LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE by linzhengnd

VIEWS: 35 PAGES: 185

									LANGUAGE AND
 LITERATURE
I. CRITICAL
   READING
     20%
I. A. Purpose and
      Main Idea
I.B. Structure
I.C. Restatement of
     Information
I.D. Genres and their
I.Characteristics
I.E. Language and
       Tone
I.F. Grammar and
      Syntax
I.G. Vocabulary in
      Context
I.H. Diction
 II. NOVEL: A TALE
OF TWO CITIES, BY
CHARLES DICKENS
      (1812–70)
A.Background of the
       Author
A.1. Biography
 A.a) Early life and
education, 1812–22
A.i. Born to John
  Dickens and
 A.Elizabeth Barrow
Dickens on February
       7, 1812
 A.ii. Childhood in
Chatham, Kent, and
  early education
 A.iii. His father’s
  books and early
literary influences
 A.b) Entering the
world of the working
     poor, 1824
   A.i. Father’s
 imprisonment in
Marshalsea Prison
     for debt
A.ii. Sense of
abandonment
  A.iii. Work in
Warren’s Blacking
 Factory (age 12)
  A.c) Continuing
education and work,
      1825–27
 A.i. Wellington
House Academy
A.ii. Office boy for
      solicitors
  A.d) Work as a
reporter, 1828–34
A.i. Freelancing
A.ii. Work as
parliamentary
   reporter
 A.e) Early writing
and editing, 1836–37
  A.i. Previously
 published stories
   collected as
Sketches by Boz in
    two series
 A.ii. Serialization of
The Pickwick Papers
A.iii. Edits Bentley’s
      Miscellany
A.f) Marriage and
 family, 1836–58
   A.i. Marries
Catherine Hogarth,
   April 2, 1836
A.ii. The first of ten
children born, 1837
  A.iii. Legal
separation from
Catherine, 1858
A.g) Commercial
success, 1840–56
A.i. Editor of several
       journals
A.ii. Authors several
 serialized novels
 during this period
A.iii. Travels abroad
A.h) The theater,
      1857
A.i. Directs and acts
  in Wilkie Collins’
   play The Frozen
 Deep, an influence
  on A Tale of Two
        Cities
A.ii. Meets Ellen
      Ternan
A.i) The later novels
and public readings,
      1858–70
novels, including A
 Tale of Two Cities
and The Mystery of
 Edwin Drood, left
 incomplete at his
       death
A.ii. Begins public
readings for profit
   A.iii. American
  reading tour and
farewell readings in
       London
A.j) Death on June 9,
 1870, and burial in
    Poet’s Corner,
Westminster Abbey
A.2. A sampling of
   other works
  A.a) Oliver Twist,
       1837–39
 i. Monthly serial in
Bentley’s Miscellany
A.ii. Brief plot
  summary
A.b) A Christmas
Carol, December
      1843
A.i. One in a series
 of five Christmas
        tales
A.ii. Brief plot
  summary
   A.c) David
Copperfield, 1849–
       50
A.i. First-person
     narrator,
Bildungsroman
A.ii. Brief plot
  summary
    A.d) Great
Expectations, 1860–
        61
A.i. Weekly serial in
All the Year Round
   A.ii. Semi-
autobiographical
A.iii. Brief plot
   summary
  A.e) Conclusion:
  commonality of
these novels with A
 Tale of Two Cities
A.3. Contemporary
     reception
A.a) Serialization
  and general
   popularity
  A.i. Writing for
monthly serialization
  A.ii. Writing for
weekly serialization
A.iii. Dickens’s
  readership
 A.b) Reception of
 public readings in
Europe and the U.S.
A.c) Disappointing
  reception of A
A.Tale of Two Cities
A.B. Background of
     the Novel
A.1. The French
  Revolution
A.a) Background to
  the Revolution
A.b) The fall of the
      Bastille
A.c) The Reign of
      Terror
A.d) The aftermath
of the Revolution
A.2. The influence of
 Thomas Carlyle’s
     The French
     Revolution
A.a) Influence of the
 historical content
A.b) Influence of
Carlylean diction
A.3. The Revolutions
       of 1848
  A.4. Dickens’s
Victorian England
A.a) Suffering in the
working classes and
      poverty
  Jean-Jacques
Rousseau and Louis
    Mercier on
 Dickens’s view of
    the French
    Revolution
   A.c) Dickens’s
eyewitness account
 of an execution on
    the guillotine
A.5. The influence of
 Wilkie Collins’ play
  The Frozen Deep
A.C. Structure of the
        Novel
A.1. Serialization
 A.2. The Victorian
triple-decker novel
A.3. Story, plot, and
subplot—duality and
      doubling
A.4. Beginnings and
      endings
A.D. Characters
A.1. Sydney Carton
A.a) The Byronic
    anti-hero
A.b) The sacrificial
      victim
A.2. Charles Darnay
A.a) Carton’s
  ―double‖
A.b) Anti-aristocratic
       beliefs
A.3. Lucie Manette
A.a) The Victorian
     heroine
A.b) Patterned on
  Ellen Ternan
A.4. Dr. Alexandre
     Manette
A.a) As prisoner
A.b) As physician
  A.5. Marquis St.
Evremonde—icon of
aristocratic abuses
A.6. Jarvis Lorry—
    the man of
    ―business‖
     A.7. Ernest
Defarge—icon of the
   lower classes
   A.8. Madame
Defarge—the spirit
   of unrelenting
revenge and female
        fury
    A.9. The
  Vengeance—
Madame Defarge’s
   allegorical
   companion
    A.10. Jerry
 Cruncher—errand
     boy and
―resurrection‖ man
A.11. Miss Pross—
  icon of English
   female virtues
A.12. C. J. Stryver—
    the solicitor
     13. Gabelle
A.a) Former servant
 of the Marquis St.
     Evremonde
   A.b) His name
   alludes to the
French tax imposed
on salt before 1790
 A.14. Solomon
Pross (aka John
Barsad)—the spy
 A.15. The Three
Jacques—spying,
  secrecy, and
  denunciation
 A.16. The
Seamstress
A.E. Setting: Place,
     Time, and
   Atmosphere
A.1. Public and
private spaces
A.a) The two cities:
London and Paris
A.b) Dickens as the
  novelist of the
    modern city
A.c) Other public
     spaces
A.d) Private spaces
A.2. The years of the
   novel: 1757–93
A.3. Allusions to the
 place and time of
 writing, London in
        1859
A.4. Atmosphere
   and mood
A.F. Literary and
    Narrative
  Techniques
A.1. Narrative point
      of view
A.2. Motifs and
  metaphor
A.3. Symbolism and
      allegory
A.4. Foreshadowing
 A.5. Literary and
historical allusions
A.G. Themes
A.1. Burial and
 resurrection
A.2. Class struggle
   and poverty
A.3. Revolution and
        war
A.4. Sacrifice, self-
   sacrifice, the
 scapegoat, and
 spiritual quests
  A.5. Prisons,
confinement, and
     release
A.6. The negotiation
of public and private
        space
A.H. Style
  A.1. Realism,
Romanticism, and
   incantation
A.2. Parable, legend,
      and myth
A.3. Melodrama and
   sentimentality
  SELECTIONS
        30%
 A. Introduction:
Relationship of the
Shorter Selections
  to the Theme
  A.B. William Blake,
 ―A Song of Liberty,‖
from The Marriage of
   Heaven and Hell
   1. Life and works
      2. The poem
    a) The context
A.c) Line analysis:
mythology, politics,
 and history in the
       poem
A.d) Verse form and
    metrics: the
  prophetic poetic
     statement
A.e) Theme
   A.C. William
Wordsworth, ―The
French Revolution
 as It Appeared to
Enthusiasts at Its
Commencement‖
A.1. Life and works
A.2. The poem
A.a) The historical
     context:
 Wordsworth in
      France
A.b) Autobiography
and Wordsworth as
      speaker
A.c) Line analysis:
politics and history
    in the poem
A.d) Verse form:
  blank verse
A.e) Metrics
A.f) Theme
A.D. George Gordon,
  Lord Byron, The
 ―Dedication‖ from
      Don Juan
  1. Life and works
     2. The poem
 A.a) Byron as
  speaker and
character in Don
      Juan
A.b) The Byronic
      hero
A.c) Historical
  allusions
A.d) Verse form: the
     satiric epic
A.e) Line analysis of
  the ―Dedication‖
A.f) Metrics: the use
   of ottava rima
      g) Theme
A.E. Jean-Jacques
    Rousseau,
A.Excerpt from The
  Social Contract
 1. Life and works
    2. The Social
      Contract:
A.a) General
 argument
A.b) ―Monarchy‖
A.i. Prose style
  A.ii. Major
arguments and
   themes
    A.F. Mary
 Wollstonecraft,
 Excerpt from A
Vindication of the
  Rights of Men
A.1. Life and works
A.2. Wollstonecraft’s
       radical,
    revolutionary
    discourse: A
 Vindication of the
   Rights of Men
A.a) The response to
       Burke
A.b) Editions of the
     pamphlet
A.c) Epistolary style
A.d) Major
arguments
A.G. Thomas Paine,
   Excerpt from
A.Rights of Man
A.1. Life and works
A.2. Rights of Man
    A.a) Paine’s
response to Edmund
 Burke’s Reflections
   on the French
     Revolution
 A.b) The nature of
  Paine’s political
discourse and prose
       style
A.c) The major
   themes

								
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