HDI_evaluating by laurasaloiye

VIEWS: 0 PAGES: 5

									Evaluate Research Sources and Materials? 
Contents 
Considerations ....................................................................................................................................................................... 1 
   Authority ............................................................................................................................................................................ 1 
   Content ............................................................................................................................................................................... 2 
   Relevancy ........................................................................................................................................................................... 2 
   Objectivity .......................................................................................................................................................................... 2 
Distinguishing Traits ............................................................................................................................................................. 2 
   Scholarly Journals .............................................................................................................................................................. 2 
   General Interest Magazines .............................................................................................................................................. 3 
   Popular Magazines ............................................................................................................................................................ 3 
   Trade Publications ............................................................................................................................................................ 3 
   Sensational Periodicals ..................................................................................................................................................... 4 
Resource Checklist ................................................................................................................................................................ 4 
Further Reading  .................................................................................................................................................................... 5 
               .



Considerations 
 
In today’s world of technology just about anyone can find a wealth of information on just about any topic. 
The challenge comes in selecting appropriate and reliable sources. Just because a book, article, or web 
page matches the search criteria and seems to be relevant, does not mean it is an appropriate or reliable 
source of information. Given that all sources are not created equal, learning to analyze and evaluate 
critically is an important part of the research process.  
 
                                                                  Helpful hint for your academic life:  

                                             If a source is “good enough” it is probably not good enough.  

                                                    
Although subtle differences are involved when evaluating different types of resources, there are basic 
questions to be considered with all.  

Authority  

Who is the author(s) and what are his or her credentials?  
         • What is the author’s educational background and experience?  
         • With what institutions or organizations is the author affiliated?  
         • Who published or disseminated the information?  
 
  Is there adequate documentation? (references, bibliography, credits, footnotes)  
Content  

 
Is this a report of primary research? (Surveys, experiments, studies, etc.)  
Is it a compilation of information gathered from other sources?  
What evidence or supporting documentation is presented? Does the data support the conclusion?  
Are arguments and supporting evidence presented clearly and logically?  
Is the topic covered comprehensively, partially, or is it a broad overview?  
Is the information free of grammatical, spelling, and typographical errors?  

Relevancy  

How current is the text? Currency is important for some topics, less so for others.  
What type of audience is the author addressing? Is it aimed at a specialized or a general audience?  
Is this source appropriate for your needs?  
                                                             
                   • too general         • too elementary           • too superficial  
                                                             
                                                             
                   • too specific        • too advanced             • too technical  
                                                             

Objectivity  

Are the author's appeals based on logic or are they appeals to the readers' emotions?  
Are issues treated in a factual manner?  
Who is the intended audience?  
What is the purpose of the information? Is a government, educational, or research group providing 
information? Is a person or group trying to sway public opinion?  
 


Distinguishing Traits 
                                                                                                                

                 Scholarly Journals  

                     •   Have a serious look with charts and graphs but few glossy pictures  
                     •   Have articles that are written by a scholar in the field, discipline or specialty  
                     •   Report on original research or experimentation  
                     •   Have articles that use the terminology and language of the covered subject  
                     •   Have articles that are footnoted and/or have a bibliography  
                     •   Generally published by a professional organization or a scholarly press  
                     •   Contain selective advertising  

Some examples of scholarly journals include: Evangelical Journal of Theology, Early American Studies, 19th 
Century Music, and Ethics 

 
                                                                                                               

                         General Interest Magazines  

                           •Attractive in appearance and heavily illustrated with photographs  
                           •Provides information in a general manner to a broad audience  
                           •Articles generally written by a member of the editorial staff or free‐lance 
                            writer  
                         • Language of articles geared to an educated audience, no subject expertise 
                            assumed  
                         • Sources are sometimes cited but more often there are no footnotes or 
                            bibliography  
    •   Contains some advertising and published for profit.  

Examples of general interest magazines include: Newsweek, Maclean's, National Geographic, Psychology 
Today, And Popular Science  

                                                                                                               

                         Popular Magazines  

                            •   Are slick and glossy with an attractive format  
                            •   Contain photographs and illustrations to enhance their image  
                            •   Rarely provide footnotes and/or a bibliography at the end of the article  
                            •   Have articles that are written by a staff or free‐lance writer  
                            •   Have short articles, written in simple language, with little depth  
                            •   The purpose is to entertain and inform the general public  
                            •   Published by commercial enterprises, for profit  
                            •   Contain extensive advertising  

Some examples of popular magazines include: Ladies Home Journal, Vogue, Sports Illustrated, People  

                                                                                                               

                  Trade Publications  

                     •    Articles written by experts in the field for other experts in the field  
                     •    Provide news, product information, advertising and trade articles to people in a 
                          particular industry or profession  
                     •    Articles use specialized jargon of the discipline  
                     •    Similar in nature to popular magazines in the use of graphics and photographs  
                     •    Published through a professional association  

Some examples of trade publications include: MacWorld, Industry World, and Byte  

                                                                                                               

 

 
                        Sensational Periodicals  

                            •   Come in variety of styles but often use a newspaper format  
                            •   Contain melodramatic photographs  
                            •   Rarely cite sources of information  
                            •   Articles written by free‐lance writers for an impressionable audience  
                            •   Purpose is to arouse curiosity and interest of the general public  
                            •   Language is elementary and occasionally inflammatory or sensational  
                            •   Contains advertising as startling and melodramatic as the stories  

Some examples of sensational periodicals include: National Enquirer, Star, and Globe 
 


Resource Checklist 
Use this checklist to evaluate your sources: 

    •   Purpose  
            o Why was the resource written? Was the author's purpose to inform, persuade, or to refute 
              a particular idea or point of view?  
    •   Audience  
            o Is the resource intended for the general public, scholars, professionals, etc.  
    •   Authority  
            o What are the author's qualifications? Consider author's educational background, past 
              writings and experience. Is the author associated with an organization or institution? Who 
              is the publisher? Are they well known? Does any group control the publishing company?  
    •   Accuracy  
            o Is the information covered fact, opinion, or propaganda? Facts can be usually verified. 
              Opinions evolve from the interpretation of facts. Are the author's conclusions or facts 
              supported with references?  
    •   Timeliness  
            o When was the information published? Is the date of publication appropriate for your topic?  
    •   Coverage  
            o Is it relevant to your topic? Is the topic covered in depth, partially or is it an broad 
              overview? Does the resource add new information, update other sources or substantiate 
              other resources that you have consulted?  
    •   Objectivity  
            o Does the author present multiple viewpoints or is it biased? How do critical reviews rate 
              the work?  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Further Reading 
Alexander, Jan, and Marsha Tate. "Teaching Critical Evaluation Skills for the World Wide Web": 
http://www.science. widener.edu/~withers/webeval.htm  

Grassian, Esther. "Thinking Critically about World Wide Web Resources": 
http://www.library.ucla.edu/libraries/college/help/critical/ 

Harris, Robert. "Evaluating Internet Research Sources" 
http://www.sccu.edu/faculty/R_Harris/evalu8it.htm 

Jacobson, Trudi and Laura Cohen. "Evaluating Internet Resources." 
http://library.albany.edu/internet/evaluate.html 

Kirk, Elizabeth. "Evaluating Information Found on the Internet" 
http://www.library.jhu.edu/elp/useit/evaluate/index.html 

Ormondroyd, J., Engle, M., & Cosgrave, T. How to critically analyze information sources 
http://www.library.cornell.edu/okuref/research/skill26.htm 

Richmond, Betsy. "Ten C's for Evaluating Internet Resources" 
http://www.uwec.edu/Library/Guides/tencs.html 

Smith, Alastair. "Evaluation of Information Sources": 
http://www.vuw.ac.nz/~agsmith/evaln/evaln.htm 

Stegall, Nancy. "Online Writing Support Center: Using Cybersources" 
http://www.devry‐phx.edu/lrnresrc/dowsc/integrty.htm  

Tillman, Hope. "Evaluating Quality on the Net" 
http://www.hopetillman.com/findqual.html 


 

								
To top