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CURRENT 5TH GRADE CRCT SCORES _SPRING 2009_

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CURRENT 5TH GRADE CRCT SCORES _SPRING 2009_ Powered By Docstoc
					                            HAYMON-MORRIS MIDDLE SCHOOL
                               SCHOOLWIDE TITLE 1 PLAN
                                 SUBMITTED: July 1, 2010


COMPONENT 1: COMPREHENSIVE NEEDS ASSESSMENT (NARRATIVE OF DATA)
        Haymon-Morris Middle School (HMMS) is one of four middle schools in the Barrow
County School System, in Winder, Georgia. Haymon-Morris was opened in 2005 and is part of a
three-school cluster sharing one common campus with Yargo Elementary and Apalachee High
School. The student population consists of sixth, seventh, and eighth graders who come primarily
from Yargo Elementary and Bethlehem Elementary Schools. With the introduction of House Bill
251, students throughout the district were able to transfer to HMMS regardless of districted school,
with the provision that they have their own transportation to and from school everyday. This has
provided our population with students from the other six elementary schools as well as the other
three middle schools. When the students leave eighth grade, they attend Apalachee High School.
        Haymon-Morris Middle School has seen steady growth since it opened in 2005. In the
2005-06 school year, the student enrollment averaged 623 students. At the beginning of the 2009-
10 school year, 798 students were enrolled at Haymon-Morris. Because HMMS is located in a
rapidly growing area of Barrow County, the mobility rate of the student population is high. The
mobility rate reflects the number of students who enter after the first day of school and/or withdraw
prior to the last day of school. Seventy-one students entered HMMS after the first day of school,
and 74 students withdrew prior to the last day of school. The student enrollment changed by 10%
within one school year. We anticipate an increase in student enrollment for the 2010-11 school
year.
        Every year HMMS conducts a student/family survey which is sent home with all students at
the beginning of the year in an information packet. The results of the survey help to yield a profile
of student/family characteristics. Of these surveys, 808 were returned. One of the questions on the
survey asked about ethnicity. The student population disaggregated by subgroups consists of 68%
Caucasian, 12% African-American, 10% Hispanic/Latino, 5% Asian, and 5% reported Mixed Race
or Other. This survey also asked the families about their access to the Internet. Eighty-three
percent of families responded as having access either at home or through their place of
employment.
        Haymon-Morris is operating as a Title 1 Targeted Assistance School for the 2009-10 school
year. After surveying our faculty and parents, it was agreed that we will plan and apply to operate
as a Title 1 Schoolwide Program for the 2010-11 school year.

       The following sources of data were used in our Comprehensive Needs Assessment:
              - 2009 CRCT Test Results
              - 2009 Middle Grades Writing Assessment Results
              - Teacher Survey of Perceived needs
              - Student/Family Survey

       In this component we looked at the CRCT scores of our feeder elementary schools and of our
current 6th and 7th grade students at HMMS. We also analyzed subgroups (ethnic, ELL, SWD, etc)
and how they compared with each other and the general school population. We chose to focus on
our CRCT data because it is the primary data used to determine our students’ progress and needs at
the state and federal level.
      The following charts summarize 2009 CRCT data for HMMS:
2009 CRCT RESULTS: READING/LANGUAGE ARTS & MATH
 ALL STUDENTS
                     DID NOT             MET          EXCEEDED   MEETS &
                       MEET                                      EXCEEDS
READ/ELA                 6.7              65.9            27.4     93.3
MATH                 13.1             57.2            29.7         86.9
2009 CRCT RESULTS: MATH
BY ETHNICITY
                 DID NOT MEET          MET           EXCEEDED      MEETS &
                                                                   EXCEEDS
ASIAN                  2.1             68.1             29.8         97.9
BLACK                 23.6             58.2             18.2         76.4
HISPANIC              17.2             65.5             17.2         82.8
WHITE                 14.8             61.7             23.5         85.2
MULTI                 16.0             60.0             24.0         84.0

2009 CRCT RESULTS: MATH
SWD, ELL, ED
                 DID NOT             MET          EXCEEDED         MET &
                   MEET                                          EXCEEDED
SWD                 48.7              43.4             7.9          51.3
ELL                 25.0              64.6            10.4          75.0
ED                  19.5              64.6            15.9          80.5

2009 CRCT RESULTS: READING/LANGUAGE ARTS
BY ETHNICITY
               DID NOT MEET      MET                 EXCEEDED       MET &
                                                                  EXCEEDED
ASIAN                  3.2             75.5             21.3         96.8
BLACK                  8.6             69.1             22.3         91.4
HISPANIC               8.0             70.7             21.3         92.0
WHITE                  6.3             63.1             30.6         93.7
MULTI                  8.0             68.0             24.0         92.0

2009 CRCT RESULTS: READING/LANGUAGE ARTS
SWD, ELL, ED
                 DID NOT        MET               EXCEEDED         MET &
                   MEET                                          EXCEEDED
SWD                 28.3        65.1                   6.6          71.7
ELL                 12.5        83.3                   4.2          87.5
ED                   9.1        72.1                  18.8          90.9




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        An analysis of the above data revealed that a slightly higher percentage of all students met
or exceeded standards in Reading/Language Arts compared to the percentage meeting standards in
Mathematics. Within subgroups, our needs are indicated in two subgroups: a higher percentage of
Black students and Student with Disabilities (SWD) students failed to meet standards in Math
compared to the percentage meeting standards in Reading/Language Arts. SWD student data,
however indicates a need in Reading/ELA since almost one-third of the SWD subgroup failed to
meet standards in that area. The data indicates that Students with Disabilities are in need of
additional academic assistance in both subject areas, and Black students are particularly in need of
assistance in the area of Mathematics. Based on the data, our economically disadvantaged students
are doing well when compared with the total school population.
        The following charts represent data from our two feeder schools, Bethlehem and Yargo.
These students will enter the 6th grade at HMMS in 2010/2011. As noted in the HMMS data, a
higher percentage of students met/exceeded standards in RLA compared to Mathematics. Further
analysis by academic subgroup indicates that a higher percentage of students in the ELL subgroup
failed to meet standards in Math than students in the SWD or ED category; 43% compared to 28%
and 31%, respectively.

CURRENT 5TH GRADE/Rising 6th Graders CRCT SCORES (SPRING 2009)
BETHLEHEM AND YARGO ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
                DID NOT MEET             MET          EXCEEDED
READING                7%                62%              30%
ELA                   10%                66%              24%
MATH                  25%                47%              27%

CURRENT 5TH GRADE/Rising 6th Graders CRCT SCORES (SPRING 2009)
BETHLEHEM AND YARGO ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES, ELL and ED
                  READING                ELA             MATH
               DNM     M       E    DNM    M   E    DNM     M  E
SWD            17% 59% 25% 16% 64% 21% 28% 52% 20%
ELL            13% 78% 9%            13% 87% 0%      43% 53% 4%
ED             11% 68% 22% 14% 73% 14% 31% 50% 19%

The charts below represent data from HMMS students who are currently enrolled in the 6th
grade and will represent our 7th graders in 2010-2011.

CURRENT 6TH GRADE/Rising 7th Graders CRCT SCORES (SPRING 2009)
                DID NOT MEET             MET          EXCEEDED
READING                8%                66%              26%
ELA                    9%                63%              28%
MATH                  23%                65%              12%

CURRENT 6TH GRADE/Rising 7th Graders CRCT SCORES (SPRING 2009)
STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES, ELL and ED
                   READING               ELA             MATH
               DNM     M       E    DNM    M   E    DNM     M                           E
SWD            26% 74% 0%            40% 51%    9     69   23                            9
ELL             7%    93% 0%          7%  86%   7     36   57                            7
ED             11% 69% 20% 11%             69  20     28   62                           11
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        A review of the data regarding our current 6th graders indicated that significantly more ELL
and ED students met standards in Reading, ELA and Math than students in the SWD group. In
looking at the data, our ELL students are performing better in reading/language arts than in math.
This is an interesting observation because many of our students are still trying to master the English
language when it comes to reading and writing. However, they could be performing better in
reading/language arts because of all of the support they get in this subject within their ELL classes.
It can be difficult to get our ELL students scheduled for a math applications and/or reading
applications class because these classes are offered the same time their ELL class is offered.. A
significantly higher percentage of SWD students met standards in Reading and Language
Arts than in Mathematics. (74% compared to 32%). Although additional assistance in Mathematics
is needed in all three groups, SWD students are most in need of remediation.

The following charts include data from our current 7th grade who will be 8th grade students in 2010-
2011:

Data in the following charts contains data on our current 7th graders who will be in 8th grade
in 2010-2011:

CURRENT 7TH GRADE Rising 8th Graders CRCT SCORES (SPRING 2009)
                DID NOT MEET            MET           EXCEEDED
READING               9%                 78%             13%
ELA                   8%                 68%             24%
MATH                 13%                 66%             21%


CURRENT 7TH GRADE/Rising 8th Graders CRCT SCORES (SPRING 2009)
STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES (SWD), ELL and ED
                  READING                ELA             MATH
               DNM     M       E    DNM    M   E    DNM     M  E
SWD            25% 71% 4%            21% 75% 4%      25% 75% 0%
ELL            25% 75% 0%            25% 75% 0%      31% 56% 13%
ED             12% 81% 7%            10% 74% 16% 16% 73% 11%

        When analyzed as an entire grade level, our 7th grade students are achieving only slightly
better in Reading/ELA than Mathematics. Within subgroups, approximately one-fourth of the SWD
students and ELL students exhibit needs in Reading/ELA and Mathematics. The ED students
outperformed the other two groups in both subject areas.
        In the area of writing, the results of the MGWA indicated that only 6.6% of our students
exceeded. Since Barrow County has a goal of raising the number of students who exceed, the
Haymon-Morris Middle School Balanced Scorecard 2009-2010 goal is to raise the percentage of
students who exceed to 9.6%. In 2010-2011, we would like to exceed that goal. We will set our
goals based on the 2009-2010 scores.
        Typically students identified as potentially high achieving are not necessarily being
challenged in all of their academic classes. We will review the 2010 data to determine placement in
Extended Learning Time for enrichment of all potentially high achieving students. Our enrichment
group will include students who scored within approximately 10 points of the Exceeding range
(850) – i.e. students who scored 839 or above in reading and 841 or above in math. In the current 6th
grade, 83 students (30%) scored 839 or above in reading, and 102 students (82%) scored 841 or


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above in math. In the current 7th grade, 89 students (31%) scored 841 or above in writing, and 58
students (22%) scored 840 or above in math.


Teacher Perception of Needs
         By taking the staff perception survey, teachers reported the three greatest area of weakness
for their students. The students’ top needs include reading skills and vocabulary acquisition, algebra
skills, and numbers and operations. Through the teacher survey, teachers also reported a need for
additional materials for use in all subject areas of ELT including technology, software, and printed
materials as well as additional personnel.

Summary

Based on a thorough review of our data, the following needs to be addressed in our Title I plan for
2010-2011 have been identified:

      Focus on assistance and/or remediation in Reading/ELA and Mathematics for Students with
       Disabilities (SWD) in grades 6, 7 and 8
      Focus on assistance and/or remediation in Mathematics for 7th grade ELL students in
       Mathematics
      Schoolwide emphasis on improving Mathematics instruction in all grade levels for all
       students, especially algebra and numbers and operations.
      Focus on assistance for Black students in the area of Mathematics
      Focus on assistance for 8th grade ELL and SWD students in all subject areas.
      Focus on meeting the needs of potentially high-achieving students, i.e. enrichment.
      Additional paraprofessionals to assist teachers in meeting student needs
      A Math Coach for grades 6-8
      Additional remedial and enrichment technology, software, and materials for Extended
       Learning Time

COMPONENT 2: NEEDS-BASED REFORM STRATEGIES, ALIGNED WITH THE
NEEDS ASSESSMENT, THAT PROVIDE OPPORTUNITIES FOR ALL CHILDREN TO
MEET THE STATE’S PROFICIENT OR ADVANCED LEVELS OF ACHIEVEMENT
        At Haymon-Morris Middle School (HMMS), through coordination with all state programs
and Title I, we will provide a variety of interventions and opportunities for all our students and
target students based on the needs identified in our Comprehensive Needs Assessment. The
improvement of instruction for all students will continue to be a focus. Improving writing skills for
all students will continue to be addressed through our strategies. Assisting our potentially high
achieving students in exceeding standards will be a focus. The following is an overview of the
academic interventions and the process we will use to implement our strategies.

        The Response to Intervention (RTI) model will be used to help analyze data and drive the
interventions for all of our students and student groups who need more academic support or
enrichment identified in our needs assessment. Through RTI, we will have a process for providing
research-based interventions to students experiencing academic difficulties in the general education
curriculum or potentially high-achieving students who could exceed standards.
        The Pyramid of Intervention is a pyramid that demonstrates the tiers of intervention which
are provided to students. Georgia’s pyramid includes four tiers or levels. Tier 1 includes all

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students and is representative of best teaching practices based upon the Georgia Performance
Standards. Tier I interventions we will utilize with all our students will include:
            EXTENDED LEARNING TIME (ELT) - ELT will be a 35-40 minute daily block of
               time that will be devoted to Reading, Math, or enrichment of potentially high-
               achieving students. The entire school population will be in ELT at the beginning of
               the school day. We will have already identified our students in Component 1 based
               on 2009 scores. Once 2010 CRCT scores are available, we will modify our groups
               based on new information. All teachers certified in math will teach math, and the
               remaining teachers will teach reading in their content area. Each individual ELT
               teacher will give a pre and post test and use the data to determine the appropriate
               curriculum. 2011 CRCT scores will also be our measurement of the effectiveness of
               ELT. Title 1 funds will be used to purchase more supplies and materials for
               remediation as well as enrichment.

              HIGH SCHOOL PREP- High School Prep will be the ELT remedial and enrichment
               program for eighth grade students. High School Prep will begin during the second
               semester and will be held during the same time as ELT. The difference between
               ELT and High School Prep is that the students have a choice in what “class” they
               would like to take. All students get a registration card with their CRCT and ITBS
               scores. An example of the registration card is found in APPENDIX A. The purpose
               of High School Prep is to preview material and courses the students will encounter
               when they get to high school. Biology, Math 1, and Agriculture Science are classes
               that many of our students can/will take as a freshman. Title 1 funds will be used to
               purchase supplies and materials for remediation and enrichment.


              CLASSWORKS - If scheduling permits, all students will use Classworks for a
               minimum of 45 minutes per week. Students may do Classworks during academic
               time or Extended Learning Time (ELT) scheduled during the school day.

              MATH COACH – We will employ a full-time math coach partially funded with Title
               1 to provide support through coaching math teachers on instructional methods,
               model best teaching practices, differentiated instruction, and additional professional
               learning.

              WRITING - Writing is a big academic initiative at Haymon-Morris and is done
               across all curriculums. HMMS will continue using the Jane Schaffer writing method
               for the students for their writings. Beginning in the fall, school-wide mock writings
               will be administered. A different writing prompt will be given to each grade level
               (either persuasive or expository). All mock writings will be graded by the whole
               faculty using the state writing rubric. Since implementing the mock writing strategy,
               we have seen improvements in our 8th grade writing scores, and we hope they
               continue to improve. If possible in 2010, we will send at least one set of seventh
               grade mock writings to the state testing facility in Athens for grading. Using Title 1
               funds in this way will help the teacher and students to see if they are prepared for the
               actual test.


        Tier 2 represents students who require additional support to acquire or extend the
curriculum concepts. Tier 2 interventions are group based interventions. The Tier 2 interventions
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we will implement with our underachieving Black, ELL and Special Education groups and
potentially high achieving students will include:

              CLASSWORKS - Classworks is a researched based software program that was
               adopted by Barrow County Schools and installed on all school computers at HMMS.
               Classworks will be used by all 6th – 8th grade targeted students. These targeted
               students include but are not limited to ELL, SWD, Title 1, Bubbles (800-813),
               Failures (below 800), and potentially high-achieving students. One of the ways in
               which we will measure the effectiveness of Classworks is by the percentage of
               attempted units mastered. This percentage will be determined by Barrow County
               Schools. Additionally funded parapro(s) will be responsible for assisting with
               Classworks and small groups.

              TITLE 1 MATH PARAPROFESSIONAL(S) - We will continue to fund our current
               Title 1 math parapro position as well as additional parapro(s) if funds permit.

              MATH TUTORING -At Haymon-Morris, we will offer two different math tutoring
               sessions to reach as many of our students as possible. We will offer opportunities for
               math help before school, during homebase, and after school. This program is
               voluntary, and any student is welcome to attend math tutoring; however, a special
               emphasis will be placed on getting the 2010 CRCT bubble/failure students and RTI
               Tier 2 and Tier 3 students. A separate ELL tutoring room will be available for those
               students to get help with their math skills. If Title 1 funds permit we will use funds
               to supply materials needed for these tutoring sessions as well as employ additional
               personnel (math parapro(s). Progress in academic class will determine the
               effectiveness of our program.

              AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM - For the 2010-11 school year, we will combine our
               funds (state, federal, and Title 1) to create an After School Program that would be
               available to students in all grade levels who need practice and preparation
               (bubbles/failures) for the CRCT. Title 1 funds will supplement the state funds for
               teacher supplements, supplies, books. The school will review different math and
               reading computer assisted programs that will help meet the students needs and
               purchase them with Title 1 funds Based on the amount of available funding, ASP
               will be offered either one or two days a week. CRCT scores will be used to
               determine the effectiveness of our program.


         Tier 3 represents a smaller portion of students who continue to struggle academically or
behaviorally despite Tier 2 interventions already in place. Therefore, these students receive Tier 3
interventions, which are research-based interventions provided on an individual basis. The Tier 3
interventions we will use with individual students who are performing well below standards will
include:

              ONE ON ONE/SMALL GROUP PULLOUTS - Teachers who need to give more
               individualized math and/or reading instruction can choose to pull a student or group
               of students from their Connections Class. The teachers will keep individualized data
               on these students and will graph their progress. Math parapro(s) funded by Title 1
               will collaborate with math teachers to provide instruction tailored to students needs.

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              COMPUTER ASSISTED LEARNING – Title 1 funds may be used to supplement
               other funds to purchase additional software that has proven effective with Tier 3
               students – such as Read 180, Voyager Math, etc.


        Tier 4 represents the top of the pyramid and the smallest portion of students. These students
typically receive special education, ELL and gifted services.

              Additional support though Title I services will be coordinated for these students and
               will include everything that has been mentioned in Tier 1-Tier 3.

COMPONENT 3: INSTRUCTION BY HIGHLY QUALIFIED TEACHERS
The Barrow County Human Resources verifies the highly qualified status of all teachers. Haymon-
Morris administration verifies certifications based on school needs and available positions prior to
interviewing candidates. Sixty-six percent of Haymon-Morris teachers hold multiple subject area
certifications. Sixteen percent hold gifted in-field certification while twenty percent hold special
education certification. Fifty-eight percent hold advanced degrees in one or more fields, with fifty-
two percent having earned a Masters and six percent a Specialists degree. Seven paraprofessionals
are employed and serve various functions throughout the school in support of student achievement.
Haymon-Morris also employs one instructional math coach who supports math teachers and one
graduation coach who support student goal setting and learning. Haymon-Morris faculty members
work collaboratively in order to create equal access to the curriculum for all students using their
advanced knowledge of middle grades strategies as well as content area expertise.

In an effort to attract and retain highly qualified teachers, Haymon-Morris leadership continuously
seeks out the most qualified candidates to fill openings in the faculty. Strategies to recruit the best
faculty members include attending the Barrow County Schools annual Job Fair in the spring,
including bringing the most prominent candidates to the school for a tour prior to the formal
interview. For the previous three years, Haymon-Morris has also taken initiative to host their own
table at the University of Georgia’s Annual Teacher Career Fair. This strategy is unique to our
school within our county and has provided Haymon-Morris the opportunity to carefully select
candidates that will fit most closely with the vision and mission of Haymon-Morris Middle School.
All open positions within Haymon-Morris are posted on the county employment web page and the
Teach Georgia website in an effort to reach candidates all over the state and nation.

A review of Title II-A equity data indicates that all schools in the Barrow County school district are
staffed equitably in regards to years of teacher experience. Our goal is for all students in all
classrooms, regardless of their demographics, to have teachers with equivalent teaching experience.
Our system has focuses on the recruitment, training, and retention of highly qualified, effective,
experienced teachers. According to the Georgia PSC Equity Technical Assistance webpage, 86.8%
of teachers in our system have low to mid-level years of experience (i.e., one to twenty years).
Principals are informed of their low, mid, and high level experience percentages annually.
Principals of schools with teachers holding the lowest average years of experience are encouraged
to hire teachers with experience.

The Barrow County School District cooperates with the teacher education programs of local
universities to accept practicum students and student teachers. These future teachers gain valuable
experience in all areas of the teaching profession. This partnership is one strategy for recruiting
highly effective and highly qualified teachers. School administrators and teachers participate in

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local job fairs, including the Barrow County job fair, as another strategy for recruiting highly
qualified teachers. All vacancies are posted on the Barrow County Schools website and/or Teach
Georgia, and all practices relating to recruitment and hiring adhere strictly to equal opportunity
policies and regulations. Certification requirements and highly qualified status are checked by the
school Principal and confirmed by central office staff.

COMPONENT 4: HIGH-QUALITY, ONGOING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
 The Haymon-Morris faculty will continue to implement the Professional Learning Community
(PLC) concept. Readings done in PLCs began in 2005 and will continue with each year’s newest
faculty members reading Whatever it Takes (DuFour, DuFour, & Eaker, 2004). Faulty-wide book
studies of topical readings will continue with a focus on needed areas for growth. All faculty
members will be provided with personal copies of the books that they will read and study during the
summer months. The following topics will continue to be the focus of professional learning during
the 2010-2011 school year:
     How to do effective differentiation in the middle school classroom
     How to use constructive assessment of student learning
     How to enhance the effectiveness of the Extended Learning Time during the school day
     How to enhance the use of the professional learning community
     How to teach reading in the content area
     How to more effectively use the RTI process
     How to implement more effective math instruction for all students


   All faculty meetings (1 per month) will be used to facilitate professional development
with various redeliveries of pertinent topics. Title I funds will be used to supplement state funds to
provide professional learning opportunities on instructional strategies that are research based, i.e.
proven to be effective with students who have difficulty achieving mastery of the curriculum.

COMPONENT 5: STRATEGIES TO INCREASE PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT

The following strategies will be used at HMMS to increase our parent involvement.

   -   Open House in August
   -   Parent Conferences and Phone Conferences
   -   Language Line used for non-English speaking parents
   -   ParentLink to remind families about upcoming school events
   -   Email used by teachers and administration to convey information about student progress,
       behavior, and positive comments
   -   Letters mailed home in regards to attendance, Student Support Team, and IEP meetings
   -   Quarterly newsletter containing messages from principal, counseling department, each grade
       level, and content area
   -   Coffee and Chat with parents, principal, and counseling department
   -   Family Academy advertised through flyers and ParentLink
   -   Band and Chorus concerts scheduled in conjunction with PTO meetings
   -   Documents translated in Spanish and Hmong (as able)
   -   Gifted Program
   -   8th grade Scope night in conjunction with PTO meetings
   -   Quarterly awards day for each grade level
   -   8th grade honors night
   -   7th grade parents decorating for 8th grade dance
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   -   Parent volunteers: PTO, substitute teachers, Book Fair, School Council, concessions at
       sporting events
   -   Promotion of Parent Night at Apalachee High School
   -   Parents, students, teachers, and principal signing a School Compact that specifies the
       expectations for each participant.
   -   Barrow County Family Engagement Specialist utilized as a resource for reaching/involving
       parents
   -   Graduation coach who frequently contacts parents to encourage involvement with students
       who are “at risk” for night completing high school.

        A COPY OF OUR PARENT INVOLVEMENT POLICY IS IN APPENDIX B

COMPONENT 6: PLANS TO ASSIST STUDENTS THROUGH THE TRANSITION FROM
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PROGRAMS TO MIDDLE SCHOOL PROGRAMS AND FROM
MIDDLE SCHOOL PROGRAM TO HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAMS.

5TH GRADE TRANSITION
         Beginning in March the graduation coach and school counselor will visit our two feeder
elementary schools, Bethlehem and Yargo. During this time we will show a Power Point
presentation about Haymon-Morris. We will discuss the academic and connections courses, extra-
curricular activities, sports, and general school rules. When we are finished presenting, we will
have a question and answer period with the students. If we run out of time, we will ask that the
students write down their questions and give them to their teachers to send to us to answer. Due to
the proximity of Yargo Elementary, we will take a group of former Yargo students to do the
presentation. However, because of distance and the need for transportation, only the counselor and
graduation coach will visit Bethlehem Elementary.
         In May, we will bring each fifth grade class to Haymon-Morris for a tour of the building.
The students will go through the lunch line, get a snack, and then break into smaller groups to tour
building. We will have former students from each elementary school lead the tour. Also in May,
we will have a one-hour rising 6th grade parent night. During this time, the administration and
school counselor will speak about transitioning to middle school. We will also have current
Haymon-Morris parents speak to the audience about their middle school experience and how to
make the transition to middle school as comfortable as possible. We will provide the parents with a
folder that will include information about our school, instructional extension, Title 1,
immunizations, etc.
         The final part of our 5th grade transition process will be to host a Rising 6th Grade Sneak a
Peek on the day after the last day of school. During this time students will meet the sixth grade
teachers and take a tour of the entire school building. The students will receive a name tag and will
be separated into smaller groups. Students will be mixed with others from different elementary
schools. We will encourage students to meet new friends through ice-breaker games, conversations
in their small groups, and lunch time. Students will also get a chance to practice opening a locker.
We will notify the parents of the Sneak a Peek by disseminating information through the elementary
schools, our school’s website, Rising 6th Grade Parent Night, and ParentLink.

8TH GRADE TRANSITION
        In January we will begin talking about high school with our eighth grade students. During
their connections classes, students will be given information about the elective courses they can take
at Apalachee. The grade level coordinator for connections coordinates guest speakers from local
businesses to come to HMMS to talk about careers in agriculture, business, healthcare, and
government. The grade level coordinator also works with the high school to bring students to
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HMMS to talk about the various career pathways that are offered at Apalachee. The high school
presenters will bring items from their classes and tri-fold displays to show the students what they do
in their classes. Students will also be given a copy of the high school registration card so they will
be prepared to choose their classes when they complete the true registration process. In addition,
Apalachee High School will host a Rising 9th Grade Parent Night. They will give parents
information on graduation requirements, elective courses, attendance, career pathways, academic
courses, and Title 1.
         In February, eighth grade students will complete the registration card for high school. They
will choose their top three elective choices and then write in their three alternate elective choices.
Teachers will register the students for their academic classes. Once the registration process is
complete, students will receive a copy of their registration card to take home to their parents. If the
parents are satisfied with all of the course selections, then they do not need to take further action.
However, if parents are in disagreement with any course selection, they will sign the copy of the
registration card, indicate their changes, and notify the middle school graduation coach and/or
counselor or the Apalachee High School guidance department.
         In March, eighth grade students will get the opportunity to listen to a panel of high school
students talk about all aspects of Apalachee. They will present on classes, attendance, extra-
curricular activities, sports, and general rules and procedures of the high school. The eighth grade
students will get the opportunity to ask the high school students questions and meet with them when
they are finished presenting.
         In May, eighth grade students will take a tour of Apalachee High School. The proximity to
Apalachee makes it easy for our students to walk to the high school. Students will get to see the
cafeteria, gym, various classrooms, school offices, and watch a transition between classes. Students
will meet the administration and get to ask questions they have about Apalachee. Eighth grade
students will be encouraged to talk to their teachers or graduation coach about transition to the high
school.

COMPONENT 7: MEASURES TO INCLUDE TEACHERS IN DECISIONS REGARDING
THE USE OF ACADEMIC ASSESSMENTS

In order to include teachers in decisions regarding the use of academic assessments, the following
measures will be in place:
     RTI data teams
     Leadership team
     Monthly subject area meetings
     Monthly grade level coordinator meetings
     Weekly team meetings
     Weekly grade level subject meetings to create collaborative lesson plans and common
        assessments
     Weekly grade level RTI meetings
     All teachers are provided with previous year’s standardized test scores
     At the beginning of each year, teachers review all students’ permanent records
Our instructional program, services, and programs for groups of students and individuals are all
driven by analyzing the results of assessments. Teachers assume an active role in using the data to
improve instruction during grade level and subject area planning times. They help schedule
students into the appropriate ELT class and assist students in getting additional academic help
through math tutoring and After School Program. Teachers also help implement additional reading
strategies based on review of previous school year’s data. These strategies were used in ELT and
the regular classroom.

                                                  11
COMPONENT 8: COORDINATION AND INTEGRATION OF FEDERAL, STATE, AND
LOCAL SERVICES AND PROGRAMS

Students may receive any combination of services from any of the following state, federal, and local
programs: Title 1, Instructional Extension, Gifted Education, ELL/ESOL programs, Special
Education, Migrant Education, Graduation Coach, Mentoring, CTAE, McKinney Vento Program,
RTI, and Hospital Homebound. The services offered by Northeast Georgia RESA will also be used
as needed to provide professional development/consultation to teachers.

Where funds and services from other federal, state, and local sources are inadequate to meet with
needs we have identified, Title 1 funds will be used to supplement them in order to purchase needed
supplies, equipment, and/or fund personnel. Title 1 funds will be used to purchase more supplies
and materials for remediation as well as enrichment. We will employ a full-time math coach
partially funded with Title 1 to provide support through coaching math teachers on instructional
methods, model best teaching practices, differentiated instruction, and additional professional
learning. We will continue to fund our current Title 1 math parapro position as well as additional
parapro(s) if funds permit. If possible in 2010, we will send at least one set of seventh grade mock
writings to the state testing facility in Athens for grading. Using Title 1 funds in this way will help
the teacher and students to see if they are prepared for the actual test. For the 2010-11 school year,
we will combine our funds (state, federal, and Title 1) to create an After School Program that would
be available to students in all grade levels who need practice and preparation (bubbles/failures) for
the CRCT. Title 1 funds will supplement the state funds for teacher supplements, supplies, books.
Title 1 funds may be used to supplement other funds to purchase additional software that has proven
effective with Tier 3 students – such as Read 180, Voyager Math, etc.

Title I-C funds are used to provide instructional support to Migrant students. Title II funds are used
in the district for professional learning and class size reduction. Title III funds are used to provide
supplemental supplies and services to our ELL students. State and federal special education funds
(IDEA and VI-B) are used to pay for the excess costs of providing special education and related
services to children with disabilities. CTAE funds (local, state, and federal) are used for salaries for
CTAE teachers, supplies for CTAE instruction, and program improvement such as professional
learning and equipment upgrades. The district receives funding through an EHCY grant that is used
to provide supplemental instruction and supplies for identified homeless students.

The district Title 1 Coordinator who works to ensure that all Title 1 programs in the district are
integrated with and do not conflict with other federal programs and laws. This plan was developed
in coordination with federal laws and programs including but not limited to the School-to-Work
Opportunities Act of 1994, the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology Act, and the
National Community Service Act of 1990.

Our school has a comprehensive CTAE program. All students have equal access to CTAE and
CTAE courses incorporate Reading and Math standards. Title 1 students have access to work-based
learning through the CTAE program.




                                                  12
COMPONENT 9– ACTIVITIES TO ENSURE THAT STUDENTS WHO EXPERIENCE
DIFFICULTY ATTAINING PROFICIENCY RECEIVE EFFECTIVE, TIMELY,
ADDITIONAL ASSISTANCE.

At the beginning of each school year, teachers are given a class list with all of their student’s test
data so they can immediately identify students who have academic needs. As the year progresses
teachers meet as a team on a weekly basis to discuss these students and any others who are having
difficulty mastering the course work. During quarterly RTI meetings, students are discussed in
detail in regards to the amount of interventions needed to help them master the content. In the RTI
meetings we discuss if these students need more intense interventions or if they should be referred
for further testing. All of our professional learning is based on helping teachers increase their skills
in identifying student difficulties and providing appropriate assistance and intervention

When teachers identify students who are having difficulty attaining proficiency they will make
contact with the parent either in the form of a face to face or phone conference to discuss the
student’s progress. During this conference teachers will outline what the school will do to help the
student, how the parent can help them at home, and identify community resources that may be
available. Teachers will outline a possible plan of strategies to help that student attain proficiency.
These strategies may include attendance at math tutoring, a change to their ELT class, an invitation
to ASP, a change in their regular academic schedule, or pull-out from the student’s connections
class to do remediation.

Haymon-Morris will do the following to help all students:
   -   Show that we care about all students
   -   Have high expectations for myself, students, and other staff members.
   -   Provide a safe learning environment.
   -   Respect the cultural differences of students and their families.
   -   Communicate with parents about student progress and learning.
   -   Provide for Parent/Teacher conferences at a pre-arranged time.
   -   Help each individual child in my class to learn grade level standards.
   -   Provide a positive environment that allows for communication between the teacher, parent, and
       student.
   -   Assure that Haymon-Morris is a safe, clean, nurturing and healthy learning environment.
   -   Provide positive, supportive instructional leadership.

Haymon-Morris recommends that parents do the following to help ensure academic success of their child:
   - Be sure my child attends school regularly and on time each day.
   - Have high expectations for my child as an individual.
   - Read with my child and let my child see me read.
   - Check my child’s agenda daily.
   - Ensure my child follows board policy on dress code.
   - Help my child learn to resolve conflicts in positive ways.
   - Attend parent-teacher conferences to discuss the contract and my child’s achievement.
   - Be respectful of the school and staff and expect the same in return.
   - Support my child in attending extra help sessions if needed and/or invited (After School Program,
      Morning Math Tutoring, Thursday Morning Tutoring, etc)
   - Ensure my child is prepared for school and materials appropriate for a safe learning environment.
   - See that my child gets adequate sleep.
   - Find a quiet place for schoolwork and make sure work is done.




                                                   13
COMPONENT 10: DESCRIPTION OF HOW INDIVIDUAL STUDENT ASSESSMENT
RESULTS AND INTERPRETATION WILL BE PROVIDED TO PARENTS.

When CRCT scores, 8th grade ITBS (fall), and the 8th Grades Writing Test (spring) results are
received at Haymon-Morris, two copies of individual students’ results are given to each homebase
teacher. One copy will be filed in the each student’s permanent record, and the second copy will be
mailed home. The copy sent home may be sent in a separate envelope, or it may be sent home in an
envelope with the final report card. A letter from our principal will be sent explaining that these are
the standardized test results and how they will be used, and parents are encouraged to contact the
school if they have questions. Teachers are available for conferences at parents’ request, and
resources will be made available to interpret test results for non-English speaking parents.

COMPONENT 11: PROVISIONS FOR THE COLLECTION AND DISAGGREGATION OF
DATA ON THE ACHIEVEMENT AND ASSESSMENT RESULTS OF STUDENTS.

Teachers will be trained to administer the state mandated assessments by the school test coordinator
who is trained by the local system test coordinator. Teachers will administer and secure all
assessments according to procedures outlined in the testing manual.. Once testing is complete, tests
will be sent to the appropriate outside agency for scoring. Test results will be received by the
Barrow County system test coordinator through a secure DOE portal using a system assigned
password. Results will be distributed to school administrators who will distribute them to teachers.
Data is disaggregated at the state level and disaggregated further by the system test coordinator. At
the school level, teachers disaggregate the data to identify student needs and to look for trends that
indicate a need for improvement in any aspect of the instructional program.

Test data is obtained by the district testing coordinator via the secure Georgia Department of
Education Portal. When data is received it is disaggregated by the testing coordinator and shared
with school administrators and teachers. School administrators have been trained to utilize
spreadsheet data and identify target students and groups.

COMPONENT 12: PROVISIONS FOR SEEKING STATISTICALLY SOUND RESULTS
FOR EACH CATEGORY FOR WHICH ASSESSMENT RESULTS ARE
DISAGGREGATED.

The Georgia Department of Education is responsible for ensuring the validity and reliability of all
state mandated assessments. Teachers are responsible for administering assessments in accordance
with the procedures outlined in the teacher manual that accompanies each assessment. Test
booklets are secured at the school and system level according to procedures prescribed by the
system and school test coordinators. Every effort is made to ensure that rigorous standardized
procedures are followed to ensure that statistically sound results are obtained.

The statistical validity and reliability of the instruments administered are maintained by the Georgia
Department of Education. Teachers and staff are continually trained on test security and
administration in order to ensure that testing results will be sound reflections of student learning.
Test data is maintained in a database format as well as in spreadsheets in order to keep data shared
between schools and the central office as consistent and secure as possible.




                                                  14
COMPONENT 13: PROVISIONS FOR PUBLIC REPORTING OF DISAGGREGATED
DATA (TO LET PUBLIC KNOW ABOUT DATA).

The results of all state mandated tests will be released to the media and general public by the
Barrow County School District. Press releases will be published in various local newspapers
(Barrow County News, Athens Banner Herald, and Gwinnett Post), on the DOE website, and the
Barrow County School District website. The Haymon-Morris website will contain a link to the
district website. Following receipt of the results, a presentation by the local district test coordinator
will be made to the Barrow Board of Education at a scheduled meeting which is open to both the
press and the public.

For each major assessment press releases are prepared from the central office highlighting both the
overall results of the testing as well as data disaggregated by subgroups when appropriate. These
press releases are shared with local newspapers, radio stations, and other media outlets. In addition,
the Barrow County webpage contains test scores and press releases available for public viewing.

COMPONENT 14: PLAN DEVELOPED DURING A ONE-YEAR PERIOD AND REVISED
AT LEAST ANNUALLY.
        A writing team was formed in August of 2009. Members of this writing team included
JoLynn Miller, Graduation Coach, Priscilla Webb, Gifted Teacher, Melissa Miller, 7th Grade
Teacher, Beth Peavey, Art Teacher, Laura Minish, 7th Grade Teacher, Carol Madden, Math Coach,
Patsy Grimes, Oustide Title 1 Consultant, and members of the School Council; Dr. Sheila Kahrs,
Principal, James Bowen, Assistant Principal, Nancy Jones, Teacher, Amber Reece, Teacher, Nancy
Maguire, Parent, Sherri Smith, Parent, Julie Hollifield, Parent/Business Partner, Suzette Howard,
Parent/Business Partner. Members were assigned various roles and components to address. An
outside consultant was employed to provide technical assistance throughout the writing process.
This plan was developed during a one year period using input from teachers, parents, and students.
The writing team involved students by meeting with them to discuss ideas for improving student
learning during the 2010-2011 school year. All of the students liked our current ELT program and
want it to continue. We also asked them about including 6th grade students in the After School
Program and they agreed that it is valuable and should be started earlier in the school year. Some
students felt that the After School Program should be held twice a week and include more subject
areas (social studies, language arts, and science). We asked the students if having more teachers
like our current math parapro would be helpful. They all agreed that they liked getting individual
and small group instruction in math. When we asked the students about things we should purchase,
they listed various technology, paper and pencils. Overall, the students agreed that we should
continue all of our academic programs (ELT, ASP, math tutoring, Classworks, mock writings, etc)
and buy more resources to support these programs.
        We involved a group of parents and business partners. We explained how HMMS will
transition from a Target Assistance Title 1 school to a Schoolwide Title 1 school in 2010-2011 and
how student needs will drive our academic programs and budgeting Title 1 money. They all agreed
that they like the programs we have in place now (ELT, math tutoring, ASP) and would like to see
the ASP expanded to include sixth grade students. Our parents and partners supported hiring more
personnel and purchasing additional resources that will benefit our students.

       The plan will be reviewed and evaluated by all our stakeholders and revised annually. A
copy of the plan will be on file with the system level Title I coordinator and at the school. Parents
and the public may view this plan in our school lobby and on-line through a link to our school
website. To the maximum extent possible, the plan will be available in other languages that are
represented in our school population
                                                   15
COMPONENT 15: PLAN DEVELOPED WITH THE INVOLVEMENT OF THE
COMMUNITY TO BE SERVED AND INDIVIDUALS WHO WILL CARRY OUT THE
PLAN INCLUDING TEACHERS, PRINCIPALS, AND OTHER SCHOOL STAFF, AND
PUPIL SERVICE PERSONNEL, PARENTS AND STUDENTS (IF SECONDARY).

Members of the writing team included JoLynn Miller, Graduation Coach, Priscilla Webb, Gifted
Teacher, Melissa Miller, 7th Grade Teacher, Beth Peavey, Art Teacher, Laura Minish, 7th Grade
Teacher, Carol Madden, Math Coach, Patsy Grimes, Outside Title 1 Consultant, and members of
the School Council; Dr. Sheila Kahrs, Principal, James Bowen, Assistant Principal, Nancy Jones,
Teacher, Amber Reece, Teacher, Nancy Maguire, Parent, Sherri Smith, Parent, Julie Hollifield,
Parent/Business Partner, Suzette Howard, Parent/Business Partner. Members were assigned various
roles and components to address. An outside consultant was employed to provide technical
assistance throughout the writing process.

COMPONENT 16: PLAN AVAILABLE TO THE LEA, PARENTS, AND THE PUBLIC.

The Title 1 plan will be available for public view on the Haymon-Morris website, in the front lobby
of the school, or upon request. The plan will also be available during the annual Title 1 Parent
Meeting. Teachers will be informed of the plan and copies will be available in each teacher
workroom. Teachers will carry out the plan during the school year.


COMPONENT 17: PLAN TRANSLATED TO THE EXTENT FEASIBLE, INTO ANY
LANGUAGE THAT A SIGNIFICANT PERCENTAGE OF HE PARENTS
PARTICIPATING STUDNETS IN THE SCHOOL SPEAK AS THEIR PRIMARY
LANGUAGE.

Barrow County Schools employs a full time language specialist who provides translation for Title 1
and other documents as needed. The Title 1 plan is available in Spanish for those who request or
need a copy of the plan. HMMS has a small population of families whose primary language is
Spanish.

COMPONENT 18: PLAN IS SUBJECT TO THE SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT OF SECTION
1116.

This plan is subject to the school improvement provisions of Section 1116 of NCLB. State
academic assessments and other indicators are used to annually review the progress of the school to
determine whether adequate yearly progress is being made.




                                                16
               APPENDIX A: HIGH SCHOOL PREP REGISTRATION CARD

                         High School Prep Time: Course Selections
Name: ___________________________________                    Homebase: __________________
Teachers: Math _________________LA_________________ SC ________________
SS____________________
CRCT Scores: Reading _____         ELA _____         Math _____       Science _____
ITBS NPR Scores: Reading total _____       LA total _____      Math total _____     Science total _____
Put a checkmark by all of the classes you qualify for based on your test scores, if you get a choice of
classes, only mark one class. Once completed, you will have only two check marks – one in math and
one in reading or science.
Criteria                                      Classes
If you scored 750-809 on Math CRCT            _____ Math Coaching
If you scored 811-819 on Math CRCT            _____ Pre-Algebra
If you scored 820-839 on Math CRCT            _____ Introduction to Math 1
If you scored 840-849 on Math CRCT            _____ Math 1
If you scored 850-926 on Math CRCT            _____ Accelerated Math 1

If you scored 750-809 on Reading CRCT          _____ Reading Coaching
If you scored 811-839 on Reading CRCT          _____ Literature Circle or
                                               _____ Jamestown
If you scored 840-920 on Reading CRCT          _____ Debate or
                                               _____ Dramatic Reading or
                                               _____ Shakespeare

If you scored 80 NPR or higher on Science ITBS                _____ Introduction to Biology with
Dissection Emphasis
If you scored 50 NPR or higher on Science ITBS &
scored 811 or more in BOTH Reading & Math CRCT                _____ Introduction to Agriculture Science




                                                   17
                             APPENDIX B: PARENT INVOLVMENT PLAN
Title I School Parent/Family Involvement Plan
1. DEVELOPMENT AND DISTRIBUTION
  The Haymon-Morris Middle School Parent/Family Involvement Plan is developed and accepted through the
   collaborative efforts of parents, families, business partners, staff, teachers, paraprofessionals, and administrators. The
   school-wide Title I plan is evaluated and updated periodically to meet the changing needs of parents, families, and the
   school. Parents and families receive an updated version of the Parent/Family Involvement Plan at the beginning of
   each new school year. The policy is shared with the community using the school’s website and a copy is placed in the
   front lobby of the school for viewing.
2. ANNUAL MEETING
   Haymon-Morris School will hold an annual meeting at the beginning of the school year to inform parents and families
   of the school’s participation in the School-wide Title I Program and Policy. At this time, the policy and its
   requirements are to be explained, parents and families are informed of their right to be involved,
   student/parent/teacher compacts are explained, and families are given the opportunity to serve on the school’s Title I
   planning committee. This meeting is held at the school’s annual open house. Notifications of this meeting are sent out
   using the school website, agenda notifications, and ParentLink.
3. TITLE 1 PLANNING COMMITTEE MEETING OPTIONS
   After the annual meeting, the school surveys the parents and families who have chosen to serve on the Title I
   Planning Committee for convenient meeting times, and offers choices of morning, afternoon, or evening meetings in
   order to ensure that all members have the opportunity to be involved in the meeting. Transportation and child care are
   offered as options when the surveys indicate this is necessary. Every effort to remove barriers to parent/family
   involvement is made to ensure that all members are fully involved in the planning process.
4. PARENT AND FAMILY INVOLVEMENT
   The School-wide Title I planning committee will involve parents and families in an organized, ongoing, and timely
   manner. Parents and families will be involved in the planning, evaluation, and improvement of all Title I programs
   including the school’s parent/family involvement policy, and the school-wide improvement policy as stated under
   section 1114(b).
5. PROVIDING INFORMATION TO PARENTS AND FAMILIES
   The school will provide all parents and families of participating students timely information through parent/family
   letters, newsletters, conferences, the school website, phone contacts, ParentLink, agenda reminders, and flyers in the
   front office.
   These contacts will include information concerning:
   1. All Title I programs at HMMS
   2. Results of the annual review of the School-wide Title I Improvement Plan, including all school performance
   profiles
   3. Individual student assessment results and an explanation of those results
   4. A description of the school’s curriculum and an explanation of that curriculum
   5. A description and explanation of the assessments used to measure student progress and proficiency levels that
   students are expected to meet
   6. Opportunities for regular meetings to formulate suggestions, share with other families, and participate in decisions
   affecting the education of their students
   7. Provide timely responses to parent/family questions and/or suggestions
   8. Collect any unsatisfactory comments regarding the Title I School-wide Improvement Plan and attach those
   comments to the School-wide plan when sent to the Georgia Department of Education.
6. PROVIDING ASSISTANCE FOR UNDERSTANDING
   Haymon-Morris will provide information to all parents and families of participating students in order to facilitate
   understanding of the following areas:
   1. No Child Left Behind (NCLB) goals
   2. Georgia Performance Standards for each content area
   3. School improvement process (planning, evaluation, revision)
   4. Components of the school’s improvement plan
   5. National, state, and local assessments
   6. Requirements of the school’s improvement plan
   7. Methods for parents and families to use to monitor their student’s progress and work with educators to improve
   their student’s performance (Parent Portal).
   8. Ways those parents and families can participate in the decisions that affect their student’s education



                                                            18
7. MATERIALS AND TRAINING
As appropriate and feasible, Haymon-Morris Middle School may provide the following opportunities to help parents
become full partners in the education of their children:
   1. Coordinating necessary literacy training to help parents and families work with their students to improve progress
   and achievement
   2. Coordinating technology resources to help parents and families work with their students to improve progress and
   achievement
   3. Providing methods to parents and families for parenting, tutoring, and assisting their students in order to improve
   progress and achievement
8. EQUAL PARTNERS
   Opportunities will be made at Haymon-Morris Middle School to educate faculty and staff in the value and utilization
   of contributions made by parents and families. The faculty and staff will work as equal partners with parents and
   families to coordinate and implement such parent/family-led programs as Parent Teacher Nights, Parent Volunteers,
   Book Fairs, etc. This coordination will be done in such as way as to build strong ties between participating students’
   families and the school.
9. COORDINATION WITH OTHER FAMILY/PARENT PROGRAMS
   Haymon-Morris Middle School will coordinate parent/family involvement programs along with other programs from
   the community such as:
   1. Northeast Georgia RESA
   2. Family Academy
   3. Hospital Homebound
   4. Migrant Programs
   5. ELL, Gifted, Special Education
   6. Homeless Programs: McKinney Vento Program (MVP)
   7. Vocational Education Programs: Career Technical and Agricultural Education (CTAE)
   8. Partners in Education
   9. Parents as Teachers Programs
   10. Student Attendance Review Board (SARB) and Community Based Risk Reduction (CBRR)
   Coordination of these programs will be carried out to the extent feasible and appropriate for participating students and
   their families.
10. COMMUNITY AND BUSINESS PARTNERS
   Haymon-Morris Middle School will develop appropriate roles for community-based organizations and businesses in
   parent/family involvement activities. Information will be provided to businesses and organizations concerning
   parent/family involvement opportunities at the school. Whenever possible, businesses and community partners will be
   encouraged to include parents and families in their partnerships with schools at all levels in the district.
11. PARENT AND FAMILY RESOURCES
   Haymon-Morris Middle School will conduct other activities, as appropriate and feasible, to help parents and families
   become full partners in the education of their participating students. Those activities may include:
   1. Parent/Family Resource Centers
   2. Literacy Training for Parents and Families
   3. Local/School Parent and Family Involvement Activities
   4. Training for parents and families to enhance and engage the involvement of other parents and families
   5. Parenting and Child Rearing Resources
   6. Family Academy
   7. Coffee and Chat
   8. PTO
12. ONGOING PARENT AND FAMILY INVOLVEMENT
   Haymon-Morris Middle School will work to involve parents and families in an ongoing assessment to evaluate the
   effectiveness of its parent/family involvement policy. These assessments will be used as a measure of performance
   evaluation for the school.
13. COMMUNICATION ADAPTATION
   Haymon-Morris Middle School will, to the fullest extent possible, provide equal opportunities for involvement to the
   parents and families of ELL students, migratory students, and students with disabilities. This will include providing
   parents and families’ information about school programs, meetings, and activities in a language and/or format that
   they can understand.




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