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PowerPoint - Corporation for Supportive Housing

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					      Supportive
Housing Institute:
           Day 1
 Corporation for Supportive Housing
                    October 3, 2006
                      www.csh.org
    Welcome to the Institute!

       Welcome
        – Sue Augustus, CSH-IL
        – Steve Gladden, IHDA
       Overview of the Day
       Logistics



2
  Getting to
Know You…
Introductions


       CSH Staff
       Table Introductions
       Team Introductions
        – Name
        – Organization
        – Role on the Team
        – Something you are proud of about your
          work
4
Institute Overview
   and Objectives
    Institute Overview and Objectives


       Structure and Calendar
       Materials (binder)
       Learning Objectives
       Deliverables
       Expectations
       Your Expectations and Needs


6
Structure and Calendar


       Goal: Develop a permanent supportive
        housing project with your team
       11 training days
        – Oct/Nov – Springfield, IL
        – Jan/Feb/March – Bloomington, IL
       Site Visits and Clinic Opportunities
       Conference Calls

7
Materials


       Institute Binder
        – Contains training materials organized by
          day
       Team Portfolio
        – Organizes the project work for the Institute
       CSH Publications
        – Not a Solo Act


8
Objectives and Deliverables


       Learning Objectives
        – Daily objectives outlined on agenda

       Deliverables
        – Expect 16 products will be worked on
          during the course of our 6 months together



9
Expectations


        What are you looking forward to?
        What challenges do you anticipate in
         meeting the objectives of the Institute?
        What expectations do you have of the
         Institute?




10
Defining the
 Population
Defining the Population - Overview


        This section lets us think about:
         – What is the current need for persons who are
           homeless in Illinois?
         – What is supportive housing and how does this
           match the stated need?
         – What are some unique needs of different
           subpopulations?
         – Why should we think about supportive housing?
         – What are the outcomes of supportive housing?


12
Homelessness in Illinois


        IL Continuums report 11,680 homeless
         households in IL at a given point in time.
          – Of these households, 1 in 3 are unsheltered
        Less than ½ of the persons homeless are from
         Chicago and Cook County (46%)
        Continuums estimate that of the homeless
         population, 28.5% are chronically homeless, as
         defined by HUD
        Source: 2006 HUD Exhibit 1 Summary




13
Continuums of Care


        Continuums plan for homeless services and housing and
         allocate federal dollars under the McKinney-Vento Act
         – Bring together diverse stakeholders to discuss homeless
           housing and services
         – Plan and monitor needs and inventory of housing
         – Conduct annual point-in-time surveys
         – Set priorities for HUD dollars and submit annual application
         – Monitor program outcomes and data systems
        21 Continuums in the state of Illinois
         – Map of Continuums and Summary of 2006 federal
           applications provided in binder

14
Housing Inventory


        There are currently 22,282 beds for
         homeless persons.
         – 37% PSH
        Five CoCs report no PSH for families
        75% of the total homeless beds in the
         State are in the Chicago-metro area



15
Unmet Need


        Continuums estimate an unmet need of
         5,671 permanent supportive housing units
        Estimates show that almost 10,000 new
         supportive housing units are needed to
         meet the current demand




16
     What Is Supportive Housing?



     A cost-effective combination of
     permanent, affordable housing with
     services that helps people live more
     stable, productive lives.



17
Housing & Services
              HOUSING
               – PERMANENT: Not time limited, not
                 transitional;
               – AFFORDABLE: For people coming out of
                 homelessness; and
               – INDEPENDENT: Tenant holds lease with
                 normal rights and responsibilities.
              SERVICES
               – FLEXIBLE: Designed to be responsive to
                 tenants’ needs;
               – VOLUNTARY: Participation is not a
                 condition of tenancy; and
               – INDEPENDENT: Focus of services is on
                 maintaining housing stability.


18
Supportive Housing is for People Who:


         Are chronically homeless
         Cycle through institutional and emergency
          systems and are at risk of long-term
          homelessness
         Are being discharged from institutions and
          systems of care
         Without housing, cannot access and make
          effective use of treatment and supportive
          services


 19
     Services Make the Difference


         Flexible, voluntary
         Counseling
         Health and mental health services
         Alcohol and substance use services
         Independent living skills
         Money management / rep payee
         Community-building activities
         Vocational counseling and job placement


20
     Supportive Housing Types

         Buildings developed /
          rehabilitated
         Rent-subsidized apartments
         Mixed-income buildings
         Long-term set asides
         Single-family homes
         Master-leased buildings or
          units

21
Supportive Housing Leverages Results



                              Reduces Stress on
                              Emergency Systems
           Houses People
                           Tool for Economic
     Supportive
                           Development
     Housing
                  Revitalizes
                  Communities
                              Leverages Other
                                 Resources


22
Subpopulations


        Point in time survey results in IL show that of
         persons who are homeless:
          –    32.9% are unsheltered
          –    24.5% report severe mental illness
          –    33.8% report chronic substance abuse
          –    9.5% are veterans
          –    4.2% are living with HIV/AIDS
          –    22.6% are victims of domestic violence
          –    5.3$ are unaccompanied youth under 18
        Source: 2006 CoC Exhibit 1




23
Unique Needs


        What are some of the unique needs of
         subpopulations?
         –   Ex-offenders
         –   Severely mentally ill
         –   Chronic Substance Users
         –   Persons living with HIV/AIDS
         –   Veterans
         –   Victims of Domestic Violence
         –   Youth

24
Consistent Findings

Housing + Services Make a Difference

        More than 80% of supportive housing tenants are able to
         maintain housing for at least 12 months
        Most supportive housing tenants engage in services, even
         when participation is not a condition of tenancy
        Use of the most costly (and restrictive) services in
         homeless, health care, and criminal justice systems
         declines
        Nearly any combination of housing + services is more
         effective than services alone
        “Housing First” models with adequate support services
         can be effective for people who don’t meet conventional
         criteria for “housing readiness”

25
     Supportive Housing: It Works

     summary of key findings from a range
     of studies
       ER visits down 57%
       Emergency detox services down 85%
       Incarceration rate down 50%
       50% increase in earned income
       40% rise in rate of employment when employment
        services are provided
       More than 80% stay housed for at least one year



26
Thinking about Target Populations


        What is the need in your area?
        What is your proposed target population?
        How does your proposal meet the need?
        What data supports the need for
         supportive housing in your community?




27
     Defining Your Population

        With your team record the following:
         – Concerns
         – Expectations
         – Challenges
         – Strengths
         – Questions




28
Where do I find out more?


        See reference page in Institute binder
         –   State/County/City
         –   Consolidated Plans
         –   State Housing Plan
         –   Local Continuum of Care
         –   Local Community Action Agencies
         –   National statistics
         –   Ryan White Planning Council
         –   Affordable housing/poverty statistics

29
LUNCH!
The Development
     Process: An
        Overview
Five Elements of Successful
Supportive Housing Projects


                People

                Place

                Support Services

                Money

                Organization


32
Supportive Housing:
Making the Pieces Fit

                   
                   People


     
     Services
                   
                 Organization
                                
                                Place




33
                  Money
The Development Process
Can be Confusing
                                                              Market
                                                            Information
                          Site Information
      Financial                                                             Regulatory
     Constraints                                                            Constraints

                                                        Financial
                               Site                     Analysis
                               Plan

                                                                          Construction
                                                                             Cost
              Other Decision                            Preliminary
                 Factors                                  Design




      Permanent                                Go                         Construction
       Financing                             Decision                      Financing



                   Equity
                   Sources
                                             Working
                                             Drawings
34
     The Development Process



     No standard model or terminology
     Tasks are interdependent
     Tasks are iterative
     Timing is critical
     Multiple players



35
Project Drivers

      Mission mandate
      Community/constituency needs
      An available site
      Available funds




36
Typical Sources of Federal
Financing


     Capital        Operating      Services

     HUD McKinney   HUD McKinney   HUD McKinney

     LIHTC          LIHTC          Ryan White

     HOPWA          HOPWA          HOPWA

     HOME           Section 8

     Section 811    Section 811

37
     Five-Phase Development Timeline
                    ONE: Concept
                         Go?



                    TWO: Feasibility
                        No Go?Go?
                         Go?




                    THREE: Dealmaking    POINT OF NO
                                          RETURN!
                        No Go?
                         Go?




                    FOUR: Construction


38
                    FIVE: Operations
Phase I – Concept Phase
Threshold
         Project concept clearly defined
         • Population to be served
         • Scattered-site vs. project-based
         • What types of services will be needed
         • On-site services vs. off-site services
         • Where is it best located?

         Financing sources identified
          Capital, operating, and services

        Assessment of organizational capacity

        Core development team identified
39
Phase II – Feasibility Phase
Thresholds
         Site is selected based on size, location, cost, and
          environmental conditions.
         Analysis of regulatory restraints (zoning, etc.)
         Schematic design – space allocations consistent
          with income projections.
         Cost estimates
         Detailed development and operating budgets
         Solidify market data
         Identified financing sources and constraints
         Finalize development team


 40
Phase III –Dealmaking Phase
Thresholds

         Negotiate financial commitments
         Develop contract documents
         Bidding, contractor selection and construction
          management procedures
         Preliminary management plan
         Preliminary service delivery plan




 41
Phase IV - Construction

        The most expensive and riskiest part of the process.
        Limited control and the least involvement day to day.
        Mitigate risk by:
          Insisting on detailed contract documents
          Establishing clear owner, architect, and contractor
             roles
          Establishing construction period protocol.
          Hiring an owner’s representative / construction
             manager who is a licensed contractor or architect




42
Who’s On the
Development
      Team?
Who’s On the Team?




            Development Team – a group of
       professional consultants, service vendors,
            and other nonprofit organizations
          that collectively bring all of the skills,
     expertise, knowledge, and experience to bear
           on the development and operation
                        of a project.




44
Who’s On the Team?

 LONG-TERM INTERESTS                 SHORT-TERM INTERESTS

     Owner                           Developer
     Property manager                Development consultant
     Service provider                Architect/engineer(s)
     Neighbors                       Attorney(s)
     Building residents              Contractor
     Funders/lenders                 Surveyor
     Licensing/regulatory agencies   Environmental investigator
                                     Marketing consultant
                                     Community relations specialist




45
Selecting Key Partners

      Owner: the buck stops here
        long-term control and legal responsibility
      Developer: from idea to occupancy
        very different from management and
          services
      Property manager: real estate operations
        lynchpin of financial and physical viability
      Service provider
        the “support” in supportive housing
46
Selecting Consultants

        Experience
           Similar projects
           Same funding sources
           Integrating services with housing
        Track record
           Time/cost/communication
        Style/approach
           Knowledge transfer
        Funder Requirements
47
Great Idea, But Will
           it Work?
Physical Feasibility

        Site identification and selection
        Community relations
        Site control
        Architectural design




49
Financing Budgets

        Development Budgets
          “Schedule of Sources and Uses of Funds”
          Capital Financing / Development Sources
        Operating Budget
          “Schedule of Income and Expenses”
          Operating Subsidy / Operating Sources
        Supportive Services Budget


50
Development Sources

      Those sources that may be used to fund the
       capital costs associated with acquiring,
       creating and/or rehabilitating housing units.

      Fall into two broad categories - Hard Costs
       and Soft Costs.




51
Development Sources

        Hard costs include land acquisition,
         construction and rehabilitation work, offsite
         improvements (such as sewers, utilities, etc.),
         and other costs.

        Soft costs include architectural services,
         appraisals, engineering, legal costs, fees and
         permits, rent-up costs, and other costs.



52
Development Sources

      Development funding is generally offered in
       the form of either:
         A grant
         A deferred loan (which operates as a grant
           for a specified period of time)
         A low-interest loan
         A Low-Income Housing Tax Credit Award
           providing investment equity



53
Financing and Development
Phases
         Acquisition and Predevelopment Financing

         Construction or Rehabilitation Financing

         Permanent Financing




 54
Operating Sources

  May be used to pay for the costs of operating
   and maintaining the housing, including all
   costs of maintaining the project once it is ready
   for occupancy:
     Utilities
     Maintenance Services
     Insurance
     Security
     Debt Service or other Loan Payments
     Operating and Replacement Reserves

55
Operating Sources

 Such funding streams are known as
  operating subsidies, rent subsidies, or
  rental assistance.

 Generally take three forms: Project-based,
  Tenant-based, or Sponsor-based.




56
Services Sources

        Independent of the real estate funding and
         budgets
        Common approaches:
          Contracts with funders for services to a set of
            eligible clients.
          Reimbursement agreement for certain services to
            eligible clients.
          Fixed fee for maintaining the health of individual
            clients.
          Grants that help cover service expenses.



57
Exercise:
The Development Process

  Divide teams into four groups
  Each group organizes the steps in the
   development process in chronological
   order




58
Project Vision
 Development
     Project Vision

        Using what you’ve heard today, articulate the
         vision for your project
        Project Vision Worksheet
         – Report out to group




60
Memorandum of
Understandings
MOUs


        Goals of CSH and Team MOUs
        CSH technical assistance
        Organizational assessment
        Deadlines and Q&A




62
Project Work and
         Wrap-up
     Day 1: Project Work

        Project Vision
        CSH Memorandum of Understanding




64
     Day 1: Wrap-Up and Evaluation

        Session Feedback
         – What was most useful to you today?
         – What would you suggest we change?


        Written Evaluations



65

				
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