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Egr

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									                          Proof for the 2011-2012 Duke University Bulletin of Undergraduate Instruction, p. 1
                                              RETURN PROOF TO rob.hirtz@duke.edu
                    ________________________________________________________________________________

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Pratt School of Engineering
Professor Katsouleas, Dean; Senior Associate Dean for Education Glass; Associate Deans Absher, Franzoni, and
Simmons
     •   For courses in Engineering (Interdepartmental), see En.
     •   For courses in Biomedical Engineering, see Error! Reference source not found.page 213.
     •   For courses in Civil and Environmental Engineering, see Error! Reference source not found.page 732.
     •   For courses in Electrical and Computer Engineering, see Error! Reference source not found.page 743.
     •   For courses in Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, see Error! Reference source not
         found.page 756.
Engineering (Interdepartmental) (EGR)
10. Introduction to Engineering. This course is designed to introduce students to the study and practice of
engineering. Presentations will be made by representatives of all four engineering departments as well as outside
practitioners, researchers, and industrial leaders. Selected group design and/or laboratory modules will be required
of all participants. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. Staff: Instructor. Half course.
20L. Engineering Innovation. Introduces freshmen to the process of team-based creative conceptualization,
visualization prototyping, and product realization. Students use computer-aided design tools to create custom circuit
boards and computer numerically controlled (CNC) machined components to produce prototype systems. Design
concepts are introduced and supported through hands-on assignments. Instructor: Twiss and Simmons. One course.
25L. Introduction to Structural Engineering. An introduction to engineering and the engineering method through
a wide variety of historical and modern case studies, ranging from unique structures like bridges to mass produced
objects like pencils. Instructor: Petroski. One course.
31FCS. Engineering The Planet. This seminar examines the environmental impacts of large infrastructure from
dam construction, to large-scale farming and irrigation, clear-cutting of natural forests, and extensive urbanization of
land-margin ecosystems. Focus on the social and engineering make-up of global environmental change and water
resources. Introduction to the science and technology of environmental adaptation and sustainability. Students will
organize in small research groups working on trans-disciplinary case-studies. Instructor: Barros. One course.
32FCS. Mapping Engineering into Biology. NS, R, STS Students will be introduced to the new and exciting ways
in which we can start to bring engineering and biology together. The course asks fundamental questions such as
"How did Nature solve problem X?" and "What are the problems that Nature has?" and explore how to forward
engineer new products and processes inspired by Nature's own solutions. The seminar will give students a
foundation to achieve technological innovation through effective channeling of creativity and scientific principles.
The class divides in teams and ranges of expertise and interest in biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, and
engineering are encouraged to join in. Instructor consent required. Instructors: Needham and Bonaventura. One
course.
49S. First-Year Seminar. Topics vary each semester offered. Instructor: Staff. One course.
                        Proof for the 2011-2012 Duke University Bulletin of Undergraduate Instruction, p. 2
                                            RETURN PROOF TO rob.hirtz@duke.edu
                  ________________________________________________________________________________

53L. Computational Methods in Engineering. QS Introduction to computer methods and algorithms for analysis
and solution of engineering problems using numerical methods in a workstation environment. Topics include;
numerical integration, roots of equations, simultaneous equation solving, finite difference methods, matrix analysis,
linear programming, dynamic programming, and heuristic solutions used in engineering practice. This course does
not require any prior knowledge of computer programming. Instructor: Gustafson. One course.
54L. Simulations in JAVA. Development of interactive computer simulations in JAVA using Reality.java, a library
that includes graphical objects such as spaceships, planets, and standardized functions for Newtonian mechanics.
Introduction to object-oriented programming, linked and inherited structures, and aspects of computational
mathematics such as stability and computational error, orbital mechanics, collision detection, strategy, etc.
Prerequisite: Engineering 53L or Computer Science 6 or Computer Science 100E. Instructor: Staff. One course.
60. Science and Policy of Natural Catastrophes. NS, SS, STS In this interdisciplinary course students will
conduct a life cycle analysis of a natural disaster. Invited experts will discuss meteorologic, hydrologic and geologic
factors that cause disasters; explore how societies plan for and/or respond to the immediate and long-term physical,
social, emotional and spiritual issues associated with survival; and present case studies of response, recovery and
reconstruction efforts. Students will attend the lecture component of the course and complete on-line quizzes to
demonstrate understanding of the material presented. Additionally, they will prepare on individual paper (~ 10
pages) on a relevant topic and one group paper, the results of which will be presented to the class. Instructor:
Schaad. One course. C-L: Public Policy Studies 107, Environment 161
61. Natural Catastrophes: Rebuilding from Ruins. NS, SS, STS Research Service Learning Gateway course
where students will conduct a life cycle analysis of natural disasters. Invited experts will discuss meteorologic,
hydrologic and geologic factors that cause disasters; explore how societies plan and/or respond to the immediate and
long-term physical, social, emotional and spiritual issues associated with survival; and present case studies of
response, recovery and reconstruction efforts. Students will attend the lecture component of the course and complete
on-line quizzes to demonstrate understanding of the material presented. For the service learning experience, students
will carry out response activities over Spring Break in an area ravaged by a natural disaster. They will keep a journal
(audio and written) of their activities, write a brief synopsis (4-5 pages), and make a group oral presentation of their
findings following their return. They will also submit a hypothetical research proposal for a project which might
stem from the course and their experiences. Instructor: Schaad. One course. C-L: Public Policy Studies 109,
Environment 162
75L. Mechanics of Solids. Analysis of force systems and their equilibria as applied to engineering systems. Stresses
and strains in deformable bodies; mechanical behavior of materials; applications of principles to static problems of
beams, torsion members, and columns. Selected laboratory work. Prerequisites: Mathematics 32 and Physics 61L.
Instructor: Albertson, Dolbow, Gavin, Hueckel, Laursen, Nadeau, or Virgin. One course.
75LA. Mechanics of Solids (1/2). Summer Session I ONLY. First half of a single course in solid mechanics that
spans both summer sessions. Students must enroll in both EGR 75LA and EGR 75LB. (See course description for
EGR 75L). Prerequisites: Mathematics 32 and Physics 61L. Instructor: Albertson, Dolbow, Gavin, Hueckel,
Nadeau, or Virgin. Half course.
75LB. Mechanics of Solids (2/2). Summer Session II ONLY. Secon half of a single course in solid mechanics that
spans both summer sessions. Students must enroll in both EGR 75LA and EGR 75LB. (See course description for
EGR 75L). Prerequisites: EGR 75LA, Mathematics 32, and Physics 61L. Instructor: Albertson, Dolbow, Gavin,
Hueckel, Nadeau, or Virgin. Half course.
95FCS. First Year seminar for Focus students only. NS, SS, STS Topics vary each semester offered. Focus
students only. Instructor: staff. One course.
107. Mapping Engineering onto Biology. Introduction to concepts and implementation of Mapping Engineering
onto Biology. Explores both a new learning paradigm as well as methodologies for reverse engineering biological
systems. Uses a Bow-Tie Hierarchy of scale applying traditional design methodology in order to reverse engineer
healthy functioning systems that represent Problems Nature Solved (Engineering Biology) and Problems Nature Has
(i.e. we have in disease) (Engineering Pathology). Third (inventive) phase is to forward engineer new approaches to
medicine or new technologies. Students in design teams of four, carry out course assignment that asks a different
and interesting to the student, problem nature solved? Out-of-class open counseling with instructors and expert
faculty across campus. Instructor: Needham. One course.
108S. Ethics in Professions: Scientific, Personal and Organizational Frameworks. EI, STS Ethics studied
through the analysis and interpretation of case studies from the scientific and engineering professions. Topics
include: moral development; concepts of truth and fairness; responsible conduct of research; the person and virtues;
                         Proof for the 2011-2012 Duke University Bulletin of Undergraduate Instruction, p. 3
                                             RETURN PROOF TO rob.hirtz@duke.edu
                   ________________________________________________________________________________

confidentiality; risk and safety; social responsibility; etiology and consequences of fraud and malpractice; legal
aspects of professionalism, and allocation of resources. The capstone course for students completing the certificate
in the Program in Science, Technology, and Human Values. Instructor: Vallero. One course. C-L: Ethics, Global
Health, Markets and Management Studies, Marine Science and Conservation
115. Engineering Systems Optimization and Economics. SS Introduction to mathematical optimization,
engineering economic analysis, and other decision analysis tools used to evaluate and design engineering systems.
Application of linear and nonlinear programming, dynamic programming, expert systems, simulation and heuristic
methods to engineering systems design problems. Applications discussed include: production plant scheduling,
water resources planning, design and analysis, vehicle routing, resource allocation, repair and rehabilitation
scheduling and economic analysis of engineering design alternatives. Corequisite: Mathematics 107. Instructor:
Peirce. One course. C-L: Economics 112, Modeling Biological Systems
119L. Electrical Fundamentals of Mechatronics. Introduction to mechatronics with a special emphasis on
electrical components, sensing, and information processing. Topics include circuit analysis and design, system
response characterization, conversion between digital and analog signals, data acquisition, sensors, and motors.
Laboratory projects focus on analysis, characterization, and design of electrical and mechatronic systems.
Prerequisites: EGR 53L, EGR 75L, MATH 103, and PHYSICS 62L, or equivalents, or permission of instructor:
Instructor: Gustafson. One course.
123L. Dynamics. Principles of dynamics of particles, rigid bodies, and selected nonrigid systems with emphasis on
engineering applications. Kinematic and kinetic analysis of structural and machine elements in a plane and in space
using graphical, computer, and analytical vector techniques. Absolute and relative motion analysis. Work-energy;
impact and impulse-momentum. Laboratory experiments. Prerequisites: Engineering 75L and Mathematics 103 or
consent of instructor. Instructor: Dowell, Hall, Knight, or Virgin. One course.
150. Engineering Communication. Principles of written and verbal technical communication; graphs, tables, charts
and figures. Multimedia content generation and presentation. Individual and group written and verbal presentations.
Prerequisite: Engineering 53L and Writing 20 or equivalent. Instructor: Kabala or Laursen. Half course.
153. Numerical Computing for Engineers. Numerical computing with applications for engineering in a C/C++
language environment. Computer programs will be developed to implement numerical algorithms and solve
engineering problems. Course topics include: solution of simultaneous sets of equations, eigenvalues, singular value
decomposition, root-finding in non-linear equations, solution of ordinary differential equations, optimization, and
spectral analysis. Prerequisites: Math 107 and either Engineering 53, Computer Science 6, Computer Science 100 or
equivalent. Instructor: Staff. One course. C-L: Modeling Biological Systems
165. Special Topics in Engineering. Study arranged on special engineering topics in which the faculty have
particular interest and competence as a result of research or professional activities. Consent of instructor(s) required.
Quarter course, half course, or one course. Instructor: Staff. Variable credit.
171. Total Quality Systems. An interdisciplinary approach to principles and practice in the applications of total
quality concepts to engineering operations and business managements; practice in using tools of statistical process
control; practice in using quality tools of management and operations; principles of continuous quality
improvement; definitions and applications of Total Quality Management (TQM); case studies; personal
effectiveness habits and social styles; assignments and projects in team building using tools learned, communication;
group problem solving; practice in professional verbal and written technical communications. Prerequisite: junior or
senior standing. Instructor: Staff. One course.
175. Aesthetics, Design, and Culture. An examination of the role of aesthetics, both as a goal and as a tool, in a
culture which is increasingly dependent on technology. Visual thinking, perceptual awareness, experiential learning,
conceptual modeling, and design will be explored in terms of changes in sensory environment. Design problems will
be formulated and analyzed through individual and group design projects. Instructor: Staff. One course. C-L: Visual
and Media Studies 114A
176S. Global Climate Change. One course.
183. Projects in Engineering. Courses in which engineering projects of an interdisciplinary nature are undertaken.
The projects must have engineering relevance in the sense of undertaking to meet human need through a disciplined
approach under the guidance of a member of the engineering faculty. Consent of instructor required. Instructor:
Staff. One course.
184. Projects in Engineering. Courses in which engineering projects of an interdisciplinary nature are undertaken.
The projects must have engineering relevance in the sense of undertaking to meet human need through a disciplined
                        Proof for the 2011-2012 Duke University Bulletin of Undergraduate Instruction, p. 4
                                            RETURN PROOF TO rob.hirtz@duke.edu
                  ________________________________________________________________________________

approach under the guidance of a member of the engineering faculty. Consent of instructor required. Instructor:
Staff. One course.
185. Smart Home Technology Development. Engineering projects related to the Duke Smart Home Program are
undertaken. Projects should be interdisciplinary in nature and have engineering relevance in the sense of undertaking
to meet human need through a disciplined approach under the guidance or a member of the engineering faculty.
Consent of instructor is required. Instructor: staff. 1/2 credit pass/fail course. Half course.
190L. Energy and Environment Design. An integrative design course addressing both creative and practical
aspects of the design of systems related to energy and the environment. Development of the creative design process,
including problem formulation and needs analysis, feasibility, legal, economic and human factors, environmental
impacts, energy efficiency, aesthetics, safety, and design optimization. Application of design methods through a
collaborative design project involving students from the Pratt School of Engineering and Trinity College. Open only
to students pursuing the undergraduate certificate in Energy and Environment. Prerequisites: CE 24L, ENV 130 and
ME 121. One course. One course.

								
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