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Vocabulary Lesson Ideas

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					                      Vocabulary Lesson Ideas
        (From Blachowicz & Fisher, Teaching Vocabulary in All Classrooms)

Strategy for Context-Use Lesson
1. Make a transparency of a passage and omit a contextually explained
   word.
2. Direct students to:
    Look. Before, at, and after the word.
    Reason. Connect what they know with what the author has written.
    Predict a possible meaning.
    Resolve or redo. Decide if they know enough or should stop.
3. Discuss – discussion is critical.
4. Reveal the author’s word choice.
5. Discuss further. Use references to elaborate.

C(2)QU – Teaching Words in Context
Choose a word to be taught.
       C1: Present the word in a broad but meaningful context, such as a
word selected from a story or chapter. Ask students to form hypotheses
about the word’s meaning; to give attributes, ideas, or association; and to
“think aloud” to explain to the group the sources of their hypotheses.
       C2: Provide more explicit context with some definitional information.
Ask students to reflect on their initial ideas and to reaffirm or refine them
again in a “think-aloud” mode.
       Q: Ask a question that involves semantic interpretation of the word.
At this point, you can also ask for a definition or give one if necessary.
Discuss as needed with group members, using each other’s cues and
explanations as more data.
       U: Ask students to use the word in a meaningful sentence. Go back
into the C(2)QU loop as needed.

The Sentence Game
 Question ~ Uses the meaning of the word
 Sentence 1 ~ A broad but meaningful context
 Sentence 2 ~ Adds more detailed information
 Sentence 3 ~ An explicit definition

            Example:
             Question ~ What is an aeronaut’s job?
              Sentence 1 ~ The aeronaut was getting the hot air balloon
               ready for flying.
              Sentence 2 ~ The aeronaut told her helpers to let go of the
               ropes so she could fly the hot air balloon.
              Sentence 3 ~ An aeronaut is a person who flies a hot air
               balloon.

Vocab-o-Gram
1. Select a vocabulary list from a narrative selection that reflects story
   grammar and present it to students by writing the words on the board or
   using an overhead projector.
2. Have students, working in teams, decide which words give clues to
   setting, characters, problem/goal, resolution, and feelings. Include a “?”
   category as well.
3. Discuss placement. Words may typically be placed in more than one
   category. Share knowledge about words.
4. Make predictions.
5. Have each student formulate a personal question to answer.
6. After reading, refine vocabulary. Go back to the selection to clarify or
   use references.
7. Use in further oral or written work. Students may use Vocab-o-Gram as
   an organizer for summarizing.

Story Impressions
1. Choose vocabulary words from the selection that give an impression of
   some of the aspects of story grammar: setting, characters, problem/goal,
   actions, resolution, and feeling. Place the words on the chalkboard or
   overhead projector.
2. Ask students to use the words to write the story they would write if they
   were the author. For unknown words, they can take a guess, ask a friend,
   or put them aside.
3. After writing, share stories as a group. Compare and contrast across
   student stories to look for similarities and differences.
4. Read the selection to compare the author’s choices with students’
   choices.
5. After reading, refine vocabulary. Go back to the selection to clarify or
   use references.
6. Use in further oral or written work. Students may use knowledge rating
   as an organizer for studying.
Word Play
1. Choose a short list of vocabulary words (three to five words) from the
   selection that gives an impression of some of the aspects of story
   grammar: setting, characters, problem/goal, actions, resolution, and
   feeling. Place the words on index cards. Make a set of cards for each
   group of students.
2. Give each team a set and ask them to construct a 3-minute skit based on
   the vocabulary. As they plan, circulate to provide information and
   clarification as needed.
3. Share the skits. Compare and contrast across student skits to look for
   similarities and differences.
4. Read the selection to compare the author’s choices with student’s
   choices.
5. After reading, refine vocabulary. Go back to the selection to clarify
   meaning or use reference works.
6. Use the words in further oral or written work.

Knowledge Rating
1. From the selection, choose a list of vocabulary words that cluster in some
   way. Place the list on the chalkboard or overhead projector.
2. Ask students to copy the list an to rate their knowledge of the words as:
      1 ~ Don’t know anything
      2 ~ I’ve heard or seen this word but I’m not sure what it means.
      3 ~ I know this word well enough to use it or define it.
Students may share their knowledge as they work.
3. Use the ratings for group discussion. Lead students to make appropriate
   predictions ( e.g. ~ who what, where, what the author will include).
4. Read the selection, watching for the vocabulary.
5. After reading, have students rerate themselves. Then refine vocabulary.
   Go back to the selection to clarify words or use reference books.
6. Use the words in further oral or written work. Students may use
   knowledge rating as an organizer for studying.

Peer Teaching of Self-Selected Words
1. Each student selects one word from a book to teach other students.
2. Each student prepares for the discussion group by writing on three index
   cards the word and the sentence in which the word appears. The student
   confirms the word’s meaning by consulting a dictionary.
3. Students meet in groups of three. Each student reads his or her chosen
   word in the sentence context from the card.
4. The other students discuss possible meanings of the word.
5. A meaning is decided on in consultation with the person who brought the
   word to the group.
6. All the students write the meaning on the index cards under the sentence
   in which the word appears.
7. The index cards become part of each student’s word box.

Dramatizing Idioms
1. Have students in groups identify idioms in recent stories that they have
   read.
2. Students select an idiom that they think might be easy to act out, for
   example, “Don’t pull my leg.”
3. Students write a short episode or skit in which the literal meaning of the
   idiom occurs. For example, a person selling shoes might pull someone’s
   leg when trying to get off a tight –fitting shoe.
4. Other students in the class try to guess what idiom is being acted out by
   the group.

Illustrating the Word for the Day
1. The teacher selects one word from previous vocabulary instruction that
    has multiple meanings.
2. Students are asked to bring pictures or items that show one particular
    meaning of the word.
3. On “the day,” students share what they have brought and describe the
    meaning that it shows.
4. Pictures or items are displayed around a poster of the word and the
    various definitions.

Developing a Semantic Map
1. The teacher selects a keyword and target words.
2. The keyword is written at the center of the map; the target words are
   listed at the side.
3. Students generate words related to the keyword and target words.
4. Relationships between the keyword, target words, and student words are
   discussed.
5. The map is constructed (or copies of an incomplete map are handed out
   for completion).
6. The students ad to the map or maps as they read or work on the topic.
Piquing Students’ Interest
1. Students form groups of four or five members and choose a secretary to
   record their discoveries.
2. Each student has the same copy of a page of a dictionary.
3. Students are asked to focus on the entry for only one word that piques
   their interest.
4. The teacher tells the number of pieces of information she found about the
   word. (example: how to pronounce it, several definitions, and the
   etymology).
5. Students list all the information that the entry gives them about the word
   and anything they notice about the order of the information. They have
   10 minutes.
6. Students share the information they found and compare it with that found
   by the teacher.

Making a Class Dictionary
1. Divide the class into homogeneous groups. Each group will be
   responsible for adding one word to the dictionary one day of the week (or
   whatever time period is feasible).
2. The group meets briefly to decide on a word each day that should be
   selected from classroom instruction. As far as possible, it is important
   that every student should have heard the word.
3. The group writes a definition and a pronunciation. They compare their
   definition and pronunciation with those in a dictionary and add the
   derivation if appropriate. Their entry is written on a card and copied on
   an overhead transparency.
4. The group presents the word and the entry to the class. The card is
   entered into the class dictionary.
5. After three or four weeks, individual students add words to the dictionary
   under the teacher’s direction. Each student is responsible for one word a
   week (presentation to the whole class is omitted).
6. The dictionary is available to the class for reference purposes.


Constructing a Synonym Web
1. Students brainstorm various synonyms and use a thesaurus to identify
   others.
2. The teacher then works with the students to determine which of the
   words “go together.” This requires the students to categorize the words in
   some way and to demonstrate an understanding of how the meanings are
   related.
3. The words are connected on a web to show their relationship.
4. The students copy the web into their vocabulary notebook.

Constructing an Alphabet-Antonyms Table
1. The teacher selects words beginning with the same letter.
2. She prepares a two-column table, with the antonyms of the target words
   listed in the first column.
3. Students complete the table, in groups or individually, knowing only that
   the words in the second column begin with the same letter.
4. After a 5-minute period, students may use a thesaurus, a synonym
   dictionary, or other resource.
5. Students share their tables and display a completed table for reference.

Teaching Prefixes
1. Present the prefix in isolation and also attached to four words (for
   example, con-, construct, converge, conference, connect).
2. Define the prefix. For example, con- means “to put together.”
3. Use the whole words in sentences.
      For example:
    Builders construct houses.
    The train and the bus converged at incredible speeds.
    The conference on dieting attracted 2,000 people.
    He connected the TV to the VCR with a cable.
4. Define the whole words.
      For example:
    To construct means to put or fit together.
    To converge means to come together at a point.
    A conference is a kind of meeting, where people come together to talk
      formally about a topic.
    To connect things is to join them together.
5. After completing steps 1 through 4 for several prefixes, with these
   familiar words, have students practice matching different prefixes to their
   meanings, and root words to prefixes.
6. Have students identify the meanings of new words with familiar prefixes.

Creating Word Riddles
1. Pick a subject (ex: pig).
2. Generate a list of related words (ex: ham, pen, hog).
3. Pick a word (ex: ham), drop the first letter(s) to get a shortened version
   (ex: am), and find a list of words that begin the way the shortened version
   begins (ex: ambulance, amnesia).
4. Put back the missing letter (h) (hambulance).
5. Make up a riddle for which this word is the answer. (What do you use to
   take a pig to the hospital? A hambulance!)

				
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