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Isotopes Lab - Lab - Isotopes and Atomic Mass

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					Lab - Isotopes and Atomic Mass

Objectives
 Determine the average weight of each isotope of the fictitious element
  beanium
 Determine the relative abundances of isotopes of beanium
 Calculate from experimental data the atomic mass of beanium

Introduction

Isotopes are atoms of the same atomic number having different masses due
to different numbers of neutrons. The atomic mass of an element is the
weighted average of the masses of the isotopes of that element. The
weighted average takes into account both the mass and relative abundance
of each isotope as it occurs in nature. The relative abundances and masses
of small atomic particles are measured in the laboratory by an instrument
called a mass spectrometer. The mass spectrometer separates particles by
mass and measures the mass and relative abundance of each. From these
data a weighted aver age is calculated to determine the atomic mass of the
element.

Safety

 Behave in a way that is consistent with a safe laboratory environment

Materials

Sample of beanium
Digital balance

Procedure

Carry out the following steps and record you results in table 5-1
1. Separate your beanium sample into the separate types of beans
2. Weigh each bean sample and record your answer
3. Count each bean sample and record your answer
4. Divide the mass of each isotope (type of bean) by the number of each
   isotope to get the average mass of each isotope, record your answer
5. Divide the number of each isotope by the total number of particles, and
   multiply by 100 to get the percent abundance of each isotope, record
   your answer
6. Divide the percent abundance from step 5 by 100 to get the relative
   abundance of each isotope, record your answer
7. Multiply the relative abundance from step 6 by the average mass of each
   isotope to get the relative weight of each isotope, record your answer
8. Add the relative weights to get the average mass of all particles in
   beanium, the "atomic mass".

Data
Table 5-1

                   Pintos             White               Black-eyed peas
Mass of each
isotope
Number of each
isotope
Average mass of
each isotope
Percent of each
isotope
Relative
abundance
Relative weight



Atomic mass:_________________

Cleaning up

Place the entire sample of beanium back in the beaker, make sure none of
the particles are on the floor

Analysis and Conclusion

1. Which of your data in table 5-1 must be measured and which can be
   calculated?
2. What is the end result when you total the individual percentages? The
   individual relative abundances?




3. Do you think your calculation for the "atomic mass" of beanium will be
close the value of your classmates? Why or why not?

				
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