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					                                                                          The ART MUSEUM of Eastern Idaho
                                                                    ARTworks Wax Relief Lesson
                                                                                                   Page 1 of 9




Create a
    Wax Carving




                                                                FEATURED ARTWORK

                 FEATURED ARTWORK
                                                                Aral Sea by Andréa Sparrow
                                                                Full version available on page 5
                 Mining Identities by Eve-Marie Bergren
                 Full version available on page 6




Grades
Subject
              3–4

Time Required 1.5 hours
              Visual arts lesson: drawing and wax relief



FEATURED EXHIBIT
The 13th Rib & Bill ~ Encaustics by Andréa Sparrow & Eve Marie Bergren

ADDITIONAL VISUAL RESOURCES
Additional artwork samples by Eve-Marie Bergren, page 7
Types of Fingerprints, page 8
Color wheel, page 9

LESSON OVERVIEW
View and discuss featured artwork. Create a fingerprint drawing and create a carving in wax.
Combine individual panels to create a class mural.



.
                                                                                 The ART MUSEUM of Eastern Idaho
                                                                            ARTworks Wax Relief Lesson
                                                                                                        Page 2 of 9


LEARNING OBJECTIVES
Students should be able to:
        ~ view and discuss visual samples from featured exhibit.
        ~ identify the meaning of scale in artwork.
        ~ identify the meaning of encaustic.
        ~ identify positive and negative space.
        ~ compare and contrast types of fingerprints.
        ~ use observational skills to employ step-by-step drawing techniques.
        ~ identify warm and cool colors and use them in a composition.
        ~ apply simple wax carving techniques.
        ~ use newly acquired skills to create original artwork.

SUPPLIES PER STUDENT
        1 piece of white scratch paper, approximately 3-in. x 3-in.
        1 piece of 80-pound sulfite drawing paper, 6-in. x 6-in.
        1 ink stamp pad to be shared by class
        1 piece of 6-in. x 6-in. colored mat board covered in beeswax (see instructions below)
        pencil
        black Sharpie permanent marker
        pointed wood stylus or large nail
        assorted colors of acrylic paint & brush
        32 oz. cup of water
        paper towel
        adhesive-backed magnet

VOCABULARY
encaustic wax painting: an ancient painting method invented by the Greeks in the 5th century BC in which
wax, pigment and resin are heated and applied to a surface such as wood.
positive space: the main objects being described in a work of art.
negative space: the space behind and around what is described in the positive space.
fingerprint types: The arch, tented arch, loop and whorl are the basic types of fingerprints. Each person has a
basic fingerprint type, yet no two finger prints are identical.
warm colors: yellows, oranges, and reds. Artists sometimes use colors to convey a certain mood. Warm colors
convey the feeling of heat, intensity and immediacy.
cool colors: Cool colors include blues, purples, and greens. These colors convey a more relaxed, calm and
peaceful feeling.
relief carving: There are three degrees or types of relief: high, low, and sunken. In high relief, the forms stand
far out from the background. In low relief (best known as bas-relief), the forms are shallow. In sunken relief
(also called hollow or intaglio), the backgrounds are not cut back, and the points in highest relief are level with
the original surface of the material being carved.
Scaling up: the process of proportionately drawing, sculpting or painting something much larger than it is in the
visible world.
Scaling down: the process of proportionately drawing, sculpting or painting something much smaller than it is in
the visible world.
                                                                                   The ART MUSEUM of Eastern Idaho
                                                                              ARTworks Wax Relief Lesson
                                                                                                          Page 3 of 9



PREPARE BEESWAX SQUARES
Heat a one-pound block of beeswax (available at the craft store) in a crockpot or over low heat on the stove.
With a utility brush, spread melted wax over 6-in. x 6-in. mat board panels. Create one square per student. Clean
wax from pan with paper towel while still warm. Discard brush.

VIEW AND DISCUSS
Artists Andréa Sparrow and Eve Marie Bergren live in Boise, Idaho. Both artists use the process of encaustic
painting to create their artwork. Both artists find beauty in natural forms and emphasize this beauty by using very
large things from nature and making them smaller and taking very small things and making them larger.
Sparrow uses satellite images accessed on Goggle Maps as inspiration for her artwork. She looked at images
from space from areas particularly devastated by drought and recreates these forms in scaled-down paintings.
Artist Eve Marie Bergren collects the fingerprints of people she comes into contact with in her daily life. She
uses a photocopier to enlarge the fingerprints to scale up the fingerprint and then paints them
on small birchwoodpanels. On the back of each panel, she records something special about each
person. She then attaches a magnet to each piece. After collecting hundreds of fingerprints, she displays them in
a grid-like pattern on a large metal board, thus creating a mural.
         ~ View and discuss the two painting samples. Identify the paintings as encaustics.
           Compare and contrast the paintings.
         ~ Discuss how one artist has scaled up the subject of her work and the other artist has scaled down the
           subject of her artwork.
         ~ Discuss why the artist might have created paintings of fingerprints or satellite images from space.
         ~ Discuss the different types of fingerprints, pointing out that each person has a unique print unlike
           anyone else in the world.


PROCESS
Fingerprint Drawing
Pass out small sheets of paper and stamp pads. Have students stamp their fingerprints on the paper. Remind
students of scaling up. Distribute 4-in. x 4-in. drawing paper. Have students create a scaled up drawing drawing
of their fingerprints. Encourage them to work from the middle of the paper out to the edges, filling as much of
the negative space as possible.
Carve in Wax
Discuss the meaning of relief carving. For each student, distribute one 6-in. x 6-in. wax square and carving stylus
or nail. Have students carve their scaled up fingerprint drawings into the wax, starting from the middle and
working out to the edges.
Discuss Color
View color wheel; discuss warm and cool colors. Remind students that warm colors can be mixed with one
another and they will not create dulled colors, and colors across from one another on the color wheel will create
brown. Review the fingerprint samples and identify warm and cool colors used in observed artwork. Discuss the
feeling that colors in these portraits convey to the viewer.
Add Color
Distribute acrylic paint of various colors to students. Remind students that their choices of colors will convey a
feeling to the viewer. Allow them to choose and mix colors for their fingerprints. Have students select a cool
paint color if the color of their board is warm, or warm color of paint if their board is is a cool color. Have them
apply a thin layer of paint over their wax carving with a brush. After applying the paint, gently wipe the paint
away using a paper towel, leaving paint in the carved in lines.
                                                                                      The ART MUSEUM of Eastern Idaho
                                                                                 ARTworks Wax Relief Lesson
                                                                                                              Page 4 of 9



Personalize
Have students use a sharpie pen to write their names on the back of each square. Then ask them to write
 something that is significant or unique about them underneath their names. When finished, attach a small
adhesive-backed magnet to the back of each square and display the squares together on a white board or large
metal surface to create a mural. Encourage students to rearrange the panels to create an interesting overall design.

EVALUATE
As a group, look at the finished wax carving mural. Look for student work that demonstrates outstanding
examples of drawing, painting, and carving techniques. Have students try to guess which artist created each
panel. Look for examples that demonstrate good use warm and cool colors. Ask students to describe the feeling
each choice of colors conveys.

FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITY
Have students write brief artists’ statements about their wax carvings. Have them describe the steps they
followed to create their work. Ask them to identify their choices of colors, their reason for the choices, and what
they chose to write about on the back of their panels.

STANDARDS ADDRESSED
Idaho Humanities Performance Standards – Visual Arts
Standard One: Historical and Cultural Contexts
3. Describe the role visual arts play in today's society.

Standard Two: Critical Thinking
2.1 Conduct analysis in the visual arts
2.2 Engage in reasoned dialogues and make informed decisions about the visual arts
    K – 3: Objectives 2.1.1, 2.1.2, 2.1.3, 2.1.4, 2.1.5, 2.2.1, 2.2.2, 2.2.3, 2.2.4, 2.2.5 optional, 2.2.6,
    4 – 5: Objectives 2.1.1, 2.1.2, 2.1.3, 2.1.4, 2.1.5, 2.2.1, 2.2.2, 2.2.3, 2.2.4, 2.2.5 optional, 2.2.6
Standard Three: Performance
3.1 Demonstrate skills essential to the visual arts
3.2 Communicate through the visual arts, applying artistic concepts, knowledge, and skills.
3.3 Communicate through the visual arts with creative expression
    K – 3: Objectives 3.1.1, 3.1.2, 3.1.3, 3.1.4, 3.2.1, 3.2.2, 3.2.3, 3.3.1, 3.3.2, 3.3.3
    4 – 5: Objectives 3.1.1, 3.1.2, 3.1.3, 3.1.4, 3.2.1, 3.2.2, 3.2.3, 3.3.1, 3.3.2, 3.3.3
                              The ART MUSEUM of Eastern Idaho
                           ARTworks Wax Relief Lesson
                                                   Page 5 of 9




Aral Sea, Andréa Sparrow
encaustic on wood
                                                                  The ART MUSEUM of Eastern Idaho
                                                               ARTworks Wax Relief Lesson
                                                                                       Page 6 of 9




Fingerprint Detail from Mining Identities, Eve-Marie Bergren
encaustic on wood
                                                                   The ART MUSEUM of Eastern Idaho
                                                               ARTworks Wax Relief Lesson
                                                                                        Page 7 of 9




"365 – untitled one year," detail , 100 Days detail & 100 days full view, Eve Marie Bergren
 encaustic on wood
                                                                EAGLE ROCK ART MUSEUM & EDUCATION CENTER
                                                                             ARTworks Portrait Lesson
                                                                                               Page 8 of 9




                                                               Tented Arch




                                                              Arch




                                                               Loop




                                                              Whorl

http://www.handanalysis.net/beginners/fingerprint_types.htm
EAGLE ROCK ART MUSEUM & EDUCATION CENTER
             ARTworks Portrait Lesson
                               Page 9 of 9

				
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