Subordinate Clause and Subordinate Conjunctions by linzhengnd

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									Subordinate Clause and
Relative Pronouns (who,
       which, that)
    Subordinate Conjunctions
There is a second kind of Subordinate
  Conjunction that also joins two sentences:
 For example, take two sentences having a Subject
  and a Verb:
My professor handed me the exam. He is named
  Dr. Glustrom,
 You can connect these two sentences to show
  that there is a relationship between them:
My professor, who is named Dr. Glustrom, handed
  me the exam.
    Subordinate Conjunctions
My professor, who is named Dr. Glustrom, handed
 me the exam.

 Notice that the Subordinate Conjunction who is
  also the Subject of the Subordinate Clause! Who
  is a Pronoun that takes the place of the second
  Subject He. Notice also that the Subordinate
  Clause “who is named Dr. Glustrom” is inserted in
  the sentence to give you extra information about
  the Subject of the Main Clause “My professor.”
   Subordinate Conjunctions
 There are only three of these Subordinate
  Conjunctions you need to remember:
 Who
 Which
 That
    Subordinate Conjunctions
Here are the rules you need to know about using
  commas with this type of Subordinate Clause:
 It is almost always true that ‘which’ takes a
  comma and ‘that’ does not.
 This is because „which‟ interrupts the sentence to
  give you extra information and „that‟ gives
  information that is essential to the sentence.
 “The briefcase, which I use for work, is in the
  closet.” [Commas!]
 “The briefcase that I use for work is in the closet.”
  [No Commas!]
   Subordinate Conjunctions
 Notice that when „which‟ (and sometime
  „who‟) is in the middle of the sentence, there
  are commas both before and after the
  interruption. For example: “The briefcase,
  which I use for work, is in the closet.”
The main sentence is: “The briefcase is in the
  closet.”
The Subordinate Clause is: “which I use for
  work.”
   Subordinate Conjunctions
 With who, you get to choose depending on
  whether you believe the sentence is
  interrupted by the Subordinate Clause.
               Practice Sentences
    Underline the Subject(s) once, and put the verb(s) in
     bold. Put the “subordinate conjunctions words that signal
     a dependent clause in blue type. Add any commas that
     are needed.
1.   Isabel knew that she was about to be fired.
2.   Jill came tumbling after Jack had fallen.
3.   That story was the first to be published.
4.   John who passed the test was elated.
5.   The quote which is in your text is important
     for understanding the controversy.

								
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