 72%

40                  AFQER Collaborative Partner Report Scrutiny January 2009
                                                                                      Appendix 5

Page 28 – Trauma – 69%?
Page 32 – Qualitative Research – 66%
Page 33 – Mood Related Disorder – 71%


DipHE/BSc in Nursing (Adult) or (Mental Health) (Former Bell College)

The Joint Courses Board comprising the Vice-Dean (Academic), an academic responsible for
assessment, an academic responsible for subject expertise and the Faculty Officer plus
appropriate staff from UWS. The minutes from these meetings are recorded and each course
submits an annual course report which is considered by the JCB. The comments on this course
are noted below.

Promoting Healthy Adulthood and Holistic Care 1 – Low pass rate 64%? February 49%?
Promoting Healthy Ageing – 64%? 49%?
Mood & Stress Disorders – 71% (as per page 33 above)
Drugs and the Mind – 41%? 36%?
Management of Patients with Cell Dysfunction – 72% (explained in final paragraph) (as per page
28 above)
Nursing Management of Patients Experiencing Trauma – 69% (as per page 28 above)
Qualitative Research – 66% (as per page 32 above)

General Comments to all Reports
    An explanation is required where passes fall below 75%
    Good practice in ILT, SMOTSnd Noelle

HSLP Report needs to be discussed


Postgraduate Certificate/Postgraduate Diploma/MSc in Person Centred Counselling
(Institute of Counselling and Psychological Studies (Athens)

The original was signed on 1 September 2005 and was valid for 5 years from 1 August 2005. To
accommodate the addition of the MSc level and the QAA comments, a revised agreement was
approved at Senate in December however the Institute are currently querying some of the terms.

The Annual Report was received late due to ongoing discussions about the agreement.

The Greek Psychotherapist Association had invited the Institute to develop a fourth year top up
course to meet the requirements of the Association and this would be delivered from January
2009.

There was demand for the Person Centred Counselling course to be delivered in Thessaloniki.
The delivery to students in that area was by attendance in Athens however intensive sessions and
client placements were delivered in Thessaloniki. The agreement would need to be amended to
reflect this change.

The University were very sad to note the death of Dr Ioulios Iossifides and passed on their
sympathy to his family and to Institute staff who had worked so closely with him.

The web site is used extensively to attract students and had been recently upgraded. Applications
had been buoyant. It appeared that the applicants age was decreasing and those who were too
young and inexperienced to join the Person Centred Counselling course had been offered
alternative options. The majority of the applicants were women however there were more males
now showing an interest. Students with disabilities were supported. Due to requirement for
experience, the students tend to be mature.


41                 AFQER Collaborative Partner Report Scrutiny January 2009
                                                                                       Appendix 5

Good practice – the introduction of introductory research lectures and a workshop. This has laid
the foundation for the introduction of the MSc.

Government bodies in Greece did not recognize counseling nor did they recognize the Diploma
from Strathclyde. This meant that only students who had a degree in psychology from a Greek
University could practice in government agencies. This may change.

The extensive series of staff development events was seen as good practice.

Student feedback was sought and responded to appropriately.

The report provided detail on the progress of all of the current student cohorts. Students had
asked for clarity about what was expected of them in terms of assessment and the handbook had
been updated to provide additional guidance.

Summary

The Institute had suffered the loss of Dr Iossifides. There had also been pressure from the Greek
government to respond to issues which contradicted EU guidance. It was hoped that this situation
would resolve. The students had had a good year and their feedback had been gathered and
responded to appropriately. QAA had spoken highly of the relationship between the Institute and
the students.


DipHE in Education and Social Services (James Watt College, Langside College, Motherwell
College)

The period of the Collaborative Agreement validating this course at James Watt College is from 1
August 2005 until 31 July 2010. It was signed on 1 September 2005. (The Collaborative
Agreements validating the course at Langside College and Motherwell College are from 1 August
2008 until 31 July 2011 and therefore not within session 2007-08).

The quality assurance for the Diploma delivered at each FE College is dealt with through a
Steering Group chaired by the Vice-Dean (Academic) with membership from Faculty departments
which contribute to the course and representatives from the management and course delivery at
each FE college. The BA in Education and Social Services is delivered and quality assured by the
University and is located in the Department of Childhood and Primary Studies.


Doctor of Psychology/Master of Science/Postgraduate Diploma/Postgraduate Certificate in
Counselling Psychology (Glasgow Caledonian University)

The period of the Collaborative Agreement validating this course is from 1 September 2007 until 31
July 2010. It was signed on 5 December 2007.

The first year of the courses was delivered in 2007/08. An annual report should be considered by
the Joint course team and taken through the assurance processes of the Administering University
(Glasgow Caledonian). Strathclyde should see a copy of this paper.


MSc in Chartered Teacher Studies (UHI)

The period of the Collaborative Agreement validating this course is from 1 August 2003 until 31
July 2008. It was signed on 12 July 2004.

Requires to be renewed. [Action Faculty Office]


42                 AFQER Collaborative Partner Report Scrutiny January 2009
                                                                                     Appendix 5

There had been confusion about who should appoint External Examiners and this had been
resolved. The agreement required to be updated in 2008/09.


BA in Childhood Practice (UHI)

The period of this collaborative agreement was signed in December 2008 by both parties. The
agreement was approved to run from 1 August 2008 to 31 July 2013.

As this was the first year of operation, an annual report was not expected.


Scottish Qualification for Headship (SQH) (Consortium of Local Authorities)

The period of the Collaborative Agreement validating this course is from 1 August 2005 until 31
July 2010. It was signed on 1 September 2005

The Course Director for the SQH course is a member of Faculty academic staff. The course,
therefore, reported to the Department of Educational and Professional Studies. The Course
Report should be extracted and considered under the Collaborative Scrutiny. [Action Faculty
Office]


Postgraduate Certificate in Securing Children’s Futures

This course was approved in 2007/08 for delivery in 2008/09. There was therefore no requirement
for an annual report as the course had not run in the year in question.

The collaborative agreement had been approved for the period 1 August 2008 to 31 July 2013.
The agreement had been signed by the Principal however the countersigned copy had not yet
been returned by BAAF. This was being chased.


LD




43                  AFQER Collaborative Partner Report Scrutiny January 2009

				
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