DERVLA KIRWAN – INJUSTICE by yaofenji

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									                    PRODUCTION NOTES
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                          Wednesday 25th May 2011***
                                                    Contents

Injustice Press Release ..................................................................... Page 3

A short foreword from Anthony Horowitz........................................ Page 5

James Purefoy plays William Travers ....................................... Page 6 - 8

Dervla Kirwan plays Jane Travers ............................................. Page 9 - 10

Charlie Creed - Miles plays DS Wenborn .................................. Page 11 - 12

Nathaniel Parker plays Martin Newall........................................ Page 13 - 14

Synopsis ...................................................................................... Page 15 - 17

Cast list ............................................................................................... Page 18

Production credits ............................................................................. Page 19




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       International star James Purefoy leads the cast in
   INJUSTICE a brand new thriller from renowned screenwriter
                        Anthony Horowitz
               “When Justice breaks down, all the rules change”


Injustice is a gripping five-part psychological thriller for ITV1 from acclaimed writer
Anthony Horowitz (Collision, Foyle’s War). This event drama tackles the universal
question which is at the heart of every country‟s legal system. How does a
defence barrister live with himself if he discovers the client he is defending is
guilty?

JAMES PUREFOY (Ironclad, Rome) is William Travers, a criminal barrister who is
recovering from a traumatic series of events that have shaken his belief in the
legal system. The 5 x 60 min drama was filmed in Suffolk and London and is
produced by Anthony‟s own production company, Injustice Films Limited.

Purefoy stars alongside DERVLA KIRWAN (The Silence, 55 Degrees North),
NATHANIEL PARKER (Stardust, The Inspector Lynley Mysteries), CHARLIE
CREED - MILES (Harry Brown, Five Days) and OBI ABILI (Foyle’s War, The
Take).

On the surface William Travers (Purefoy) is a picture of success. Famous for
defending the underdog. Underneath he is recovering from a nervous breakdown
and the complete uprooting of his family and his work.

Reluctantly, he is drawn into a case that involves his old friend Martin Newall
(Parker) who faces conspiracy and murder charges while at the same time being
investigated by a vicious and vengeful detective DS Mark Wenborn ( Creed -
Miles).

Injustice is a complex, nail-biting drama that takes the audience on a journey full
of surprises until it reaches its devastating conclusion.

ITV Director of Drama Commissioning, Laura Mackie said: “Anthony is such a
talented screenwriter and the quality of his scripts has attracted top flight acting
talent. We‟re totally committed to original, authored drama and this commission is
a brilliant addition to our slate for 2011”

“I'm delighted to be working with ITV again after the success of Collision. Laura
Mackie asked me to come up with a psychological thriller that would keep
audiences guessing to the end and I hope that with Injustice I've done just that,”
said executive producer and writer Anthony Horowitz.



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Injustice is directed by Colm McCarthy (Single Handed, The Tudors, Spooks) and
produced by Jill Green and Eve Gutierrez.

Press contacts:
For ITV: Tim West, 0207 157 3040 or email Tim.West@itv.com
For ITV Pictures: Pat Smith, 0207 157 3044 or email Patrick.Smith@itv.com




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             A SHORT FOREWORD FROM ANTHONY HOROWITZ


Injustice was inspired by one of those questions that many people have asked.
You‟re a criminal barrister. You defend a man who has committed a horrible crime
and thanks to you, he walks free. How do you live with yourself?

To be honest, I‟ve always had a great dislike of the law. What seems black and
white to me, suddenly becomes complicated – and expensive – the moment a
barrister turns up. The rituals and horse-trading of the courtroom, the weird
language, the wigs and gowns, strike me as quite divorced from the 21 st century. I
would say that my hero, William Travers, is a moral and decent lawyer. It was a
difficult part to cast but I think James Purefoy gets the nuances exactly right.

That said, Injustice is not a legal drama. In many ways it‟s about a society in
which law has ceased to function. Both Travers and his nemesis – Detective
Sergeant Wenborn – operate according to their own set of rules and in the end I
see the series as a duel between the two of them as they follow a tangled path of
murder and conspiracy.

Wenborn is without doubt the most extraordinary detective I have created in a
long career working in murder-mystery and Charlie Creed - Miles turns in a
standout performance. There are a lot of real surprises in Injustice – at the end of
episode one and twice more in episode five. I hope audiences will enjoy the
various twists and turns and won‟t guess the ending. I was also very happy to be
able to shoot in Suffolk where I spend so much of my time and although I‟ll
probably have to apologise to everyone in Felixstowe, I think it gives the series an
unusual and very striking backdrop.




                                                                                  5
                  JAMES PUREFOY PLAYS WILLIAM TRAVERS

From playing heart-throbs to bad guys, historical characters to sci fi heroes,
James Purefoy has had anything but a straightforward career…

“I always thought when I left drama school the thing to do as an actor is to play as
many parts as you can and then you would never get pigeon holed, or typecast –
I‟m not so sure anymore. There are plenty of people who have had long careers
playing the same type of character over and over again. Having said that, I
wouldn‟t change mine. I‟ve had a cracking time in that respect and I am happy to
have played incredibly varied parts although I think it sometimes confuses people
– they don‟t recognise me.

“I wouldn‟t do any fantasy, sci-fi roles if they weren‟t fun. I‟m not cool enough to
say those parts are beneath me, partly because I watched a lot of those types of
films while I was growing up. They took me away from sleepy Somerset and made
me think that there was a bigger and more exciting world out there. They inspired
me and let my imagination run wild, that‟s why it‟s been such fun to work on some
of the films I have during my career. There could be many different reasons why
you do films like Resident Evil and Solomon Kane - that they‟re cracking good
stories, that you love the director, the script – but there is also a little secret part of
you somewhere which is just a ten year old boy.

“My 13 year old son will find a way to see some of the more violent films I‟ve
starred in. It‟s like being told don‟t look in the cupboard – you‟re going to do it.
The more I say to him he can‟t see it the more he‟ll want to see it.”

In Injustice James plays William Travers a criminal barrister who is recovering
from a traumatic series of events that have shaken his belief in the legal system:

“William Travers is a very successful barrister. He is somebody who is intelligent,
articulate and sympathetic. He‟s well known for taking on underdogs, people who
look like they haven‟t got a chance in hell of being proven innocent. If he believes
their story and believes in them then he can do his job. However, if he doesn‟t
believe in them he won‟t take the case on in the first place.

“Travers took on a case in the past that eventually tipped him over the edge and
caused him to have a nervous breakdown. As a result he moved out of London
with his wife and his daughter and uprooted them to Suffolk. There he joined a law
firm in Suffolk, a small town chambers where he still managed to do cases
involving underdogs, but he doesn‟t take on murder cases anymore.

“He is in the wrong place really because he is clearly overqualified and could do
so much more. He shines like a very bright diamond in Ipswich. However,
Travers finds himself reluctantly drawn into a new murder case back in London.
An old friend of his, Martin Newall (Nat Parker) has been accused of strangling his
secretary in a London hotel. Martin swears that he has been framed and that he is
part of a wider conspiracy involving an international oil-trading corporation.
Travers is the only man who believes him.




                                                                                         6
Injustice is a story with extraordinary twists and turns and Travers is clearly not all
seems. He‟s a man with secrets and a very troubled past. A lot of the characters
I‟ve played recently have been very masculine, black and white characters who
are really far out there, Solomon Kane, Mark Antony – and one of the things I was
thinking when I was doing those characters was that I wanted to play someone
who on the surface appeared to be very normal.

“Travers is like an onion – and I think people with be interested in seeing those
layers peel away each night and finding out what kind of man he is underneath it
all. When I‟m on the bus or in a café I look at people wondering „what secrets do
you have?‟ Everybody has secrets and I find that really interesting as they kind of
make us what we are.”

On researching his role as Travers: “I read a lot of news, I‟m a news junkie and I
keep in touch a lot with what‟s going on in current affairs, what‟s going on in the
law courts, I‟m a big fan of Michael Mansfield QC, a big fan of Gareth Pierce, the
lawyers who represented the falsely accused people who have been put in
Guantánamo and tortured. So yes I do have a very strong sense of social justice
myself and admire lawyers enormously. The human rights lawyer – Clive Stafford
Smith is an extraordinary man, someone who has put his life absolutely at the
service of others. He flies around the world protecting people and giving them
access to some level of justice. I like to imagine, there are more lawyers out there
like him.

“Production arranged for me to meet and watch some high court barristers at work
in The Old Bailey at the beginning of filming and bizarrely when I was there I
thought „I could do this, this is a job I really could see myself doing‟.”

At the heart of Injustice are two characters from two very different worlds – police
detective, Mark Wenborn and Cambridge-educated barrister William Travers.
Wenborn, is a vile bully who pursues Travers in a murder investigation, here
James talks about the joys of playing a bad guy:

“People will enjoy Charlie Creed - Miles‟ character Wenborn. He‟s a nasty bully of
a man, who‟s like a stubborn Jack Russell. We all like watching characters we
love to hate – I‟ve played a few of them myself so I know exactly how Charlie
must feel playing this role.

“I don‟t back away from those kind of characters. You face them full on.
Audiences love watching somebody enjoy themselves. The more you relish
playing those characters the more the audience get out of it.”

On the perils of fame: “I have enough famous friends to know that being incredibly
famous is frankly often a bore. Simple logistics like going to get a pint of milk from
the shops can be exhausting.

“I‟ve always enjoyed the idea of being an actor who can play all of these complex
and varied characters. If you can do that on one hand and go to the supermarket
and to the park to play football with your kid without being photographed then
you‟ve achieved a kind of bizarre near perfect balance.”



                                                                                     7
On why he decided to accept the role: “The characters I‟ve been playing recently
have been very upfront, mainly historical figures and I fancied a change for the
time being anyway and wanted to play someone from contemporary London.
Someone for want of a better phrase, just with a suit and a mobile phone as
opposed to chain mail and a bloody big sword! I think Anthony Horowitz is a
terrific screenwriter and his ability to keep people guessing right the way up to the
end, to the last frame actually is brilliant.”

On the similarities between actors and Barristers: “I actually think there is
something quite similar between barristers and actors and I know a lot of actors
who have become actors after they‟ve done law degrees. Jason Issacs for
example, studied law at Bristol and then became an actor. There is something
about the actor within barristers – one of the defence lawyers I spoke to before we
did this said that he found it very difficult sometimes because he‟s quite friendly
with prosecution barristers, because they all work together and they all know
what‟s going on and they switch sides all the time. Sometimes they‟re the
prosecution, sometimes they‟re defending, and if a client of his sees him going for
lunch with the prosecution it doesn‟t look good.

“In court, they are in a way acting and there is something quite ADHD about it and
I think there‟s something quite ADHD about actors. Barristers like taking on cases
all the time, actors like taking on new parts and they probably get a little bit bored
if they had to do the same thing all the time. I think they get energised by new
cases – and in turn actors get energised by new parts.”

James is currently starring in Flare Path in the West End and his other credits
include: John Carter of Mars, Ironclad, Camelot, Rome, The Philanthropist,
Solomon Kane, Frankenstein, Resident Evil, A Knight’s Tale.




                                                                                    8
                      DERVLA KIRWAN IS JANE TRAVERS

Irish born actress Dervla Kirwan reveals she was drawn to her role in Injustice
because of the chance to work with award-winning writer, Anthony Horowitz.

“I‟m a massive fan of Anthony Horowitz's writing,” says Dervla. “I think he is a
really unique writer and I loved the script. I‟d never worked with Anthony before
but always wanted to. I thought this could be something really special. As an actor
I‟m keen to work on drama that I would want to sit down and watch.”

Speaking about her character, Jane Travers, Dervla says: “Jane Travers is
married to William Travers, (Purefoy). Jane has been in publishing and has had a
very successful career. William was a hotshot lawyer who had a major nervous
breakdown, and it caused them to redirect their lives and leave London to live in
Suffolk.

“Jane is very supportive, honest, hardworking and loving. She‟s a really good
person who has tried to, in quite a passive way, rehabilitate her husband. She has
given up a really great career to support her husband. Not a lot of people would
do that, but she is one of those people. William has been her best friend since
they were at university, so they have 25 years of history together, and they have a
daughter. She can‟t walk away when Will has a nervous breakdown.”

In Injustice Dervla found herself having to play emotional scenes on screen. In
preparation, Dervla admits it was a challenge to build her emotions ready for
when the camera starting rolling.

“I had to cry and I found it very difficult to do on screen and muster fake tears. I do
find it very challenging to be emotional. Katherine Hepburn used to say that she
didn‟t understand it but she used to be able to cry at the drop of a hat. I genuinely
envy that and often think, „What‟s it going to take to make me cry?‟ Maybe it‟s my
pride or self-consciousness, I don‟t know.”

Away from the world of publishing in London, Jane spends her time in Suffolk
teaching English at a Young Offenders Institute.

“Being the productive, optimistic, helpful individual that Jane is, she thought she‟d
use the time she now has to teach at the Young Offenders Institute,” explains
Dervla. “I think she‟s incredibly brave because I wouldn‟t have the guts to go and
teach in a place like that.

“Teaching is in my blood because my mother was a very successful French and
English teacher for 20 years. I think there‟s a certain mentality you need to have
as a teacher. I don‟t know if I could walk into a class room and do it - I would be
terrified.”

Dervla has been married to actor Rupert Penry Jones since 2007. Together they
have two children who are six and four years old.

Although Dervla and Rupert have previously starred together on stage, she
admits she wouldn‟t be keen to work with her husband in the future.


                                                                                     9
“I feel as if I‟ve had two lives. I‟ve been out with and lived with an actor for four
years and that didn‟t work out. I vowed I‟d never go out with another actor again,
but in walked Rupert. Now we‟re ten years down the line.

“I‟ve worked with Rupert on three separate occasions, mainly in theatre, but if I‟m
honest I would be very hesitant about working with him now. He has established a
life in front of the camera and a particular audience that want to see him in those
roles. I am a very different person and to keep that line between us is very
important as it allows us both to stand on our own two feet.

“Ultimately it will only be narcissistic and will only ever be viewed in that way. It‟s
not what the job‟s about and I would hope we would be able to stand on our own
two feet.”

Since starting her career, Dervla has appeared in a wealth of TV and film. Her
credits include The Silence, Law & Order:UK, Marple and 55 Degrees North.

In 2008 Dervla appeared as the villain Miss Hartigan in the Christmas special of
Doctor Who. She admits it‟s often difficult having young children who may see her
in villainous roles on-screen.

“I did Doctor Who when my daughter was three and a half years old. She saw an
advertisement which came on TV showing me with black eyes and a red dress
and she was traumatised! That was the first time I really realised whatever
children see around them they believe. It is difficult to think of anything I could let
them see me starring in!”

As an actress and mother of two, Dervla has ambitions to get involved in TV or
film made for children.

“I would love to one day do a kid‟s film or voice a character for one. I‟m very
much a six year old at heart. I love that I‟ve got children because it allows me to
watch all the great kid‟s films out there today.”

Dervla also has hopes make her own drama for television.

“I‟ve reached a stage in the last two years where I think to generate your work is
very important. I‟ve a very good friend and we‟ve written a drama together that we
are trying to get made.”

Dervla‟s other credits include; Luna, Material Girl, Ondine and True Dare Kiss.




                                                                                    10
              CHARLIE CREED - MILES PLAYS DS MARK WENBORN

Mark Wenborn is the bullying police detective who bends the rules in order to
carry out justice. Here Charlie Creed - Miles talks about the highs and lows of
playing such a conflicted and dislikeable character:

“Detective Sergeant Wenborn is a violent and vengeful police detective who‟s
respected but doesn‟t do everything exactly by the book. He gives the odd bribe in
order to put pressure on people so he can get good results. Some of his dealings
are a bit shady, and he doesn‟t do things for popularity. He likes to see criminals
behind bars and is very proud of that. It‟s a running joke with his colleagues that
he never fills out the paperwork. His boss has a bit of a soft spot for him as he is a
bright and determined guy that gets the job done.”

Charlie admits that some of the more emotional scenes were at times quite
draining:

“Wenborn is a man who has moments when he is out of control. His home life is
less than perfect and he is a bit of a nasty bully. It wasn‟t nice filming those
scenes and you‟ve got to try and not take it home with you. There were parts in
the story that were very emotional and looking back I‟m glad they‟re over and
done with.”

“Injustice starts at the trial of a suspect who is charged with assault and burglary.
The case brings him into contact for the first time with a defence barrister called
William Travers. Wenborn hates lawyers. He has no belief in the law. As far as he
is concerned, people like Travers – smooth-talkers who are so smart when it
comes to detail and technicalities just make it harder for him to do his job – which
is to see criminals locked up. He believes the whole legal profession “is just a bit
of a game”, divorced from his day-to-day reality which encompasses burglaries,
gun dealing and murder.

“The case doesn‟t go well, thanks to Travers‟ sharp thinking and attention to
detail. Wenborn‟s colleague is suspended on suspicion of encouraging a witness
to fabricate evidence leaving Wenborn as the superior officer face with the
prospect of losing his own job. Instead Wenborn is handed a new case, a
gruesome murder in the Suffolk countryside.”

“He starts investigating the case and there are a few leads. The murdered man
has a single gun shot wound to his head which has all the hallmarks of an
execution. After following a few leads Wenborn is surprised to discover the dead
man is connected to William Travers the same man he came to blows with in
court. Wenborn now seems determined to have his revenge by dragging Travers
into his current investigation and he‟ll distort all the evidence to prove that he‟s
right.”

Despite some highly intense and emotionally charged scenes Charlie also found
there were also lighter parts to his character:




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“On the other hand Wenborn has a real sharp sense of wit and takes pleasure in
going round and intimidating the other police officers. He‟s quite an enigmatic
character because he‟s got a turn of phrase and has this illogical hatred of his
new assistant, Detective Constable Nick Taylor played by Obi Abili who has just
been fast-tracked and who also happens to be black. There is quite a lot of
humour in their relationship and their first scene involves Wenborn spelling out
„the rules‟ to him. Wenborn tells Taylor to keep his „stupid‟ opinions to himself.
That pretty much sets the tone for their relationship and it doesn‟t really get much
better from there on. Poor Taylor is such an enthusiastic young police officer and
yet he‟s is chucked in with the grumpiest, yet, most brilliant detective. There‟s a
great contrast between the two characters and this is something       I have really
enjoyed most as he is constantly putting him down and Taylor just takes it in his
stride.

“I think underneath the jibes Wenborn feels like he‟s giving him some rather harsh
life lessons. And after a while he softens towards him and even Taylor starts to
develop a strange respect for Wenborn.”

On what attracted Charlie to take on the role of DS Wenborn: “What I really like is
that Anthony Horowitz hasn‟t just created a character who is a great cop – in this
drama no one is perfect and Wenborn is furthest from it. I love the fact that he is
not just a two dimensional copper. Wenborn‟s a great character and it‟s a part to
die for really, I was so chuffed to get the chance to play the part. There is so much
going on and he is such an interesting guy. It was a dream role and a great one
for me to get my teeth into.”

Charlie‟s credits include: Wild Bill, Silent Witness, Harry Brown, Criminal Justice,
5 Days, Charles II: The Power and the Passion, Waking The Dead, The Fifth
Element, Nil by Mouth, Essex Boys.




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                NATHANIEL PARKER PLAYS MARTIN NEWALL


Renowned for his role as the upper crust Detective Inspector Lynley, Nathaniel
Parker talks about playing Martin Newall a man on the wrong side of the law and
with all the odds stacked against him.

“Martin Newall has been accused of strangling his secretary in a London hotel. He
ends up appealing to his old friend William Travers to represent him. Martin
swears he‟s been framed and that he is part of a wider conspiracy involving his
employer Qestrel, an international oil-trading corporation. Travers is the only man
who believes him.

“Martin is a man who was disappointed quite early on in his life when he was at
university – he was at Cambridge with Travers and he was going out with Jane.
Travers „stole her off him‟ and he‟s enormously resentful of that, even at this
stage. This is how he convinces Travers to represent him after all these years.

“He now works as a rather boring corporate lawyer for an oil trading company – I
know plenty of those sorts of people, the only difference is I don‟t have enough of
a tan! There‟s a moment when Newall compares himself to Travers, almost
immediately in the police interview room. He comments on the fact that Will was
always better than him at cricket, athletics – everything he did. It is definitely a
barbed thing to say, full of bitterness and resentment towards his old friend. I was
forming a character very much based on that.

Martin has been married twice, his second wife is very protective and she stands
up for him immediately after hearing about his affair and is sure that it was just a
moment of weakness. It‟s a very „stiff upper lip‟ attitude from a woman who has
just found out about her husband‟s infidelities and she still stands by her man
through the charges.”

Nathaniel has found in the past, researching a role can sometimes lead to some
unsettling experiences:

“Even though Martin Newall is also a lawyer like Travers I didn‟t feel the need to
research the inner workings of a real life court room like James as my character is
a corporate lawyer and the only time he‟s in court is when he‟s in the dock.

There‟s only so much research that I feel is useful – I remember when I did
McCallum, I‟d taken over from John Hannah and I decided to go and see a couple
of autopsies and I wish I‟d never done that, it was horrible. I think there are times
when research is useful but sometimes I think its better to use your imagination
and read what‟s on the page and let that come alive.

On accepting the role of Martin Newall:

I was convinced I should take on the role after reading the first episode. About
three or four pages in. I was reading it on my way to France for my holiday and I
just thought, this is very good – the best stuff I‟ve read for a while and I‟ve always
wanted to work with Anthony. I thought Collision worked brilliantly and I read the


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first Stormbreaker and thought it was amazing. He‟s very good at taking you on a
very twisty, suspense filled journey and it was great to find out how my character‟s
story played out.

Despite the suspenseful nature of Injustice Nathaniel still found there was plenty
of time to enjoy the lighter moments once the cameras stopped filming.

Filming on Injustice was a ball. Over November the guys on set decided to take
part in „Movember‟ for charity so there was just an obscene amount of
moustaches wandering all over set during that month! We also had Wild West
Wednesday‟s when some of production came in wearing Sheriff Hats and toy
guns. We actually had to stop shooting at one point because someone‟s six
shooter dropped out of from their back pocket!


Nathaniel‟s credits include: The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn
Treader, Stardust, The Land Girls, The Inspector Lynley Mysteries and Bleak
House.




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                                     Synopsis


At the heart of Injustice are two characters from two very different worlds – a local
Ipswich police detective, Mark Wenborn and a Cambridge-educated barrister,
William Travers whose destinies become intertwined. Both of them will be tested
to the limit. Their actions will constantly surprise us. At every step, we will find
ourselves questioning the moral line.

William Travers (James Purefoy) was once a well-known defence barrister,
working on high profile murder cases in London. He was admired for his
passionate support of the underdog – and because he had total belief in the
people he defended. He had a loving wife and daughter. He was successful,
approachable, intelligent – a man used to winning.

Then something happened. He suffered a complete nervous breakdown, left
London and moved to Suffolk. He made an oath never to pursue another murder
case, contenting himself with less sensational cases...though still championing the
people who needed his help.

His wife, Jane (Dervla Kirwan), has given up her successful career in publishing to
be with him. She is very unsure about life in rural Suffolk it didn‟t suit her even as
a child. She is working part time as a teacher at a Young Offender‟s Institute but
wonders if she is doing it to help the inmates or to help herself.

Their student daughter, Kate, has found herself uprooted too. She is deeply
worried about the mental health of her dad. She spends as much time in London
as she can.

It is in Suffolk that our story starts. At Ipswich Station, Travers happens to see a
figure on the opposite platform, someone from his past and in that moment his life
is shattered once again. He is about to be tested as never before – and we are
going to discover that nothing about him is quite what it seems.

A murder follows and suddenly a new character is involved...Detective Sergeant
Mark Wenborn (Charlie Creed - Miles), a violent and vengeful police detective
who has already come to blows with Travers in the courtroom and now seems
determined to have his revenge by dragging Travers into his current investigation.
INJUSTICE is about how this murder is connected to our barrister and the first
major twist of this story is revealed at the end of Episode One.

Wenborn hates lawyers. He has no belief in the law. As far as he is concerned,
people like Travers – smooth-talkers who are so smart when it comes to detail
and technicalities just make it harder for him to do his job – which is to see
criminals locked up. He believes the whole legal profession “is just a bit of a
game”, divorced from his day-to-day reality which encompasses burglaries, gun
dealing and murder.

Wenborn never takes notes and rarely keeps adequate records. At a time when
there is an increasing need for dot-perfect paperwork, this really pushes the
patience of his immediate superior, Assistant Chief Constable Packard (David


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Schofield). He also has an illogical hatred of his new assistant, Detective
Constable Nick Taylor (Obi Abili) who has just been fast-tracked.

Injustice is a duel between these two complex men, Travers and Wenborn.

Travers finds himself reluctantly drawn into a new murder case. An old friend of
his, Martin Newall (Nathaniel Parker) has been accused of strangling his secretary
in a London hotel. Martin swears that he has been framed and that he is part of a
wider conspiracy involving Qestrel, an international oil-trading corporation.
Travers is the only man who believes him.

But at the same time, he is being investigated by Wenborn. He soon sees that
Wenborn is a maverick with a questionable moral code. He has barely any social
manners and no charm. Above all, he won‟t give up. Wenborn has made up his
mind about Travers and he‟ll distort all the evidence to prove that he‟s right.

What unfolds in this drama is a tense and gripping game of cat and mouse. We
have two men from completely different backgrounds. But their professional lives
intertwine in a complicated and disturbing way.

Injustice is designed to keep audiences guessing for five nights in a row. The first
episode ends with a complete shock that turns everything upside down and we
will be telling critics not to reveal what occurs. And there are more surprises in
every episode that follows.

This is a thriller where you can never take anything for granted. Because in law
and in life, nothing is ever black and white.

And when there is Injustice, all the rules change.




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                                                  CAST LIST

William Travers .................................................................................... James Purefoy
DS Mark Wenborn ................................................................... Charlie Creed - Miles
Jane Travers ........................................................................................ Dervla Kirwan
Martin Newall .................................................................................... Nathaniel Parker
DS Nick Taylor................................................................................................Obi Abili
Natalie Chandra....................................................................................... Sasha Behar
Maggie Wenborn .................................................................................. Kirsty Bushell
Jeremy Forbes-Watson ........................................................................ Nick Dunning
Philip Spaull ..................................................................................... Robert Whitelock
Terry Cooper ............................................................................................. Ian Burfield
Kate Travers. .......................................................................................... Lisa Diveney
Caroline Newall .................................................................................... Camilla Power
Robin Miller .............................................................................................. Adam Grant
ACC Stephen Packard........................................................................David Schofield
Lucy Wilson ......................................................................................... Jayne Wisener
Alan Stewart ................................................................................................. Joe Cole
Susanna ............................................................................................Susannah Doyle
John Slater ...................................................................................... Peter Ferdinando
Michael Bankes. ................................................................................ Andrew Tiernan
Pamela Stewart .................................................................................. Amelia Lowdell
Gemma Lawrence ...............................................................................Imogen Stubbs
PMO Adam Christie ................................................................................ Hilton McRae




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                                     PRODUCTION CREDITS

Executive Producer & Writer ........................................................... Anthony Horowitz
Producer ....................................................................................................... Jill Green
Producer ................................................................................................ Eve Gutierrez
Director ............................................................................................... Colm McCarthy
Line Producer .............................................................................Carolyn Parry-Jones
DOP .................................................................................................... Ruairi O’Brien
Sound Recordist .................................................................................David Lascelles
Location Manager .................................................................................. Simon Nixon
Costume Designer ....................................................................... Anushia Nieradzik
Make up Designer .................................................................................. Irene Napier
Production Designer .................................................................................. Matt Gant
Casting Director ....................................................................................... Gary Davy
Editor ............................................................................................... St John O’Rorke
Composer ........................................................................................ Magnus Fiennes




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