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Study Abroad Course Catalogue - Edge Hill University

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					STUDY ABROAD COURSE CATALOGUE

Course Catalogue 2011/2012


Please note that there may be changes and substitutions to courses may need to be made. Modules may be cancelled
due to staff absence or unavoidable unforeseen circumstances

For module syllabi, or any other course information, please contact Louise.Davies@edgehill.ac.uk
Modules may be cancelled
                                                                                                                       SEMESTER                     CREDITS
                                                                                                                        MODULE                   AVAILABLE PER
MODULE CODE   MODULE TITLE          MODULE DESCRIPTION                                                                   RUNS     TOTAL CREDIT     SEMESTER

                                  is an area of study that recognises that resources are scarce and that choices
                                 must be made between alternative uses. It provides an understanding of those
BUS1000       BUSINESS ECONOMICS external factors which might influence an organisation's financial situation.            S1          20              20
                                 introduces you to the basics of English law allowing you to develop an
                                 understanding of the general legal framework within which an organisation
                                 operates. The module will also enable you to develop awareness and an
                                 understanding of common law, statute law and European law in relation to legal
BUS1001       LAW FOR BUSINESS   areas of importance to organisations.                                                    S2          20              20
                                 This module focuses on the development and interpretation of financial and
                                 statistics information to be used in the context of personal skills development and
BUS1002       ACCOUNTING         an understanding of business.                                                            S2          20              20
                                 covers three major themes. The first provides you with an understanding of the
                                 major developments in modern management. The second theme considers moves
                                 away from rational models where organisations became increasingly interested in
                                 developing strong corporate cultures, improving flexibility and devising HRM-type
              WORK MANAGEMENT people management strategies. Contemporary issues are discussed in theme
              & ORGANISATIONAL three where the emphasis is upon managing identities and the impact of
BUS1004       BEHAVIOUR          globalisation.                                                                           S2          20              20
                                 The competitive global market and the changing technological nature of society
                                 heavily influence the practice of business. Adaptation to and obtaining strategic
                                 value from information and the use of communication technology will determine
                                 the success of organisations. This module will evaluate how the technology has
                                 evolved and its place for use for delivery of information & communication today
                                 and in the future. It will also address the ways in which business is changing the
                                 way it is operationalised. A review of its use for strategic management will be
                                 undertaken to identify how organisations creating value through investment in IT,
                                 in particular with regard to the management and storage of business information.
                                 Competitive strategy literature will also be introduced to illustrate where
                                 significant value and benefits can be achieved for both the organisation and the
                                 customer through the effective use of ICT and business information systems.
                                 Consideration will also be given to how technological developments increase the
              INFORMATION        complexity of the cultural, social and ethical dimensions of business information
BUS1005       SYSTEMS            and communications.                                                                      S2          20              20
                           Designed for Business Minor students, this module provides an introduction to
          THE BUSINESS     business, including a consideration of organisational structures and models of
BUS1006   ENVIRONMENT      business analysis.                                                                     S2   10   10
                           This module is designed to provide an introduction to the central principles of
          PRINCIPLES OF    marketing thinking and practice. A range of foundational marketing concepts and
BUS1007   MARKETING        models will be examined.                                                               S1   20   20
                           The rapid advances of new technology and its applications demands that students
                           and practioners of digital and interactive marketing keep up to date with its new
                           developments - This discipline has undergone a major transformation in a matter
                           of years. With SMS marketing moving in to the mainstream and its multi-media
                           counterpart MMS, radio frequency identification (RFID) tagging and other new
                           applications, this module sets out to identify the needs of a new age in electronic
          DIGITAL AND      marketing.
          INTERACTIVE
BUS1008   MARKETING                                                                                               S2   20   20


                           Brand Creation. Branding is a central concept in marketing. It is fundamental to
                           the success of many products and organisations as it signals a product’s
                           positioning strategy to the marketplace and enables companies to establish their
                           corporate reputation and that of their products. Through the creation of strong
                           brands and brand equity customer value is built. The purpose of this module is to
                           define branding and introduce you to the concept of branding, both product and
                           organisational. The range of marketing tools and activities required in the creation
                           of brands will be considered and key branding models examined. You will have the
                           opportunity to apply the knowledge gained in a practical context.
BUS1009   BRAND CREATION   ormation found                                                                         S2   20   20
                           The module provides an introduction to marketing and demonstrates its centrality
                           to organisational success. It provides a range of marketing of modules which can
                           be used in a variety of situations and allows opportunity for students to work
BUS2000   MARKETING        together in applying them.                                                             S1   20   20
                                This module is concerned with developments in Human Resource Management
                                since the early 1980s and current people management practice. In keeping with
                                the management discipline in general, there have been a number of significant
                                developments in the management of people over the last few decades not least
                                with the move away from Personnel Management to Human Resource
                                Management. In the UK we have moved some way toward a post-Fordist
                                (Alvesson and Willmott, 2002) or high modern (Giddens, 1991) era where
                                organisations are compelled to manage increasingly fragmented identities
                                (Sennett, 1998) and employee wellbeing, as well as adopting a more strategic
                                outlook. These changes have considerable implications for the HR function in
          HUMAN RESOURCE        organisations. We consider the reasons why such developments have taken place
BUS2001   MANAGEMENT            and analyse their influence upon the people management function.                      S1   20   20
                                The module is offered to students undertaking the management minor route. It
                                will provide an opportunity to study a range of functional business disciplines and
          FUNCTIONS OF          to develop an ability to integrate an understanding of them in considering
BUS2002   BUSINESS              business problems.                                                                    S2   30   30

                           Research Methods and philosophies are crucial to personal, academic and
                           vocational development. Research methods are utilised at all levels of the degree
                           programme and employers are increasingly looking for graduates who have
                           specific skills, including those significantly developed through learning about
                           methods of research. Such methods are required to undertake specific academic
                           projects, to enhance knowledge and understanding and also, in a vocational
BUS2003   RESEARCH METHODS context, to address specific business issues and practical managerial problems             S2   20   20
                                Graduate Enterprise. Work related learning is recognised as a key element in the
                                provision of management programmes at undergraduate level. This module
                                enables you to contextualise and evaluate theoretical perspectives in a practical
                                setting. Furthermore, as careers in self-employment and small and medium sized
                                enterprises become serious graduate destinations, it is clear that higher education
                                has a role to play in developing the appropriate skills in order that you can
                                capitalise on these opportunities. The module aims to develop and enhance a
          GRADUATE              range of general transferable intellectual and study skills, which are highly
BUS2005   ENTERPRISE            appropriate to a career in business, management and accountancy.                      S2   20   20
                               One of the few certainties in life is that change occurs. This module will introduce
          CULTURE AND          students to some of the key changes occurring in society and business and identify
BUS2007   CHANGE               ways in which organisations can structure their responses.                             S1   20   20


                               There have been many changes in the nature of people management in the UK
                               and elsewhere in response to significant economic, political, technological and
                               social developments. Organisations and, therefore, the ways in which they are
                               managed have been affected by, for example, globalisation and new technologies.
                               Economic changes such as the increasing service economy in the UK present
                               managers with new opportunities and challenges. In this module we evaluate the
BUS2008   MANAGING PEOPLE      consequences of these developments for the practice of people management.              S2   20   20

                               The retail sector is one of the most dynamic in the UK economy and this module
BUS2009   RETAIL MARKETING     provides an insight into the challenges faced by marketers within it.                  S2   20   20

                             This module examines the implementations of marketing concepts, theories and
BUS2010   SERVICES MARKETING practices to the increasingly competitive services environment.                          S1   20   20
                                focuses on the importance and relevance to all organisations of management
                               accounting theories and systems in making decisions. Management accounting
                               could be viewed as a main mechanism used by an organisation to control,
                               coordinate and communicate the direction and strategies of a firm. The module
                               develops your skills acquired in year 1 in using and interpreting management
          FINANCIAL            accounting techniques and solutions. There is more of a focus on the underlying
          MANAGEMENT AND       assumptions, potential flaws and issues with the methods, and the options that
BUS2011   CONTROL              may be available to the decision maker                                                 S1   20   20
                               builds on the basic techniques taught in year 1 and develops knowledge and
                               understanding of more advanced financial accounting, including consolidated
          FINANCIAL            reporting. You will be required to evaluate the use of these techniques and apply
BUS2012   REPORTING            them in a practical context.                                                           S1   20   20
                               An understanding of the ways in which business operates globally is important in
                               the 21st century. The pressures for environmental sustainability; the ideological
          INTERNATIONAL        differences between countries; and the issues of culture are all addressed in this
BUS2013   BUSINESS             module.                                                                                S2   20   20
                             The pressures on Business from a variety of stakeholders, places considerable
          GLOBAL CORPORATE   strains on managers. How to act ethically and balance these is an essential skill.
          SOCIAL             This module examines these pressures and considers ways in which companies
BUS2014   RESPONSIBILITY     can structure their response.                                                          S1       20   20
                             Customer Relationship Marketing includes all marketing activities that are
                             directed toward establishing, developing and maintaining successful customer
                             relationships. The focus of relationship marketing is on developing long-term
                             relationships and improving corporate performance through customer loyalty and
                             customer retention. From its origins in business-to-business marketing many in
          RELATIONSHIP       business-to-consumer markets (i.e. retailers) are now adopting relationship
          MARKETING          marketing approaches in their efforts to become more competitive and retain
BUS2015   MANAGEMENT         customers more effectively.                                                            S1       20   20
          SOCIAL AND         This module examines a wide range of contemporary issues in societal marketing
          SUSTAINABLE        including social marketing, ethics in marketing, and sustainable and ‘green’
BUS2016   MARKETING          marketing.                                                                             S1       20   20
                             Strategy and Decision Making provides an opportunity to consider how different
                             business functions relate together in informing the development of strategy.
          STRATEGY AND       Deciding strategic directions is about meeting choices and aspects of decision
BUS3000   DECISION MAKING    making are therefore included in the module.                                         S1 and 2   30   15

                             The module will be organised around three core themes. Theme one will outline
                             the development of the global economy throughout the 20th and 21st centuries. It
                             will concentrate on the importance of existing and new centres of production in
                             developed and developing economies in Western and Central/Eastern Europe, The
                             Americas and the Asian ‘Tiger economies’. It will be located in a theoretical
                             discussion centred on the convergence/divergence dualism. Theme two will look
                             at the role of the ‘stateless corporation’ and Management Development
                             programmes in the growth of the ‘Global Manager and assess the role of state-
                             centred regulatory frameworks. Theme three will identify the distinctiveness of,
          INTERNATIONAL      and similarities between, national and regional models of management and the
BUS3002   MANAGEMENT         specificity of their people management strategies.                                     S1       20   20
                              The module critically investigates how far human relationships are embedded in
                              the practice of Human Resource Management (HRM). It will investigate the
                              difference between the perceptions of the role of the HR professional as the
                              ‘employee champion’ to that of its strategic role in increasing organisational
                              performance. We will ask how far is the case that HR practice is placing an
                              increased emphasis on the link between people management and company
          ADVANCED HUMAN      performance. Using a range of theoretical and empirical source we will investigate
          RESOURCE            the ‘soft’ rhetoric of people as an organisation’s greatest assets and the reality
BUS3003   MANAGEMENT          that ‘people’ constitute only a part of organisations strategic thinking.             S2   20   20
                              The increase of globalisation on business means that an understanding of
          INTERNATIONAL       international influences becomes critical. This module develops understanding of
          STRATEGIC           marketing concepts by providing opportunities to apply them in international and
BUS3004   MARKETING           strategic contexts.                                                                   S2   20   20
                              Organisations need to communicate with a variety of stakeholders. This module
          MARKETING           provides an opportunity to identify these stakeholders and devise appropriate
BUS3005   COMMUNICATIONS      strategies to manage communication channels.                                          S1   20   20
                              An understanding of how and why consumers behave is an important aspect of
          CONSUMER            marketing. This module considers ways in which we can analyse and attempt to
BUS3006   BEHAVIOUR           forecast consumer behaviour.                                                          S1   20   20
                              Conventional accounting reports financial activity only. Increasingly, however,
          ACCOUNTING FOR      organisations are required to account for non-financial aspects of their activities
BUS3007   THE ENVIRONMENT     and this module considers one such area.                                              S1   20   20

                              Aims to build on the skills, knowledge and understanding from year one and two
                              to ensure that you will be able to exercise judgement and evaluation in corporate
          ADVANCED            reporting matters and can react to current developments or new practice. There
          CORPORATE           will be opportunities for you to produce complex company accounts complying
BUS3008   REPORTING           with the appropriate legislation and critically evaluate the process.                 S1   20   20
                              An understanding of the financial implications of decisions is vital for managers.
                              This module introduces some of the techniques used in financial decision-making
          FINANCE FOR         and provides an insight into the complex issues involved in the financial appraisal
BUS3009   MANAGERS            of long term projects.                                                                S1   20   20

                              The increasing trend towards globalisation represents a challenge to 21st century
                              organisations. This module provides theoretical insights into globalisation and
BUS3010   GLOBAL INFLUENCES   provides opportunities to use these to analyse current events.                        S1   20   20
          ETHICS IN           This module explores a range of the ethical issues surrounding the practice of
BUS3017   ADVERTISING         advertising.                                                                          S1   20   20
                             for semester 1 is designed as a breakthrough into Mandarin Chinese for beginners
                             with no or little prior knowledge of Chinese. It teaches basic Chinese skills for
          MANDARIN CHINESE   listening, speaking, reading and writing, and how to communicate using basic
CHN1001   (1)                survival Chinese. It also introduces you to Chinese ICT tools and skills.              S1       20   20
                             for semester 2 builds on the linked module CHN1001 and teaches more
                             advanced Chinese language skills which enable you to engage in daily life
          MANDARIN CHINESE   conversation using simple Chinese more confidently. More advanced
CHN1002   (2)                Chinese IT skills will be introduced.                                                  S2       20   20

                             introduces the history, geography, ethnicity and socio-cultural aspects of
                             modern China, which provides a framework for the study of Chinese
          INTRODUCTION TO    politics, economics and society in years 2 and 3. Both contemporary
CHN1003   MODERN CHINA       developments and important historical backgrounds are covered.                       S1 only    20   10
                             This module is about the basic principles of modern computer organization and
                             architecture. It explores the layered nature of systems structures and examines
                             the interfaces between them. The module covers a range of topics from bare
          FUNDAMENTALS OF    hardware to operating systems and sophisticated system software. As networking
          COMPUTER           is an important aspect of today’s computing, the essentials of networking are also
CIS1000   ARCHITECTURE       briefly covered.                                                                       S2       20   20

                             This module provides a description of the organisational context within which
                             information systems are developed, it presents the typical life cycle for system
                             development and maintenance and focuses specifically on the knowledge and
CIS1001   SYSTEMS ANALYSIS   skills required during Information Requirements gathering.                           S1 and 2   20   20

          PROGRAMMING:       A practical introduction to the fundamentals of an object-oriented approach to
          CONCEPTS TO        software development. Students will be introduced to analytical techniques and
CIS1002   CONSTRUCTION       processes essential for specifying, designing and implementing applications.         S1 and 2   30   15

                             In this practical module students will explore elements of image capture and
                             manipulation, interaction design/animation, and sound for use in multimedia
                             systems, including the Web. Students will be expected to assemble text, images,
                             animation, and sound together in an effective presentation. In addition, they will
                             also consider the usability and accessibility issues associated with content
          MULTIMEDIA         navigation and interaction. This module will also enable students to explore and
CIS1003   DEVELOPMENT        gain experience of current Multimedia development tools and how to use them.          1 year    30   15
                              This module has been designed to give students an introduction to the field of
                              Web Site Development. Students will explore the elements of Web Site Design,
                              including colour, typography and imagery and assemble them together in an
                              effective layout. In addition, students will also look at usability and accessibility
          WEBSITE             issues associated with content, navigation and interaction, whilst gaining a
CIS1004   DEVELOPMENT         grounded understanding of (X)HTML, DHTML, CSS and client-side scripting.                 1    20   20
                              This module provides an understanding of the scientific discipline concerned with
                              the understanding of interactions among humans and other elements of a system
                              This module will apply theory, principles, and methods to design in order to
                              optimize human satisfaction and overall system performance. The module
                              presents an overview of the ergonomic evaluation relating to system
          ERGONOMICS AND      development and will focus specifically on the usability aspect of Human
CIS1005   USEABILITY          Computer Interaction.                                                                    ?    10   10
                              Business Analysis is the process of investigating what a business wants to achieve
                              and what is done at the moment. Analysis does not just look at what objectives
                              once were, and how the existing systems achieve those objectives now, but also
                              what the business systems should be doing. By producing a statement of
                              requirements, analysis aids the process of designing how to achieve a solution. An
                              effective manager, in a business context, should be able to handle, analyse,
                              interpret and evaluate the data which are generated internally and externally to
                              an organisation. The managerial decision making process is greatly enhanced if
CIS2043   BUSINESS ANALYSIS   these activities provide timely and relevant information.                               TBC   15   15
                              The aim of this module is to introduce the students to the fundamental concepts
                              in database design. Students are expected to acquire practical skills in database
          INTRODUCTION TO     modelling, development and design using the rules of normalisation and entity
CIS2100   DATABASES           relationship modelling.                                                                 S1    20   20

                              Competitive IT aims to give the students a broad overview of the use of
                              Information Technology for Competitive advantage. The module will concentrate
                              on models such as Porters Value chain and will look at how these models can be
                              used by Businesses to improve their competitive advantage. The module will
                              consider the latest ‘killer apps’ created and marketed by technology suppliers and
CIS2102   COMPETITIVE IT      evaluate their likely effectiveness in a variety of contexts.                           S1    20   20
                               Business Analysis is the process of investigating what a business wants to achieve
                               and what is done at the moment. Analysis does not just look at what objectives
                               once were, and how the existing systems achieve those objectives now, but also
                               what the business systems should be doing. By producing a statement of
                               requirements, analysis aids the process of designing how to achieve a solution. An
                               effective manager, in a business context, should be able to handle, analyse,
                               interpret and evaluate the data which are generated internally and externally to
                               an organisation. The managerial decision making process is greatly enhanced if
CIS2103   BUSINESS ANALYSIS    these activities provide timely and relevant information.                             S2   20   20

                           This module is about advanced features of modern computer architectures which
                           enhance system performance. The CPU instruction set design and choices have
                           been explored in the context of system performance. Cache and instruction
                           pipeline technologies are studied as examples of techniques developed to get
          COMPUTER SYSTEMS round the limitations of the von Neumann bottleneck. Novel RISC architecture is
CIS2104   ARCHITECTURE     also examined and justified.                                                              S1   20   20

                               This module has been devised in response to the rapidly changing nature of the
                               Web. It is a synthesis of the traditional fields of Hypermedia and Usability. The
                               module focuses on the structuring, organising, labelling, and managing of
                               hypermedia content, were information architecture and information management
                               remain particularly significant. The module embraces established methods and
          USEABLE              skills, which can be employed, systematically, to inform a high degree of
CIS2105   HYPERMEDIA           functionality in the design of navigation for Web content.                            S1   20   20
                               In this module students will gain an in depth knowledge of the Software
          SOFTWARE             Engineering processes, development models and gain skills in producing high
CIS2106   ENGINEERING          quality software documentation.                                                       S1   20   20
                               Advances in telecommunications technology and a constant surge by users for
                               more advanced, graphical, interactive and dynamic content on the World Wide
                               Web (WWW). Such websites require technologies that go beyond the ageing
                               HTML standard, making use of client-side scripting languages to allow for users to
                               interact in a much more visual way. This module will enable students to
                               understand the basics of client-side scripting, along with its application to a
                               dynamic client presentation. In addition, they will develop an understanding of the
CIS2107   WEB SCRIPTING        tools and techniques needed to implement a dynamic client presentation.               S2   20   20
                             Object-oriented concepts underlie the modern system design paradigm. This
                             course presents the concepts behind the object model and its use in modelling
                             and implementing computer applications. In this module students will gain an in
          OBJECT ORIENTED    depth understanding of the Object Oriented Modeling concepts and acquire skills
CIS2109   PROGRAMMING        in Object Oriented Programming.                                                       TBC     20   20
                             In this module students will gain an understanding of constructing electronics
                             projects for control applications, will gain a further in-depth understanding of
          PHYSICAL           developing sensing applications and the issues around basic sensors, and will
          COMPUTING: INPUT   develop and enhance skills in computer programming through the coding required
CIS2110   AND OUTPUT         for microcontrollers.                                                                 TBC     20   20
          OBJECT ORIENTED    This module will introduce the students to the theoretic and practical concepts
          PROGRAMMING FOR    and applications of Object oriented programming for web based developments
CIS2111   THE WEB            and applications.                                                                     TBC     20   20

                             This module is designed to provide both theoretical knowledge and practical skills
                             in the basic principles of modern networking and data communications and at the
          COMPUTER           same time to motivate students through understanding and awareness of the
CIS2112   NETWORKS           emerging new technologies in the field.                                               S1      20   20
                             In this module, students will develop theoretical understanding and the practical
                             skills for designing and developing database driven web systems. The students will
                             learn a server side scripting language, how to design and implement a database
                             within a web environment and finally link these practices together to produce an
CIS2115   E-COMMERCE         ecommerce system.                                                                    1 year   30
                             We are witnessing the coming together of the world’s two fastest growing
                             services, namely Mobile Technology and the Internet. This is leading to the
                             so called Mobile Internet model, which will have immense impact on
                             telecommunications companies, ISPs and any other organisation wishing to
                             transact in the new world economy. From the user’s perspective, this will
                             lead to a move to mobile application development – any content (e.g.
                             information, entertainment, data, service) will be available on any
                             appliance (mobile phone, personal digital assistant, TV, PC, wristwatch etc)
                             at any location, and in the right context. This module provides you with a
                             comprehensive theoretical and practical understanding of all the relevant
                             technologies associated with mobile computing, ranging from applications
                             development and middleware support for mobile applications to fixed and
                             mobile networking technologies and standards. You will also gain practical
          MOBILE APPLICATION skills by developing small applications for mobile devices.
CIS3104   SECURITY                                                                                               S2   20   20
                            This module is about the internal structure of modern multi-tasking operating
                            systems. It explores the techniques used in order to efficiently manage the
                            resources of computer systems and provide protection to these resources and its
                            users. The hardware/software interfaces and the levels of abstractions are studied
CIS3107   OPERATING SYSTEMS in some detail.                                                                      S1   20   20
MODULE CODE   MODULE TITLE                     MODULE DESCRIPTION
                                               introduces the key theoretical perspectives relevant to the study
                                               of crime and social justice. Using contemporary case studies in
                                               crime, deviance and conflict, it will evaluate the main theoretical
                                               traditions and recent critiques within criminology.
CRI1001       UNDERSTANDING CRIME & CONFLICT
                                               is concerned with the historical contexts of crime and criminal
                                               justice from the late eighteenth century to the present day. It
                                               examines the significance of changing relations of class, gender,
                                               ‘race’ and age in underpinning responses to crime, deviance and
              CRIME & PUNISHMENT IN THEIR      disorder.
CRI1103       HISTORICAL CONTEXT
                                               considers the controversies, contradictions and common sense
                                               assumptions that underpin the generation of ‘knowledge’
                                               around ‘crime’, harm, punishment, rights and justice. Using
                                               biographies and personal testimonies in a variety of forms, the
                                               module will demonstrate how the processes of denial,
                                               neutralisation and disqualification are used to undermine and/or
                                               silence personal, experiential accounts relating to crime, harm,
                                               punishment rights and justice.
              GENERATING CRIMINOLOGICAL
CRI1104       KNOWLEDGE
                                               explores the concept of violence and the various forms it can
                                               take, ranging from intrapersonal violence (e.g. self harm) to
                                               interpersonal violence, institutional and state violence, and
                                               violence on a global scale. You will be encouraged to look
                                               beyond established understandings of what constitutes a violent
                                               act to explore more abstract forms of violence such as harm,
                                               denial of rights, and poverty.

CRI2102       VIOLENCE
                                               provides a thorough grounding in issues of youth justice,
                                               considering the history of youth justice in the UK and elsewhere
                                               and the development of responses to children and young people
                                               in conflict with the law in its social and political context. It
                                               explores theoretical approaches to youth justice and considers
                                               explanations regarding differences in state responses to this
                                               issue.
CRI2016       YOUTH JUSTICE


                                               explores the ways in which criminal, deviant and marginalised
                                               identities are constructed and reproduced. You will be
                                               encouraged to reflect on the role the media plays in the process
                                               of developing identities and the relationships between
CRI2104       GENERATING REPUTATIONS           discrimination, criminalisation and victimisation.


                                               examines the theoretical traditions, and their legacies, of what
                                               constitutes the ‘child’. The module considers the mechanisms
                                               through which children are socialised, placed under surveillance,
                                               disciplined and in turn criminalised and victimised. Central to the
                                               module is a critical analysis of state intervention into the lives of
                                               children together with an exploration of child exploitation and
CRI2105       CHALLENGING CHILDHOODS           the process through which children become ‘victims’.

                                                provides the historical and political contexts to contemporary
                                               policing from a perspective of citizens' civil rights and civil
                                               liberties. Drawing on case studies and contemporary examples, it
                                               examines the tension between the principle of equality before
                                               the law and differential police strategies, and between lawful
CRI3101       THE POLITICS OF POLICING         discretion and institutionalised discrimination.
                                          provides you with a critical knowledge and understanding of the
                                          nature, functions and justifications for the use of punishment in
                                          modern society. It considers the philosophical and sociological
                                          theories of punishment and the legitimacy of the state’s use of
                                          punishment, specifically imprisonment but also other methods
CRI3102   THE POLITICS OF PUNISHMENT      such as capital punishment.

                                          This module will examine the development of the discourse
                                          about rights and justice. Taking a national and international
                                          approach, the module will consider the development of new
                                          discourses of rights. Students will evaluate statutory policies and
                                          responses to the issue of rights and justice. Students will
                                          consider how States respond to issues of justice and rights,
                                          including where States themselves uphold or violate citizen’s
CRI3104   JUSTICE, RIGHTS AND THE STATE   rights.

                                          introduces you to legal reasoning and legal analysis, practical
                                          legal study skills and legal institutions, concepts and processes in
                                          preparation for subsequent legal study. It is also designed to
                                          enable you to develop your research skills, problem solving skills
LAW1201   LEGAL METHODS & SYSTEMS         and communication skills.

                                          introduces the students to one of the seven foundational
                                          subjects of legal knowledge. It provides a clear map through the
                                          different torts, while at the same time identifying the common
LAW1204   LAW OF TORT                     underlying themes and uniting principles.

                                          Public International law is the law governing relations between
                                          States and the activities of international institutions such as the
                                          United Nations and the European Union. It is concerned with
                                          questions such as the settlement of disputes, title to territory;
                                          diplomatic relations; human rights; the law of the sea; legal
                                          restraints on the use of force, and the law governing
LAW3201   PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW        international commercial/ trade agreements


                                          Building on knowledge acquired at Level Four (Contract and Tort
                                          Law) and Level Five (Criminal Law), this module examines the
                                          statutory framework relating to the sale of goods, and supply of
                                          goods and services to consumers. It also considers the rights and
                                          remedies for consumers in respect of liability for personal
                                          injuries or damage caused by defective products and services, as
                                          well as dangerous goods. Also included is an examination of
                                          restrictions applied to misleading pricing and advertising of
                                          goods and services, and the criminal sanctions imposed as a
                                          consequence. Finally, the module introduces students to the
                                          range of credit transactions and the regulatory control imposed
LAW3202   CONSUMER LAW                    upon them.

                                          This module explores the nature of the employment
                                          relationship, the contract of employment, how contracts are
                                          ended, how employees are disciplined, discrimination in the
                                          workplace, the regulation of working time and pay, parental and
                                          maternity rights, equality issues, employment tribunal process
                                          and the role of trade unions in the employment relationship. The
                                          module adopts a contextual approach in which legal frameworks
                                          are considered in light of changes in labour relations, prevailing
                                          social, economic and political movements in the UK and the EU
                                          and perceptions of what constitutes ‘good employment
LAW3203   EMPLOYMENT LAW                  practice’.
                            The module introduces student to a range of jurisprudential
                            theories. Students will examine the major theories relating to
                            the nature of law – including questions relating to the purpose of
                            law, theories of adjudication and the relationship between law
                            and morality. Students will also examine theories of justice and
                            rights. Finally, the module will introduce students to some of the
                            critical alternatives to mainstream theories. Students will
                            analyze the relationships between these various theories and
LAW3204   JURISPRUDENCE     any criticisms that could be made of them.
                            A practical examination of company formation, decision-making,
                            shareholders, directors and their duties, insolvency, liquidation
LAW3205   COMPANY LAW       and administration.


                            This module introduces students to the assessment of the nature
                            of human rights claims and their translation into law and legal
                            institutions. The module charts the emergence of human rights
                            arguments through, legal, social and political theory and
                            examines how these discourses have informed the creation of
                            national and international law. This module will further
                            introduce students to a range of substantive areas issues both at
                            a national and international level. These issues include, the role
                            of state actors, international organisations, women and children,
LAW3206   HUMAN RIGHTS      crimes against humanity, genocide and mass murder.

                            The Family Law course will examine the main areas of
                            substantive law and social policy pertaining to the family. The
                            focus will be on the ‘family’ and the rights and obligations of the
                            adults within it, with the more specialised area of regulation of
                            parents and children forming a separate course. Family Law will
                            introduce the concept and nature of marriage as the central
                            nucleus from which the laws governing the family have
                            traditionally emanated. It will consider the extent to which
                            marriage remains an instrument of social, moral and economic
                            regulation in society. This will mean examining the formation
                            and function of marriage, its legal moral and social effects, and
                            the legal means devised by the State to protect it. This will
                            include the legal effects of marriage, void and voidable
LAW3207   FAMILY LAW        marriages and the law of annulment.
                            No longer can sport and law be considered separate realms.
                            Established general legal principles deriving from, for instance,
                            criminal law, contract law, the law of torts, public law,
                            administrative law, property law, competition law, EU law,
                            company law, fiscal law and human rights law, have been
                            applied to a wide number of sporting contexts including; public
                            order and sport, drugs and sport, safety in sport, disciplinary
                            measures in sport, conduct in sport and wider issues relating to
                            restraint of trade, anti-competitive behaviour, disability
                            discrimination and the exploitation of sports economic potential.
                            This module examines these developments and seeks to
                            understand the dynamics driving the relationship between sport
LAW3208   SPORTS LAW        and law.

                            The Module concentrates upon the Law of Criminal Evidence in
                            England and Wales. It initially focuses upon a number of types
                            of criminal evidence, and examines the procedural safeguards
                            which govern the decision to admit these types of evidence at
                            trial. It then widens its focus to include an examination of the
                            operation of the Court of Criminal Appeal and the Criminal Cases
LAW3209   LAW OF EVIDENCE   Review Commission.
                                       This module examines the complex pattern of international
                                       regulatory frameworks affecting sport. It explores the role of
                                       sport in society and assesses claims that sport should be self
                                       regulating as a consequence of its unique characteristics which
                                       distinguish it from other industries. The key sources and
                                       institutions of international sports regulation are explored, with
                                       particular emphasis given to the role of the international sports
                                       governing bodies, the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), the
                                       World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), the Council of Europe and
                                       the European Union (EU). National patterns of state sports law
                                       and policy throughout Europe are also considered and
                                       contrasted with the US model of sport. The impact of these
                                       bodies on sports broadcasting, the rights of athletes and wider
LAW3214   INTERNATIONAL SPORT LAW      issues of sports governance is explored.


                                       This module critically examines the institutions and legal rules
                                       governing the international economic system. At the core of the
                                       module is the relationship between power disparities and the
                                       fundamental principles shaping international regulation. The
                                       focus of the module is the law and policy of the World Trade
          INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC LAW   Organisation and the International Monetary Fund that are the
LAW3217   (not running 2011/12)        institutional pillars of global economic governance.

                                       This module examines some legal aspects the organisation and
                                       regulation of private international business, especially
                                       transnational corporation. The general theme is the legal aspect
                                       of the globalisation of business and in particular problems of
LAW3218   INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS LAW   liability, jurisdiction and enforcement.
  SEMESTER                         CREDITS AVAILABLE PER
 MODULE RUNS   TOTAL CREDIT              SEMESTER




S1 only                       30                      15




S1 only                       30                      15




S1 only                       30                      15




S1 only                       30                      15




S1 only                       30                      15




S1                            20                      20




S2                            20                      20




S1                            20                      20
S2                  20   20




S1 and 2 only
available for
students studying
for whole year      20   20




S1 only             30   15


sS1 and 2 only
available S1 or
whole year          30   30




S1                  20   20




S2                  20   20




S1                  20   20
S2   20   20



S1   20   20




S1   20   20




S1   20   20




S1   20   20




S2   20   20
S2   20   20




S1   20   20




S2   20   20
MODULE CODE   MODULE TITLE


FLM1011       HOW TO READ A FILM: SOUND AND IMAGE


FLM1012       CINEMA IN CONTEXT: 1895-1945




FLM1013       WORLD CINEMAS: EUROPE




FLM1014       HOW TO READ A FILM: APPROACHES

FLM1015       CINEMA IN CONTEXT: 1945 - TODAY




FLM1016       WORLD CINEMAS: BEYOND EUROPE




FLM2001       FILM CRITICISM 1: ISSUES OF REALISM




FLM2006       IDENTITY & REPRESENTATION




FLM2007       CENSORSHIP & THE CINEMA




FLM2008       FILM GENRE
FLM2009       FILM AUTHORSHIP
FLM2010   REALISM & THE CINEMA




FLM2011   ANIMATION & THE CINEMA




FLM2012   IDENTITY & REPRESENTATION




FLM2013   CENSORSHIP & THE CINEMA




FLM3007   FROM TEXT TO SCREEN




FLM3008   CINEMA AND NATIONAL IDENTITY




FLM3011   NON-WESTERN CINIMA CASE STUDY




          CONTEMPORARY FILM CULTURE AND
FLM3012   FUTURE CINEMAS


HIS1010   THE MEDIEVAL OUTLOOK


HIS1011   THE DAWN OF MODERNITY




HIS1012   EUROPE RE-MADE
HIS1013   IMPERIALISM, LIBERATION AND GLOBALISATION - THE 20TH CENTURY




HIS2002   THE RISE & FALL OF THE SOVIET UNION




          THE REPUBLIC IN DANGER: THE UNITED
HIS2003   STATES 1800-1941




          IDEALS & SELF INTEREST: US FOREIGN
HIS2004   POLICY & EXPANSION SINCE 1840




HIS2006   THE RISE & FALL OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE




          CRIME & SOCIETY IN ENGLAND & WALES
HIS2007   1660-1900




          CONFLICT & SOCIAL CHANGE: FRANCE
HIS2020   SINCE THE POPULAR FRONT 1936-2007




          BLACK LIFE & BLACK PROTEST IN THE
HIS3001   UNITED STATES SINCE 1895



          HISTORY & SOCIETY: INTERPRETATIONS &
HIS3004   APPLICATIONS


          THE BIRTH OF A CONFLICT - BRITISH RULE
HIS3013   IN PALESTINE 1917-1948
LIT1012   PRACTICAL CRITICISM




LIT1013   CRITICAL READING


          INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY PERIODS AND
LIT1010   GENRES 1


          INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY PERIODS AND
LIT1011   GENRES 2




LIT1014   BEYOND BOOKS


LIT2100   THE RENAISSANCE




LIT2101   ORDER & CHAOS




LIT2104   GREEN WRITING




LIT2105   THE GRAND TOUR




LIT2108   WRITING THE FEMALE BODY




LIT2110   CONTESTED MASCULINITIES
LIT2111   IMAGINARY HOMELANDS




LIT2112   WRITING THE SUPERNATURAL




          ENTERTAINMENT & EXPERIMENTATION:
LIT2113   THE FIN-DE-SIECLE SHORT STORY


LIT2114   ANGER & AFTER: MODERN BRITISH DRAMA




LIT3100   VICTORIAN LITERATURE




LIT3101   MAKE IT NEW: MODERNISM




LIT3106   FLIGHT FROM REALISM




LIT3107   THE SHORT STORY




LIT3109   SEXUALITY AND SUBVERSION




LIT3115   GOTHIC ROMANTICISM




          LATE-VICTORIAN GOTHIC: DECADENCE,
LIT3116   DEVIANCE, DEGENERATION




LIT3117   CONTEMPORARY IRISH FICTION
LNG1008   THE STRUCTURE OF ENGLISH

LNG1009   STUDYING ENGLISH LANGUAGE


LNG1010   SOUND AND STYLE IN ENGLISH


LNG1011   VARIATION IN ENGLISH

LNG2012   DESCRIBING DISCOURSE


          HISTORY & DEVELOPMENT OF THE ENGLISH
LNG2100   LANGUAGE

          APPROACHES TO SOCIOLINGUISTIC
LNG2101   VARIATION




          THE LANGUAGE OF SHAKESPEARE & HIS
LNG2102   TIME


LNG2104   ANALYSING DISCOURSE




LNG2105   EARLY ENGLISH




LNG2106   PHONETICS & PHONOLOGY 1




LNG2107   MODERN ENGLISH STRUCTURE & USAGE


LNG2108   REGIONAL VARIETIES OF ENGLISH


LNG2109   COMPUTERS & LANGUAGE

LNG2114   INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION




LNG3100   LANGUAGE & EDUCATION


LNG3101   LANGUAGE & GENDER




LNG3102   LANGUAGE & WORLD DEVELOPMENT
LNG3103   COMMUNICATING SEXUALITY




LNG3104   ENGLISH IN CONTACT




LNG3105   BILINGUALISM




LNG3106   LITERARY STYLISTICS




LNG3107   LINGUISTIC ETHNOGRAPHY




          AN INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING ENGLISH
          TO SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES
LNG3108   (TESOL)




LNG3109   FORENSIC LINGUISTICS




LNG3110   BEYOND ENGLISH


LNG3111   LANGUAGE & IDENTITY




LNG3112   LANGUAGE, NATION & CONFLICT


WRI1010   INTRODUCTION TO POETRY


WRI1011   INTRODUCTION TO FICTION


WRI1012   INTRODUCTION TO SCRIPT WRITING

          READING THE WORLD AND THE BUSINESS
WRI1013   OF WRITING
WRI2001   WRITING POETRY 2


WRI2002   SCRIPTWRITING 2


WRI2003   FICTION 2-Writing Short Stories




WRI2004   WRITER'S CONTEXT


WRI3001   WRITING POETRY 3




WRI3002   SCRIPTWRITING 3


WRI3003   FICTION 3-Stories and Sequences




WRI3004   WRITER'S WORKSHOP
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
MODULE DESCRIPTION

gives you the language and skills needed to examine, interpret and write about films, examining a different film in depth
each week. It is full of truly valuable activities, advice and guidance in becoming an efficient reader of film.

introduces you to the major film movements and moments in cinema's rich international history, beginning pre-1895 and
concluding at the end of the Second World War, enabling you to see film in its political, social and cultural context.

enables you to recognise the impact of a range of significant national cinemas and directors from across the history of
cinema within their particular, unique contexts. This module will concentrate on Europe.


takes you a step further into critical, analytical and theoretical spheres, examining films in close detail and discovering some
of the many significant academic and critical approaches to the cinema. You will be introduced to several important critical
concepts such as structuralism, post-structuralism, Marxism, feminism and postmodernism.
concentrates on significant moments, movements and styles of post-war cinema to the present. You will consider a range
of films and eras from American, British and European cinema.

concentrates on cinema outside Europe. Not only will your knowledge of international cinemas be dramatically broadened,
but you will also discover the incredible breadth of styles, narratives and motivations in the making of world film.




Building on the elementary approaches to film analysis explored in FLM 1001 How to Read a Film, FLM 2001 introduces
students to more advanced and complex critical methods of film analysis. Since the question of ‘realism’ in film is a factor
with which students will be at least tangentially aware, and has always been at issue in cinema and film studies, FLM 2001
centralises this in its approach to film analysis. Ranging from classical Greek debates to post-structuralist concerns and the
advent of the postmodern, the module aims to negotiate a pathway through various schools of thought, movements, and
academic traditions problematising notions of realism, verisimilitude and ‘the real’ in relation to film and cinema.

Feminist film criticism has had a profound influence on Film Studies, reshaping the academic tradition of film analysis from
the 1970’s onward. Extending the interrogation of representation in film to sexuality and race, feminist theory marked the
transformation of criticism and theory and presents a body of work that is now fundamental to the study of film. This
module is designed to introduce students to aspects of feminist, black, gender, gay, lesbian and queer theory informing
contemporary film studies.


Feminist film criticism has had a profound influence on Film Studies, reshaping the academic tradition of film analysis from
the 1970’s onward. Extending the interrogation of representation in film to sexuality and race, feminist theory marked the
transformation of criticism and theory and presents a body of work that is now fundamental to the study of film. This
module is designed to introduce students to aspects of feminist, black, gender, gay, lesbian and queer theory informing
contemporary film studies.

The module encourages students to investigate the politics of representation and identity in relation to gender, race and
sexuality, culminating in a block of case studies focusing on feminist, black, gay and lesbian filmmakers. The trajectory of
the module shifts from theoretical development (with extracts from relevant films) and issues of representation and
identity, to practitioners emphasising the positive challenge to a mainstream industry, historically and ideologically bound
to white, male heterosexual dominance.




The module encourages students to investigate the politics of representation and identity in relation to gender, race and
sexuality, culminating in a block of case studies focusing on feminist, black, gay and lesbian filmmakers. The trajectory of
the module shifts from theoretical development (with extracts from relevant films) and issues of representation and
identity, to practitioners emphasising the positive challenge to a mainstream industry, historically and ideologically bound
to white, male heterosexual dominance.
Since the question of ‘realism’ in film is a factor with which students will be at least tangentially aware, FLM 2010
centralises the academic discourse concerned with this question in its approach to film analysis. Accordingly, the module
examines issues concerning realism, objectivity, subjectivity, the viewer’s relationship to the screen and the illusion of the
real in realist cinemas, and observational and non-fiction cinemas. A single realist form will be explored in depth, posing a
range of questions about truth and bias in the light of various critical and theoretical perspectives.

FLM 2011 provides a critical and historical overview of animation on film, encompassing mainstream, political and avant-
garde forms and styles, and encouraging appreciation of diverse animations from around the globe. Examples of animation
are assessed according to their relation to the real, constructions of the viewing subject and ideological motivations

FLM 2012 explores typical representations of race, gender and sexuality in American and British cinemas, providing
students with the skills and knowledge to investigate the politics of representation and to identify white, patriarchal,
heterosexist ideologies in much mainstream film. The module is designed to introduce students to key areas of image
studies before considering a number of ground-breaking films and director-based case studies in which conventions have
been subverted and hegemonic control over representation has been disrupted.

Censorship and the Cinema introduces students to the concept of film regulation and censorship, its history in Anglo-
American cinema, the theoretical debates surrounding the subject, and several key films that have been contested
throughout motion picture history as relevant case studies. In this way, it provides students with historical, contextual,
academic and theoretical knowledge which will inform their own opinions and attitudes towards censorship.

Text to Screen introduces students to the phenomenon of film adaptation and to the critical discourses necessary for
understanding that phenomenon. The module familiarises students with a variety of narrative forms (including the novel,
the short story, sequential art and the interactive text) and how these are adapted for the cinema. Using different
examples, students will learn about the various factors (theoretical, aesthetic, stylistic and ideological) governing the
adaptation process.


FLM3008 focuses and deepens students’ understanding of film through one or two case studies of national cinema(s),
examining cultures, contexts of production and national identity. The rapid global development during the 20th century of
many geographically distinct cinemas as national cultural institutions makes the study of films from different origins a
fruitful and important focus for academic work. Students will study films within the contexts of national film production,
national identity and both national and global culture. The module will engage with contemporary debates concerning the a
selected national cinema or cinemas, particularly issues of aesthetics, representation, race and gender.


The module introduces students to the concept of national cinema in a non-European, non-English speaking context. It
considers how a specific cinema can be analysed using theoretical, socio-cultural and historical knowledge and
methodologies. It identifies the interconnections between nation and cinema, thereby engaging students with themes of
identity, globalisation, colonisation and colonialism, hybridity and cultural difference within the context of cinema as a
global medium. It assesses how a specific cinema is positioned in relation to Hollywood and, accordingly, it offers students
an opportunity to consider the complexity of global relationships between differing national cinemas.


FLM 3012 offers a space for students to discover, discuss and assess new and evolving media technologies and their
relationship to cinema. Core contemporary issues are debated, including globalisation, digitisation and conglomerisation,
each of which affect traditional modes and understandings of cinema in significant ways. The module also looks ahead to
impending changes and their potential effects on the viewer, such as increasing interactivity in narrative cinema.

focuses on the period between the end of the Roman Empire and the Renaissance. You'll learn about the emergence of
Europe as a distinct entity, comprised of a variety of peoples with diverse cultures and languages.
examines the process by which the ideas and attitudes of the medieval period are dramatically re-shaped by the great
voyages of discovery, the Reformation, and the advances in knowledge brought about by the developments of the
Renaissance.

introduces you to the key developments that transformed European society between 1789 and 1919. The module is
primarily concerned with the broad political, economic and social influences that caused this transformation which was of
immense significance not only for Europe but also for the course of world history during the twentieth century.
examines some of the main events, political and social movements, economic developments and ideologies which
dominated the twentieth century around the world. You will study the rise and fall of the great ideologies of Communism,
Nazism and Fascism, the causes and outcome of the second world war and the development of the Cold War between the
Super Powers after 1945. The module will also look at international relations and the global economic system after the fall
of the Soviet Empire in 1989-1991.

The module provides a coherent framework for understanding the nature of the Soviet system, from the collapse of
Czarism, the emergence of the Soviet system under Lenin and Stalin, to its crises under Khrushchev and Brezhnev and
collapse under Gorbachev, though detailed investigation of key themes within a chronological timescale. Students will be
introduced to different concepts and ideas related to the ideology of Marxism, Leninism and Stalinism, how the Bolsheviks
came to power, how the Soviet System operated and changed. Reference will be made to both political history approaches
focusing domestic and foreign policy agendas and to issues relating to class, nationality and gender using a social history
approach.

The module examines the history of the United States from its revolutionary origins in 1776 through to American entry into
the Second World War in 1941. It focuses on the various threats to the new republic during the intervening period. These
include the growth of black slavery, southern secession and the civil war and the rebuilding of the nation in the
Reconstruction era, 1865-1877. From the 1880s onwards new threats emerged which will also be considered, including
urbanization, mass immigration, two world wars and economic recession.

This module begins by examining the process of frontier expansion within the United States during the nineteenth century.
It assesses the impact of the move west on native American populations and also the ideological justifications advanced to
justify this expansionism, such as mission, manifest destiny and American exceptionalism. The second half of the module
examines the emergence of the United States as a global superpower from the war of 1898 against Spain to the present
day. The various strategic doctrines advanced to further American foreign policy in this period, such as containment, are
examined together with their strengths and weaknesses.

This module focuses on the expansion and dissolution of the British empire in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
Particular attention is given to the debates among historians on these subjects. At the heart of the module are
fundamental, and much disputed, questions regarding the nature of imperialism, and the process by which Britain
attained—and lost—an empire that at different times stretched across Africa, Asia, America and the Pacific.

This module examines major changes in crime, policing and punishment in England and Wales between the late 17th
century and 1900 when the English criminal justice system was transformed. Particular emphasis will be placed on the
relationship between crime, law, policing and punishment and divisions within society relating to class, ethnicity and
gender. Consequently it will be possible to understand how crime, law, policing and punishment are historical processes
that evolve over space and time and are specific to particular societies.


This module offers an introduction to the history of France since the Popular Front of 1936, focussing on the themes of
political conflict and social change. How did French democracy survive in an era where many were willing to kill each other
for their political beliefs, and later adapt to a changing multicultural society? It examines competing historical explanations
for the defeat of 1940; wartime collaboration and resistance; the violent struggles over the end of the French empire in
Algeria and elsewhere; the rise and fall of the Communist Party; and the upheavals of the 1960s. It also introduces students
to major issues of on-going debate in France today, including popular protest immigration, the rise of the far right, and the
role of anti-Americanism and French exceptionalism.

This module examines African American life and history from the 1890s to the present day. It examines the reasons for the
widespread introduction of racial segregation in the United States at the end of the nineteenth century and its impact on
African American communities. The efforts of African American leaders, from Booker T. Washington through to Louis
Farrakhan, to challenge discrimination are examined together with their strengths and weakness. The roots of the civil
rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s are examined together with the movement itself and its impact and legacy on
American society since the 1970s.

The purpose of the module is to examine the development of History as a discipline, from the late 19th century to the
present-day. It will relate changes in the discipline to changes within society at large. The module seeks, in general terms to
demonstrate that academic disciplines do not develop within social vacuums.
The aim of the module is to enable students to analyse the origins and development of Britain’s occupation of Palestine,
and its impact upon the Zionist-Palestinian conflict. It will help to broaden their horizons by focusing on an additional extra-
European region, and will give them valuable insights into an issue of great and ongoing significance for international
politics.
"What does this mean? How do I think about meaning in this text?" This module will deepen your appreciation of a wide
chronology of English Literature through close attention to the detail of the text. This is an introductory module which will
provide you with the analytical vocabulary necessary to develop and broaden your interpretative and evaluative skills.


builds on the interpretive and evaluative skills developed in the Practical Criticism module by exploring a range of critical
theories and approaches which excited literary critics and authors in America and Europe from the 1920s onwards to the
present day. Their ideas help us to articulate our views and criticisms in the ongoing debate about English Literature. These
approaches enhance our experience of the texts so the study of theory will be accompanied by extracts from a wide
chronology of English Literature.

is a gateway to the study of periodicity and genre at degree level. Beginning with the (post)modern short story and working
backwards chonologically, the module will also introduce you to the Victorian novel and Romantic poetry. You will also be
introduced to an array of critical approaches to literature.

continues where its predecessor leaves off in working backwards chronologically while introducing you to the major literary
periods and genres. You will study the Gothic novel, Renaissance poetry and Renaissance drama, whilst also being
introduced to an array of critical approaches to literature.

One of the most fundamental ways of understanding how literature functions is by considering the nature of story-telling.
This module introduces you to a range of narrative forms (literature, narrative poetry, comic strips, and films) and the
critical approaches appropriate to a higher understanding of how such narratives work. Beginning from straightforward
concepts like the 'narrator' and the 'narratee', the module later adopts an interdisciplinary approach to highlight the
contrasts and comparisons that can be drawn between different narrative media.
Explores the literature of the English Renaissance from 1450 to 1680, tracing the development of the three key literary
genres: poetry, prose narrative (including autobiography) and drama in a period of extraordinary civil tumult and cultural
change.

Provides an introduction to texts, authors, genres and central themes from 1700-1830. This period encompasses a shift
from a poetry of public argument towards a poetry more personal and introspective in nature, focused on individual,
subjective experience. You’ll consider critically a variety of themes including the meaning of Romanticism and the aesthetic
debates that produced it; the place of art and artists within society; anxieties about social change; sex and marriage within
literature; debates about human nature; the rise of the novel; landscape and society; sensibility; and women and labouring-
class writers.

Green Writing looks at ways in which ideas about the environment and the human impact on it have been expressed in
literature. You will be encouraged to make connections with the contemporary world, and to express your own ideas,
surveying some of the main eco-critical writers in Britain and America.


The Grand Tour. The eighteenth century was a time of exploration, during which an intrepid range of English travellers
roamed the world, and particularly Europe, in the period sometimes labelled “the Age of Pergrination.” The pinnacle of a
gentleman’s education (and that of some ladies) was a Grand Tour of the splendours of European civilisation. These
journeys are recorded in letters, journals, factual books and more fanciful novels, reflecting the period’s fascination with
travel, and the idea of the journey as a means of self-revelation and self-improvement. In this module we will examine the
travel literature of the time and chart its relationship to the emerging form of the novel. You will read a wide range of
extracts from travellers and also some novels of the time that reflected the contemporary interest in travel.


You do not have to be a woman or a feminist to enjoy this module exploring textual representations of the female body in
English Literature. You will explore changes and continuities in the textual representation of the female form over time
from an interdisciplinary and theoretical stance, recognising contemporary attitudes to the body as part of a much larger
and longer historical continuum. Topics can include body image, idealisations of the female form, brutalisation, self-
brutalisation, the sexual body, the aging body, the dying body, the grotesquea and the suffering body.

What does it mean to be a man? What does it mean to be masculine? Is male identity something you ‘do’ or something you
‘are’? Is contemporary masculinity in crisis? These are some of the questions that will provide the interrogative framework
for this module. Each week, we will analyse a key literary text (including Jarhead, Fever Pitch, American Psycho and Fight
Club) in order to gain a better understanding of contemporary masculinities.
Offers the opportunity to study the growing range of cosmopolitan literature which articulates contemporary cultural and
political tensions. You will read works by migrant and diasporic writers, exploring concerns about identity, displacement
and belonging. You will also consider key trends in postcolonial theory and the significant impact of events such as 9/ll on
literary and theoretical interventions.
Examines the textual representation(s) of the supernatural, specifically of ghosts, haunting and the haunted, in works of
English Literature from the nineteenth century to the present day. You will examine three key genres: short fiction; the
novella, the novel and drama; and the development of short ghost fiction. Themes include supernatural subjects and
supernatural space.

Do we read for entertainment or for intellectual reasons? This module examines the short fiction of the fin de siècle (c.
1880-1910), a transitional period between Victorianism and Modernism that saw the emergence of a mass reading public
but also witnessed early Modernist experiments. You will explore both popular (e.g. detection, humour) and elitist (e.g.
New Woman writing, proto-Modernism) short fiction from the period.
Gves you the opportunity to study post-war British drama, emphasising the diversity of practice, from the growth of
“kitchen-sink” realism in the fifties to the rise in experimental theatre in the sixties and seventies to the contemporary
engagement with political issues.

Introduces you to the main currents of English literature in the Victorian period, particularly 1837-1880. You will gain a
thorough grounding in fiction and poetry of the Victorian era, with ample opportunities to study a wide a range of Victorian
literature in its various contexts. The module aims to present the Victorians as innovative, enterprising and socially
conscious people and seeks to challenge the prevailing view of Victorian society as strait-laced and prudish.


Modernism had a profound effect on the ways in which literature was produced and perceived, altering the relationship
between reader and writer and creating the conditions in which further late twentieth century upheavals in the field of
literary production occurred. Modernism is thus a central influence on the literature of the last century, and continues to
resonate in contemporary literature. This module enables you to explore the texts which contributed to this major shift in
literary culture, look at the concept of modernism, and consider how it manifests itself in the arts generally.

 Offers you an opportunity to develop an appreciation of recent and contemporary writing in Britain. In particular, the
module focuses on fiction that challenges conventional notions of the literary text. You will examine the major
characteristics of postmodernism as expressed in recent and contemporary British fiction writing and develop your critical
response to this important area of literary production. The module examines postmodernism as a phenomenon, and
applies its insights to a series of texts written between the emergence of postmodernism as an area of literary activity to
the present day.

Explores the nature of the short story as a distinct genre, separate to the novel and yet related to it. While the emphasis is
on contemporary authors, their work is put into context in relation to their predecessors in the short story tradition. There
is a particular focus on the short story’s representation of time, concepts drawn from Bakhtinian and Bergsonian theory are
introduced, and we will consider how stories fit together in collections and anthologies. The module culminates in the
compilation of a short anthology of published short stories.
 Is not a ‘scary’ theory module…you do not have to be a keen cultural theorist or feminist to enjoy it. Devoted to
understanding textual representations of sexuality and sexual identity, the module explores the textual representation of
same-sex desire and of sexual dissidence in the British novel from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present
day.

At the heart of Romantic literature is a dark obsession with all things Gothic. This module will explore Romanticism’s
Gothic impulse, examining the rise of the Gothic Romance in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century. Each week,
we will analyse a key literary text from the period alongside a theoretical issue and trace the ways in which the Gothic
Romance is both a conservative and a reactionary genre.

Are you prepared for an encounter with Count Dracula, Dr Jekyll (and Mr Hyde), and She-Who-Must-Be-Obeyed? This
module charts the gothic revival of the late nineteenth century , exploring urban and imperial gothic fiction alongside
contemporary social and cultural developments and current critical thinking. Authors covered include Oscar Wilde, R. L.
Stevenson, Bram Stoker, H. Rider Haggard, and Joseph Conrad.

Novels and short stories published by writers from Ireland and Northern Ireland in the last twenty years are among the
most entertaining, intriguing and exciting texts you will ever read. Unlike England, Ireland has never had a 'traditional' novel
so if you want to know what can be done with the novel or the short story, this is the course for you. We will explore the
diversity of contemporary Irish fiction and pursue topics such as diversity and difference, gender, sexuality, crime, social
and cultural change, nationalism and religion.
investigates the formal features of English by exploring its grammar. You will explore the major elements of English
grammar and how they are used in practice
introduces you to a variety of English Language topics that linguists research. You will also explore the different
methodologies involved in linguistic research
explores the formal features of both spoken and written discourse. You will discover how speech sounds are produced by
humans and how they are used linguistically to form spoken language. In addition, you will study how writers are able to
produce particular styles of language.
Why doesn’t everyone speak with the same accent? Why do we prefer some accents of English to others? What happens
when speakers of a language, such as English, come into contact with speakers of another language? This module addresses
such questions.

explores aspects of spoken and written discourse, investigating how they are constructed and understood.

This module affords the opportunity to explore what English was like earlier in its development (from Old English), to
account for its present form, and to understand current changes. It develops key transferable skills of close reading, and
encourages open-minded analysis of change, particularly in grammar and vocabulary.

The module looks at the major social factors that govern language use and language variation. It concentrates on the
linguistic expression of social status and group solidarity and the ways in which change in society is affecting language.

The module examines what English was like at the time of Shakespeare and focuses on important significant differences
(such as alternation between 'thou' and 'you') to promote fuller understanding of his plays. Rhetoric and contemporary
debates about language provide the necessary context for appreciation of Shakespeare's linguistic artistry and some
aspects of humour.

This module explores how language, both spoken and written, is structured above the level of the sentence. It considers
how linguistic knowledge and social factors combine to create meaning in discourse between addressor and addressee.

The module is designed to complement modules on LNG2100 History of the Language and LNG2102 Shakespeare by
focusing on the language of the period 1100-1450. An exploration of the main features of Middle English and the language
of important writers of the period such as Chaucer and Gower and Langland is complemented by a study of the main
changes in sounds and grammar and vocabulary during the period of rapid linguistic change preceding Modern English.

 This module builds on the work begun in the first year language modules. It gives students the opportunity to acquire
theoretical and conceptual knowledge of both phonetics and phonology, as well as the practical skills needed to be able to
produce, analyse and describe human speech sounds.

 This module is intended to build on the grammar elements of Year One. It enables students to gain confidence in the basic
linguistic descriptions of noun groups, verb groups and clauses, all vital for analytical work at degree level in language, and
for intending teachers on English at any level.
 The module looks at the origins and relatedness of varieties of English in Britain and overseas. It looks at the major
distinctive linguistic features of English around the world and offers the opportunity to undertake fieldwork and apply a
range of investigative techniques.

The module provides an opportunity to employ statistical methods to the analysis of linguistic style and to engage in
debates about authorship and the use of IT in handling spoken and written language data.
This module is designed to help students of language and communication to develop their cultural awareness and
intercultural competence and skills for communicating across cultures.

This module focuses on the roles played by language in facilitating - or obstructing - access to learning. As well as examining
educational language policy in the UK the module focuses on spoken language use in classrooms - teacher talk and talk
among learners - and on the teaching of literacy. Students are introduced particularly to Vygotskyan learning theory and are
expected to apply this in reflecting critically on their personal experience as learners.
The module explores the literature on gendered features of language use. It examines alleged sexist language use, male use
of language, cross gender and same sex talk and the relationship between power and gender and status as conveyed
through language use.

In this module we examine the roles played by English and other languages in the contemporary global linguistic ecology.
Students are encouraged to problematise different definitions of the concept of development, as it is applied to many poor
countries throughout the world, and to explore the language policies and planning which are associated with different
societal aims, both socio-political and economic. We give particular attention to the role of language(s) in educational
programmes and in access to literacy.
This module is designed to provide an opportunity for study of and reflection on theoretical, conceptual and political issues
of language use as they relate to the articulation of sexual identity, whether heterosexual, gay, lesbian or bisexual.

Language contact is one of the most dynamic and controversial fields in modern linguistic thought. This module examines
the effects of contact-induced language change upon English over the past millennium or more. It also looks at the effect
that English has had on other languages, both those which are spoken in predominantly 'anglophone' (English language-
dominant) areas and those which are used in non-anglophone areas. Ancient and modern contact effects will be examined
using a wide range of language material, and drawing attention, through English oriented examples, to some of the most
disputed questions in the study of creolistics and mixed languages.

This module investigates bilingualism as a socially and culturally contextualised phenomenon, beginning by identifying
processes involved in the acquisition of more than one language in the contexts of both the family and of a range of formal
educational settings. At the level of individual language use we tackle theories surrounding conversational code-switching,
and at the level of communities and societies we consider different models for the functional distribution of languages and
attempts to 'plan' language.

As a result of the course students should be able to approach confidently the language of literary text, both poetry and
prose. Through close analysis of language choices made by the writer we try to explain how particular effects are created.
The course enables primarily language students to gain confidence in talking about literary texts, and students whose main
focus is Literature to focus on how language is used for stylistic purposes.

This module introduces students to theory and method associated with linguistic ethnography through study of significant
research in this field. Students go on to design and conduct a small-scale research project based on ethnographic
microanalysis of communicative events within a community or institution.


This course introduces you to the principles and practice of good English language teaching. Issues dealt with during the
module include the history of language teaching and learning, communicative language teaching, testing and placing
students into the appropriate level, individual learner differences, grammatical terminology and the difference between
overt and covert grammar teaching, materials evaluation and development and planning ESOL programmes and lessons.

 Forensic linguistics concerns the application of linguistic science in the legal process, on analogy with forensic science and
forensic medicine. The law is overwhelmingly a linguistic institution. Laws are coded in language; legal processes, such as
court cases, take place overwhelmingly though language; legal contracts, such as those between us and our partners or
employers, are overwhelmingly language documents. Thus, both the law and the language of the law permeate our lives.
This module investigates the interface between language and the law.

What are the features of English which make it similar to other languages, how does it differ from other languages, and
which features of English make it difficult for non-native speakers to learn? What features of other languages do English-
speakers find difficult to learn? This module looks at the science of TYPOLOGY, the structural classification of languages,
and illustrates the range of phonological, morphological and syntactic features in the world's languages, ranging from
French and German, via Chinese and Arabic, to Esperanto and Klingon.
This module will explore a variety of past and present approaches to the study of language and identity. It will examine how
individual, social and institutional identities are constructed and their intrinsic relation to language and other socio-cultural
phenomena.

 The module explores the links between nationhood, identity, multi-lingualism and language use in a European context. It
focuses on the politics of language use within the modern nation-state, and the status of surviving minority languages, as
well as exploring the conflict that often exists between groups over their language rights.

introduces you to the art of writing short observational poems and examines the ways in which writers of poetry reflect on
their practice and improve.


considers the art of writing short stories, memoirs and biographical sketches.


will introduce you to the art of writing scripts for the stage, radio, television and film.


will introduce you to the art of writing scripts for the stage, radio, television and film.
This module introduces you to a range of poetry and, by following carefully designed exercises, you will experience writing
groups of poems. You will also practise the art of reading as a poet.

Building on the skills introduced by WRI 1001, students focus on writing for the stage and radio. Practical workshop
activities are backed up by the close-reading of published plays and a theatre visit
In this module, students explore the techniques of short fiction, including characterisation, narrative structure and the
epiphany. With the help of published examples, they produce complete short stories and reflect upon the nature of the
genre.

This module looks at poetry, fiction and scriptwriting in an introductory cluster of weeks that enables you to write across
the genres. You will also study one of these genres and undertake a research component that allows you to find out about
some aspect of the writer's world (literary agents, or small magazines, for example), or to research a possible career for
yourself (writing in education, working as an editor). Completing this module enables you to match the transferable skills of
creative writing (literacy, creativity, flexibility and reflectiveness) to a possible career.

This module builds on earlier exercises to allow you to experiment both in a range of poetic styles, but also to concentrate
upon a longer work of your own. You will also be guided in writing a reflection on what kind of poet you have become.

In this module, students concentrate on writing for film and television. They complete storylines, treatments and short
scripts, adding an awareness of the specific demands of writing for the screen to the understanding of plot, characterisation
and audience response developed in earlier scriptwriting modules
Building on the skills nurtured by WRI 2003, students work on longer, more complex stories or chapters of a novel. With
examples drawn from published material, they engage with multiple narratives, shifting viewpoints and generic
experimentation.

For this module, students undertake an extended project in a genre of their own choosing. This normally consists of 5000
words of prose or the equivalent in poetry or scriptwriting. The work receives intensive feedback during workshop sessions
and is accompanied by independent research and reading.
                                CREDITS
 SEMESTER                    AVAILABLE PER
MODULE RUNS   TOTAL CREDIT     SEMESTER


     S1            20             20


     S1            20             20




     S1            20             20




     S2            20             20

     S2            20             20




     S2            20             20




     S1            15             15




     S1            15             15




     S1            15             15




   S1 only         30             15
     S1            15             15
S1 only   30   15




  S1      15   15




  S2      15   15




  S2      15   15




S1 only   30   15




  S1      15   15




  S2      15   15




  S2      15   15


  S1      20   20


  S2      20   20




  S1      20   20
  S2       20   20




S1 and 2   30   15




S1 and 2   30   15




S1 and 2   30   15




S1 and 2   30   15




S1 and 2   30   15




S1 and 2   30   15




S1 and 2   30   15




S1 and 2   30   15




S1 and 2   30   15
   S1       20   20




   S2       20   20




   S1       20   20




   S2       20   20




S 1 and 2   40   20


S1 and 2    30   15




S1 and 2    30   15




   S2       15   15




   S2       15   15




   S1       15   15




   S1       15   15
  S2       15   15




  S2       15   15




  S1       15   15


  S1       15   15




S1 and 2   30   15




S1 and 2   30   15




  S2       15   15




  S2       15   15




  S2       15   15




  S2       15   15




  S2       15   15




  S1       15   15
       S1            20   20

       S2            20   20

S1 and 2 available
     S1 only         20   10




    S1 and 2         40   20




       S1            15   15


       S1            15   15




       S2            15   15


       S1            15   15




       S2            15   15




       S2            15   15




       S1            15   15


       S1            15   15


       S1            15   15

       S1            15   15




       S1            15   15


       S1            15   15




       S2            15   15
        S2                15




        S1           15   15




     S1 and 2        15   15




        S1           15   15




        S1           30   ?




        S1           15   15




        S1           15   15




        S2           15   15


        S2           15   15




        S1           15   15

S1 and 2 available
S1 only              20   10

S1 and 2 available
     S1 only         20   10

S1 and 2 available
     S1 only         20   10

S1 and 2 available
     S1 only         20   10
S1   15   15


S1   15   15


S2   15   15




S2   15   15


S2   15   15




S1   15   15


S1   15   15




S2   15   15
MODULE CODE   MODULE TITLE




DAN1000       WRITING DANCE




DAN1002       WESTERN THEATRE DANCE


DAN1003       DANCE PRACTICE EDUCATION




DAN1004       DANCE PRACTICE IN THE COMMUNITY




DAN1005       MAKING DANCE




DAN1006       DANCE MAKING AND PERFORMANCE




              THE MAKING OF MODERN DANCE
DAN1072       THEATRE
          REALISING PROJECTS - COMMUNITY
DAN2004   AND EDUCATION




DAN2005   COMPOSITION AND PERFORMANCE




DAN2006   MAKING DANCE 2




DAN2007   DANCE PRACTICE IN CONTEXT




          INITIATING PROJECTS - COMMUNITY
DAN2008   AND EDUCATION
          THE MAKING OF MODERN DANCE
DAN2072   THEATRE 2
DES1072   DESIGN FOR PERFORMANCE




DES2072   DESIGN FOR PERFORMANCE 2
DES2075   SCENOGRAPHY 1




          COSTUME DESIGN: INTERPRETATION
DES2076   AND CONSTRUCTION 1




          THE NATURE AND HISTORY OF
DRA1071   DRAMA: THE RISE OF THE THEATRE
          THE SECRET ART OF THE ACTOR:
          INTRODUCING THE HISTORICAL AND
DRA1072   CULTURAL ROLE OF THEATRE ACTING




          TEXT INTO ACTION: INTRODUCING
          THE DRAMATIC TEXT AND THE
DRA1073   PERFORMANCE TEXT




          THE PROCESS AND PURPOSE OF
          DRAMA: MODERN THEATRES IN
DRA2071   CONTEXT




          THE MAKING OF MODERN THEATRE:
DRA2072   PROCESS INTO PERFORMANCE




          DRAMA IN THE REAL WORLD: THE
          EFFICACY OF APPLIED THEATRE IN THE
DRA2073   COMMUNITY




          THE ROLE OF THE ACTOR AND THE
DRA2074   RISE OF THE DIRECTOR
          POPULAR THEATRE AND THE
DRA2075   INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION




          THE ROLE OF THE PLAYWRIGHT AND
DRA2076   THE IDEA OF THE PLAY




MUS1051   MUSIC AND SOUND PRACTICE


          INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL
          THEATRES: CONCEPTS AND
PTH1073   PROCESSES


          PHYSICAL THEATRES: CULTURAL AND
PT2079    PHILOSOPHICAL CONTEXTS




VT1072    VISUAL THEATRE




          MAKING OF MODERN VISUAL
VTH2072   THEATRE
MODULE DESCRIPTION                                                                           SEMESTER MODULE RUNS


DAN1000 is a compulsory module that introduces students to methods of close observation,
which facilitate their skills in identifying, describing and interpreting dance. Alongside
focused studio practice, students watch and write about live and recorded dance
performances using a range of practical, observational and textual frameworks to support
analytical description. Students may also investigate wider processes of dance
documentation, such as writing reviews, journals and critical reflection.                  S1


This compulsory module introduces students to selected histories of Western Theatre Dance,
studying theory alongside focused studio practice. The module outlines the development of
dance as an art form within western culture, looking at traditions and innovations in Europe
and America. Practical and theoretical approaches are used to identify and discuss the work
of key artists in relation to historic practices, concepts and contexts, which may include
developments of ballet, modern and post modern dance.                                        S2

Students select specific artists, styles and contexts to study in more depth, identifying how
historic dance practices respond to broader historic issues.                                  S1

DAN1004 is compulsory project based practice module were students are guided through the
creation of an applied dance project focusing on a range of informal community settings.
Students will identify and devise an appropriate project for a chosen setting. In this module
at Level 4 the students will not implement the project but present their plans with key
illustrations of practice in the controlled setting of the university.                        S2


This compulsory practice based module introduces students to dance making and movement
enquiry. Students will investigate composition, explore relationships and experiment with
movement through experiential analysis of contemporary and post-modern dance practice.
Alongside focused studio practice, students will develop their abilities in the devising of
movement and will present short choreographic studies. Students will demonstrate their
capacity to outline and discuss their practical and research processes.                     S1


Alongside focused studio practice, this compulsory semester two module further develops
the students' skills of devising and creating dance. The students will engage in the making,
rehearsal and performance of a small-scale dance piece under the direction of a tutor
undertaking the role of choreographer. The module focuses on areas such as developing
performance and technical ability as well as considering intentional points such as: creating
from an improvisational, conceptual or thematic / issue base. Throughout the devising
period, the students will explore approaches to movement making and composition in
preparation for public performance of the dance work.                                         S2

DAN1072 is a Level Four compulsory module for single honours Dance and Drama students.
The module introduces the fundamental elements of modern dance theatre in terms of
historical and socio-political contexts, choreographic treatment of the norms and codes of
dance theatre, and performance analysis of theoretical and creative strategies. The module
enables students to begin to acquire specific technical knowledge through




skills-based learning, and to investigate methods of theoretical enquiry through practical
research.
                                                                                             S1
This module is a compulsory project based practice module where students are expected to
demonstrate independence in the delivery of an applied dance project. Students are required
to develop and understand effective dance principles, alongside focused studio practice. The
students will implement a project proposal in their chosen setting and it will be presented
alongside a devised scheme of work. The project will be documented using industry models
for evaluating applied dance. Students will be assisted in fieldwork by working from a menu
of client groups who have been contacted and briefed by the module leader.                               2


Alongside focused studio practice, this semester one optional module expands student
understanding of dance making for performance under the direction of a tutor undertaking
the role of choreographer. The module focuses on areas such as developing performance and
technical ability and investigating dance in a Global context. Students will create movement
informed by Non Western dance traditions, Social and/or Popular dance genres,
underpinned by theory and cultural discourse. Throughout the devising period, students will
explore and apply approaches to movement making and composition in preparation for
public performance of the dance work.                                                                    1

Alongside focused studio practice, this semester two optional module allows students to
cultivate their dance making skills, offering space to develop their own artistic processes,
drawing from frameworks explored throughout the programme. The module focuses on
areas such as developing performance and technical ability, experimenting with
compositional approaches and investigating personal practice underpinned by independent
research. Students devise, rehearse, prepare and organise a public performance of their
work.                                                                                           S2


DAN2007 is a compulsory module which extends students understanding of current dance
practice by exploring histories and traditions of global, social and popular dance. Alongside
focused studio practice in international and social dance forms, students critically investigate
current scholarship, theories and methods of contextualising the cultural significance of
dance traditions. Students may also investigate wider processes of application, such as
ethnographic documentation. Within the range of subjects studied, students select examples
of practice and theory for more extended research and analysis.                                  S2

This module is a compulsory project based practice module were students are expected to
demonstrate independence in the creation of an applied dance project. Students will visit
and assess a community or education setting and then devise and plan an appropriate
project for the setting studied. This will be presented as an industry style proposal complete
with an associated scheme of work.                                                             S1
Students are required to develop and understand effective dance principles alongside
focused studio practice.                                                                       S2
                                                                                               S1 only
DES2072 is one of two compulsory Level Five modules for single honours Design for
Performance in the ‘research, analysis and projects’ strand of the programme, continuing the
established pattern of integrated theory and practice in the study of Design for Performance
and Scenography.                                                                               S1 only
DES2075 is a Level Five optional module and is available to single honours Dance and Drama,
Design for Performance and Visual Theatre students.

DES2075 concerns itself with the practice and theory of Scenography. The module will
introduce students to the principles and practice of stage design with emphasis on set as well
as costume design. The module will look at the ways in which space, time, light, sound,
colour and form can be composed, and used to influence and communicate with the
spectator.
The aim of this module is to open up the possibilities of stage design to all students
interested in design as a central element in the making of performance, and to engage the
students in a visual and creative response to music text, character, and shapes.
The student will gain skills in research critical analysis and visual communication.
                                                                                                 S1
DES2076 is a Level Five optional module and is available to single honours Drama, Dance,
Dance and Drama, Design for Performance and Visual Theatre students.
The module engages with different aspects of research, interpretation and construction of
costumes. It is intended for those who wish to specifically develop and produce costumes in
tandem to their other strands of inquiry.
The module includes an in depth investigation of the history of costumes. Through the
practical application of this research the students will engage with the development and
construction of full scale costumes . DRA1071 is one of three compulsory Level Four modules
for single honours Drama students, and one of two compulsory Level Four modules for joint
honours students combining Drama with another subject. The module provides different
learning environments in which the Drama students can begin their essential theoretical and
historical study of drama, focusing broadly upon the rise of Western European practices, but
drawing on contextual examples and theoretical perspectives from around the world.


The module defines fundamental concepts, examines theoretical perspectives and explores
diverse practices in the field of drama, subjecting each to critical scrutiny. The module
addresses at an introductory level the challenge of dramatic theory and its impact on our
understanding of practice, seeking preliminary answers to some fundamental questions:
What is drama? How did it originate and develop? What does it do? How does it work? What
is it for? Why do we need it?

The module also examines the nature and evolution of dramatic form, confronting the range                  1


DRA1071 is one of three compulsory Level Four modules for single honours Drama students,
and one of two compulsory Level Four modules for joint honours students combining Drama
with another subject. The module provides different learning environments in which the
Drama students can begin their essential theoretical and historical study of drama, focusing
broadly upon the rise of Western European practices, but drawing on contextual examples
and theoretical perspectives from around the world.


The module defines fundamental concepts, examines theoretical perspectives and explores
diverse practices in the field of drama, subjecting each to critical scrutiny. The module
addresses at an introductory level the challenge of dramatic theory and its impact on our
understanding of practice, seeking preliminary answers to some fundamental questions:
What is drama? How did it originate and develop? What does it do? How does it work? What
is it for? Why do we need it?

The module also examines the nature and evolution of dramatic form, confronting the range
of dramatic genres and styles as they appear in both historical and contemporary examples
of the dramatic text.
                                                                                                 S1 only
DRA1072 is one of three compulsory Level Four modules for single honours Drama students.
The module provides the Drama student with a foundation level of knowledge and
understanding of theoretical and critical perspectives on the art of the actor, on the history
of acting, and on the socio-cultural role of actors in different historical contexts. The module
provides a creative environment in which the individual student’s own performance
awareness of the art of the actor through history can be developed.                              S1


DRA1073 is one of three compulsory Level Four modules for single honours Drama students.
The module provides a Performance Laboratory environment in which the Drama students
can begin to experience the creation of small-scale practical production projects,
transforming different kinds of ‘text’ into dramatic action. The practical work in DRA1073 is
informed both by the theoretical and historical study of theatrical performance (DRA1071),
and by the investigation of the theory, history and role of the actor (DRA1072).              S2


DRA2071 is one of two compulsory Level Five modules for single honours Drama students,
and for joint honours students combining Drama with another subject. Focusing principally
on the Western context, the module places the development of modern drama in the
context of the arguments surrounding the essential processes involved in the making of
theatrical events, and the essential controversies surrounding what the purposes of drama
are said to be in its response to modernity. In contextualising modern drama and confronting
modern theatre processes via key practitioners, productions, and plays of the modern era,
students enter with this module into the crucial debate concerning the purpose, use and
value of drama, initiated by Plato and Aristotle and continued since.
                                                                                                S1 only

DRA2072 is one of two compulsory Level Five modules for single honours Drama students.
The module investigates and interrogates approaches to theatre making in the modern era.
Students in this module study key theatre practitioners in the history of Western modern
drama, and make work informed stylistically by an exploration and examination of their ideas
about acting, training, directing and the art of theatre production                          S2


DRA2073 is one of four optional modules offered at Level Five to single honours Drama
students, to joint honours students combining Drama with another subject, to students on
the single honours Dance and Drama degree programme, and to Music and Sound with
Drama students. DRA2073 is of particular relevance to students interested in ‘applied drama’
and ‘applied theatre’. The module provides the Drama student with a developed level of
practical knowledge and theoretical understanding of the uses, applications and value of
drama and theatre, in particular social or community contexts outside of the conventional
theatre environment.                                                                         S1


DRA2074 is one of four optional modules offered at Level Five to single honours Drama
students, to joint honours students combining Drama with another subject, to students on
the single honours Dance and Drama degree programme, and to Music and Sound with
Drama students. DRA2074 is of particular relevance to students interested in the art of the
theatre practitioner. The module is a practical and theoretical interrogation of the cultural
significance of acting and directing in the modern era of drama, and provides the Drama
student with a developed level of practical knowledge and theoretical understanding of the
skills, technique and role of both the actor and the director in modern theatre.                S1
DRA2075 is one of four optional modules offered at Level Five to single honours Drama
students, to joint honours students combining Drama with another subject, to students on
the single honours Dance and Drama degree programme, and to Music and Sound with
Drama students. DRA2075 is of particular relevance to students interested in examining the
historical rise of ‘popular theatre’ and ‘popular performance’. The module charts the origins
and development of various genres of popular theatre during the Industrial Revolution, and
provides the Drama student with a developed level of knowledge and understanding of the
experience of popular theatrical performance for the performer and the spectator.
                                                                                                    S1

DRA2076 is one of four optional modules offered at Level Five to single honours Drama
students, to joint honours students combining Drama with another subject, to students on
the single honours Dance and Drama degree programme, and to Music and Sound with
Drama students. The module is a practical and theoretical interrogation of the historical and
cultural significance of the playwright, and of the idea of the play-text.                    S1


MUS1051 is the introductory music/sound practice module for Drama and Media students.
The module will run alongside MUS1050 offering students the opportunity to study and
experiment with practical components in relation to the theory and history that is explored
throughout MUS1050.
Students will be introduced to a wide range of music for different media, research various
compositional practices and apply their findings in the realisation of a practical project, using
current industry standard digital music composition programmes.
                                                                                                    1 and 2

PTH1073 is the introductory module for the physical theatre pathway, and provides an
overview of the areas of debate concerning definitions and concerns of physical theatres (the
expressive body foregrounded; text), and the processes by which physical theatres find and
capture their expression (devising; ludic and physical improvisation; notation).              S2

The module will concentrate upon the writings, theories and practice around two centres of
development in two (sometimes opposing) schools of physical theatres, namely Jacques
Lecoq and the Western Europe tradition, and Jerzy Grotowski and Eastern Europe.                     S1


VTH1072 concerns itself with the practice and theory in the making and animation of specific
performance objects associated with traditional forms of performance now being defined as
part of Visual Theatre. The module will concern itself with the basic theory and practice of
the making and animation of masks, puppets and clowns.

Through theoretical examination and practical involvement the module addresses
preliminary answers to some fundamental questions: What is visual Theatre? How did it
originate and develop? How do we define it and what does it involve?
                                                                                                    S1

VTH2072 is the second (Level 5) Visual Theatre module in the ‘Visual Theatre strand of the
Drama and Dance and the Design for Performance programmes, continuing the established
pattern of integrated theory and practice in the study of Modern Visual Theatre. The module
develops theoretical and critical perspectives in the context of 20th century development of
Visual Theatre and it applies the results of focused research and laboratory studies in
enhanced practical production projects.                                                      S2
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                                                                         MODULE DESCRIPTION
 MODULE CODE             MODULE TITLE


                                             The module provides a broad introduction to the study of human
                                             geography, identifying and exploring key inter-relationships,
                                             namely between people, places and environments. The module
                                             outlines conceptual and theoretical approaches to the study of
                                             human geography. Attention focuses on the role of time, space
                                             and scale in human geography. In addition, the module
                                             introduces students to current debates, concerns and issues
                                             within the discipline. The module connects a knowledge and
                                             understanding of human geography with the development of key
GEO1030        INTRODUCING HUMAN GEOGRAPHIES transferable skills



                                                   The module focuses on the broad theme of ‘human geography in
                                                   action’ where students are introduced to the research process in
                                                   human geography and the idea of ‘practising’ human geography.
                                                   Students are guided through the research process, using local
                                                   fieldwork activities to gain experience of practising and
                                                   evaluating the effectiveness of a range of qualitative research
                                                   methods. In addition, key themes and case studies in cultural,
                                                   urban and environmental geography are used to exemplify
GEO1031        PRACTISING HUMAN GEOGRAPHIES        different ways in which human geography can be researched.


                                                   This is an introductory module in physical geography which looks
                                                   at basic concepts and their development. It outlines the physical
                                                   framework of the Earth’s surface and investigates the materials
                                                   and processes operating there. It covers basic aspects of
               INTRODUCING PHYSICAL                biogeography, climatology and geomorphology and links these to
GEO1032        GEOGRAPHIES                         human : environment interactions.


                                               This module will investigate a range of laboratory methods and
                                               equipment for the recording of physical geographical
                                               phenomena. It will demonstrate effective recording of laboratory
                                               observations and use of appropriate identification guides and
                                               keys. It will introduce statistical and presentational techniques
                                               appropriate to the handling of data collected on materials from
GEO1033        PRACTISING PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHIES our physical environment.



                                                   This module provides an introduction to generic and subject
                                                   specific skills in the geosciences (Geography, Earth and
                                                   Environmental Sciences) that students require to study, research
                                                   and succeed in their degree programme, and to engage with
                                                   lifelong learning. It includes learning and key skills, together with
                                                   more specialist skills including map skills, aerial photography,
                                                   satellite image interpretation, research skills, statistical analysis,
                                                   and fieldwork skills. The Personal Development Portfolio is
GEO1034        GEOGRAPHIC SKILLS                   introduced and monitored in this module during Level 4.
                                        A skills-based module which will use geographical knowledge to
                                        develop a range of subject-specific skills together with general
                                        ICT and communication skills. The module focuses on the
                                        handling, analysis and communication of spatial and graphical
                                        data and geo-information by providing an introduction to the
                                        principles, uses and practical skills of Geographical Information
                                        Systems (GIS), digital cartography and graphical software
GEO1035   GEO.COM                       packages.

                                        The module provides an introduction to the nature, structure
                                        and composition of the physical environment and the processes
          SCIENCE OF THE PHYSICAL       and interactions that operate within and between the various
GEO1130   ENVIRONMENT                   components.

                                        The module provides an introduction to practical skills in
                                        environmental science. It covers a range of laboratory practical
          PRACTISING ENVIRONMENTAL      and fieldwork investigations focusing on the effective recording,
GEO1131   SCIENCE                       analysis and interpretation of environmental data.


                                        This module aims to provide a suitable knowledge base allowing
                                        students to appreciate the origin, composition, dynamics and
                                        history of the Earth as a planet. It will show plate tectonics as a
                                        unifying concept in the geological sciences. It will illustrate the
                                        composition and formation of major mineral and rock groups
                                        and identify and classify the main marine invertebrate fossil
                                        groups. The module will provide skills suitable to the description,
                                        identification and classification of these geological materials. It
                                        will illustrate the principles of stratigraphy, correlation and
GEO1230   ROCKS, MINERALS & FOSSILS     dating.

                                        Introduction to a range of field and laboratory geological
                                        techniques covering the range of knowledge and skills that a
                                        geologist in training will need to successfully study and practice
GEO1231   GEOLOGICAL TECHNIQUES 1       geology at more advanced levels.


                                        In following this module students will investigate the
                                        relationships between the processes of weathering,
                                        transportation and deposition of surface materials. They will
                                        consider the methods for the monitoring and interpretation of
                                        contemporary processes of transport and deposition. Students
                                        will then progress to study these generic relationships and
                                        methods with reference to specific major surface processes and
GEO2066   GEOMORPHOLOGY                 environments.
GEO2068   BIOGEOGRAPHY
          ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION
GEO2122   CHEMISTRY
          COASTAL ZONE ENVIRONMENTS &
GEO3053   MANAGEMENT

                                        Heritage Landscapes explores the heritage debate, and analyses
                                        the reasons why preserving the past is considered important in
                                        post-industrial society. The focus is a contemporary
                                        consideration of the meanings attached to heritage by a variety
                                        of organisations and individuals. It seeks to challenge current
                                        attitudes to conservation, and develop a high level of critical
                                        thinking. Case studies include both urban and rural
                                        environments.
GEO3062   HERITAGE TOURISM
                                          In recent geological history 30% of the Earth’s land surface has
                                          been covered by glaciers, 10% is today. The whole global
                                          environment is dominated by Earth’s glacial character and an
                                          understanding of the Earth’s surface is impossible without an
GEO3068   SNOW & ICE ENVIRONMENTS         understanding of glaciers.




                                          One of the main aims of this module is to provide a holistic
                                          representation of the sub-continental culture breaking the
                                          borders of the individual nation state's boundaries. Whether it
                                          was under Hindu, Muslim or European rulers the South Asian
                                          cultural society represents a curious mixture of a number of
                                          religions, languages, norms and beliefs. Like Southern Europe,
                                          South Asia is criss-crossed by a number of races like the
                                          Australasians, Dravidians, Aryans, Mongolians coming as far as
                                          China and the Middle East who settled in the area centuries ago.
                                          Therefore even after 50 years of Partition of India and Pakistan
                                          or 25 years of independence of Bangladesh, the cultural
                                          expressions of any part of the sub-continent continues to
                                          represent a delicate blend of a pluralist society transcending the
                                          boundaries of religion and native culture.

GEO3065   POPULAR CULTURE OF SOUTH ASIA

                                          This module provides the knowledge which will enable students
                                          to recognise major taxa and to appreciate their evolutionary
                                          origins and relationships. It also provides the conceptual
                                          framework to understand these origins and relationships
                                          through study of the taxonomic hierarchy, the fossil record,
                                          phylogeny and the major events in the development of
SCI1402   BIODIVERSITY                    biodiversity.
                                          Introduces some basic concepts in ecology through practice in
                                          the field. It covers the basic skills required for ecological
SCI1403   ECOLOGY                         fieldwork including plant and animal , survey techniques and
                                          This module introduces the methods of the freshwater biologist
                                          necessary for the surveying of freshwater communities and
SCI1404   FRESHWATER ECOLOGY              biomonitoring. It also introduces some of the basic principles of
                                          provides an introduction to cellular physiology and biochemistry.
                                          Through a range of practical activities you will examine the
                                          molecular components that determine the structure,
                                          biochemical nature and physiology of different cells and will
                                          develop essential skills and confidence in scientific laboratory
                                          techniques. This module provides you with the background to
                                          understand biological phenomena at a variety of levels, from
                                          molecular through cellular, to complement the organ, whole
                                          organism and ecosystem levels covered in other year 1 modules.


SCI1406   CELLULAR FORM & FUNCTION
                                          will explore the nature of biological enquiry, the ways that
                                          biological knowledge develops, the contribution biology makes
                                          to society and the influence society has on both the speed and
                                          direction of research in the biological sciences.
SCI1407   BIOLOGY & SOCIETY
                                             investigates marine communities on shores and in deeper waters
                                             (using a research vessel) during a residential field course. In
                                             addition to developing further your field skills, you will have the
                                             opportunity to examine and identify animal and plant species
                                             found only in marine environments, and to understand their
          MARINE BIOLOGY (fieldcourse week   patterns of distribution.
SCI2309   11)
                                             provides a coverage of how genetic variation at the DNA and
                                             chromosomal level leads to variation in the phenotype and the
                                             potential consequences of this variation. This is a fundamental
                                             feature of life and central to any understanding of biology.
SCI2311   CELLULAR GENETICS
                                             examines the classic causes of disease and considers how
                                             diseases influence normal physiology. You will investigate
                                             diseases caused by external factors, such as invading organisms,
                                             or those caused by internal dysfunctions, such as specific gene
                                             abnormalities, autoimmune diseases or environmental factors.

SCI2313   BIOLOGY & DISEASE
                                             develops your understanding of the physiological mechanisms in
                                             animals and plants which are affected by environmental stress.
                                             Practical lab studies will help you to understand the impacts of
                                             the environment on organisms and to appreciate how
                                             environmental factors limit what organisms can do.

SCI2314   ENVIRONMENTAL PHYSIOLOGY
                                             explores some of the significant questions of the future that are
                                             posed by our population reaching seven billion. The module
                                             investigates the historical patterns of human population growth
                                             and takes an ecological perspective on our resource needs and
                                             environmental impacts. This will lead you to the development of
                                             the concepts of sustainability and environmental protection.

SCI2316   HUMAN POPULATION ECOLOGY
                                             outlines the recent progress made in the assessment of genetic
                                             variation within populations. You will study the genetic
                                             differentiation of populations using modern molecular genetic
                                             techniques and receive a grounding in some of the key genetic
                                             issues in society.

SCI3311   ECOLOGICAL GENETICS
                                             examines the unique nature of tropical habitats, including
                                             forests, savannas and coral reefs, and explores why tropical
                                             habitats are so species rich. Threats to these ecosystems, such as
                                             deforestation and exploitation, are examined, with an emphasis
                                             placed on the importance of incorporating local cultures into
                                             addressing conservation problems.
SCI3310   TROPICAL ECOLOGY
SCI3312   ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE               #####################################################
                                             Recent scientific developments involving biology, particularly at
                                             the molecular level, have included the development of DNA
                                             fingerprinting, the Human Genome Project, Genetically Modified
                                             Organisms (GMOs) and stem cell research. This module
                                             considers the inter-relationship between biology and society,
                                             focusing on recent themes and developments and the underlying
                                             science behind these topics. It will consider the contribution
                                             biology makes to society and the influence society has on both
                                             the speed and direction of research in the biological sciences.


SCI3314   CURRENT ISSUES IN BIOLOGY
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MODULE CODE   MODULE TITLE




MED1040       DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY




              FOUNDATIONS OF PR: HISTORY &
MED1052       CONCEPTS




MED1055       MEDIA RELATIONS




MED1056       WRITING FOR THE MEDIA




MED1057       COMMUNICATING THROUGH DESIGN




MED1201       EDITING




MED1202       SOUND FOR PICTURE




MED1204       UNDERSTANDING VISUAL CULTURES
MED1205       SINGLE & MULTI-CAMERA
MED1207       MEDIA & SOCIETY




MED1210       PRODUCTION COORDINATION
MED1211   MEDIA LAW




          SCRIPT TO SCREEN: LOCATION
MED1212   SCOUTING/CASTING




MUS1001   MUSIC GENRES AND SOUND SYSTEMS




MED2050   CREATIVE ADVERTISING




MED2052   INTEGRATED BRAND CAMPAIGNS




MED2069   PR CAMPAIGNS




MED2070   CLIENT LED CAMPAIGN
MED2080   PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSUASION




          CREATIVE RESEARCH METHODS AND
MED2082   PROFESSIONAL ETHICS




          CULTURAL REPRESENTATIONS AND
MED2201   THE MEDIA




          MUSIC VIDEO (OPTION PLEASE CHECK
MED2204   WITH LOUISE DAVIES)




          MEDIA GENRES AND NARRATIVE
MED2214   THEORY
MED2215   ANALYSING AUDIENCES




MED2217   FACT TO FICTION: KEY DEBATES




          SPECTACLES, BODIES AND OTHER
          PLEASURES: CONCEPTS IN
MED2227   TELEVISION, ANIMATION AND FILM




MED3001   IDENTITIES




MED3002   MEDIA POLICY




          MUSIC COMPOSITION AND SOUND
MUS2002   DESIGN
          MUSIC SOUND AND THE MOVING
MUS2003   IMAGE
MUS2004   MUSIC AND MEDIA




MED3001   IDENTITIES




MED3002   MEDIA POLICY
          MEDIA POLICY AND POLITICAL
MED3058   COMMUNICATION
                                                                                      SEMESTER
MODULE DESCRIPTION                                                                   MODULE RUNS   TOTAL CREDIT

covers various genres within photography such as landscape, portrait,
architecture, pictorial and other areas. Each session will typically consist of a
lecture, workshop and a tutorial / seminar. You will consider composition,
framing, colour and editing. All work will be undertaken using digital
technology and basic training in the use of cameras and Photoshop will be
provided.                                                                           S2                         20

introduces you to public relations focusing on definitions, the development of
the profession, key theoretical concepts and some of the current issues,
including issues of ethics. It provides a solid grounding for all subsequent
modules on the degree.                                                         S1                              20

is key to public relations and every PR professional will need to have a clear
understanding of the media and how to work with the media. Topics covered
include audience selection, selling in stories and working with the differing
agendas of different media.                                                    S1                              20

gives you the chance to practice and develop skills in writing. Teaching will
take a practical approach and students will write material including press
releases, news stories and features. This is a key skill which is expected of
entrants to the profession.                                                         S2                         20

introduces you to a range of production skills including web page creation and
the use of Photoshop. The module will give you a good understanding of how
design can be used to reinforce specific communication messages.               S2                              20


This module introduces the essential element of editing and forms the basis of
the practical and conceptual understanding of digital non-linear editing, using
industry standard software. Editing is one of the most important parts of the
production process and students need to understand its importance and the
craft skills involved before developing their production abilities.             S2                             20



considers the theory and practice associated with film sound, and particularly
post-production sound design. You will be subject to both relevant theory and
the technology necessary for successful capture of audio suitable for film. The
module will be assessed by two pieces of interrelated coursework. You will
record all of the sound for a short digital movie, using only one microphone
and a digital recorder, and have the opportunity to explore the perceptual
properties of sound and manipulate it for dramatic effect with industry
standard software. Keeping a production diary will reflect your knowledge and
comprehension of the subject as gained over the duration of the module.         S2

introduces you to ways in which you can think about, and thus critically
examine, the visual and visualisation. Engaging with a variety of theoretical
approaches, you will be offered opportunities to actively engage with visual
technologies and experiences and to apply and problematise critical
approaches through reflection upon your experiences.                          S1
                                                                              S1
introduces you to technical theory and the professional language of camera operation within multi and single camera operation contexts. The module examine
                                                                              S2

This module introduces students to the principles and concepts that are
central to the role of a Production Co-ordinator within the cultural industries.
As well as gaining an understanding of the production process, students will
be introduced to some of the key elements associated with the role – namely:
research, finance, health and safety and a range of administrative task and
duties.                                                                          S1                            20
This module introduces the key issues and debates that relate to the cultural
industries in terms of defamation, obscenity, copyright and the protection of
intellectual property in a digital World.                                        S1   20


This module introduces students to the principles of finding suitable locations
and the procedures involved in casting for the production. The module aims
to give students a basic understanding of location scouting and casting and
will give them the opportunity to investigate these important production
considerations and to understand the procedures involved in both areas.         S1    20

This module analyses the ways in which music is categorized and formally
recognised. In doing so it will develop your knowledge of a variety of music
styles and consider the social, cultural, economic and political influences that
order our musical expectations. In addition, you will examine the
technological developments that have influenced the sonic landscape of music
and sound production.                                                            S1   20

For this module, students will respond to a series of live briefs working in
creative teams as art directors and copywriters exploring the relationships
between advertising, production companies, conceptual thinking, writing,
teamwork and design.

By the end of the module, students will assemble a portfolio with a selection
of their best work that will be the starting point for the creation of a
professional                                                                     S1   20




This module focuses on the development of branding and the changing role
of advertising, promotion and design and will enable students to develop a
critical and practical understanding of how branding is used in modern
societies and institutions to contemporary branding and its contexts.

The module introduces students to a range of contemporary approaches to
branding, and situates its development in the context of broader social and
historical shifts. These include the emergence of consumer cultures, the
changing media environment, the role of design and promotion in
contemporary economies, and impact of globalisation. This module
encourages students to consider the range of activities that comprise the
development of an advertising and brand strategy, from researching and
defining objectives, through targeting audiences, media selection, to testing,
implementation and evaluation across a range of applications.
                                                                                 s1   20

builds on the previous introductory work and gives you a deeper
understanding of aspects of campaign planning and implementation. Planned
campaigns are central to public relations and you will analyse a number of
campaigns in depth. Teaching will also focus on the management aspects of
running a successful campaign.                                             S1         20

You will combine with those in years 1 and 3 of the course to implement a real
PR campaign for a real client. As a year 2 student, you will be expected to take
some leadership roles in your teams.                                             S2
This module has a strong communication component, emphasising the
discursive elements of a variety of written and visual texts. The module
introduces a range of supporting theories, after which students work with
models of audience consumption and reception and visual and discursive
techniques aimed at producing impact, changing opinions and behaviours.
Students analyse a variety of media and case studies and apply a number of
rhetorical and persuasive techniques to their own practice. The module also
discusses the way biology and psychology, precondition certain responses and
how psychologists have tried to understand the intricacies of persuasion.
Students are asked to reflect upon the types of emotional responses triggered
by a range of media texts and visuals.                                        S2     20

This module provides an overview of the main research methodologies in
communications. Students learn to identify, justify and implement appropriate
methods and techniques, in accordance to the topic and type of the research
project. Students also think independently and reflect upon the ethical
constraints of research and professional conduct.                             S1     20



This module gives you the opportunity to study cultural representations across
a range of different media forms. It will develop your understanding of
representational systems and encourage critical engagement with issues of
naturalisation, marginalisation and exclusion. You will also also be introduced
to a range of representational forms and practices, identifying links between
representational systems and the production of meaning / identity. At the end
of the module, you will have knowledge and understanding of various
representational systems and theories in a range of different contexts.
Moreover, you will have learnt how to express these understandings with
persuasion and cogency in your oral and written work.                           S1   20


This module introduces you to the academic and cultural theory of popular
music applied to the production of music videos. Combining your
understanding of the industrial contexts in which music videos are produced
with the development of technical skills gained in year 1, you'll produce a
music video of your own, able to satisfy the various needs of multi-channel,
niche-audience music television. Issues relating to copyright will be discussed
and the planning of post-production will also be included.                      S1   20



This module will investigate – through a variety of topical examples – how
genres are formed and reworked and how narratives are constructed within
the complex interrelations among texts, industries, audiences and historical
contexts. It seeks to give students an opportunity to study a number of genres
and their narrative construction in contemporary media. The module enables
students to do in-depth work on genre and narrative theories – from
structuralist approaches to postmodern analyses – and apply them to the
media texts studied on the module. At the end of the module, students will
have knowledge and understanding of various manifestations of media genres
and an appreciation of the cultural interactions with industries, audiences,
and broader contexts. Moreover, students will have learnt how to express
these understandings with persuasion and cogency in their written and oral
work.                                                                          S1    20
aims to provide you with a range of approaches to the understanding of
audiences and methods of researching and theorising those audiences. You
will experience a range of texts in a variety of media. Consideration will be
given to the role of the media producer in audience creation and evolution,
including the role of new media and new technology in the creation of
contemporary audience practices.                                                S2   20


The module engages with key ideas regarding film and television in relation to
the factual and fictional representation of the world. It emphasises that fact
and fiction are part of a scale of representations which include documentary
formats, reality television, drama documentaries, dramatisations of factual
content, and fiction films and television drama. It examines the impact of new
technologies on how ‘the real’ is constructed and highlights changes to the
concept of ‘witness’ (Ellis 2000) due to an increase in mobile recording
technologies.                                                                  S1    20


 offers a range of approaches to the analysis of media. Focus here is on
contemporary media theories, which will inevitably change as time progresses
but currently revolve around issues of spectacle, the embodied experience of
viewing film and television, notions of the uncanny valley and the spectacle of
new technologies, convergence, aesthetics, the global, and viewing pleasures.
The module is designed to reflect changes in direction of media theory, by
emphasising new developments in media technologies and the effect this has
on our thinking.                                                                s2   20

This module takes as its key themes the concepts of public/national identities
and private/personal identities. Students will be encouraged to critically
investigate the nature of identity and to form ideas around political
constraints, bodily limitations, personal freedoms and notions of belonging
that inform an interrogation of ‘the subject’.                                 S1


This module invites students to take a wider view of media events and issues
and to understand the relationship between social, cultural and technological
change and media performance within both national and international
contexts. The module seeks to develop awareness and understanding of a
variety of issues relating to policy making from 1945 to the present and
includes for example, ownership, the underlying principles, current practice
and developing trends within Public Service Broadcasting, the impact of the
private sector and comparative models of regulation in Europe. The module
also encourages students to explore issues such as normative and radical
representations and ideology.                                                 S1     30


This module offers students an opportunity to apply their skills and compose
and/or design music and sound to a proposed brief. Students will make use of
the recording studio and further develop their skills in using digital music
production tools. Students will learn the basic techniques of sound diffusion
and surround sound mixing. The final composition/sound design will be
performed in a live setting. The aim of this module is to allow students to
investigate and construct stand-alone creative compositions/sound designs
using the technologies and skills already obtained in order to find their own
aesthetic.                                                                    s2     20
This module critically examines the relationship between music and moving
images in cultural contexts such as film, television, computer, video games,
and interactive performance. Students will interrogate the communicative
potential of musical scores and soundtracks and use tools of semiotic analysis
to explore the discourses of visual culture and how they are amplified by
ascribed non-visual (sonic) traits. Equally the applied use of soundscapes,
incidental music, and songs is a significant tradition in live performance and
theatre. The analysis and deconstruction of music and sound in these
performance texts lies happily alongside its analysis in visual media and will
also be considered.                                                            S2                                   20
                                                                               S1                                   key
This module develops year 1 considerations of the mediation of popular music by offering a detailed analysis of the 20 media influences that are involved in th

This module takes as its key themes the concepts of public/national identities
and private/personal identities. Students will be encouraged to critically
investigate the nature of identity and to form ideas around political
constraints, bodily limitations, personal freedoms and notions of belonging
that inform an interrogation of ‘the subject’.                                 S1                                  15


This module invites students to take a wider view of media events and issues
and to understand the relationship between social, cultural and technological
change and media performance within both national and international
contexts. The module seeks to develop awareness and understanding of a
variety of issues relating to policy making from 1945 to the present and
includes for example, ownership, the underlying principles, current practice
and developing trends within Public Service Broadcasting, the impact of the
private sector and comparative models of regulation in Europe. The module
also encourages students to explore issues such as normative and radical
representations and ideology.                                                 S1 only                              30

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MODULE CODE   MODULE TITLE                  MODULE DESCRIPTION

                                            Introductory Psychology provides foundation knowledge for subsequent levels (single and joint honours in psychology). It
                                            introduces students to approaches and concepts central to the study of behaviour, exploring how processes underlying
                                            behaviour work (such as perception, sensation, and memory) and how human beings are embedded in their world (e.g., by
                                            way of their shared biology, learned knowledge and individual differences). In this way, the module aims to equip the
                                            student with a broad understanding of basic theories and concepts in psychology and of the range of interrelated
PSY1101       INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY       approaches towards the psychological study of human behaviour.
                                            This module aims to develop students’ knowledge of key areas of Applied Psychology, enabling students to understand,
                                            discuss and critically evaluate the research, both within a framework of psychological theory and in terms of practical
PSY2010       APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY            implications.
                                            The module will provide a broad and up-to-date background and critical examination of theory and research and their
              PERSONALITY SOCIAL AND        applications in relation to three major areas of psychology: personality and individual differences, social psychology and
PSY2101       DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY      developmental psychology.

                                            This module will brings together the study of cognitive science (thinking, language, emotions, memory, attention and
                                            perception) with biological psychology (structure and function of the central nervous system and peripheral nervous
                                            system, neuroscience and biological basis of behaviour). The cognitive component will cover the major theories which seek
                                            to explain important cognitive processes, and the evidence which supports or contradicts such theories. The biological
              COGNITIVE AND BIOLOGICAL      component of the module will cover the structure and functioning of the nervous system, and some of the methods by
PSY2103       PSYCHOLOGY                    which the brain may be studied.

                                            This module provide a good general background in social psychology. In this module students critically examine major
                                            areas of social psychological research and apply this to real world scenarios; they learn about the unique contribution of
                                            social psychology to the understanding of human behaviour in a social context. Students will further develop their skills in
PSY2106       SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY             the oral and written presentation of information and in informed, critical discussion of issues.

                                            The module will address the processes involved in key aspects of human development and their relevant applications in
                                            real world settings. It will focus mainly (though not exclusively) on development in childhood including areas such as
                                            cognition, memory, language, emotional, social development. Emphasis will be placed on the evaluation of key theories
PSY2107       DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY      and psychological research that have informed our understanding of development in these areas.
                                            One of the most obvious things we notice in our everyday lives is that not everybody behaves the same way. The course
              PERSONALITY & INDIVIDUALITY   will cover the main personality theories, intelligence, the ways psychologists measure individual differences and abnormal
PSY2108       DIFFERENCES                   behaviour.
                                               Cognitive Psychology is a branch of Psychology that investigates internal mental processes. The core research focus of
                                               Cognitive Psychology is on how people acquire, process, and store information. Three components essential to this are
                                               attention, perception, and memory. This module will examine both classic and contemporary research that has led to the
                                               development of theories regarding how attention, perception, and memory function. It will also examine how each of these
                                               components interact during everyday tasks. For example, a driver is constantly bombarded with visual stimuli such as other
          ATTENTION, PERCEPTION AND            cars, pedestrians, scenery etc. A driver, however, needs to be able to pick out road signs (attention), read them
PSY2109   MEMORY                               (perception), and access their meaning so that the instructions can be followed (memory).

                                               This module aims to provide a critical understanding of the application of cognitive psychological science to thinking,
PSY2110   THINKING, LANGUAGE & EMOTION         emotion, and language as well as providing topics required by the British Psychological Society.

                                               This module will study the human nervous system, including its structure and functioning. There will be a particular focus
                                               upon the brain. Students will learn in detail the processes by which messages are passed through the system, and the way it
                                               interacts with the hormones of the endocrine system in order to preserve life. The methods by which the brain is commonly
                                               researched will also be explored in order to provide a basis for understanding much current research and theorising in
PSY2111   BIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY                psychology.

                                               Work Psychology is concerned with the application of theoretical perspectives and insights from other core areas of the
                                               discipline to issues such as employee selection, training, stress and stress management and job design. It also contributes
                                               to the study of employee well-being and effective management and is concerned with the experience of women and
                                               minorities in the work place. All of these issues feature in this module which also provide a grounding for those students
PSY3103   WORK PSYCHOLOGY                      who may be considering post-graduate qualifications in this area.

                                               This module aims to provide a critically evaluative understanding of conceptual issues in the scientific study of mind, body,
PSY3105   MIND, BODY AND CONSCIOUSNESS         and behaviour as well as providing topics required by the British Psychological Society.

                                         This module will examine various aspects of substance misuse (including the misuse of alcohol) from a psychological
                                         perspective which will also be informed by other academic perspectives, such as those of brain science and sociology,
                                         respectively. In this way students are helped to develop a more complete understanding of the role of learning and reward
                                         in the development of substance misuse than would be possible with one academic perspective alone. A broad range of
                                         psychological consequences of substance misuse, such as memory impairments, will also be studied. Psychological
PSY3108   PSYCHOLOGY OF SUBSTANCE MISUSE interventions for substance misuse will also be examined.
                                        This module will introduce students to the study of abnormal psychology and psychiatric disorders. It aims to provide them
                                        with a thorough understanding of a variety of perspectives in psychology and how they apply to specific mental disorders.
                                        Students will develop their understanding and the relative merits of a medical/clinical model (diagnosis, and treatment) of
                                        specific disorders, which will include schizophrenia (and other personality disorders), attention-deficit/hyperactivity
                                        disorders, Bipolar-mood disorders and Cognitive disorders related to aging and autism. This module has been designed to
          CLINICAL AND ABNORMAL         encourage students to critically analyse the medical model of mental disorders, as seen from the historical, social,
PSY3109   PSYCHOLOGY                    psychopharmacological (neuroscience/neuropsychological) and medical perspectives.


                                        The module will use key arguments from critical psychology to evaluate traditional models and images of childhood,
                                        normative goals of development, and research methods that underpin much of traditional developmental psychology and
                                        educational policy. The module will provide a theoretical and practical framework for contemporary research practice.
          CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES IN      Ethical issues associated with carrying out research within a range of settings, and particularly with children, will be
PSY3110   DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY      discussed, especially in relation to carrying out research ‘with’ children and also from a ‘reflexive’ practitioner perspective.


                                        The module will introduce students to the multi-disciplinary nature of the study of early childhood. Importantly, the
                                        conceptual tools for sociological, educational and health analysis in levels two and three of the programme are established
                                        in this module. Key issues and theoretical perspectives in the study of health, development and learning are introduced and
                                        a sociological analysis is applied to the constructions of childhood, family and society. It is intended that students will be
                                        introduced to aspects of the physical, social and emotional development of children and how this is affected by the social
          INTRODUCTION TO EARLY         and cultural context in which they live. A critical analytical framework is introduced. Students will have opportunities to
SPY1006   CHILDHOOD STUDIES             explore common health challenges that influence children’s potential for growth and development.

                                        explores traditional and current sociological thinking in the context of childhood. It acknowledges that relatively new
                                        empirical and theoretical work has advocated the conceptual autonomy of children and childhood and recognises that
                                        childhood deserves to be at the centre of a sociological analysis rather than linked to other groups. Both micro (social
                                        psychological) and macro (structural) approaches are taken to the sociology of childhood as the module prepares you for
SPY1070   THE SOCIOLOGY OF CHILDHOOD    more advanced sociological analysis in years 2 and 3.

          INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION     offers an overview of the interdisciplinary study of education as a process and considers how this plays a key role in shaping
SPY1071   STUDIES                       both the identity of children and young people and the experience of childhood and youth.

          INTERDISCIPLINARY CHILDHOOD   introduces you to the multi-disciplinary nature of the study of childhood and youth and, importantly, reinforces the
SPY1074   STUDIES                       conceptual tools for sociological, psychological and educational analysis in levels two and three of the programme.
                                                This module seeks to provide foundation knowledge on the different social and cultural theories that underpin
                                                contemporary sociological analysis. It will provide introductory outlines of a range of relevant theories, both sketching their
                                                salient points and exploring how they relate to and contrast with other contemporaneous theories, and how the theories
                                                make different claims to be scientific, ideological and theoretical. As well as providing an overview of different ways in
                                                which theorists have thoughts about modern and contemporary societies, the module will focus on how we apply
          INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL AND            theoretically – how we use theories to understand particular social issues and problems, using a case study approach, and
SPY1075   CULTURAL THEORY                       the module will encourage students to have an awareness of how they think about and apply theories.

                                           This module seeks to provide foundation knowledge on the theoretical understanding of the state and civil society in a
                                           global world, recognising that sociologists require an understanding of the political and political economic dimensions of
                                           social and cultural life. The module provides a foundational knowledge on the key concepts, ideas and arguments
                                           sociological thinkers use to understanding the relationship between the global and the national, the civil and the political,
                                           the private and the public, and the ordered and the violent – both in respect of violence and the state and the political
                                           economy of the state. This knowledge is delivered within a learning and assessment strategy that emphasises the skills of
                                           desk research and presentation skills that are essential to a good academic and also transferable skills for a wider
SPY1076   GLOBALISATION, STATE AND SOCIETY marketplace.

                                                This is an introductory module, which will offer Sociology students the opportunity to appreciate, analyse and understand
          CONTEMPORARY BRITAIN, CHANGES         a range of key continuities and changes in the social structure of contemporary British society. In particular it will consider
SPY1077   AND CONTINUITY                        the nature of ongoing social inequality ; how this is measured, theorised and explained and its consequences analysed .


                                                An introduction to the art of thinking sociologically. Students will engage intensively with Zygmunt Bauman and Tim May’s
                                                book Thinking Sociologically to develop their ability to reflect on the challenges, choices and constraints that we all
                                                routinely face in our lives, and to explore the underlying assumptions and tacit expectations which structure our view of the
                                                world. The module will encourage students to defamiliarise their lives, to explore a range of sociological concepts and
                                                approaches, and to reason effectively about the relation of human agency and social structure. Students will study the
                                                ‘micro’ and its dialogical relation to the ‘macro’ – i.e. how we create and sustain meaningful social relationships,
SPY1078   SELF AND SOCIETY                      organisations and systems, and how, in turn, those relations, organisations and systems impact on human agents.
SPY2014   SOCIOLOGY OF CONFLICT                 You will have the opportunity to explore your personal beliefs, assumptions and expectations about childhood, youth, family and society, and the ways in which t


                                         The module will provide students with an understanding of some of the key conceptual and theoretical approaches to the
                                         study of youth and childhood in contemporary societies. It will adopt a primarily sociological framework to explore the
                                         relationship between theory, policy and practice as these both reflect and impact upon the changing experiences of
                                         children and young people. The aim of the module is also therefore to allow students to examine the work of major
                                         contemporary social theorists through the study of youth and childhood issues. Understanding contemporary youth
                                         transitions requires an analysis of the social construction of youth and childhood in relation to questions of inequality and
SPY2016   CHILDHOOD AND YOUTH IN CONTEXT social exclusion on the grounds of class, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation and disability.
                                            This module will offer students the opportunity to analyse and critically understand key continuities and changes in the
          CONTINUITY AND CHANGE IN          social structure of contemporary British society. In particular it will consider the nature of ongoing social inequality ; how
SPY2018   CONTEMPORARY BRITISH SOCIETY      this is theorised, measured, explained and its consequences analysed .


                                            This module seeks to build on the work undertaken in Level 1, especially in SPY1010 Self & Society and to complement that
                                            done in the Level II module SPY2013 Identity, Difference & Diversity. This will be achieved by exploring the contested and
                                            multi-layered concept of identity within contemporary society. This exploration will consider both different dimensions of
                                            the study of identity and different levels of analysis, taking these as potentially complementary and rival. Thus the module
                                            will involve the study of individual, social and collective identity. It will also consider clearly structured elements of identity
          INDIVIDUAL, SOCIAL & COLLECTIVE   associated with modernity such as social class and national identity, and will critically consider arguments that these retain
SPY2112   IDENTITY                          or have lost relevance within contemporary society.

                                            This module enables you to understand these differing legal and policy contexts by situating them within a more general
                                            exploration of the concepts of need, rights and responsibilities as they apply to the state, the family, the child and the
          IDENTITY, DIVERSITY AND           young person. The module also provides a conceptual framework to help identify and analyse the focus and structure of
SPY2113   DIFFERENCE: SEXUALITY GENDER      some of the main services for children, young people and their families.


                                            This module establishes a global perspective on the study of children, families and young people. It adopts a comparative
                                            approach, drawing on differences within the European experience, and expanding to global dimensions to consider
                                            experiences in culturally different and developing societies. The aim is to consider how constructions of childhood, family
                                            and youth are shaped by interactions between cultural representations and political and economic structures in differing
          INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES ON     social contexts. Global influences and an understanding of globalisation trends also increasingly shape the social and
SPY3003   CHILDREN & FAMILIES               cultural experiences of children and families and global interconnectedness is an important issue to consider.
                                            One of the most attractive recent lines of criticisms of the emergent field of studies in sexuality concerns the nature of
                                            conceptual thinking and theoretical study. Although it deconstructs medico-moral and legal-political pathologies and
                                            prejudices, and disrupts the ‘normal’ understanding of sexual identities, relations, behaviours and acts with subversive
                                            bodies of knowledge, it still presents itself in a scientific, rationalist and forensic form. In doing so it fails to account for the
                                            phenomenology of embodiment – the messy physicality and material location of the sensuous and desire with sexual
                                            bodies. This model focuses attention on the key concerns of this new sociology of sexuality – engaging with the sexual self
                                            as an embodiment, sexual ethics as a key discourse in understanding permission, prohibitions and regulations of sexual
                                            behaviour and acts, and exploring diverse sexual desires. This new sociology seeks to explore the sexual self and body and
                                            its differences and diversity, bodies of knowledgontextual examples and theoretical perspectives from around the world.


SPY3014   DESIRE, IDENTITY AND DIFFERENCE   The module defines fundamental concepts, examines theoretical perspectives and explores diverse practices in the fie
                             The module engages with contemporary debates about the nature and implications of ‘risk’ in late modern societies. It
                             does so by critically analysing various theoretical contributions to those debates, including the work of Ulrich Beck. It is
                             Beck’s view that the key characteristic of late modern societies is that they are dominated by new and uncontrollable types
                             of risk; that these risks threaten life as we know it; and that there is an increasing awareness of risk amongst the general
                             population that opens up the possibility for a new politics of risk that will lead towards an ecological democracy. Together,
                             these are claimed to produce “the risk society”. By referencing the ordinary and extraordinary risk experiences of everyday
SPY3020   THE RISK SOCIETY   life, the module subjects Beck’s thesis to rigorous analysis, and offers some alternative analyses.
  SEMESTER                     CREDITS AVAILABLE PER
 MODULE RUNS   TOTAL CREDIT          SEMESTER




S1 and 2                  30                       15


S1 only                   30                       30


S1                        30                       30




S2                        30                       30




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To be confirmed


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MODULE CODE   MODULE TITLE




              HISTORICAL AND SOCIAL ANALYSIS
SPT1520       OF SPORT




SPT1720       SPORT AND OTHER AGENDAS




              WORKING WITH CHILDREN AND
SPT1521       YOUNG PEOPLE




              LEADERSHIP & VOLUNTEERING FOR
SPT1722       SPORT



              COACHING AND LEADERSHIP:
SPT1724       THEORY AND PRACTICE




SPT1921       FOUNDATION OF PHYSIOLOGY




              EXERCISE AND RECREATIONAL
SPT1922       THERAPY

              FOUNDATIONS IN SPORTS
SPT1923       THERAPY




SPT1924       FOUNDATIONS OF KINESIOLOGY




SPT2420       SPORT & EXERCISE BIOMECHANICS
SPT2422   SPORT & EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY




SPT2424   SPORT & EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY




          CHILDHOOD SPORT AND PHYSICAL
SPT2521   CULTURE




          CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES IN SPORT
SPT2522   SOCIOLOGY




          GLOBAL SPORT AND
SPT2721   COMMERCIALISATION




          SPORT MANAGEMENT AND EVENT
SPT2722   MANAGEMENT



SPT2920   APPLIED ANATOMY



SPT2921   APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY
          SPORTS AND EXERCISE
SPT2922   REHABILITATION




SPT3420   APPLIED SPORT & BIOMECHANICS




SPT3421   APPLIED EXERCISE BIOMECHANICS




SPT3422   APPLIED SPORTS PHYSIOLOGY




SPT3423   APPLIED SPORTS PHYSIOLOGY




SPT3424   APPLIED SPORT PSYCHOLOGY




SPT3425   APPLIED EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY
                        CHILD WELFARE AND
SPT3520                 SAFEGUARDING IN SPORT




SPT3522                 YOUTH CULTURES AND LIFESTYLES




                        SPORT AND CONTEMPORARY
SPT3721                 ISSUES FORUM



SPT3724                 SPORT POLICY AND PRACTICE




                        STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING
SPT3921                 ISSUES FOR THERAPISTS




SPT3922                 FUNCTIONAL REHABILITATION



SPT3923                 MANUAL THERAPY 2



*May only be taken
by students taking an
Atheletics Trainers
Programme or a
Physiotheraphy
degree
                                                                                                       SEMESTER
MODULE DESCRIPTION                                                                                     MODULE RUNS


introduces you to the role of sport in society, from historical beginnings and development, to
global expansion and commercialism. You will be encouraged to consider how the social
structure, significance and values attached to sport are shaped through history and culture. This
will be achieved through a careful mapping of the significant societal and sporting developments
which coalesced to produce modern sport, and secondly, through an exploration of sport on a
national and global scale; as a national pastime, as a political vehicle, as an international event,
and a global industry.                                                                                 S1


introduces you to how sport has been incorporated into a vast array of agendas which would not
be considered relevant to the traditional expectation of developing athletes. The study of the
mechanics of how sport has engaged with other areas highlights the opportunities that are
available beyond the obvious sports related employments.                                               S2


 provides an introduction to this specialised working environment and investigates the
infrastructures and policies that legitimise the roles, responsibilities and functions that are
undertaken. The module examines the historical development of sports policy with regards to
children and young people, and how it has become integrated into mainstream social welfare
policy. It will also review the work of the Child Protection in Sport Unit and the influence it has had
on developing policy and guidelines to safeguard children in the sporting environment.                  S1
allows you to experience working in a sport development environment, and to reflect upon your
initial experiences. This will develop report writing, observation and reflective skills, and allow you
to begin establishing contacts and networks within the industry. You will be registered on the V
programme with Lancashire County Sport Partnership to which your voluntary hours will be
recorded towards V outcomes.                                                                            S1

provides the opportunity to gain the skills to develop working relationships with children and
young people through the vehicle of coaching. You will undertake a NGB award which will involve
practical delivery sessions to develop an understanding of how to motivate young people.        S2

This module will introduce the basic systems of the body from a physiological aspect and will S1 and 2 only for
incorporate all the systems necessary to equip the student with the back ground knowledge to students staying for
enable them to become competent sports therapists.                                            one academic year



This module will attempt to lay down the basic principles of implementing exercise, games, and
activities for a healthy population. The environment used will be a mixture of gymnasium, pool,
and field based providing the student with a range of areas in which to develop their skills. The
key areas will focus on initial personal characteristics of the student in terms of voice, manner,
enthusiasm, reaction to situations and events to more organisational skills such as time
management, planning and preparation of certain tasks. The student will be expected to use their
own initiative and imagination in developing game/activity plans for pair, small groups and team
related games and activities and be able to reflect on the outcome of these tasks.                 As above
This module is designed to provide students with an introduction to the role of a sports therapist
and provides the foundation on which students will build further knowledge, skills and expertise in
the path to becoming qualified sports therapists.                                                   As above

This module will introduce the base elements of Kinesiology and introduces the student to the
ideas of mechanics for movement. This will enable the student to progress to Applied
Kinesiology (SPT 2924) having given them the underpinning theory and knowledge                         S1


This module furthers the understanding and application of the study of human movement.
Biomechanics tools that include quantitative kinetic analysis of sporting techniques are used in
laboratory sessions, whilst highlighting the potential for biomechanical analysis to be taken into
the competitive or training environment. The foci of the module are in performance enhancement
and injury prevention, providing the student with a vocational appreciation of biomechanics in
sport and exercise. Analysis is conducted through the application of theoretical mechanical
principles pertaining to kinetic derivatives of force, with interpretation applied across a range of
sporting case studies, furthering the vocational relevance of the module. The student will begin
to develop a sport-specific appreciation of biomechanical analysis through independent study of a
self-selected movement. The module allows acquisition of basic research skills and scientific
writing skills.                                                                                      S2
This module offers the opportunity for students to develop an understanding of physiological
factors and their application to both sport and exercise. The module endeavours to evaluate the
effects of sport and exercise interventions from a physiological perspective. This comprises an
assessment of both acute and chronic responses to sport and exercise participation.
Furthermore, students will gain knowledge and experience of executing practical laboratory
activities, and thus, demonstrate the skills required to monitor and evaluate sports performance in
a laboratory and/or field setting. An understanding of the reliability and validity of these skills and
techniques will also be considered.                                                                     S1


This module provides a theoretical understanding of sport and exercise psychology principles.
Key components of the module include the evaluation of psychological theory in sport and
exercise, and the influence on performance and participation respectively, as well as gaining
practical experience of laboratory and/or field-based activities within the discipline. This module
will be of direct relevance to students wishing to gain an insightful understanding of the
underpinning psychological theories and concepts in both sport and exercise settings.               S1


 will enable you to embed your sociological ‘skills’ through offering a critical understanding of the
notion of childhood, drawing from, in particular, the ‘new social studies of childhood’. Utilising
notions such as physical culture and children’s rights, you will be able to interrogate the current
construction and organisation of sport and the manner in which it regards children and childhood.
This will facilitate the development towards informed critical reflection on contemporary policy and
practice relating to children and physical activity and a consideration of these might be
alternatively envisaged.                                                                              S2


will allow you to utilise your basic knowledge of sport in society and sociological perspectives to
develop a more independent, critical approach to the study of sport. The module builds on
foundational sociological theory by addressing more contemporary developments in sports
sociology and research. The content will focus on key theoretical debates and the application of
theory to social and cultural sporting contexts. You will be expected to develop your own
sociologically informed perspective to sport in society and demonstrate this in class discussion
and debate as well as independent work                                                                 S1


provides an insight into the increasingly commercial nature of international sport through focusing
on economic and financial aspects within a global context. Differences in sporting systems across
the world are examined and commercial impacts including broadcasting, sponsorship, marketing
and branding are assessed utilising the extensive research knowledge base. The module will
critically analyse both the international labour and product markets within the sports industry
underpinned by the multi-disciplinary areas of economics, sport management, finance and
sociology. This module provides you with an insight into the increasingly commercial nature of
international sport through focusing on economic and financial aspects within a global context.
Differences in sporting systems across the world are examined and commercial impacts including
broadcasting, sponsorship, marketing and branding are assessed utilising the extensive research
knowledge base. The module will critically analyse both the international labour and product        S1 and 2 only for
markets within the sports industry underpinned by the multi-disciplinary areas of economics, sport students staying for
management, finance and sociology.                                                                  one academic year


Sport Management and Event Planning firstly provides the opportunity to build on your
knowledge and skills from the Management for Sport Development module and then use these
concepts and understanding within a practical sports setting. You will be expected to plan,
organise and run a sporting event within the local community. It is expected that the theoretical      S1 and 2 only for
concepts introduced in the first year will be applied within the event planning process and allow      students staying for
you to demonstrate the application of management theory to sport.                                      one academic year
This module is designed to provide students with a deeper understanding of anatomy and it’s
relation to sports therapy. The students will continue to build further knowledge, skills and
expertise in the path to becoming qualified sports therapists.                                1&2
This module expands on knowledge gained on Levels 4 and provides an understanding of the
application of physiology in relation to the Sport Therapist and their work with elite and
recreational athletes.                                                                                 ?
This module will develop the skills taught on the level 4 module ‘exercise & recreational therapy’
It aims to introduce the concepts of injury and rehabilitation management supported by the
evidence based practice strategies adopted by health care professionals. Clinical reasoning will
form the ethos of planning and putting together any preventative or treatment strategy. It is
expected that the student realises the importance of the multi factorial approach to injury
management and rehab and equally the role of the many disciplined professions who are
involved in the injured athlete. The module facilitated the putting in to practice of skill developed
within other Level 4 modules such as Foundations of Anatomy(joint assessments and Massage
practice) through the clinical hours within the therapy clinic and at other external placements.        1&2


This module aims to develop the kinetic analysis of sport and exercise at Level 5 toward a holistic
analysis of sports performance, with implications for injury prevention. The case-study analysis of
a self-selected sporting technique may be continued from Level 5, providing the student with a
greater depth of knowledge in an area of interest. The module will provide the student with
experience of data collection and analysis using a myriad of biomechanical analysis tools,
providing a contemporary appreciation of the vocational application of sports biomechanics. The
primary analysis tools relating to electromyography, force platform analysis, and kinematic motion
analysis will be considered discretely, and subsequently in unison to provide a holistic
biomechanical analysis of technique. As with Level 5, case studies will be provided to enhance
the vocational appreciation of sports biomechanics.                                                 S1



This module aims to apply theoretical concepts of biomechanics to the analysis of strength and
conditioning training exercises. Application of statics and dynamics helps estimate internal loads
in the musculoskeletal system, including compressive stress, muscle forces, joint reaction forces
and joint moments which may lead to adaptation of biological tissues, or to acute or chronic injury
through inappropriate exercise activity. Muscle function can be assessed objectively through the
application of isokinetic dynamometry and surface electromyography which permit isolating weak
muscle groups. The knowledge gained may be used in the development of effective conditioning
programmes and the design of exercise equipment.                                                    S2


This module offers the opportunity to study the role and relevance of exercise physiology in a
more focused and applied manner. The module will examine the exercise participant in the
context of different exercise conditions and investigate the physiological adaptations to different
modes and intensities of exercise. The module will allow students to critically evaluate these
factors. They will be able to demonstrate an understanding of how the development of
physiological components influences exercise prescription and referral.                                 S1


This module offers the opportunity to study the role and relevance of sports physiology within
human performance in a more focused and applied manner. The module will examine the
performer in the context of different environmental conditions and investigate key physiological
limitations to human performance. The module will allow students to critically evaluate these
factors. They will be able to demonstrate an understanding of how the development of
physiological components assists in the optimisation of elite sports performers and thus evaluate
appropriate intervention strategies.                                                              S2


This module offers the students an opportunity to study the application of the theory of Sport
Psychology. Students will review, consolidate, extend and apply knowledge of sport psychology
theory through a problem based learning approach. This module will examine human behaviour
in the sporting environment and focus upon the application of psychological skills training (PST)
intervention strategies in order to maximise sporting performance. The module will be of direct
relevance to students wishing to pursue a career in sport settings by emphasising the qualities
and transferable skills necessary for employment.                                                       S1


This module offers the students an opportunity to study the application of the theory of exercise
and health psychology. Students will review, consolidate, extend and apply knowledge of exercise
and health psychology theory. Levels of intervention will be addressed, considering matching
strategy and theory to appropriate populations. Skills, strategies and approaches are covered to
develop self-efficacious individuals who are able to define motivations and adapt behaviours to
initiate and maintain healthy behaviours. The module will be of direct relevance to students
wishing to pursue a career in exercise settings by emphasising the qualities and transferable
skills necessary for employment.                                                                  S2
 facilitates a critical appreciation of the attempts made over the last decade by organised sport in
the UK to ‘protect’, ‘safeguard’ and enhance the well-being of children who participate in sport.
This module will enable an historical understanding of why and how such legislation came about
and will provide a critical evaluation of how such change is embedding within the particular
cultures of organised sports in the UK and the challenges this legislation represents for sports
bodies. These challenges will also be placed within a global context as the recognition of the
abuse of children in sport is played out across international organisations, nations and cultures.


concentrates on youth and culture, particularly in late modernity. You will be encouraged to utilise
your knowledge of critical perspectives to reflect on contemporary youth cultures and their
intersections with mainstream popular culture. The module will concentrate on key debates,
relevant research and emerging theory which has shed critical light on existing theories of youth
subcultures. The module will also take an historical perspective, reflecting on the social, cultural,
political and economic changes which have impacted on youth cultures, in our late modern age.
allows you to fully immerse yourself in sport as an academic discipline. It involves utilising
previous knowledge and skill learned and applying them to produce a journal article suitable for
publication in an academic journal and ultimately to present at the 3rd Year Sport Research
Conference in front of your peers, lecturers and invited guests from the sports industry and
academia.
 enables you to gain a critical understanding of the political and policymaking context for
practising sports development professionals, and to facilitate an understanding of challenges and
solutions in policy and strategy implementation.


This module furthers the understanding and application of the study of sports therapy, with an
applied focus on current initiatives in strength and conditioning. Issues in strength and
conditioning are considered with reference to both performance enhancement, rehabilitation and
injury prevention. The applied nature of the module will develop a vocational appreciation of
strength and conditioning for the sports therapist. The student will develop sport-specific
appreciation of strength and conditioning issues across a range of sports, in each case
considering the hierarchical needs of the various parameters of conditioning.                  ?


This module will develop the skills taught on the level 5 module ‘ Sports & Exercise
Rehabilitation’ It aims to develop the concepts of injury and rehabilitation management in a more
functional approach supported by the evidence based practice strategies adopted by health care
professionals. The module will look at the relationship of ’physiological rehabilitation’ and how this
is aligned to the more specific physical rehabilitation modes. It will highlight the importance of     S1 and 2 only for
position and sport specific rehab concepts and how as Sports Therapists we aim to bridge the           students staying for
gap and apply our knowledge base.                                                                      one academic year

This module will introduces the student to the concepts of manual therapy as applies to the spine
and the developments of clinical reasoning skills by the means of case scenarios                  ?
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