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					                 DRAFT
  Washington County and City of Beaverton
                  2008
           Consolidated Annual
        Performance and Evaluation
                 Report




   Volume I

September 2009
Cover pictures:
Play area located at Merlo Station Apartments
Tigard Senior Center’s garden room veranda
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                                                 Table of Contents
Executive Summary .............................................................................................................................................7
Financial Summary..............................................................................................................................................9

Part 1. CAPER Narrative Statement
        Washington County and City of Beaverton

           a.    Assessment of Three to Five Year Goals and Objectives ..................................................................11
           b.    Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing ..............................................................................................26
           c.    Affordable Housing............................................................................................................................33
           d.    Continuum of Care .............................................................................................................................35
           e.    Other Actions .....................................................................................................................................40
           f.    Leveraging Resources ........................................................................................................................44
           g.    Citizen Comments ..............................................................................................................................56
           h.    Self-evaluation....................................................................................................................................56

Part 2. Community Development Block Grant Narrative

           Washington County
           CDBG Narrative .......................................................................................................................................85

           City of Beaverton
           CDBG Narrative ......................................................................................................................................91

           CDBG Financial Summaries
           Washington County Consortium...............................................................................................................99
           City of Beaverton......................................................................................................................................104

Part 3. HOME Investment Partnerships Program
        Washington County Consortium

           Home Narrative.........................................................................................................................................107
           HUD 40107 HOME Performance Report................................................................................................114
           HAD-40107A HOME Match Report.......................................................................................................116

Part 4. Housing Opportunities for Persons With AIDS (HOPWA) ...............................................................119

Part 5. Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG) ..........................................................................................................121
        Washington County

Part 6. Public Participation ................................................................................................................................123
        Washington County and City of Beaverton




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                                                            i
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                                                Figures and Tables
 Geographic Distribution Maps
       Figures 1-6................................................................................................................................................ 71

 Charts
            Chart A. Washington County CDBG Allocation Formula 2005-2009 .................................................... 18
            Chart: B Federal Program Funds in the Lindsay Lane Homeownership Project………………………...23
            Chart C. Program Income by Year........................................................................................................... 90

 Tables
            Table 1-1, Washington County Consortium Assessment of Community Development
               Accomplishments from PY 2005 through PY 2009 .......................................................................... 13
            Table 1-2, Beaverton CDBG Program Summary of Non-Housing Activity Undertaken
               in PY 2008 ......................................................................................................................................... 20
            Table 1-3, Washington County Consortium High-Priority Housing Needs and Annual Goals............... 21
            Table 1-4, Washington County Consortium Assessment of Housing Accomplishments,
               PY 2005-2009.................................................................................................................................... 22
            Table 1-5, Racial Characteristics of Housing Beneficiaries in Washington County
               and City of Beaverton ........................................................................................................................ 24
            Table 1-6, Racial Characteristics of Non-Housing Beneficiaries in Washington County
               and Beaverton .................................................................................................................................... 24
            Table 1-7, Income Data—PY 2008 Activities, City of Beaverton........................................................... 25
            Table 1-8, Income Data—PY 2008 Activities, Washington County ....................................................... 25
            Table 1-9, Actions to Address Impediments to Fair Housing, PY 2008 .................................................. 27
            Table 1-10, Washington County Consortium Summary of Housing Accomplishments
               by Tenure and Income Category, PY 2008........................................................................................ 33
            Table 1-11, Washington County Consortium Summary of Other Activities Proposed
               and Undertaken in PY 2008............................................................................................................... 45
            Table 1-12, Washington County Consortium List of Other Actions Undertaken in PY 2008................. 54
            Table 1-13, Washington County Consortium Leveraged Resources for Projects Completed in
               PY 2008 ............................................................................................................................................. 57
            Table 1-14, Washington County Consortium Summary of Leveraged Resources for
               All Projects Completed in PY 2008................................................................................................... 58
            Table 1-15 Analysis of Washington County/City of Beaverton
               2005-2010 Consolidated Plan and Action Plan Objectives for PY 2008 .......................................... 59
            Table 1-16 Summary of Positive Impacts of Activities Completed in PY 2008
               by the Washington County Consortium............................................................................................. 63
            Table 2a-1, Relationship of Washington County CDBG Funds to Public Facility Priorities .................. 86
            Table 2a-2, Relationship of Washington County CDBG Funds to Infrastructure Priorities .................... 87
            Table 2a-3, Relationship of Washington County CDBG Funds to Public Services Priorities ................. 87
            Table 2a-4, Relationship of Washington County CDBG Funds to Housing Priorities ............................ 88




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                                                         ii
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                                     Figures and Tables Continued
           Table 2a-5, Washington County CDBG Activities Completed in PY 2008
              Compared to National Objectives...................................................................................................... 88
           Table 2a-6, Housing Rehabilitation Statistics for Washington County.................................................... 89
           Table 2b-1, Relationship of Beaverton CDBG Funds to Public Services Priorities ................................ 91
           Table 2b-2, Relationship of Beaverton CDBG Funds to Housing Priorities............................................ 92
           Table 2b-3, Beaverton CDBG Activities Completed in PY 2008
              Compared to National Program Objectives ....................................................................................... 93
           Table 2b-4, Housing Rehabilitation Statistics for the City of Beaverton................................................. 94
           Table 3a-1 Relationship of Washington County HOME Funds to Housing Priorities ............................ 109
           Table 5-1 Homeless Statistics Reported Under CDBG and ESG Programs ............................................ 121
           Table 5-2a ESG Match ............................................................................................................................. 122
           Table 5-2b Summary of ESG Services..................................................................................................... 122




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                                                  iii
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)   6
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

    CAPER Executive Summary
    Washington County and City of Beaverton

    Executive Summary                                viding affordable housing, including      of Beaverton administers its own
                                                     the number and types of families          Community Development Block
    The 2008 Consolidated Annual Per-                served. This element of the report        Grant (CDBG) funds while the
    formance and Evaluation Report                   must include the number of ex-            Washington County Office of Com-
    (CAPER) describes and assesses the               tremely low-income, low-income,           munity Development manages
    Washington County Consortium's                   and moderate-income persons               CDBG funds for the County and the
    progress in carrying out its Consoli-            served.                                   City of Hillsboro. However, the City
    dated Plan for housing and commu-                                                          of Hillsboro and the City of Beaver-
    nity development during the July 1,              For Community Development Block           ton have elected to have Washington
    2008–June 30, 2009 reporting pe-                 Grant (CDBG) recipients, the report       County administer HOME funds on
    riod.                                            includes a description of the use of      their behalf.
                                                     CDBG funds during the program
    Each jurisdiction that has an ap-                year and an assessment by the juris-      The PY 2008 CAPER consists of
    proved Consolidated Plan must an-                diction of the relationship of that use   two volumes. Volume One contains
    nually review and report, in a form              to the priorities and specific objec-     the narratives as prescribed by HUD.
    prescribed by HUD ("The CAPER")                  tives identified in the Consolidated      Volume Two contains reports gener-
    on the progress it has made in carry-            Plan, giving special attention to the     ated by HUD’s Integrated Disburse-
    ing out its strategic plan and its an-           highest priority activities that were     ment and Information System
    nual plan.      HUD is continually               identified.                               (IDIS). The entire report is avail-
    working to better integrate the vari-                                                      able for public review at the
    ous required documents                           For HOME participating jurisdic-          Washington County Office of
    (Consolidated Plan, Action Plan and              tions, the CAPER includes the re-         Community Development, located
    CAPER) so that they effectively                  sults of on-site inspections of afford-   at 328 West Main, Suite 100, Hills-
    complement one another. This fis-                able rental housing assisted under        boro, OR 97123. If you have any
    cal year is the fourth year within the           the program; an assessment of the         comments or questions regarding the
    five-year planning period that is out-           jurisdiction's affirmative marketing      PY 2008 CAPER, you may contact
    lined in the 2005-2010 Consolidated              actions and outreach to minority-         Patricia Longua at 503-846-2060.
    Plan.                                            owned and women-owned busi-
                                                     nesses; and data on the amount and        Community Development
    The CAPER must include a descrip-                use of program income for projects,
    tion of the resources made available             including the number of projects and      Between the two jurisdictions,
    to and invested by the Consortium,               owner and tenant characteristics.         Washington County and the City of
    the geographic distribution and loca-                                                      Beaverton disbursed a total of
    tion of these investments, the fami-             For ESG grantees, the CAPER must          $3,402,367 in CDBG funds during
    lies and persons assisted (including             include descriptions to what extent       the reporting period to projects that
    their racial and ethnic status), ac-             the activities supported with ESG         benefited low and moderate-income
    tions taken to affirmatively further             funds addressed homeless and home-        persons. During the 2008 program
    fair housing, and other actions indi-            less prevention goals as established      year, CDBG funds were used to:
    cated in the Consolidated Plan and               in the Consolidated Plan and, if ap-
    annual Action Plan. This perform-                plicable, the Continuum of Care            Purchase and rehab seven group
    ance report shall be submitted to                Plan.                                        homes for youth and adults deal-
    HUD within 90 days after the close                                                            ing with developmental disabili-
    of the jurisdiction's program year.              The Washington County Consortium             ties
                                                     consists of Washington County, the         Make improvements to a senior
    The CAPER must include an evalua-                City of Hillsboro and the City of            center in Tigard
    tion of the jurisdiction's progress in           Beaverton, all three of which are          Complete four infrastructure im-
    meeting its specific objective of pro-           entitlement communities. The City            provement projects involving


Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                     7
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

     water systems, sidewalks and                  51%-80% MFI category. This has
     street improvements serving                   skewed the data.
     2,496 low and moderate-income
     persons                                       Another 9,614 (County/City) home-
   Assist 3,945 low- and moderate-               less persons benefited from CDBG
     income persons, including youth               or ESG – assisted activities during
     and seniors, with various public              PY 2008.
     services (not including homeless
     activities)
   Complete five storefront facade
     improvements in downtown Bea-
     verton.

  Many other CDBG-assisted projects
  were active but not completed during
  the year.

  Total CDBG funds spent by Wash-
  ington County and Beaverton on
  planning and administration in PY
  2008 was $591,280.

  Housing and Homelessness

  HOME and CDBG programs in
  Washington County provided hous-
  ing assistance to 880 households
  during the 2008 program year, in-
  cluding 588 renters, 279 owners, and
  12 homebuyers. In all, 49% of these
  households earned less than half of
  the area’s median family income
  (MFI). 260, or 30% of assisted
  households in PY 2008 - had ex-
  tremely low incomes (0–30% of
  MFI). These numbers appear to be
  quite low in comparison to previous
  years. This year, the Consortium
  noted the completion of six large
  rental housing projects. While in-
  come demographics are available for
  the HOME-assisted units (HAUs),
  there is no demographic data avail-
  able for all other units. We know
  that most if not all of the units are
  housing families earning below 50%
  MFI, but without documentation, we
  are required to report them in the




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                            8
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

    CAPER Financial Summary, Program Year 2008
    Washington County and City of Beaverton


    Financial Summary, Program Year 2008
    Washington County
    Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program

    PART I: SUMMARY OF CDBG RESOURCES:


    UNEXPENDED CDBG FUNDS AT END OF PREVIOUS PROGRAM YEAR       $2,541,735
    ENTITLEMENT GRANT                                           $2,634,338
    CURRENT YEAR PROGRAM INCOME                                 $ 118,933

    TOTAL AVAILABLE                                             $5,295,006


    PART II: SUMMARY OF CDBG EXPENDITURES:

    DISBURSEMENTS OTHER THAN SECTION 108 REPAYMENTS             $2,860,102
    PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION                                 $ 498,276
    TOTAL EXPENDITURES                                          $3,358,378

    UNEXPENDED BALANCE                                          $1,936,628




    City of Beaverton
    Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program

    PART I: SUMMARY OF CDBG RESOURCES:


    UNEXPENDED CDBG FUNDS AT END OF PREVIOUS PROGRAM YEAR       $ 575,223
    ENTITLEMENT GRANT                                           $ 603,998
    CURRENT YEAR PROGRAM INCOME                                 $ 14,915

    TOTAL AVAILABLE                                             $1,194,136

    PART II: SUMMARY OF CDBG EXPENDITURES:

    DISBURSEMENTS OTHER THAN SECTION 108 REPAYMENTS             $ 542,265
    PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION                                 $ 93,004
    TOTAL EXPENDITURES                                          $ 635,268

    UNEXPENDED BALANCE                                          $ 558,867




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                9
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)   10
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009


  PART 1. CAPER Narrative Statement
  Washington County and City of Beaverton

   Narrative Statement                               in the 2005-2010 Consolidated Plan.     ferent priority levels.

   Washington County’s Office of Com-                The Consolidated Plan for Washing-      The County identified all public fa-
   munity Development (OCD) has                      ton County and the City of Beaver-      cilities, with the exception of parking
   managed the Community Develop-                    ton presents a long-term strategy for   facilities and non-residential historic
   ment Block Grant Program since                    using federal resources to address      preservation activities, as a high pri-
   1979. Beginning in July of 2003,                  priority housing and community de-      ority level. The City’s high priori-
   OCD began management of the                       velopment needs.                        ties were parking and health facili-
   HOME Investment Partnerships Pro-                                                         ties.
   gram which included a new federal                 Comparisons of annual accomplish-
   component of the HOME Program                     ments to Consolidated Plan goals        The County identified street, side-
   called the American Dream Down-                   and objectives are presented in the     walks, flood drain improvements and
   payment Initiative. In July of 2004,              following sections.                     water/sewer improvements as high
   the County also resumed administra-                                                       priorities. The City identified all
   tive oversight for the Emergency                  Community Development                   infrastructure as a medium priority.
   Shelter Grant Program.                                                                    Public service activities ranked as a
                                                     Washington County’s Office of           high-priority need for both the
   In May 2005, the County and the cit-              Community Development (OCD)             County and the City.
   ies of Beaverton and Hillsboro com-               and the City of Beaverton use inde-
   pleted the 2005-2010 Consolidated                 pendent processes to determine the      The County identified activities tar-
   Plan. This plan went into affect July             needs in each of their respective ju-   geted to homeless populations as a
   1, 2005. The 2008 CAPER reflects                  risdictions.                            high-priority also.
   activities underway and completed in
   this fourth year of the five-year cycle.          In July 2003, the Office of Commu-      The 2005-2010 Consolidated Plan
                                                     nity Development assumed responsi-      contains a complete list of the prior-
   a. Assessment of Five-year                        bility for the HOME program, which      ity levels assigned to non-housing
                                                     necessitated an alignment in funding    community development needs by
   Goals and Objectives                              cycles between the HOME and             the County and the City of Beaver-
                                                     CDBG programs. The Consortium           ton. Each jurisdiction’s annual action
   The Consolidated Annual Perform-
                                                     now conducts its planning process       plan lists, by priority needs, pro-
   ance and Evaluation Report
                                                     every five years but conducts fund-     posed accomplishments for each
   (CAPER) details the progress of the
                                                     ing rounds annually.                    CDBG-assisted activity.
   Washington County Consortium in
   carrying out its long-term strategy
                                                     Beaverton also has a one-year fund-     Table 1-1 shows how County and
   and its Action Plan for the 2008 re-
                                                     ing cycle. During the planning proc-    City CDBG-assisted projects address
   porting period (July 1, 2008–June 30,
                                                     esses, both jurisdictions work with     priority non-housing community de-
   2009).
                                                     nonprofit organizations plus city and   velopment needs.      Program year
                                                     county departments to identify the      2008 is the fourth year in the five-
   Each jurisdiction prepares an annual
                                                     needs of their respective low and       year planning cycle.
   action plan describing how Commu-
                                                     moderate-income citizens.
   nity Development Block Grant
                                                                                             In this fourth year of the 2005-2010
   (CDBG), HOME Investment Partner-
                                                     A high, medium, low, or no-priority     cycle, we are better able to assess the
   ships (HOME) Program, Emergency
                                                     level is assigned to each sub-need,     extent to which the local community
   Shelter Grant Program, and American
                                                     which helps guide how the City and      development priorities are being met
   Dream Downpayment Initiative Pro-
                                                     Washington County allocate funds.       for the county as a whole.
   gram resources will be used in the
                                                     The City and the County have as-
   coming year to address the priority
                                                     signed different priority levels to     Please refer to Table 1–1 for a com-
   needs and local objectives established
                                                     needs. Table 1-1 reflects those dif-    parison of the non-housing accom-

Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                     11
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

  plishments to the five-year Consoli-                come-qualified areas to ensure the       pleted. Upon completion of the
  dated Plan’s goals and objectives.                  health and safety of communities,        other three projects, Washington
  For a breakdown of non-housing                      and increase neighborhood pride          County will be only slightly off tar-
  activities by the race/ethnicity and                and viability.                           get in meeting anticipated goals
  income of program beneficiaries,                 C. Provide public services that ensure      (79% at year 4). Staff has no con-
  please refer to Tables 1-5 through                  the health and welfare of income-        cerns. For a more detailed assess-
  1-8.                                                qualified people living in the com-      ment of progress in meeting goals,
                                                      munity.                                  please see Part 1h, Self Evaluation.
  Some brief assessments are provided
  by the respective jurisdictions below.           Objectives A, B, and C tie in directly      Infrastructure
                                                   with the priority needs identified in
  Washington County                                HUD Table 2B (which can be found            Seven high-priority infrastructure
                                                   on pages 34 and 129 of the 2005-2010        projects are in various stages of con-
  Washington County’s Office of                    Consolidated Plan - Volume I). The          struction. Four were completed en-
  Community Development (OCD)                      methodology used to direct funds to         suring the health and safety of com-
  manages the Community Develop-                   these established needs is the formula      munities and increasing neighbor-
  ment Block Grant Program (CDBG),                 identified in Chart A.                      hood pride and viability:
  HOME Investment Partnerships Pro-
  gram (HOME), Emergency Shelter                   Public Facilities                            G a s t o n W a t e r R e s e r v o i r
  Grant Program (ESG) and the                                                                     (completed)
  American Dream Downpayment Ini-                  High-priority, public facility projects      WA County Sell/Turk Roads
  tiative (ADDI). As the lead agency               targeted to benefit income-qualifying          (completed)
  for these programs and as required               neighborhoods and income-qualified,          Hillsboro 21st Street Sidewalks
  by federal regulations, OCD man-                 special needs populations were funded          (completed)
  aged a planning process that in-                 as follows:                                  Cornelius 12th Avenue & Dog-
  volved identifying both housing and                                                             wood (completed)
  non-housing needs and priorities in               Edwards Center—Florence home              King City Cul-de-sac (underway)
  the community. This process in-                     (completed)                               Forest Grove 18th Avenue Side-
  volved the County, the Policy Advi-               Albertina Kerr Group Home Rehab             walks (underway)
  sory Board (representing the County                 5 units (completed)                       Forest Grove A Street Improve-
  and incorporated cities), cities and              Tigard Senior Center Remodel                ments (underway)
  county departments, nonprofit or-                   Phase I (completed)
  ganizations and Washington County                 Tigard Senior Center Remodel             Over the course of the five-year cy-
  citizens. Through this process, a                   Phase II (completed)                     cle, it is expected that 14,000 per-
  Community Development Plan (non-                  Albertina Kerr Group Home Pur-           sons will be served upon completion
  housing) was developed as an ele-                   chase (completed)                        of the proposed infrastructure pro-
  ment of the Consolidated Plan. This               Forest Grove Health Center               jects. This year, 2,496 persons were
  section of the CAPER addresses                      (underway)                               served in Hillsboro, Forest Grove,
  those non-housing needs and accom-
                                                    Hillsboro Bicentennial Park              Gaston, and King City with an addi-
  plishments.
                                                      (underway)                               tional 327 persons to be served by
                                                    Community Action Shelter                 the “underway” projects listed
  The Block Grant program identified
                                                      (underway)                               above. Upon completion of the
  three long-range objectives to be
                                                                                               “underway” projects, the county will
  addressed:
                                                   Thirty-four public facility projects are    be well within targets for this point
                                                   projected for completion over the five-     of the cycle. The accomplishment
  A. Develop or improve a variety of
                                                   year cycle. During the fourth year of       numbers for certain projects above
     public facilities to benefit in-
                                                   the five-year cycle, five public facility   may be slightly inflated as the num-
     come-qualifying neighborhoods
                                                   activities (covering 9 actual units)        bers are derived from Census Block
     or income-qualified special needs
                                                   were completed and three activities         Group data as opposed to the actual
     populations.
                                                   remain underway. To date, 24 of the         service area of the projects. Wash-
  B. Improve the infrastructure of in-
                                                   34 facilities (or 70%) have been com-       ington County attempted to correct


Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                          12
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                               Table 1-1
                                     Washington County Consortium
            Assessment of Community Development Accomplishments from PY 2005 through PY 2009
                                                           PRIORITY
              PRIORITY COMMUNITY                             NEED   Proposed PY Actual PY Actual Actual Actual Actual Actual
              DEVELOPMENT NEEDS                             LEVEL    2005-2009  2005-2009 PY 2005 PY 2006 PY 2007 PY 2008 PY 2009                      NOTES

                                                                                          ACCOMPLISHMENTS
    PUBLIC FACILITY NEEDS                                                            Measured in numb er of pub lic facilities

                          Neighborhood Facilities              H/M                  2                 0         0          0     0   0   -

             Parks and/or Recreation Facilities                 H/L                 6                 3         1          0     2   0   -

                                    Health Facilities            H                  2                 0         0          0     0   0   -

                                  Parking Facilities            L/H                 1                 0         0          0     0   0   -

         Non-Residential Historic Preservation                 L/M                  0                 0         0          0     0   0   -

                                                                                                                                             Tigard Senior Center - 2
                                     Senior Centers            H/M                  3                 3         1          0     0   2   -
                                                                                                                                             projects, Phase I & II.

                                                                                                                                              Abrtina Kerr - 5 group
                                                                                                                                             homes refurbs & 1 home
                             Handicapped Centers                 H                  1                 8         1          0     0   7   -
                                                                                                                                             purchase. Edw ards Center
                                                                                                                                             rehab.


                                  Childcare Centers              H                  2                 0         0          0     0   0   -

                                      Youth Centers              H                  2                 1         1          0     0   0   -

                              Homeless Facilities                H                  3                 2         0          0     2   0   -

                           Other Public Facilities             H/M                 12                 7         3          4     0   0   -
                                                                                                                                             The City of Beaverton did
                                                                                                                                             not fund any public facility
    TOTAL # OF PUBLIC FACILITIES:                                                  34                24         7          4     4   9   0   projects using CDBG
                                                                                                                                             resources.

    Where split priority levels are show ing, County priority is listed first, then the City of Beaverton.




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                                                               13
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                           Table 1-1 (continued)
                                      Washington County Consortium
             Assessment of Community Development Accomplishments from PY 2005 through PY 2009
                                                         PRIORITY
            PRIORITY COMMUNITY                             NEED   Proposed PY Actual PY Actual Actual Actual Actual Actual
            DEVELOPMENT NEEDS                             LEVEL    2005-2009  2005-2009 PY 2005 PY 2006 PY 2007 PY 2008 PY 2009 NOTES

                                                                                 ACCOMPLISHMENTS
  INFRASTRUCTURE NEEDS                                                  Measured in numb er of persons served

                   Water/Sewer Improvements                  H/M        2,000          774         0            0     0     774     Gaston Water Reservoir


                        Sidewalk Improvements                H/M        5,000          950         0       950        0       0

                                                                                                                                    Hillsboro 21st ave,
                            Street Improvements              H/M        5,000        11,631      1,999    2,053     5,857   1,722   Cornelius 12th ave,
                                                                                                                                    WA Co Sell rd


        Solid Waste Disposal Improvements                     N/L         0             0          0            0     0       0

                     Flood Drain Improvements                H/M        2,000           0          0            0     0       0

   Other Infrastructure Improvement Needs                      M          0             0          0            0     0       0


                                                                                                                                    The City of Beaverton no
                                                                                                                                    longer funds infrastructure
  TOTAL # OF PERSONS SERVED:                                            14,000       13,355      1,999    3,003     5,857   2,496   projects using CDBG
                                                                                                                                    resources.

  Where split priority levels are show ing, County priority is listed
  first, then the City of Beaverton.




                                       Gaston’s new one million gallon water reservoir located next to
                                       original water reservoir.


Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                                             14
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                        Table 1-1 (continued)
                                   Washington County Consortium
          Assessment of Community Development Accomplishments from PY 2005 through PY 2009
                                                PRIORITY
             PRIORITY COMMUNITY                   NEED   Proposed PY Actual PY Actual Actual Actual Actual Actual
             DEVELOPMENT NEEDS                   LEVEL    2005-2009   2005-2009 PY 2005 PY 2006 PY 2007 PY 2008 PY 2009 NOTES
                                                                   ACCOMPLISHMENTS
     PUBLIC SERVICE NEEDS                                    Measured in numb er of persons served
     WASHINGTON COUNTY
                   Handicapped Services            H            50          28          0            0    28        0

                      Transportation Services      H            50           0          0            0     0        0

                   Substance Abuse Services        H            50           0          0            0     0        0

                        Employment Training        H          200            0          0            0     0        0

                              Health Services      H         7,000         7,716      2,574     2,698      0      2,444

                              Senior Services      H          100           253        145       20        34           54

                            Crime Awareness        H            35           0          0            0     0        0

                              Youth Services       H            50          614        129       276      92       117
                                                                                                                                 7 public service
                                                                                                                                 projects are still
                                                                                                                                 underway.
                          Child Care Services      H          300            0          0            0     0        0

                      Lead Hazard Screening        N            0            0          0            0     0        0

                  Other Public Service Needs       H         20,000       33,077     15,101    13,156    3,490    1,330          The last priority need
                                                                                                                                 for homeless services
          Homeless (prevention and supportive                                                                                    is taken from Table 1C
                                                             30,300       38,592      9,535    11,441    8,265    9,351
                                    services)      H                                                                             (page C3 of Con Plan
                                                                                                                                 Volume II). These
                                                                                                                                 numbers may be
                                                                                                                                 reflected elsewhere in
                                                                                                                                 the document. Does
                                                                                                                                 not include ESG
                                                                                                                                 numbers (1,200).
     TOTAL # OF PERSONS SERVED:                              58,135       80,280     27,484    27,591    11,909   13,296     0




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                                             15
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                         Table 1-1 (continued)
                                    Washington County Consortium
           Assessment of Community Development Accomplishments from PY 2005 through PY 2009
                                              PRIORITY
          PRIORITY COMMUNITY                    NEED   Proposed PY Actual PY Actual Actual Actual Actual Actual
          DEVELOPMENT NEEDS                    LEVEL    2005-2009  2005-2009 PY 2005 PY 2006 PY 2007 PY 2008 PY 2009            NOTES
                                                                ACCOMPLISHMENTS
  ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT                                     Measured in numb er of persons served
                                                                                                                       Washington County's
                                                                                                                       CDBG program does not
  WASHINGTON COUNTY                              N           0             0          0            0   0   -    -
                                                                                                                       fund economic
                                                                                                                       development projects.

  CITY OF BEAVERTON
                                                                                                                       The City of Beaverton
                                                                                                                       sponsors a Downtown
                                                                                                                       Storefront Improvement
        Rebab; Publicly or Privately Owned       H           0             8          0            1   3   4    -      Program that provides
                                                                                                                       façade improvement
                                                                                                                       grants and architectural
                                                                                                                       design services.

 Commercial/Industrial Infrast. Development      H           0             0          0            0   0   -    -

  Other Commercial Industrial Improvements       H           0             0          0            0   0   -    -

                Microenterprise Assistance       M           0             0          0            0   0   -    -

                  ED Technical Assistance        M           0             0          0            0   0   -    -

             Other Economic Development          H          50             0          0            0   0   -    -

  TOTAL # OF UNITS SERVED:                                  50             8          0            1   3   4    0




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                                     16
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                        Table 1-1 (continued)
                                   Washington County Consortium
          Assessment of Community Development Accomplishments from PY 2005 through PY 2009
                                            PRIORITY
             PRIORITY COMMUNITY               NEED   Proposed PY Actual PY Actual Actual Actual Actual Actual
             DEVELOPMENT NEEDS               LEVEL    2005-2009  2005-2009 PY 2005 PY 2006 PY 2007 PY 2008 PY 2009           NOTES

                                                                    ACCOMPLISHMENTS
     PLANNING                                               Measured in numb er of persons served
                                                                                                                     Neither Washington County
                                                                                                                     nor the City of Beaverton
                                                                                                                     funds planning studies
     Planning                                   N               0           0          0            0   0   0   -    unless directly related to
                                                                                                                     the overall function and
                                                                                                                     administration of the CDBG
                                                                                                                     program.


     TOTAL # OF PERSONS SERVED:                                 0           0          0            0   0   0   0




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                                     17
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

this inflation by requiring more spe-
cific service area data from project                                             Chart A
applicants in the 2007/2008 funding                             Washington County CDBG Allocation Formula
cycle.                                                                         2005 - 2010

Public Services

The goal to provide public services
that ensure the health and welfare of                                                                        Public Facilities (35%)
income-qualified people living in the                                                                        Infratructure( 25%)
community is being addressed by the                                                                          Public Services (15%)
following high priority projects:                                                                            Housing Rehab (25%)

 Community Action Basic Needs
   (completed)
 Boys and Girls Aid Safe Place
   (completed)
 Community Corrections Crime                    another 30,300 homeless (or at-risk      The City’s long-range, non-housing
   Victims Specialist (completed)                 of homelessness) persons would re-       objectives, as listed in the Washing-
 Virginia Garcia Oral Health                    ceive federal assistance through the     ton County Consortium’s 2005-2010
   (completed)                                    provision of a range of specific         Consolidated Plan, consist of the
 CASA Advocates (completed)                     homeless services. The County’s          following:
 Family Bridge Volunteer Expan-                 actual accomplishments through this
   sion (completed)                               fourth year of the cycle totaled          Downtown Redevelopment/
                                                  12,034 persons who received varying         Revitalization, including com-
 Community Action Shelter Wait-
                                                  human services (not including those         mercial revitalization and housing
   list (completed)
                                                  served under the Emergency Shelter          development in the downtown
 LCSNW HopeSpring (completed)
                                                  Grant Program). In this fourth year         area.
 Project Access Washington                      of the cycle, we have already far ex-     Affordable Housing, including
   County (completed)                             ceeded the five-year goal for the           housing rehabilitation, accessibil-
 E M O S h a r e d H o u s i n g                number of persons to be served.             ity rehabilitation, rehabilitation of
   (underway)                                     These numbers indicate that the pro-        existing affordable housing; and
 Forest Grove Senior Guardian-                  jected numbers were too low. Staff        Public Services, including anti-
   ship Assistance Program                        will use this information in the next       crime and youth programs and
   (underway)                                     planning process.                           programs for seniors and special
 CA Bridges to Housing Child                                                                needs populations.
   Care (underway)                                Ten of the sixteen active public ser-
 St Vincent de Paul Rent Assis-                 vices projects (not including ESG)       The activities undertaken in PY2008
   tance (underway)                               specifically assisted homeless per-      by the City of Beaverton with CDBG
 TVHP Eviction Prevention                       sons or persons at risk of homeless-     funds addressed all of the City’s non-
   (underway)                                     ness. This year, approximately 8,414     housing objectives.
 DVRC Empowerment Fund                          persons were assisted through these
   (underway)                                     ten projects. An additional 1,200 per-   Public Services
 LCSNW Breaking the Homeless                    sons were served through the ESG
   Cycle (underway)                               Program.                                 As the Consolidated Plan lists fair
                                                                                           housing activities and all other public
 Over the course of the five-year cy-             City of Beaverton                        services as a high-priority need, the
 cle, Washington County projected                                                          City continues to allocate the maxi-
 that at a minimum, 27,835 people                 The City of Beaverton Mayor’s Of-        mum 15% of its total CDBG alloca-
 would receive federal assistance                 fice administers the City’s Commu-       tion to public services annually. In
 through the provision of a range of              nity Development Block Grant             2008, the City allocated $90,599.70
 public services. In addition, at least           (CDBG).                                  to eight public service activities

Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                      18
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

    based on an application process con-                 agement services for pregnant         total number of completed down-
    ducted during the spring of 2008:                    teens and young parents (under        town storefronts to nine projects,
                                                         the age of 21). Services include      which benefited nine businesses.
     Beaverton Loaves & Fishes-                        parenting skills training, child      The City currently has five projects
       Hispanic Initiative: Provides                     development education, and child      under construction, and two under
       home delivered meals, group                       abuse prevention counseling.          application.
       meals, and nutritional assess-                  Open Door Counseling Center:
       ments for minority seniors in                     Provides housing-related services     Table 1-2 lists all funded non-
       Beaverton.                                        including first time homebuyer        housing activities, by priority-need
     Community Action Organization                     education programs, foreclosure       category and level, undertaken with
       Energy and Emergency Rent:                        prevention counseling and a day       CDBG funds by the City of Beaver-
       Provide one-time assistance to                    center for homeless persons           ton in PY 2008.
       families that are in jeopardy of                  (meals, laundry, internet services
       losing their housing because they                 to assist with job hunting).          Please refer to Table 1-1 for a com-
       are behind on rent and/or utility               Boys and Girls Aid: Provides          parison of the Washington County
       payments.                                         shelter and case management           Consortium’s non-housing accom-
     Court Appointed Special Advo-                     services for runaway, homeless        plishments in 2008 with the five
       cates (CASA) of Oregon-                           and at-risk youth at a youth shel-    year Consolidated Plan’s goals and
       Washington County: Recruits,                      ter site in Hillsboro.                objectives. For a breakdown of non-
       trains and supervises community                                                         housing activities by race/ethnicity
       volunteers to advocate for chil-               All eight of the public services that    and income of program beneficiar-
       dren who have found their way                  were funded with CDBG funds met          ies, please refer to Table 1-5 through
       into the juvenile court system                 the high priority needs of Public        1-7.
       through no fault of their own                  Service Needs, Youth Programs, and
       (abuse victims, etc). CASAs are                Senior Programs. A total of 1,264        The City of Beaverton completed no
       appointed by a juvenile court                  persons were served by these public      low-priority non-housing activities
       judge to monitor juvenile court                services in PY 2008, roughly 106%        in 2008.
       cases and ensure that the children             of the PY 2008 Action Plan estimate
       are receiving the services that                of 1194 public service beneficiaries.    Housing and Homelessness
       have been ordered and make rec-
       ommendations based on their                    Economic Development                     Washington County and the City of
       own investigation.                                                                      Beaverton have designated five
     Domestic Violence Resource                     The City of Beaverton ranked pub-        housing and homeless needs as high
       Center-Monika’s House:                         licly and privately owned rehabilita-    priorities in their 2005-2010 Con-
       Monika’s House offers a safe                   tion for the purpose of economic         solidated Plan:
       shelter and a 24-hour crisis line              development as a high priority in its
       to women and children escaping                 2005-2010 Consolidated Plan. In           Housing for low-income renters
       imminent physical danger.                      order to facilitate this redevelopment      (including households with chil-
     Good Neighbor Center: A home-                  strategy, the City implemented a            dren)
       less shelter in Tigard that allows             downtown storefront improvement           Owner-occupied Housing Reha-
       families experiencing homeless-                program in 2005/2006. This pro-             bilitation Programs
       ness stay for up to five weeks.                gram provides up to $20,000 in            Homeownership Programs
       During their stay, residents work              matching funds for each project in        Housing and Supportive Services
       on a plan to overcome their situa-             its designated downtown redevelop-          for the Homeless
       tion and find resources to move                ment area. During PY 2008, five           Housing for Persons with Dis-
       into stable housing. The shelter               storefront façade improvement pro-          abilities
       also provides supportive services              jects were completed, benefiting
       after families have transitioned               four businesses: A&P Appliance,          Housing for farmworkers, seniors/
       into stable housing.                           North Building (Sun Connections          elderly, and persons with substance
     Lifeworks Northwest New Par-                   Travel), Riddle Press, Moomaw            abuse issues is designated a medium
       ent Network: Provides year-                    Miller & Hildebrant, and Cross-          priority.
       round, comprehensive case man-                 roads Hobby Shop. This brings the

Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                      19
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                                           Table 1-2
                                                      City of Beaverton
                                     Summary of Non-Housing Activities Undertaken in PY 2008

                         Activity                Funds Expended          Priority Need          Priority Level    Status
                                                                     Youth Programs/Youth
                     CASA of Oregon                   $12,000                                         H          Complete
                                                                            Services
                                                                   Public Service Needs/Other
          Domestic Violence Resource Center           $14,000                                         H          Complete
                                                                     Public Service Needs

                                                                   Public Service Needs/Other
                  Good Neighbor Center                $12,000                                         H          Complete
                                                                     Public Service Needs

                                                                    Senior Programs/Senior
                   Loaves and Fishes                   $2,313                                         H          Complete
                                                                           Services
                                                                   Public Service Needs/Other
              Open Door Counseling Center              $8,500                                         H          Complete
                                                                     Public Service Needs

                                                                   Public Service Needs/Other
                   Boys and Girls Aid                 $20,000                                         H          Complete
                                                                     Public Service Needs

                                                                   Public Service Needs/Other
                      Lifeworks NW                    $15,000                                         H          Complete
                                                                     Public Service Needs

             Community Action Energy and                           Public Service Needs/Other
                                                       $6,787                                         H          Complete
                 Emergency Rent                                      Public Service Needs


                                                                           Economic
             Storefront Improvement Program          $93,413.87      Development/Privately-           H          Underway
                                                                         Owned Rehab
                      Administration                 $93,003.71     Planning/Administration           H          Complete

          Total                                     $277,017.28

  The housing activities completed in               the Consortium has, with one excep-         goals.   Twelve homebuyer units
  PY 2008 that meet high or medium-                 tion, met the annual goals in this          were purchased for a total of 68 ex-
  priority needs are described in more              fourth year of the five-year cycle for      ceeding the Consolidated Plan five-
  detail below.                                     the five high priority needs. One           year goal of sixty units. The Wash-
                                                    application for a project serving per-      ington County Consortium assisted
  For each high-priority need, the                  sons with disabilities was submitted        582 renter households, well over the
  Consolidated Plan’s housing af-                   last year and subsequently with-            100 projected.
  fordability strategy also presents                drawn with the understanding that it
  annual goals for the use of federal               would be resubmitted for 2010 fund-         For a breakdown of housing benefi-
  HOME, CDBG and ESG funds                          ing. A48-unit project for seniors           ciaries by race/ethnicity and income,
  (Table 1-3 on page 21).                           received funding in 2006 but experi-        please refer to Tables 1-5 through 1-
                                                    enced delays. It will likely see occu-      8 in the next section.
  Table 1-4 summarizes Washington                   pancy in 2011. The two Merlo Sta-
  County’s housing accomplishments                  tion projects that were completed           The housing activities completed in
  in program year 2008 and over the                 have fifteen units targeted to persons      PY 2008 that meet high priority
  five-year consolidated planning pe-               with developmental disabilities. The        needs are described in more detail
  riod, comparing them with the high-               improvement project at Gateway              below.
  priority housing needs and goals set              Commons added ten mobility/
  forth in the 2005-2010 Consolidated               sensory accessible units.        Local      Housing for Low-Income Renters
  Plan.                                             housing rehabilitation programs and
                                                    homeless assistance providers ex-           The County made great strides in
  Very preliminary numbers show that                ceeded annual Consolidated Plan             completing several housing projects.


Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                       20
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                                         Table 1-3
                                             Washington County Consortium
                                      High-Priority Housing Needs and Annual Goals
              High-Priority                              Annual Goals                                        Funding
                 Need                                                                                        Source
             Low-Income           Washington county will use federal HOME funds to build or
                                                                                                              HOME
             Renters              preserve 100 affordable rental units each year over the five-year
                                  cycle for households earning less than 50% or area median
                                  income.
             Housing              Washington County and the City of Beaverton will use federal funds
                                                                                                              HOME
             Rehabilitation       to assist at least 60 low and moderate-income homeowners each
                                                                                                              CDBG
                                  year through the housing rehabilitation programs.
             Homeownersh          Washington County will use HOME/ADDI funds to purchase/build                HOME
             ip Programs          12 units of owner-occupied housing each year over the five-year             ADDI
                                  cycle.
             Homeless                 Washington County will use ESG/CDBG resources to provide
                                                                                                              CDBG
             Persons                  homeless prevention assistance and/or other essential services
                                                                                                              HOME
                                      to 6,000 homeless persons each year over the five-year cycle.
                                                                                                               ESG
                                      Washington County will use federal resources to provide
                                      emergency shelter and permanent housing with supportive
                                      services to an average of 60 homeless persons each year over
                                      the five-year period.
             Persons with         Washington county will assist in developing an annual average of
                                                                                                              HOME
             Disabilities         15 units reserved for low-income persons with disabilities.


   In Part 3, there is a more detailed               In addition, a smaller project, Gate-    82% earned less than 30% MFI.
   explanation of these projects. This               way Commons, included ten accessi-
   year, the County completed con-                   ble units as well as parking lot modi-   Projects that are still underway:
   struction on seven projects: one ac-              fications and five ramps. Seven          Farmington Road, Huntting Park
   cessibility improvement project, one              units are for households with mobil-     (formerly Leadership Row II), and
   small group home rehab project , and              ity impairments, three units are for     The Knoll at Tigard Apartments for
   five very large construction projects             sensory impairments. There are also      senior housing.
   (two new construction and three re-               three HOME-assisted units in the
   habilitation) for a total of 471 units.           138-unit complex. This project was       The County’s Home Access and Re-
                                                     actually reported on in a prior          pair for the Disabled and Elderly
   The three rehab projects were                     CAPER; however, because of the           (HARDE) program served three
   awarded funds in 2004/05 but the                  need to add accessibility improve-       renters, all earned incomes below
   funds were not actually committed                 ments, we are showing the project as     30% MFI.
   until 2007 due to lengthy legal and               completed this year.
   ownership negotiations. Most of the                                                        The City of Beaverton does not have
   large-scale rehab work was com-                   The County continues to set aside        a program set aside to directly bene-
   pleted in PY 2007 but some minor                  $45,000 for Community Action’s           fit low-income renters, but the
   work was still being done as of June              weatherization activities, which         Adapt-a-Home is available to both
   30, 2008. All three were completed                benefit both low-income renters and      homeowners and renters. The owner
   and the last drawdown occurred in                 homeowners. These programs help          of a unit must approve the modifica-
   August 2008.                                      to keep utility costs low which in       tions of the unit, but many landlords
                                                     turn allow these owners and renters      realize that the program assists with
   Work on Merlo Station (I and II)                  to direct their limited resources to     reasonable accommodation require-
   projects were completed in PY 2007                other critical basic needs. This year,   ments under the Fair Housing Act,
   but the beneficiary data was not                  91 renters received education and        and consent to their tenant’s partici-
   available. That data has now been                 conservation training, or more com-      pation. Unlimited Choices (who
   collected and will be reflected in the            prehensive weatherization treatments     administers the Adapt-a-Home pro-
   HOME section of the CAPER.                        on their homes. Of that number,          gram) has found that many landlords

Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                     21
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                               Table 1-4                                                   throughout the Portland Metro Area
                                   Washington County Consortium                                            leave the improvements in place after
                         Assessment of Housing Accomplishments, PY 2005-2009
                                                                                                           their tenants are no longer able to stay
         High-Priority                                                                      Completed
            Need
                            Goal                                  Activity
                                                                                             by Activity   in their units. Ten of the 26 house-
         Low -income renters (High)                                                                        holds assisted by the Adapt-a-Home
                                                    HARDE (County)                         3
                                                    Weatherization (Wx)                    91              program were renters.
                                                    Merlo Satation I                       80
                                                    Merlo Satation II                      48
                                                    Adapt-a-Home (City)                    10              The City also provided relocation as-
            PY 2008        100 units       582
                                                    Sunset Gardens                         101             sistance to eight renter households un-
                                                    Willow Park                            46
                                                    Sierra West                            57              der Uniform Relocation Act require-
                                                    Beaverton Relocation                   8               ments in preparation for the demolition
                                                    Gatew ay Commons                       138
            PY 2007        100           211                                                               of sub-standard housing in downtown
         PY 2005&2006      200           322                                                               Beaverton. All residents were relo-
         PY 2005-2009 500 units         1115
         Ow ner-Occupied Housing Rehab & Wx Programs (High)
                                                                                                           cated to units that met safety and habi-
                                                 Housing Rehab (County)                    4               tability standards throughout the re-
                                                 HARDE (County)                            23
                                                 Rebuilding Together (County)              4
                                                                                                           gion (location of the units was deter-
            PY 2008         60           285     Adapt-a-Home (City)                       16              mined by each household).
                                                 Mend-a-Home (City)                        15
                                                 Weatherization (Wx)                       220
                                                 Hope-4-Homes (City)                       3               Owner-Occupied Housing Rehabilita-
            PY 2007           60           354                                                             tion Programs
         PY 2005&2006        120           336
         PY 2005-2009      300             975
         Homeow nership Programs (High)                                                                    The County continued to fund its
            PY 2008           12            12
                                                    ADDI                                   7               Housing Rehabilitation Program and
                                                    Farmington                             5
            PY 2007           12            24                                                             Home Access and Repair for the Dis-
         PY 2005&2006         24            32                                                             abled and Elderly (HARDE) Program
         PY 2005-2009       60              68
         Homeless persons (High)
                                                                                                           serving 26 owner-occupied house-
                                                    ESG Programs                           1,200           holds. Total program expenditures
                                                    HopeSpring                             43
                                                    CA Shelter Waitlist                    2,758
                                                                                                           were $140,075 (including both renter
                                                    Family Bridge Volunteers               81              and owner households). In addition,
                                                    Boys and Girls Aid Safe Pl.(City/CO)   96
                                                    CA Basic Needs                         2,163
                                                                                                           the County sets aside $10,000 in
                                                    Bridges to Housing                     5               CDBG funding for Rebuilding To-
                                                    St Vincent Rental                      3051
            PY 2008          6060         12,944    LCSNW Breaking the Homeless            89
                                                                                                           gether to support its housing rehabili-
                                                    DVRC Empow erment                      5               tation work.
                                                    TVHP Eviction                          156
                                                    Good Neighbor Center (City)            75
                                                    Community Action (City)                159             Community Action’s weatherization
                                                    Open Door Counseling (City)            2,058
                                                    TVHP Resident Services (City)          245
                                                                                                           programs served 220 owner-occupied
                                                    CA Energy/Rent Program (City)          793             households of which 63% had incomes
                                                    DVRC Monica's House (City)             17
            PY 2007          6060         12,944
                                                                                                           below 30% MFI.
         PY 2005&2006       12,120        26,305
         PY 2005-2009        30300         52,193                                                          The City of Beaverton changed pro-
         Persons w ith Other Special Needs
         Persons w ith Disabilities (High)
                                                                                                           viders for its housing rehabilitation
            PY 2008             15            1     Edw ards Center - Bonnie Brae          1               loan program during PY 2008, and the
            PY 2007          15              0                                                             program is now called Hope-4-Homes.
         PY 2005&2006        30              55
          PY 2005-2009    75 units           56
                                                                                                           In PY 2008, Hope-4-Homes completed
         Farmw orkers, Seniors/elderly, and persons w ith substance abuse issues (Medium)                  the rehabilitation of three (3) houses,
            PY 2008          21               0
                                                                                                           expending $54,394 in CDBG funds.
             PY 2007         21            0
         PY 2005&2006        42            0                                                               The City of Beaverton worked with
          PY 2005-2009      105            0                                                               the Unlimited Choices Inc (UCI) to
         ** Years 2005 and 2006 w ere combined in order to conserve space.
                                                                                                           provide low-interest loans (between 0–
                                                                                                           5%) to qualified homeowners.

                                                                                                           The City continued to provide funding


Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                                     22
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

   for the Adapt-a-Home program,
   which provides grants for accessibil-
   ity modifications for local renters and                                      Chart B
   homeowners.      Sixteen of the 26
   households assisted by the Adapt-a-                                Federal Program Funds in the
   Home program were home-owners.                                           Farmington Road
   The Adapt-a-Home program ex-                                         Homeownership Project
   pended $80,233.13 in CDBG funds                                               ADDI              HOME
   (these funds benefited both renters
   and homeowners).
                                                                Unit 1
                                                                Unit 2
   The Mend-a-Home program provided                             Unit 3
   grants for local mobile home owners                          Unit 4
   and vulnerable homeowners to under-                          Unit 5
   take emergency rehabilitation pro-                           Unit 6
   jects. Fifteen households benefited
                                                                Unit 7
   from the program, and $56,270.92 in
   CDBG funds were expended.                                    Unit 8
                                                                Unit 9
   Homeownership Programs                                       Unit 10
                                                                Unit 11
   Willamette West Habitat for Human-                           Unit 12
   ity’s Lindsay Lane Homeownership                             Unit 13
   project, which was closed out in IDIS
   last year, saw its last house sold util-
                                                                Unit 14
   izing ADDI assistance. The final                             Notes: There are a total of 14 units in the planned
   homebuyer was assisted by HOME                               development, five are completed.
   and ADDI funds

   The American Dream Downpayment                    Five of which have been sold. Hunt-    prevention assistance and/or other
   Initiative assisted seven first-time              ting Park, located in Beaverton, was   essential services to 6,000 homeless
   homebuyer households with down-                   awarded funds in the 2006/07 pro-      persons each year, and providing
   payment assistance this year. Four                gram year (also using Beaverton’s      emergency shelter and permanent
   families had incomes between 51—                  allocation of prior-year HOME          housing with supportive services to
   80% MFI; three families had incomes               funds). The parcel was acquired        an average of 60 persons each
   below 50% MFI. Four of the seven                  from the City of Beaverton early in    year.” Boys and Girls Aid Safe
   families are part of the partnership              PY 2007. There will be five units      Place Shelter project served 63
   with Willamette West Habitat for                  developed on the site.                 homeless youth in a new facility pro-
   Humanity in which they each put in                                                       viding shelter services that were not
   500 hours of sweat equity to make                 The City did not fund any home-        previously available in the county
   purchasing the home a reality. HUD                ownership programs in PY2008.          prior to PY 2006. The opening of
   did not include continuing funding                                                       this shelter dedicated to homeless
   for ADDI for the PY 2009.                         Housing and Supportive Services for    youth has directly addressed a gap in
                                                     the Homeless and Persons with Spe-     the continuum as identified in the
   The HOME Program is partnering                    cial Needs                             Consolidated Plan. Family Bridge’s
   with Willamette West Habitat for                                                         Expanding Volunteers project has
   Humanity on two other homeowner-                  The Office of Community Develop-       added a staff person to better manage
   ship projects, Farmington Road and                ment has continued to fund projects    a program that is run almost exclu-
   Huntting Park. Chart B shows the                  that benefit the homeless in Wash-     sively with volunteers. This staff
   funding that has been used for the                ington County.     This year, ten      person is able to schedule volunteers
   homebuyers at Farmington Road.                    CDBG-assisted projects were ac-        more effectively, recruit more volun-
   Seven of the fourteen homes at Farm-              tively involved in assisting the       teers to lessen the burnout on exist-
   ington Road have been completed.                  homeless by “providing homeless        ing volunteers and also frees up the

Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                  23
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009
                                                                  Table 1-5
                                                      Racial Characteristics of Housing
                                               Beneficiaries (Washington County & Beaverton)
                                        Race/Ethnicity                    # that are # Served           # That are
               Race Categories per HUD                 # Served in   WA                       Beaverton
                                        of WA County                      Hispanic      in               Hispanic
                     Requirements                      WA County County %                        %
                                         (per Census)                     Ethnicity Beaverton            Ethnicity
                         White              82.60%        687      83.0%      65        44       84.6%      1
                Black/African American       1.60%         23       2.8%      1          1        1.9%
                         Asian               7.70%         42       5.1%                 4        7.7%      1
      Single




               American Indian /Alaskan
                                             0.60%         52       6.3%      35
                         Native                                                                   0.0%
                 Native Hawaiian/Other
                                             0.40%          9       1.1%
                    Pacific Islander                                                              0.0%
               American Indian /Alaska
                    Native & White
                    Asian & White
               Black/African American &
      Dual




                                             2.10%         15       1.8%                 3        5.8%      1
                         White
               American Indian /Alaska
                    Native & Black
                   Other Multi-Racial
               Some Other Race (This is a
               Census category not allow ed       5.00%
                        by HUD)
                     Total              100.00%           828       100%          101          52           100%        3
                   Hispanic              14.00%                      12%                                      6%
    WA County collects income and race data for assisted units only. For the balance of unassisted units (that still
    benefits persons under 80% MFI), we applied the county's race percentages as identified by the census. Staff
    estimates that the Hispanic category of 12% is very low, because of our inability to collect race data.
                                                                 Table 1-6
                                                   Racial Characteristics of Non-Housing
                                               Beneficiaries (Washington County & Beaverton)
                                        Race/Ethnicity                    # that are # Served           # That are
               Race Categories per HUD                 # Served in   WA                       Beaverton
                                        of WA County                      Hispanic      in               Hispanic
                     Requirements                      WA County County %                        %
                                         (per Census)                     Ethnicity Beaverton            Ethnicity
                         White              82.60%        9766     73.8%     4753      750       59.3%     120
                Black/African American       1.60%         654      4.9%      22        52        4.1%
                         Asian               7.70%         115      0.9%      1         37        2.9%
      Single




               American Indian /Alaskan
                                             0.60%         324      2.4%     156        22
                         Native                                                                   1.7%      17
                 Native Hawaiian/Other
                                             0.40%         109      0.8%      7         7
                    Pacific Islander                                                              0.6%      2
               American Indian /Alaska
                    Native & White
                    Asian & White
               Black/African American &
      Dual




                                             2.10%        2,266    17.1%     1654      396       31.3%     345
                         White
               American Indian /Alaska
                    Native & Black
                   Other Multi-Racial
               Some Other Race (This is a
               Census category not allow ed       5.00%
                        by HUD)
                          Total                  100.00%        13234      100%       6593     1264      100%          484
                        Hispanic                 14.00%                     50%                           38%
Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                24
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

   time of the executive director to fo-             the City contracts with Unlimited        Racial/Ethnic and Income Charac-
   cus on a myriad of other duties in-               Choices, Inc. to provide their Adapt-    teristics of Beneficiaries
   cluding administrative and case man-              a-Home program in Beaverton to
   agement. Family Bridge served 81                  make accessibility-related repairs       Tables 1-5 through 1-8 provide in-
   homeless persons this year. Lu-                   and improvements to homes and            formation on persons assisted by
   theran Community Services NW’s                    apartments. In PY 2008, the Acces-       housing and non-housing activities
   Breaking the Homeless Cycle pro-                  sibility Rehab Program assisted          that reported accomplishments to
   gram served 89 persons with mental                twenty-six (26) households.              Washington County and the City of
   health and substance abuse counsel-                                                        Beaverton in PY 2008. Tables 1-5
   ing families leaving shelters or living           The City of Beaverton funded the         and 1-6 reflect ten race categories as
   on the edge. DVRC’s Empower-                      Good Neighbor Shelter, Community         required by HUD. Five are single
   ment Fund was launched as a Micro-                Action’s Energy and Emergency            race categories and five are dual race
   Enterprise business that residents will                                            Table 1-7
   participate in as a tool in their transi-                                Income Data - PY 2008 Activities
   tion to post shelter life. So far, 5 per-                                         Beaverton
   sons have been assisted. LCSNW‘s                                           Household Income as % of Median Family Income (MFI)
   HopeSpring Program provided                                                0-30% MFI 31-50% MFI 51-80% MFI 81%+ MFI
   childcare and other housing and                         Housing Activities          21           17           14            0
   counseling services for 43 women                    Non-Housing Activities        800          179          238            47
   and children. Community Action’s
   Shelter Waitlist served 2,758 per-
   sons who called for assistance in                                                       Table 1-8
   gaining access to the shelter network.                                       Income Data - PY 2008 Activities
   The Waitlist staff work with all the
                                                                                      Washington County
   shelters to provide a central contact
   point for homeless persons in the                                               Household Income as % of Median Family Income (MFI)
   county. This streamlines the coordi-                                          0-30% MFI    31-50% MFI 51-80% MFI 81%+ MFI
   nation thereby benefiting homeless                        Housing Activities           239           156          433
   families.                                             Non-Housing Activities        9,441         2,119          474

   In addition, the County awarded
   Emergency Shelter Grant funds to
   Community Action to administer the                Rent Program, Boys and Girls Aid         categories. The tables reflect that,
   ESG Program. Community Action                     Safe Place for Youth, and Monika’s       for non-housing activities, with the
   subcontracted with five agencies to               House – a family homeless housing        exception of the Asian population,
   provide services: DVRC, Good                      shelter, homeless prevention pro-        the County is generally providing
   Neighbor Center, Open Door Coun-                  gram, youth shelter and victims of       services to all races without particu-
   seling Center, HopeSpring, and Fam-               domestic violence shelter respec-        lar de-emphasis in any area. 50% of
   ily Bridge. In addition, Community                tively. The Open Door Counseling         those served were Hispanic, a sig-
   Action also provides services through             Center also provides a day-time drop     nificant increase from last year. The
   its shelter. 1,200 persons were as-               in shelter for homeless persons in       City data shows that the non-housing
   sisted through the ESG Program.                   Washington County and provides           services this year were primarily
                                                     mental health, meals, job search and     used by Whites, African Americans,
   Altogether, these projects and pro-               other services. These activities are     and those with dual racial back-
   grams served 9,614 homeless persons               reported as serving 937 city residents   grounds. 38% of those served were
   in PY 2008.                                       under the non-housing high-priority      Hispanic, an increase from last year.
                                                     need of Homeless Needs, they also        The dual race categories for both
   In 2008, the City of Beaverton con-               meet the housing need of “providing      jurisdictions were high (17% and
   tinued its Accessibility Rehabilitation           housing and supportive services to       31% respectively).
   Program (Adapt-a-Home) to serve                   homeless persons.”
   homeowners and renters with mobil-                                                         Housing activities appear to be serv-
   ity limitations. Under this Program,                                                       ing the Hispanic population slightly

Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                      25
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

  less than proportionally. 12% of the             tected classes; and an assessment of      of great benefit to low-income, pro-
  households served are Hispanic.                  the availability of affordable, acces-    tected-class renters, and most notably
  Beaverton statistics show that Asian,            sible housing in a range of unit sizes.   families with children.
  African American and dual-race                   See Table 1-9 (beginning on page
  households were served at least pro-             27) for specific actions taken to ad-     City of Beaverton
  portionally but less so other race               dress impediments and the resulting
  categories.                                      impacts.                                  The City of Beaverton has continued
                                                                                             to support local fair housing efforts
  Geographic Distribution                          Washington County                         through sponsorship of the Annual
                                                                                             Oregon Fair Housing Conference.
  Figures 1 through 6 (at the end of               Community Action will be replacing        During the month of April, the City
  Part 1) provide maps that show the               the Ready to Rent Program with a          created a Fair Housing display in the
  geographic distribution of housing               new curriculum, Rent Well, to ad-         library lobby, which provided infor-
  and community development assis-                 dress housing readiness for Wash-         mation regarding residents’ rights
  tance within Washington County and               ington County. Through this com-          under the Fair Housing Act in six
  the City of Beaverton in the 2008                prehensive education program, Com-        languages, provided additional read-
  program year.                                    munity Action will continue to offer      ing material (novels, children’s
                                                   education to low-income persons           books and plays) that focus on fair
  Please note that one of the assisted             who have had past difficulties being      housing and civil rights. City coun-
  activities shown on Figure 5 serves              successful tenants. The curriculum        cilor Cathy Stanton joined a large
  Washington County residents but has              covers topics such as determining         group of parents and children for a
  its administrative office in Portland.           housing priorities, understanding and     reading of A Pig is Moving In! and
  In addition, the Domestic Violence               repairing one’s credit, rights and re-    hosted an educational lecture on fair
  Resource Center is not shown on the              sponsibilities as a tenant, rental ap-    housing and the role it plays in our
  map to preserve the confidential na-             plications, the screening process,        community.
  ture of its services.                            communicating effectively with a
                                                   landlord, and developing and follow-      Throughout the year, City staff dis-
  b. Affirmatively Furthering                      ing a workable household budget.          tributes informational brochures to
                                                   More information about the Rent           Beaverton residents at various City-
  Fair Housing                                                                               sponsored events including the vari-
                                                   Well Program can be found in Part
                                                   1d. Graduates of the Ready to Rent        ous Picnics in the Park, Family Re-
  In January 2004, Washington
                                                   will be covered by the State’s Land-      source Fair, and Holiday Open
  County’s Office of Community De-
                                                   lord Guarantee Fund only until the        House.
  velopment began the development of
                                                   last class has been completed (June
  its 2005-2010 Consolidated Plan.
                                                   2009). From that point on, only           The City executed a contract with the
  Under the regulations of the Consoli-
                                                   graduates of the Rent Well Program        Fair Housing Council of Oregon to
  dated Plan, entitlement jurisdictions
                                                   will be covered by the Landlord           complete six fair housing trainings
  are required to undertake the devel-
                                                   Guarantee Fund.                           within the City of Beaverton and
  opment of a Fair Housing Plan:
                                                                                             provide support for the fair housing
  Analysis of Impediments to Fair
                                                   The Office of Community Develop-          complaint hotline. During PY 2008,
  Housing Choice (FHP). The FHP is
                                                   ment, the Department of Housing           the hotline received 77 hotline calls
  a review of impediments to fair
                                                   Services, and the City of Beaverton       from the City of Beaverton. Twenty-
  housing choice in the public and pri-
                                                   sponsored fair housing activities in      six calls were regarding issues re-
  vate sector and involves a compre-
                                                   April of 2009.                            lated to the Fair Housing Act. The
  hensive review of the entitlement
                                                                                             largest number of complaints was
  jurisdiction’s laws, regulations, and
                                                   Actions taken to address impedi-          regarding disability status, followed
  administrative policies, procedures,
                                                   ments created by the short supply of      by race and religion. As a result, the
  and practices; an assessment of how
                                                   affordable housing in Washington          City will increase its efforts to edu-
  those laws, etc. affect the location,
                                                   County are discussed elsewhere in         cate housing providers within our
  availability, and accessibility of
                                                   this report (See Parts 1c and 1e).        community regarding their responsi-
  housing; an assessment of condi-
                                                   Efforts to expand and preserve the        bilities under the Fair Housing Act.
  tions, both public and private, affect-
                                                   supply of affordable units tend to be
  ing fair housing choice for all pro-

Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                     26
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                                                       Table 1-9
                                                   Actions to Address Impediments to Fair Housing
                                                                 Program Year 2008
                                                    (As identified in the 2004 Fair Housing Plan)
          Impediments/Action                                  Expenditures       Impacts
                                                              and
                                                              Beneficiaries
              Publicly Supported Low-Income Housing
               Sited in Areas of Failing Schools
                                                                   A total of $1,478,774      This project was the rehabilitation of a
          Bienestar completed the rehabilitation of three          of HOME funds were         substandard housing complex in the vicinity of
          apartment complexes, 2 of which were located in          used in the                lower performing schools. The condition of the
          areas of poor performing schools. These complexes        rehabilitation of 204      units has greatly improved since the project
          were in poor condition and the area experienced a        units, including 34        begin two years ago providing decent, safe and
          high rate of crime.                                      HOME assisted units.       affordable homes.
              Lead-Based Paint in Housing Occupied by
               Protected Class Children
                                                                                              The Housing Rehabilitation Program has
          The County’s Rehabilitation Program continues to         $10,038                    continued to reach out to families with small
          work with the Lead Hazard Control grant (managed                                    children that may be living in a lead
          by the City of Portland) to ensure that applicants who                              contaminated environment. One family with
          have children under the age of six implement lead                                   two small children was assisted with lead
          hazard controls in their homes. This year, the County                               hazard control measures which will directly
          signed on with other regional partners on a Lead                                    benefit the children who are under the age of 6.
          Hazard Demonstration grant that will bring more
          funding to the County for lead hazard control.
                                                                                              101 units received lead hazard controls which
          Bienestar’s Sunset Gardens received assistance from      $305,613                   will protect children under the age of 6.
          PDC’s Lead Hazard Control Grant.
             Loss of Housing Due to Loss of Health
              Benefits and Medication

          Project Access (a new program based on a national        $24,702 (CDBG)             Washington County providers have made
          model) was funded in PY 2007 to develop a pool of        339 persons served.        significant strides in the provision of health
          doctors who wish to donate their “primary care”          After a year in            care but due to the overwhelming need, there
          services. The clients are able to be distributed         preparation, Project       are still huge numbers of people who may not
          equitably amongst the pool of doctors. The doctors       Access began serving       meet program guidelines and therefore are not
          have the advantage of an already-established             people July 1, 2008.       getting medical attention. Virginia Garcia, the
          infrastructure of wraparound services such as lab                                   Essential Health Clinic, and Project Access
          work, diagnostic services and pharmacy medications.                                 (which has grown into a region-wide effort
          This infrastructure was developed through the                                       called Project Access NOW) are all working to
          creation of the Essential Health Clinic (reported last                              meet the needs of the under/uninsured.
          year) which has expanded coverage to additional
          nights in the county. These services offer free clinic
          access for acute care for the uninsured/underinsured.
          A third night was offered at a new site in Tigard.

          Virginia Garcia Memorial Health Clinic (VGMHC)           A total of 2,105 clients   CDBG funding was for start-up costs for
          received funding for a new oral health clinic in         were served by the         medical supplies for the new location. The
          Hillsboro providing low cost dental assistance.          clinic.                    project received funding in 2006 but the agency
                                                                                              had issues relating to the collection of data.
                                                                                              After meeting their beneficiary reporting
                                                                                              requirements, the project is complete.




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                                    27
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                                              Table 1-9 (continued)
                                                 Actions to Address Impediments to Fair Housing
                                                               Program Year 2008
                                                  (As identified in the 2004 Fair Housing Plan)

          Impediments/Action                                         Expenditures           Impacts
                                                                     and
                                                                     Beneficiaries
              Failure to Provide Fair Share Housing to
               Households at 50% MFI and Lower

          Continue to provide higher level of points on the
          HOME application for projects that support housing
          for households between 0-50% MFI.

          HOME projects serving households at or below 50%           $168,301 (HOME)        13 (20% of total units) HOME-assisted
          MFI: Edwards Center, TVHP’s Merlo Station I and II,        13 HOME-Assisted       households will have long term affordable
          Bienestar’s Sunset Gardens, Sierra West, and Willow        (20% total HOME        rents/mortgages and supportive services to
          Park; and Willamette West Habitat’s Farmington             assisted units)        provide housing stability and promote self-
          Road and Leadership Row homeownership projects.                                   sufficiency.
              Membership on Appointive Boards and
               Commissions is Not Inclusive

          The cities have been made aware of the impediments         N/A                    There is not currently a system on place for
          identified in the Fair Housing Plan.                                              tracking or documenting board membership.
              Higher Income Residents Disproportionately
               Occupy Affordable Housing

          The federal programs ensure that higher income             $168,301 (HOME)        HOME-assisted units with long term
          residents do not occupy assisted affordable units. At      A total of 67 HOME     affordability restrictions ensure that those units
          this time there are no controls in the private market to   assisted units were    will not be occupied by higher income
          ensure similar income restrictions.                        added this year.       residents.

          Several Washington County affordable properties will                              The State, County and Washington County
          have affordability periods expiring within the next 2-5                           CHDOs have identified the properties that have
          years.                                                                            expiring uses and there are efforts underway to
                                                                                            preserve their affordability. Several in the last
                                                                                            year have already been preserved.
              Affordable Housing is Disproportionately
               Located in High Crime Areas
                                                                                            The HOME funds allowed this project to move
          Bienestar has completed the rehabilitation of three        $14,312 (HOME) in      forward with a more comprehensive rehab
          apartment projects. The agency has worked with the         PY 2008.               scope of work which was completed in PY
          police to decrease crime by increasing patrols through     204 units (serving a   2008. Improving these apartments and
          the properties. HOME funds were used with other            minimum of 410         providing resident services will provide a more
          sources to improve the existing properties to make         persons) were          stable source of housing in the community.
          them a more attractive and safe place to live. While       completed June 2009.
          there were initial delays, the projects were completed                            Funding noted is the expenditure in this fiscal
          as of June 2009.                                                                  year; not in total.
              Problems in the Maintenance of Housing as a           $14,312 (HOME) in      Units rehabilitated were considered substandard
               Last Resort                                           PY 2008.               and suitable for rehab. 204 units received
                                                                     204 units (serving a   rehabilitation assistance.
          Housing of last resort is housing where the                minimum of 410
          residents are overcrowded, or where the condition          persons) were          Funding noted is the expenditure in this fiscal
          of the housing is substandard.                             completed June 2009.   year; not in total.




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                                    28
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                                               Table 1-9 (continued)
                                                  Actions to Address Impediments to Fair Housing
                                                                Program Year 2008
                                                   (As identified in the 2004 Fair Housing Plan)

          Impediments/Action                                       Expenditures              Impacts
                                                                   and
                                                                   Beneficiaries
              Conversion Threat to Mobile Home Parks of
               Washington County                                                             Due to changes in the economy, there have
                                                                                             been no new park closures in the county in
          In 2007, the Oregon legislature approved a bill          No CDBG or HOME           2008.
          creating a new legal entity, a non-profit manufactured   funds expended.
          dwelling park housing cooperative, which enables                                   In 2007, the Oregon legislature also approved
          residents to band together, purchase their park, and                               legislation that provides a measure of relief to
          have the land remain in non-profit ownership in                                    homeowners who are displaced due to park
          perpetuity.                                                                        closures. The relief includes:
                                                                                                   a one-time payment by the landlord of
          In Washington County, the land costs are so high that                                     $5,000, $7,000 or $9,000 for a
          the gap between the park owners' price and what a                                         singlewide, doublewide or triple-wide
          coop could afford make the use of this new provision                                      respectively.
          a huge challenge. This option of park purchase by                                        a $5,000 tax credit, refundable if the
          residents may be more feasible in places with lower                                       person is low income
          land costs.                                                                              if they abandon their home, the landlord
                                                                                                    must pay for its disposal at no cost to the
                                                                                                    tenant.

                                                                                             In 2009, the Oregon legislature approved the
                                                                                             document recording fee and included
                                                                                             manufactured home park purchases by coops as
                                                                                             an eligible expense.
              Overcrowding Due to the Relative Deficiency
               of Housing for Large Families

          Continue to offer Housing Rehabilitation assistance to
          combat overcrowding in owner-occupied, low-income
          families. No requests for assistance were received to
          address this issue this year.

          Tualatin Valley Housing Partners’ Merlo Station          $153,989 (HOME)           Upon completion of Merlo Station projects,
          Projects have predominantly 3 and 4-bedroom units to     Construction on the       large families will now have greater housing
          accommodate large families. The project has been         two Merlo Station         choices and be in housing that is located along
          completed. The project is in close proximity to the      projects is finished. A   the MAX line for better access to
          light rail.                                              total of 128 units are    transportation.
                                                                   available.
                                                                   88 – 3-bedrooms
                                                                   15 – 4 bedrooms
          Willamette West Habitat for Humanity (WWHfH) has
          continued construction on the Farmington Road and        $335,735 (HOME)           These larger owner-occupied units, when
          Huntting Park (formerly Leadership Row) homebuyer        7 units completed         completed, will increase the number of large
          projects located in Aloha and Beaverton. Farmington      12 in development         affordable units in the County’s inventory.
          Road has 7 of the 14 single-family homes completed       6 – 3-bedrooms
          with families already occupying the homes. Huntting      3 – 4-bedrooms
          Park will have five single-family homes.                 4 – 5-bedrooms




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                                     29
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                                             Table 1-9 (continued)
                                                Actions to Address Impediments to Fair Housing
                                                              Program Year 2008
                                                 (As identified in the 2004 Fair Housing Plan)

         Impediments/Action                                        Expenditures           Impacts
                                                                   and
                                                                   Beneficiaries
             Lack of Housing Shelter for Homeless Single
              People

         In support of the 10-Year Plan, the County                $0 - CDBG              During the first two months of operation, one
         appropriated $100,000 General Fund dollars to             8 persons served       graduate of the program obtained employment
         develop a new transitional housing project serving        through the new        and moved to permanent housing.
         unaccompanied individuals. The Homeless To Work           Homeless to Work
         Program was implemented in May 2009 to provide            Program
         shared housing with a focus on employment and
         referral to an array of supportive services.

         Severe Weather Response Plan was developed with           3,237 homeless         During severe cold weather, eight church
         faith-based community to provide shelter for              persons were helped.   shelters and one nonprofit provided 3,237 bed
         homeless persons during inclement weather. Referral                              stays to homeless persons during 70 days of
         of homeless persons to the church shelters is made                               activation (December 2008 through March
         through the 211info community referral system, law                               2009). Nearly 8,000 volunteer hours were
         enforcement, fire/EMS, libraries, and local service                              provided by community volunteers staffing the
         providers.                                                                       faith-based shelters.
              Insufficiency of Programs to Assure
               Accessible Housing Choice

         Continue to support the Home Access and Repair for        $140,000 (CDBG)        26 disabled or elderly persons received grants
         the Disabled and Elderly (HARDE) Program, which           26 households          for accessibility improvements or urgent repairs
         provides grants to the disabled to remove architectural                          to their homes. This assistance helps to keep
         barriers or make urgent repairs in private housing                               these people in their homes thereby keeping
         (both rental and owner-occupied).                                                their homes affordable.

         Beaverton’s Adapt-a-Home Program provides                 $80,233                This assistance helps to keep these people in
         accessibility improvements to low-income owners or        20 households          their homes thereby keeping their homes
         renters.                                                                         affordable.

         TVHP’s Merlo Station I and II provided 10 units for       $153,989(HOME)         10 units for developmentally disabled persons
         the developmentally disabled as well as a number of       10 accessible units    will provide affordable housing coupled with
         accessible units as required by Section 504.                                     independent living services.

         Willamette West Habitat for Humanity’s Farmington         $335,753               By building accessible housing, families with
         Road project provided one fully accessible 1-level        1 - accessible         disabilities have more opportunities to become
         home and one home ‘visitable’ by including a ramp,        1 - visitable          homeowners.
         zero step entry, and wide doorways on the 1st floor.

         Accessibility improvements at Gateway Commons             $6,628 (HOME)          Cascade Housing Group used HOME funds to
         provided 10 accessible units, 7 for mobility              10 units               make ten units at its Gateway Commons
         impairments and 3 for sensory impairments,                7 - mobility           Apartments accessible for the mobile and/or
                                                                   3 - sensory            sensory impaired. In addition, parking lot
         Washington County requires 5% of all newly                                       modifications and five accessible ramps were
         constructed units to be accessible for the mobility                              incorporated into the project.
         impaired and 2% to be accessible for the sensory
         impaired.




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                                30
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                                            Table 1-9 (continued)
                                               Actions to Address Impediments to Fair Housing
                                                             Program Year 2008
                                                (As identified in the 2004 Fair Housing Plan)

          Impediments/Action                                      Expenditures             Impacts
                                                                  and
                                                                  Beneficiaries
              Discrimination by Landlords Against Section
               8 Voucher Holders


          The County (OCD and Department of Housing               $1,500 (OCD/DHS)         The Fair Housing Council of Oregon helps
          Services) and the City of Beaverton contributed the     $1,200 (City CDBG)       individuals in Oregon to enhance their
          Fair Housing Council of Oregon’s Fair Housing                                    awareness of fair housing rights and
          Month.                                                                           responsibilities, increase their use of available
                                                                                           home ownership opportunities, recognize and
          Translated State Fair Housing brochure into Korean.     Beaverton                eliminate predatory lending practices, and
                                                                                           remove regulatory barriers that impede
                                                                                           development of affordable and accessible
                                                                                           housing this year.

              Disproportionate Lack of Protected Class
               HomeOwnership


          The American Dream Downpayment Initiative               $70,000 (ADDI)           The final home purchase at Lindsay Lane
          (ADDI) program provided downpayment assistance to       7 homebuyers             benefited from the ADDI Program. An
          first-time homebuyers. Although ADDI has been           2 minority households    additional six families received ADDI
          canceled, seven homebuyers were assisted in PY 2008                              assistance for a home purchase in PY 2008.
          with home purchases. The final drawdown occurred                                 The final ADDI assisted home will be reported
          in July 2009.                                                                    in PY 2009

          Willamette West Habitat for Humanity (WWHfH)            $405,753                 The Office of Community Development
          provides homeowership opportunities for families        (HOME/ADDI)              continues to outreach to the Hispanic
          below 50% MFI. WWHfH works extensively to               7 units completed this   population. The 6/30/08 HUD Dashboard
          outreach to Spanish speaking potential applicants via   year.                    Report for the County’s HOME Program shows
          the use of translated materials, interpreters, and                               that since inception, 30% of the homeowners
          meetings specifically for Spanish-speakers. A                                    served were Hispanic, 3.7% were American
          Cambodian interpreter is also available.                                         Indian/Alaskan, 7.4% Asian, and 54% White.
                                                                                           Of the 16 units purchased this year, 8 of the
                                                                                           homebuyers were from a protected class.

                                                                                           The Office of Community Development
                                                                                           continues to outreach to the Hispanic
                                                                                           population. These families will have the
                                                                                           benefit of homeownership with an affordable
                                                                                           mortgage allowing them to spend their limited
                                                                                           resources on other basic needs. In addition, the
                                                                                           children will have stable homes with access to
                                                                                           the same school system for as long as they are
                                                                                           living in their home.




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                                  31
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                                                     Table 1-9
                                                 Actions to Address Impediments to Fair Housing
                                                               Program Year 2008
                                                  (As identified in the 2004 Fair Housing Plan)

          Impediments/Action                                        Expenditures               Impacts
                                                                    and
                                                                    Beneficiaries
              Need for Local Jurisdictions to Provide Tax,
               SDC and Other Incentives and Accelerated
               Process for Development of Affordable
               Housing

          Housing Advocacy Group continues to advocate for          No expenditures            No new movement in this area. Tigard and
          SDC fee waivers or reduction and tax abatements for       No direct beneficiaries    Beaverton continue to be proactive in this
          affordable housing development.                                                      regard.

          The City of Tigard operates a Fee Subsidy Program         $10,000/year               The City elected to change the provision so that
          for affordable housing. Each year $10,000 is set aside                               any funds left over each year would be rolled
          on a first come-first served basis.                                                  over to the next year. This will allow the fund
                                                                                               to grow if it remains unused in a given fiscal
                                                                                               year.

          In this past year, the Oregon Legislature passed HB                                  An estimated $15 million will be generated in
          2436, the Housing Opportunity Bill, which created a                                  the 2009-2011 biennium. Of this amount, 76%
          dedicated revenue source for affordable housing                                      is to be dedicated to a General Housing
          based on an additional fee tacked onto documents                                     Account which will fund multi-family rental
          recorded across the State of Oregon.                                                 housing development and capacity building for
                                                                                               community-based housing development
                                                                                               agencies. 10% of the revenues generated by the
                                                                                               Document Recording Fee will be dedicated to
                                                                                               an Emergency Housing Account to support
                                                                                               local efforts to decrease and end homelessness.
                                                                                               Finally, 14% of the revenues generated will be
                                                                                               used to create homeownership opportunity
                                                                                               through funding counseling, downpayment
                                                                                               assistance and front-end construction subsidy or
                                                                                               land banking.
              Victims of Domestic Violence are Being
               Evicted by Some Landlords Solely Because of
               their Victimization

          The Fair Housing Council of Oregon (FHCO) has             No expenditures.
          incorporated domestic violence education of landlords     No numbers available
          in its landlord training curriculum. Currently, there     on direct beneficiaries.
          are no federal funds specifically targeted to this type
          of education for Washington County landlords.

              DV Shelters in Adjoining Counties Refuse to
               Accept Families with Adolescent Boys as Part
               of the Inter-County Cooperative Overflow
               Program

          DVRC accepts everyone regardless of age or gender         No expenditures.           Because of DVRC’s open policy and that of the
          or other protected class. DVCR has recently seen an       No numbers available       one Multnomah County shelter, there are two
          increase in the number of victims who are coming          on direct beneficiaries.   safe housing options currently available for
          from Multnomah County.                                                               victims of domestic violence who have male
                                                                                               children over the age of 12. Shelter staff have
                                                                                               indicated that this policy is changing across the
                                                                                               board.




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                                      32
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                                              Table 1-10
                                                     Washington County Consortium
                                        Summary of Housing Accomplishments by Tenure and Income
                                                           Category, PY 2008
                                                 Proposed Annual               Assisted Households by
                                                 Accomplishments          Percentage of Median Family Income
                                                                       0-30%    31-50%       0-50%   51-80%    0-80%
                  Low-Income Renters
                                                                100      94        60        154       434      588


                  Rehabiliation Programs                        60       166      106        272        7       279
                  (includes Weatherization)


                  Homeownership                                 12        0        6          6         6        12
                  Programs

                  Special Needs Populations                     36        0        1          1         0         1

                  Homeless Shelter Beds                         60        0        0          0         0         0
                  or Permanent Housing

                  Total                                         268      260      173        433       447      880



                                                         % of Total     30%       20%        49%      51%       100%
                                                        Households




   The City hosted training for homeless             The City has continued to provide        gory, compared to the proposed pri-
   shelter providers throughout our                  CDBG support to the Adapt-a-Home         ority targets listed in the 2005-2010
   community regarding their responsi-               which provides rehabilitation grants     Consolidated Plan. Total overall
   bilities to protect their client’s rights         to home owners and renters through-      accomplishments in PY 2008 ex-
   under Fair Housing law. The two                   out the City. In addition to provid-     ceeded those proposed in the Con-
   primary concerns centered on victims              ing accessibility rehabilitation, the    solidated Plan for high priority
   of domestic violence (Oregon pro-                 Adapt-a-Home staff educates local        needs. The Consortium fell short in
   vides additional protections for vic-             landlords about the requirements for     developing units for special needs
   tims of domestic violence under its               reasonable accommodation under the       populations. One project, Commu-
   fair housing rules) and reasonable                Fair Housing Act. As a result, a         nity Partners for Affordable Hous-
   accommodation.           The training             number of rental units in the City       ing’s The Knoll, a 48-unit project for
   brought about increased dialogue                  have accessibility modifications, and    the elderly was first funded in 2006
   among shelter providers and modifi-               we have found that landlords are         and would have been completed by
   cation of existing policies and proce-            choosing to leave those accommoda-       this time had they not experienced
   dures.                                            tions in place after a tenant moves      significant, but unavoidable, delays
                                                     out.                                     in finding a site. Other high priority
   During the fall of 2008, the City’s                                                        needs (low-income renters rehab
   dispute resolution center held an edu-            c. Affordable Housing                    programs and homeownership pro-
   cational seminar for local renters that                                                    grams) exceeded projections.
   provided an overview of tenants’                  Table 1–10 summarizes total hous-
   rights under Oregon tenant-landlord               ing accomplishments in FY 2008 for       By successfully targeting assistance
   law and the Fair Housing Act.                     renters and owners, by income cate-      to low-income households, many of
   Nearly 100 residents attended.
Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                     33
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

  whom live in substandard housing                 Merlo I, Merlo II, Sunset Gardens,        Housing repair and weatherization
  units, Washington County and the                 Sierra West, Willow Park, Gateway         activities are also funded with CDBG
  City of Beaverton addressed critical             Commons, and Edwards Center               funds via Rebuilding
  “worst-case” housing needs. In last              Bonnie Brae group home. More de-          Together’s Home Repair Program
  year’s CAPER, 86% percent of fed-                tail on these HOME projects can be        and Community Action’s Compre-
  erally-assisted households earned                found in Part 3. Five projects spon-      hensive and Self-Help Weatheriza-
  less than half of the area’s median              sored by two Community Housing            tion Programs. These activities sup-
  family income (MFI). This year, the              Development Organizations were            port affordable housing by repairing
  CAPER reflects that 49% of the                   completed this year. All of these         or improving substandard conditions,
  households earned less than half the             projects had extremely complex fi-        thereby allowing lower-income resi-
  area’s MFI. This statistic is impor-             nancing mechanisms which from a           dents to remain in their homes. In
  tant to note. It does not represent              legal and ownership standpoint            addition, the weatherization im-
  that the federal programs are funding            added to the time it took to complete.    provements lower energy costs while
  most units above 50% MFI. Seven                                                            at the same time keeping the home
  HOME-funded renter projects were                 Gateway Commons, a 138-unit               more comfortable when extreme
  completed this year with a total of              apartment complex in Hillsboro was        weather conditions exist.
  470 units of affordable housing.                 completed this year. This project
  This represents more completed                   was reported in a prior CAPER how-        A total of $70,051 was expended
  units than all previous years in this            ever, due to the need for accessibility   from the 2005 and 2006 Housing
  cycle. Only 67 of those units are                improvements to ten of the units, the     Rehabilitation Program awards.
  HOME-assisted which means we                     project was kept open in HUD’s re-        These funds assisted four homeown-
  have known demographic data on                   porting system. The accessibility         ers. $70,022 in HARDE funding
  those households. The remaining                  improvements have been completed          was expended assisting 26 renter/
  number of units (404) we know to be              and the project closed out.               owner households.
  under 80% MFI but we don’t have
  more targeted data. While we can                 Edwards Center’s Bonnie Brae              Rebuilding Together of Washington
  presume that most of those units are             Group Home was completed provid-          County was funded in the amount of
  below 50% MFI, with no data to                   ing needed rehab assistance to make       $10,000. Community Action’s two
  document that, we are required to                the home more safe and livable.           weatherization programs were
  show them as between 51%-80%                                                               funded with $45,000.
  MFI. This reporting issue has re-                The ADDI program awarded seven
  sulted in data which could lead the              households with downpayment assis-        In total, 30 rehabbed units were com-
  reader to assume most of the units               tance this year. Three of the house-      pleted this year. Of the 30 house-
  are above 50% MFI which would be                 holds, assisted with HOME funds,          holds receiving CDBG rehabilitation
  incorrect. The Consolidated Plan                 were able to purchase homes at            assistance (not including weatheriza-
  estimates that 69% of all households             Farmington Road. The final ADDI           tion), 47% were elderly and 63%
  with incomes at 0–50 percent of MFI              award will be reported in PY 2009.        were disabled. None of the units
  are considered cost burdened. In                                                           assisted this year directly addressed
  other words, they pay more than 30               HOME loans generated $145,456 in          overcrowding issues. In addition,
  percent of their income for rent.                program income this year.                 311 units received weatherization
                                                                                             assistance.
  County and City housing rehabilita-              Washington County CDBG Pro-
  tion programs repaired 78 homes in               gram                                      Of the 345 low and moderate-income
  PY 2008. In addition, weatheriza-                                                          homeowners/renters assisted through
  tion improvements were provided to               The Office of Community Develop-          the CDBG housing repair and weath-
  311 additional units.                            ment (OCD) administers a housing          erization programs, 99% earned less
                                                   repair program for Washington             than 50% of the area median family
  Washington County HOME Pro-                      County’s lower-income residents. In       income. 67% earned less than 30%
  gram                                             addition, OCD administers a home          median family income. Approxi-
                                                   accessibility and repair program that     mately 31% of the households re-
  The County’s HOME Program com-                   is geared specifically to persons who     ceiving assistance represented minor-
  pleted seven projects this year:                 are at least 62 years of age or dis-      ity populations. 18 % were identified
                                                   abled.
Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                    34
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

   as Hispanic. 47% of the households                affordable housing component as           Address Emergency and Transi-
   were categorized as female-headed                 part of the larger transit-oriented de-   tional Housing Needs
   households.                                       velopment.
                                                                                               Domestic Violence Resource Cen-
   City of Beaverton CDBG Program                    d. Continuum of Care                      ter—Empowerment Fund and
                                                                                               Monika’s House
   The City of Beaverton has built part-
                                                     Narrative                                 DVRC provides safe shelter, group
   nerships with Washington County                                                             and individual support, advocacy,
                                                     Washington County and the City of
   community housing development                                                               education, referrals, and intervention
                                                     Beaverton continue in their efforts to
   organizations (CHDOs) interested in                                                         to women and children escaping do-
                                                     address the needs of homeless people
   working in Beaverton to create new                                                          mestic violence. In addition, under a
                                                     and fulfill the county’s strategy for
   affordable housing units and preserve                                                       County CDBG award, DVRC is pro-
                                                     combating homelessness. In the
   existing affordable housing.                                                                viding support to residents as they
                                                     2008 program year, County and City
                                                                                               transition from the shelter to inde-
                                                     CDBG grants funded one program
   The City also has a close working                                                           pendent living. Accomplishments: 5
                                                     that helps to prevent homelessness,
   relationship with the Unlimited                                                             people served (County), 15 people
                                                     three local emergency shelter provid-
   Choices, which administers the City’s                                                       served (Beaverton); Expenditures:
                                                     ers, a transitional housing program,
   housing rehabilitation program,                                                             $569.24 CDBG (County), $14,000
                                                     supportive services for homeless
   Hope-4-Homes. Hope-4-Homes pro-                                                             CDBG (Beaverton).
                                                     children, bilingual advocacy, a pro-
   vides moderate income, low income,
                                                     gram to streamline access into the
   and very low income homeowners                                                              Community Action—Basic Needs
                                                     shelters, and one homeless youth
   with low- or no-interest loans and                                                          Community Action provides eligible
                                                     shelter.
   provides qualified home owners to                                                           clients a one time emergency rent
   undertake necessary rehabilitation                                                          assistance payment as well as refer-
                                                     All County and City entitlement
   projects to address health and safety                                                       rals to other services clients may
                                                     funding supported projects that ad-
   issues (including lead based paint),                                                        need. Accomplishments: 2163 people
                                                     dressed high-priority needs or gaps
   and other building code deficiencies.                                                       served; Expenditures: $30,000
                                                     that have been identified in the local
                                                                                               (County).
                                                     Continuum of Care (CoC) strategy
   Through the Adapt-a-Home program,
                                                     or Consolidated Plan. Overall,
   the City is also able to serve home-                                                        St. Vincent de Paul – Rent Assis-
                                                     CDBG-assisted public service pro-
   owners and renters with mobility                                                            tance
                                                     jects served more than
   limitations, with grants for accessibil-                                                    St. Vincent de Paul provides eligible
                                                     9,351homeless people at a cost of
   ity-related repairs and improvements                                                        clients a one-time emergency rent
                                                     $323,373 in program year 2008.
   to homes and apartments.                                                                    assistance payment as well as refer-
                                                                                               rals to other services including ac-
                                                     Washington County receives a direct
   The Mend-a-Home program is tar-                                                             cess to food boxes through the
                                                     allocation of Emergency Shelter
   geted towards low and moderate in-                                                          agency’s food bank.
                                                     Grant (ESG) program funds. The
   come mobile home owners to under-                                                           Accomplishments: 3,051 persons
                                                     Office of Community Development
   take emergency rehabilitation project                                                       served; Expenditures: $15,000
                                                     (OCD) subcontracts the award to
   that maintain the viability of their                                                        (County)
                                                     Community Action, which continues
   homes. Program guidelines have also
                                                     working with its non-profit partners
   been revised to allow the City to refer                                                     Lutheran Community Services
                                                     in the provision and delivery of ser-
   clients who cannot participate in the                                                       NW—HopeSpring
                                                     vices. OCD maintains overall re-
   Hope-4-Homes program access to the                                                          HopeSpring provides transitional
                                                     sponsibility for the program. More
   Mend-a-Home program to address                                                              housing, child care, counseling and
                                                     about the ESG program can be found
   immediate life/safety issues in their                                                       other services to homeless women
                                                     in Part 5.
   homes.                                                                                      and children who have been sub-
                                                                                               jected to domestic violence and/or
                                                     Provided are brief summaries of
   The City is working with a variety of                                                       substance abuse. 96% of all benefici-
                                                     CDBG-assisted activities undertaken
   private development partners to de-                                                         aries earned less than 30% of median
                                                     or completed in PY 2008 that ad-
   velop possible sites downtown and                                                           family income. Accomplishments: 43
                                                     dressed the needs of homeless per-
   along light rail, with a significant                                                        persons served, Expenditures:
                                                     sons:
                                                                                               $32,800 CDBG (County).
Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                      35
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

  Lutheran Community Services                      people served, Expenditures:              less families with children in the
  NW – Breaking the Homeless Cy-                   $22,429 CDBG (County).                    four-county metro region. This pro-
  cle                                                                                        gram is funded with private founda-
  Provides integrated family mental                Community Action—Energy &                 tion, nonprofit and local government
  health and substance abuse recovery              Emergency Rent                            commitments. Washington County
  services on site to homeless and tran-           Provide eligible residents of Beaver-     developed a “one-stop rapid entry”
  sitioning families and children. Ac-             ton who are in need of assistance to      intake and screening model that in-
  complishments: 89 persons served;                maintain their current housing, thus      corporates housing-first in its truest
  Expenditures: $58,036 (County).                  avoiding homelessness through a one       form with quick access to housing
                                                   time payment to prevent eviction due      and family-oriented intense case
                                                   to rent or utilities in arrears. Accom-   management with supportive ser-
  Good Neighbor Center                             plishments: 793 persons served, Ex-       vices. Homeless families seeking
  Good Neighbor Center provides                    penditures: $6,786.70 CDBG                mainstream resources at the three
  shelter and essential services to                (Beaverton).                              Oregon Department of Human Ser-
  homeless families and individuals                                                          vices field offices are screened and
  while working with them to re-                   Family Bridge Expanding Volun-            selected for the program.
  establish a self-sufficient lifestyle.           teers
  Accomplishments: 38 persons                      Provides one volunteer manager who        In September 2008, Community Ac-
  served, Expenditures: $12,000                    provides additional case manage-          tion, in partnership with community
  (Beaverton).                                     ment, training and coordination for       housing and service providers, re-
                                                   approximately 600 volunteers. Ac-         ceived a Phase 2 award of $205,112
  Open Door Counseling Center—                     complishments: 81 people served,          private foundation funds that lever-
  Regional Housing Center                          Expenditures: $20,760 CDBG                aged an additional $387,011 in local
  Open Door provides comprehensive                 (County).                                 resources to implement a second
  services to serve the homeless popu-                                                       Bridges To Housing project serving
  lation and low and moderate-income               Boys and Girls Aid Society Youth          12 families beginning in October
  persons who could be at risk of                  Shelter                                   2008.
  homelessness including mental                    Provides staff (intake and assess-
  health counseling, mortgage foreclo-             ment) for the newly opened home-          During the first 18 months of imple-
  sure prevention, reverse equity coun-            less youth shelter in Hillsboro. Ac-      menting the program, two families
  seling for seniors, and life planning            complishments: 63 youth served,           have successfully graduated from the
  for persons who are released from                Expenditures: $48,202 CDBG                program and have retained their per-
  incarceration or institutions. Accom-            (County).                                 manent housing and no longer need
  plishments: 173 people served, Ex-                                                         case management and services.
  penditures: $8,500 CDBG                          Community Action – Bridges to             Washington County is currently de-
  (Beaverton). (11 additional residents            Housing Childcare                         veloping funds to implement a Phase
  were served by Open Door through                 Provides childcare assistance to          3 project to serve 15 families begin-
  their first time homebuyer education             those families that are enrolled in the   ning in 2009-2010.
  program.)                                        Bridges to Housing program allow-
                                                   ing the parent(s) the ability to focus    Severe Weather Shelter Response
  Community Action Shelter Wait-                   on housing and employment stabil-         Plan. The shelter plan was devel-
  list                                             ity. Accomplishments: 5; Expendi-         oped with faith-based and nonprofit
  Provides a more streamlined process              tures: $3,153.                            community partners who open their
  by which homeless families access                                                          facilities during inclement weather to
  any of the three emergency shelters              In addition to the above projects,        provide shelter to homeless persons.
  in the county. A single phone num-               other actions were being taken to         Referral of homeless persons to the
  ber is available for clients which re-           address emergency homeless needs          church shelters is made through the
  sults in them being housed faster and            within the county.                        211info community referral system,
  more efficiently. This centralized                                                         law enforcement, fire/EMS, libraries,
  waitlist also serves as an entry point           Bridges To Housing Program. This          and local service providers. Com-
  for a variety of supportive, long-term           program is a bi-state regional effort     munication of shelter activation/
  services. Accomplishments: 2,758                 focused on serving high-need home-        deactivation is coordinated by the

Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                     36
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

   Washington County Homeless Pro-                   the plan’s six goals and nearly 40    pointed 17 members to the Home-
   gram Coordinator. During the pro-                 strategies began in July 2008.        less Plan Advisory Committee
   longed severe cold weather that blan-                                                   (HPAC) to provide oversight to the
   keted much of Washington County                   In support of the 10-Year Plan, the   implementation of the county’s
   under nearly two feet of snow, eight              County appropriated $100,000          homeless plan and to provide lead-
   church shelters and one nonprofit                 General Fund dollars to develop a     ership in the development of re-
   provided 3,237 bed stays to homeless              new transitional housing project      sources to meet the plan’s ambi-
   persons during 70 days of activation              serving unaccompanied individu-       tious goals. The HPAC is com-
   (December 2008 through March                      als. The Homeless To Work Pro-        prised of individuals who bring
   2009). Nearly 8,000 volunteer hours
                                                     gram was implemented in May           knowledge about the needs of
   were provided by community volun-
                                                     2009 and provides shared housing      homeless and very-low income
   teers staffing the faith-based shelters.
                                                     with a focus on employment and        persons and have the authority
   In May, the City of Beaverton passed              referral to an array of supportive    within their agency/jurisdiction to
   an exemption for churches, secon-                 services. The program is adminis-     make policy and budget decisions
   dary-schools and public buildings,                tered by the Washington County        that impact the community’s hous-
   which allows them to provide emer-                Department of Housing Services,       ing and supportive services system.
   gency shelter services as part of the             in collaboration with the Depart-
   County’s Severe Weather Shelter                   ment of Community Corrections,        Identified in the 10-Year Plan was
   Service Network, without obtaining a              the Department of Health and Hu-      an emphasis on income and eco-
   conditional use permit. This was is               man Services, and a nonprofit ser-    nomic support to assist homeless
   an effort to increase the level of par-           vice provider, Bridges To Change.     persons in retaining housing stabil-
   ticipation of Beaverton organizations             During the first two months of op-    ity. The HSSN Income Support
   in the Severe Weather Shelter pro-                eration, one graduate of the pro-     Subcommittee was formed to de-
   gram, while decreasing the regulatory             gram obtained employment and          velop income opportunities and
   barriers that exist within the City.              moved to permanent housing.           includes members from nonprofit,
                                                                                           private and public agencies. Dur-
   Project Homeless Connect. On Janu-                Washington County has experi-         ing this economic downturn, the
   ary 28, 2009, a network of nonprofit,             enced an increase in homeless vet-    subcommittee has remained fo-
   public, private, and community stake-             erans and identified in the 10-Year   cused on developing systems that
   holders participated in providing ser-            Plan the need to expand homeless      reduce barriers and increase access
   vices to nearly 500 homeless persons              service systems with the Veterans     to mainstream resources, expansion
   during the one-day event hosted at
                                                     Administration (VA). In March         of information and referral of re-
   Sonrise Church. Project Homeless
                                                     2009, a collaborative outreach pro-   sources, and assisting clients with
   Connect is a one-stop resource event
                                                     gram was implemented in partner-      education and training to prepare
   that links service agencies with
   homeless consumers.         A diverse             ship with the U.S. Department of      employment applications, inter-
   group of agencies and volunteers pro-             Veterans Affairs, Washington          view and job search resources.
   vided on-site vision, dental, foot care,          County Disability, Aging, and Vet-    This new HSSN subcommittee en-
   employment, veteran services, hous-               eran Services and the Department      countered many challenges to im-
   ing referral, and personal amenities to           of Housing Services. Twice a          plementing the strategies outlined
   include hair cuts, showers, clothing,             month the Veterans Mobile Out-        in the 10-Year Plan as the unem-
   and much more. The 4th annual Pro-                reach Van is scheduled at various     ployment rate in Washington
   ject Homeless Connect is scheduled                locations in Washington County to     County rose from 4.8% in June
   for January 27, 2010.                             provide emergency resources, as-      2008 to 10.4% in June 2009.
                                                     sistance in applying for Veteran
   A Road Home: 10-Year Plan to End                  benefits, accessing the VA Medical    In summary, the first year of the
   Homelessness. On June 3, 2008,                    Center, and emergency shelter in      plan’s implementation provided an
   the Board of County Commission-                   Multnomah County.                     exit from homelessness through an
   ers approved a comprehensive plan                                                       array of housing and services to
   to address homelessness in Wash-                  On December 16, 2008, the Board       homeless families, unaccompanied
   ington County. Implementation of                  of County Commissioners ap-           adults, runaway and homeless

Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                37
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

  youth. A comprehensive report                    that will replace Ready to Rent. The    New FY2008 McKinney-Vento
  outlining the accomplishments and                new program, Rent Well, will con-       Funded Projects:
  challenges during year one of the                tinue to offer the Landlord Guarantee    $126,000 for Shelter Plus Care
  plan’s implementation will be pro-               Fund benefit. Accomplishments: 279         tenant-based rental assistance
  vided to the Board of County Com-                clients enrolled; 115 clients gradu-       serving disabled chronic home-
  missioners and the community. A                  ated; 12 classes offered; Expendi-         less single adults. The three
  copy of the report will be made                  tures: $0 CDBG (County).                   units will be funded for five-
  available on the county’s 10-Year                                                           years and will leverage suppor-
  Plan webpage at http://                          Continuum of Care Homeless
                                                                                              tive services from participating
                                                   Assistance
  www.co.washington.or.us/                                                                    project sponsors as a match for
  Housing/10-year-plan-to-end-                                                                the rental assistance funds. The
                                                   Homeless services in Washington
  homelessness.cfm                                                                            Shelter Plus Care Program is
                                                   County are administered through
                                                                                              administered by the Department
  Help Homeless Persons Make the                   the Washington County Depart-
                                                                                              of Housing Services in collabo-
  Transition to Permanent Housing                  ment of Housing Services and de-
                                                                                              ration with seven nonprofit
                                                   livered through a community-based
                                                                                              sponsor agencies:        Cascade
  Ready to Rent Housing Readiness                  network of organizations that work
                                                                                              AIDS Project, Community Ac-
  Training                                         together to help homeless families
                                                                                              tion, Good Neighbor Center,
                                                   and individuals move toward self-
                                                                                              Lifeworks NW, Luke-Dorf, Inc.,
  Through PY 2008, Community Ac-                   sufficiency. These organizations
                                                                                              Open Door Counseling Center,
  tion continued to provide Ready to               comprise the Housing and Suppor-
                                                                                              and Sequoia Mental Health Ser-
  Rent training, a housing readiness               tive Services Network (HSSN) and
                                                                                              vices, Inc.
  program developed by the Portland                follow the HUD Continuum of
  Housing Center and endorsed by the               Care (CoC) model to develop and          $388,320 for Shelter Plus Care
  Oregon Apartment Association, a                  implement homeless activities to           tenant-based rental assistance
  statewide organization of landlords.             effectively achieve self-sufficiency       for homeless families with chil-
  Ready to Rent is a 12 hour Housing               outcomes.                                  dren participating in the Bridges
  Readiness Education Program devel-                                                          To Housing Program. The eight
  oped to help people with rental barri-           McKinney-Vento Homeless Assis-             two-bedroom units will be
  ers including evictions, credit prob-            tance. To address critical unmet           funded for five years and lever-
  lems, negative rental history and                housing and supportive service             ages supportive services as a
  criminal backgrounds all of which                needs for an increasing number of          match for the rental assistance.
  make it very difficult to get accepted                                                      This leverage includes private
                                                   homeless, a strategic plan that in-
  into housing. Community Action                                                              foundation, local and state fund-
                                                   corporated the goals identified in
  staff have been trained as instructors                                                      ing. This program is adminis-
                                                   the county’s 10-Year Plan to End
  of the Ready to Rent program. The                                                           tered by the Department of
  Oregon Department of Housing and                 Homelessness and the CoC’s Gaps
                                                   Analysis was developed in Septem-          Housing Services in collabora-
  Community Services reauthorized                                                             tion with the nonprofit grantee
  the Landlord Guarantee Program                   ber 2008. The plan was submitted
                                                   in a FY2008 McKinney-Vento                 selected to provide Bridges To
  which acts as an incentive for land-                                                        Housing case management to
  lords to work with graduates for the             CoC Homeless Assistance grant
                                                   application that scored the highest        the program families.
  Ready to Rent program. Through
                                                   in Oregon (91.5%); national high-        $62,055 for case management
  the program, landlords can be reim-
  bursed up to one month’s rent for                est application score was 92%.             provided in a Housing Stabiliza-
  any damages or non-payment of rent.              The application resulted in                tion Program serving 12 home-
  The program reduces the risk to the              $1,960,909 funding from HUD’s              less families annually. The two-
  landlords, helps to decrease unit va-            Supportive Housing Program                 year HUD funded project pro-
  cancies, and provides greater choice             (SHP) and Shelter Plus Care (SPC)          vides case management staff
  and improved access to housing for               Homeless Assistance Programs in            serving families transitioning
  individuals and families. Beginning              February 2009.                             from the Good Neighbor Center
  in PY 2009, Community Action will                                                           shelter into permanent housing.
  begin a new educational program                                                             The housing is provided in part-

Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                 38
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

       nership with the Housing Au-                     program that serves chronically     In October 2009, a funding request
       thority of Washington County                     homeless individuals and fami-      will be submitted through the HUD
       through a 12-month reduction of                  lies.                               FY2009 McKinney-Vento CoC
       rent for the family.                           $960,828 for a one-year renewal     Homeless Assistance Program com-
                                                        of 110 units of Shelter Plus Care   petitive grant application process.
   Renewal FY2008 McKinney-Vento                        Program tenant-based rental         The application will include an ex-
   Funded Projects:                                     assistance. This program is ad-     pansion of housing resources
    $136,523 for one-year renewal                     ministered by the Department of     through a new project proposal to
                                                        Housing Services in collabora-      include Shelter Plus Care (SPC) ten-
      of the HopeSpring Transitional
                                                        tion with seven nonprofit spon-     ant-based rental assistance for
      Housing Program for homeless
                                                        sor agencies: Cascade AIDS          chronic homeless individuals. The
      families (single woman head-of-                                                       application will request nearly $2
      household with children) who                      Project, Community Action,
                                                                                            million in funds for the following
      are recovering from mental                        Good Neighbor Center, Life-
                                                                                            projects:
      health, alcohol and drug abuse.                   works NW, Luke-Dorf, Inc.,
      The HUD funded portion of the                     Open Door Counseling Center          $126,000 for three new five-year
      program provides rental assis-                    and Sequoia Mental Health Ser-         Shelter Plus Care tenant-based
      tance and supportive services for                 vices, Inc.                            rental assistance vouchers to
      10 of the 18 families provided                                                           serve chronic homeless singles.
      by Lutheran Community Ser-                     Looking ahead to FY2009-2010,             This project is a strategy in the
      vices NW.                                      Washington County continues to            10-Year Plan to End Homeless-
    $83,869 for one-year renewal of                develop and implement homeless            ness and will be administered by
      the Hillsboro Graduated Inde-                  programs and activities that expand       the Washington County Depart-
      pendent Living Program (HGILP)                 services provided to homeless per-        ment of Housing Services.
      to provide operation subsidy of a              sons within the county. A new pro-      $136,523 for a one-year renewal
      15-bed facility and intense sup-               gram funded by the American Re-           of supportive services and hous-
      portive services for chronically               covery and Reinvestment Act               ing rents for women with children
      homeless individuals who experi-               (ARRA) federal stimulus is the            in the HopeSpring Transitional
      ence chronic mental illness and                Homelessness Prevention and               Housing Program provided by
      addictions (dually-diagnosed).                 Rapid Re-housing Program                  Lutheran Services NW.
                                                     (HPRP).      The $824,990 ARRA
      The HGILP is located in Hills-                                                         $83,869 for a one-year renewal of
      boro, adjacent to the Safe Haven.              funds will provide financial assis-
                                                                                               supportive services and operation
      Luke-Dorf, Inc. manages both the               tance and services to prevent indi-
                                                                                               for dual diagnosed chronic home-
      HGILP and Safe Haven programs                  viduals and families from becoming
                                                                                               less individuals in the Hillsboro
      and is a State-licensed provider of            homeless and help those who are
                                                                                               Graduated Independent Living
      both mental health and alcohol/                experiencing homelessness to be
                                                                                               Program provided by Luke-Dorf,
      drug services.                                 quickly re-housed and stabilized.
                                                                                               Inc.
    $165,219 for a one-year renewal                The Washington County Office of
                                                                                             $119,465 for a one-year renewal
      of SAFAH Self-Sufficiency Pro-                 Community Development is the lead
                                                                                               of the Transitional Living Pro-
      gram serving homeless families                 agency and will contract the program
                                                                                               gram for older youth to include
      with case management and sup-                  service delivery through Community
                                                                                               rental assistance and case man-
      portive services focused on in-                Action. The program will be coordi-
                                                                                               agement, education assistance,
      creasing income, maintaining                   nated with other ARRA funded pro-
                                                                                               life skills training, transportation
      housing, and decreasing depend-                grams and state/federal entitlement
                                                                                               and money management. This
      ence on public assistance. The                 programs to provide a comprehen-
                                                                                               program is provided by the Boys
      program serves 120 families annu-              sive housing and service system.
                                                                                               and Girls Aid.
                                                     The Housing Authority will provide
      ally and is provided by the Com-
                                                     Administration of the Homeless          $291,867 for a one-year renewal
      munity Action Organization.                                                              of the Garrett Lee Smith Safe
                                                     Management Information System for
    $76,190 for a one-year renewal of                                                        Haven serving chronically home-
                                                     the HPRP.
      mental health outreach and coun-                                                         less individuals with mental ill-
      seling activities.     Open Door                                                         ness. The Safe Haven provides
      Counseling Center provides the                                                           housing, mental health care, case

Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                    39
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

       management, and supportive ser-             undertake over a five-year period to       this partnership are Merlo I and
       vices. The program is provided              fulfill key elements of the county’s       Merlo II which respectively provide
       by Luke-Dorf, Inc.                          overall Housing Affordability Strat-       80 and 48 units of housing along the
     $165,219 for a one-year renewal             egy. The 2008 Action Plan specifi-         MAX line. This project was ready
       of SAFAH (Supplemental Assis-               cally identifies actions to be under-      for occupancy at the beginning of
       tance for Facilities to Assist the          taken during the 2008 program year.        June 2008 but HOME completion
       Homeless) to include supportive             Tables 1–11 and 1–12 list and de-          data was not available so the project
       services provided by Community              scribe in brief the specific “other        was carried forward into the 2009
       Action.                                     actions” that were carried out this        reporting year.
     $38,095 for a one-year renewal of           past year. These tables are intended
       mental health outreach and ser-             to supplement the sections that fol-       HOME dollars will also be used to
       vices provided by the Open Door             low, which describe select activities      purchase the land for CPAH’s The
       Counseling Center.                          in greater detail. Please also note        Knoll project (to occur early in PY
     $14,496 for a one-year renewal of           that alphanumeric codes have been          2009) which will provide 48 units of
       the Washington County Transi-               added to each action category to fa-       affordable housing for the elderly.
       tional Housing Program. This                cilitate their identification and track-
       program is operated in collabora-           ing.                                       The relative scarcity and escalating
       tion between the Department of                                                         price of developable land continues
       Housing Services and the Depart-            Obstacles to Meeting Underserved           to promote the acquisition of existing
       ment of Community Corrections.              Needs                                      housing (with or without rehabilita-
     $39,000 for a one-year renewal of                                                      tion) as a cost-effective alternative to
       the Homeless Management Infor-              Washington County’s Consolidated           new construction for many afford-
       mation System (HMIS) Adminis-               Plan identifies three main obstacles       able housing projects in Washington
       trator position (part-time). The            to meeting under-served needs for          County.
       System Administrator position               affordable housing: the cost of land;
       resides in the Department of                community acceptance of affordable         The County has worked with local
       Housing Services and coordi-                housing; and the lack of in-depth          partners to offer Community Hous-
       nates, implements, and adminis-             capacity among nonprofit develop-          ing Development Organizations first
       ters the countywide HMIS soft-              ers. While not specifically identi-        right of refusal on available surplus
       ware program with participating             fied, the lack of sufficient resources     land.
       nonprofit agencies.                         to adequately address affordable
     $960,828 for a one-year renewal             housing continues to also be the           Public and nonprofit developers’ ef-
       of 110 units of Shelter Plus Care           most obvious obstacle.                     forts to engage community residents
       Program tenant-based rental as-                                                        and to address community concerns
       sistance. This program is admin-            The cost and the availability of land      have allowed for greater community
       istered by the Department of                is often cited as the main obstacle to     acceptance of affordable housing
       Housing Services in collaboration           providing affordable housing. Cur-         developments in Washington
       with seven nonprofit sponsor                rent planning efforts underway for         County.
       agencies: Cascade AIDS Project,             North Bethany and South Hillsboro
       Community Action, Good                      are potential new areas of land avail-     In regards to local capacity, Wash-
       Neighbor Center, LifeWorks                  able for housing within the Urban          ington County continues to award a
       NW, Luke-Dorf, Inc., Open Door              Growth Boundary.                           significant portion of its HOME dol-
       Counseling Center, and Sequoia                                                         lars to nonprofit housing developers.
       Mental Health Services.                     The Office of Community Develop-           This year, 42% of the HOME funds
                                                   ment continued to make HOME dol-           available for development went to a
                                                   lars available for the acquisition of      Community Housing Development
  e. Other Actions                                 land for new construction of afford-       Organization (CHDO), well above
                                                   able housing developments. Tuala-          the HUD minimum requirement of
  The 2005-2010 Consolidated Plan                  tin Valley Housing Partners worked         15 percent. This does not include
  includes a variety of actions that               closely with Tri-Met to obtain Tri-        any portion of the City of Beaver-
  Washington County, the City of Bea-              Met land for affordable housing.           ton’s allocation which in most prior
  verton, and their partners propose to            Two projects that are the result of        years has also been allocated to a

Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                        40
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

   CHDO. To further support the ef-                  The County seeks to maximize pri-            housing across the State.
   forts of nonprofit organizations seek-            vate-sector participation in the           Assist non-profits and other de-
   ing to develop affordable housing,                HOME program by encouraging pro-             velopers of affordable housing in
   Washington County made the maxi-                  posals from all eligible applicants.         meeting state and local permitting
   mum amount of HOME program                        County HOME funds were allocated             requirements.
   funds available to designated CHDOs               through an annual request-for-             Advocate for the ability to use
   for reasonable and necessary costs of             proposals funding process, with              inclusionary zoning programs in
   operations. The Board of Commis-                  funding decisions made in advance            the development of affordable
   sioners awarded operating grants to-              of the State’s application deadline to       housing.
   taling $79,260 to support critical staff          demonstrate support for local pro-         Increase state tax credit awards to
   positions at three different CHDOs in             jects that may also require state grant      Washington County by securing
   PY 2008.                                          funding or tax credits to proceed.           local match dollars.
                                                                                                Support efforts to fully capitalize
   The County has identified the lack of             In addition to increasing the supply         the Community Housing Fund.
   resources as a major barrier to ad-               of existing affordable housing stock,
   dressing unmet community develop-                 another viable method for supporting      Institutional Structure
   ment needs. Part 1f, “Project Lever-              these strategies is maintaining the
   aging” describes the success sponsors             existing affordable housing stock.        The Office of Community Develop-
   have had in leveraging CDBG dollars               Both the City of Beaverton and            ment (OCD) maintains overall re-
   in order to implement their projects.             Washington County operate housing         sponsibility for the CDBG, ESG and
   Notwithstanding the lack of re-                   rehabilitation programs that fund         HOME Programs as well as the con-
   sources, nonprofit housing develop-               needed improvements to homes oc-          solidated planning process. OCD
   ers have been very successful in im-              cupied by households that lack the        and the Housing Authority share in
   plementing their funded projects.                 means to do so on their own.              the coordination of housing policy in
                                                                                               the County. DHS has overall re-
   Foster and Maintain Affordable                    Oregon Housing and Community              sponsibility for administering Hous-
   Housing                                           Services, CHDOs and OCD staff             ing Authority housing programs.
                                                     have exchanged information to dis-        DHS continues to coordinate the
   Washington County's adopted hous-                 cuss options for preserving future        Continuum of Care and the Housing
   ing strategy stresses the need for                expiring-use projects. If these units     and Supportive Services Network
   strong County leadership in promot-               are not preserved, the county will        (HSSN), a network of over 50 ser-
   ing affordable housing. The Office                lose 488 affordable units. The state      vice providers and public funding
   of Community Development and the                  has been proactive in this effort and     agencies. The HSSN contributed to
   Department of Housing Services/                   several projects have been preserved.     the overall development of the
   Housing Authority of Washington                                                             County’s 2008 Continuum of Care
   County continue their efforts to add              Public Policy Barriers to Affordable      application submission. OCD and
   substantially to the local stock of af-           Housing                                   DHS staffs work closely in the man-
   fordable housing.                                                                           agement of interrelated planning and
                                                     The 2005-2010 Consolidated Plan           program activities. The City of Bea-
   Consistent with both the Fair Hous-               identified strategies for reducing        verton administers its independent
   ing and Consolidated Plans, the com-              costs and barriers to affordable hous-    CDBG entitlement, working in part-
   mitment of County HOME resources                  ing. See Table 1-11 Other Actions         nership with OCD on housing issues
   has helped make local projects more               for accomplishments in some of            and programs.
   successful in the competition for state           these areas:
   funding. CPAH’s The Knoll project                                                           The encouragement of public/private
   in Tigard was awarded tax credits in               Advocate for fee subsidies to pay      partnerships and expansion of the
   this year’s highly competitive fund-                 for SDC’s, permits, and other          capacity of all interested participants
   ing cycle which could, in part, be                   development fees.                      to create affordable housing opportu-
   attributed to the $1.5 million in                  Passage of HB 2436 which initi-        nities continue to be of major impor-
   HOME funds already awarded to this                   ates a document recording fee          tance in addressing priority needs in
   project.                                             which will provide a stable reve-      Washington County. These partner-
                                                        nue source to fund affordable          ships were strengthened during the

Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                       41
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

  Consolidated Plan’s needs assess-                has to-date, selected this option an-   objectives and eligibility require-
  ment process as well as the Fair                 nually.                                 ments. OCD retains overall respon-
  Housing Planning process.                        Option Two allows the City Member       sibility for federal compliance.
                                                   to specifically designate its portion
  Coordination                                     of HOME funds to projects within its    Public Housing Strategy
                                                   jurisdiction. However, the Represen-
  OCD continues to build new rela-                 tative Member (Washington County)       For the year-end June 30, 2009, the
  tionships in the housing and Contin-             would complete project implementa-      Housing Authority of Washington
  uum of Care community. OCD staff                 tion and administration. The City of    County expended Capital Fund Pro-
  are present at monthly Housing Ad-               Beaverton has selected Option Two.      gram funds to rehabilitate or modern-
  vocacy Group and Housing and Sup-                                                        ize units identified in the five-year
  portive Services Network meetings                Washington County and Beaverton         plan. These funds supported a variety
  to sustain relationships with these              have participated in the HOME con-      of capital improvements to scattered
  participants. OCD has communi-                   sortium since 1994. Hillsboro chose     project units, to include site improve-
  cated with these groups about current            to join the HOME consortium once it     ments, roofing, paving, and window
  and upcoming planning and funding                qualified for designation as a CDBG     replacement.
  processes. Notifications have been               Metropolitan City entitlement in FY
  sent via publicized notices, mass                2000.                                   Capital funds were also applied to-
  mailings, e-mail distributions, bro-                                                     ward the salary of the County’s Resi-
  chures, and notifications via the web            The County and the City of Beaver-      dent Initiatives Coordinator and for
  site.                                            ton continue to work together as        staff training to improve the manage-
                                                   HOME Consortium partners to pro-        ment and operation of public hous-
  OCD continues to meet quarterly                  vide affordable housing opportuni-      ing. More information on these and
  with local CHDOs to ensure open                  ties to local residents. As in previ-   other public housing improvements
  communication and discuss issues of              ous years, the jurisdictions prepared   may be obtained from the Housing
  concerns or strategize with those                and submitted to HUD this spring        Authority's Performance and Evalua-
  groups on how to build on coordina-              their FY 2009 Action Plan for the       tion Report for the Capital Fund pro-
  tion.                                            investment of federal housing and       gram.
                                                   community development resources.
  Efforts to enhance coordination be-              They also jointly designed and de-      The Housing Authority of Washing-
  tween housing and service providers              veloped their eleventh CAPER in         ton County, in its concurrent role as
  and among units of local govern-                 September 2009.                         Washington County's Department of
  ment, such as the regular meetings of                                                    Housing Services (DHS), has taken
  the local Housing and Supportive                 Prior to program year 2001, the City    numerous actions to promote
  Services Network are noted in Part               of Hillsboro achieved a population      "resident initiatives" for tenants of
  1d Continuum of Care narrative.                  greater than 50,000, which defined it   public housing and related services
                                                   as a metropolitan city and made it      to other recipients of housing assis-
  In June 2008, the County and the                 eligible to receive Community Block     tance:
  cities of Hillsboro and Beaverton                Grant funds directly from HUD.
  completed the 2009-2012 HOME                     The City, however, opted to become      A Family Self-Sufficiency Occu-
  Intergovernmental Agreement which                a joint CDBG entitlement with           pancy Specialist promotes various
  went into affect July 1, 2009 through            Washington County, thereby remain-      self-sufficiency opportunities, in-
  June 30, 2012. Under the new agree-              ing in the Consortium.                  cluding linking participating house-
  ment, member options will be lim-                                                        holds to job training, education, and
  ited to two options.                             Under a CDBG operating agreement        participation in homeownership,
                                                   effective July 1, 2009 through June     among other activities.
  Option One allows the Representa-                30, 2012, OCD manages Hillsboro’s
  tive Member to administer all                    housing rehabilitation and public       Consistent with its policy on home-
  HOME funds on behalf of the City                 service funds. The City retains a       based occupations, the Housing Au-
  Member, including the selection of               portion of its grant to undertake a     thority permits public housing resi-
  projects with participation of the               project of its own choosing provided    dents to operate businesses out of
  City Member. The City of Hillsboro               that it complies with HUD national      their homes.

Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                    42
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

  Two Housing Authority rental assis-              sessments when needed. This en-           Antipoverty Strategy
  tance program participants currently             ables them to assess the risks from
  serve on the County’s nine-member                lead based paint and coordinate with      Estimates of poverty released in
  Housing Advisory Committee. One                  contractors trained to do lead hazard     March 2009 by the Oregon Eco-
  program participant also serves on               control work which in turn insures        nomic and Community Development
  the Housing Authority Board of Di-               our rehabilitation work is done using     Department show that Washington
  rectors.                                         lead safe work practices. Trained         County has the lowest rate of poverty
                                                   staff also monitor and inspect the        of any county in Oregon, however
  The County sent 20 children of as-               work of contractors to ensure com-        the rate has risen since 1999 from
  sisted families to Camp Rosenbaum                pliance.                                  7.1% to 8.6 %. This increase results
  this past summer.                                                                          in over 8,000 more people living in
                                                   Developing the capacity of contrac-       poverty (jumping from close to
  Lead Based Paint Hazards                         tors trained in lead safe work prac-      30,000 to over 38,000 county resi-
                                                   tices is a critical part of the plan to   dents currently living in poverty).
  Washington County’s entitlement                  address lead-based paint hazards          To help address the needs of this
  jurisdictions have taken a variety of            throughout Washington County.             population, Washington County’s
  steps to ensure compliance with the              Staff continues to encourage contrac-     2005-2010 Consolidated Plan in-
  federal lead-based paint regulations             tors working with the program to          cludes an updated antipoverty strat-
  that went into affect in September               access the training and by providing      egy.
  2000.                                            them with information for that.
                                                                                             Both Washington County and the
  Washington County’s Housing Re-                  The City of Beaverton, also a partici-    City of Beaverton have helped to
  habilitation Program continues to                pant in the regional group, works         establish and actively participate in
  ensure compliance with Federal                   very closely with the Portland De-        the local Continuum of Care process
  lead-based paint regulations on all              velopment Commission in imple-            for combating homelessness. They
  projects through a variety of ways.              menting a grant program to assist         also devote the maximum possible
  These include staff trained and certi-           homeowners to alleviate lead-based        level of CDBG resources to public
  fied as Risk Assessors, ongoing                  paint hazards from their homes. No        services activities, which tend to
  training, contractor capacity build-             households were referred to the Port-     benefit those residents in the lowest
  ing, and participation in a HUD                  land program, but lead based paint        income categories. The Department
  funded Lead Hazard Control Grant.                hazards were addressed for one            of Housing Services remains com-
                                                   through the Hope-4-Homes program          mitted to allocating local housing
  Washington County participates as a              during PY 2008.                           resources “as part of an overall strat-
  partner in a regional grant for con-                                                       egy to assist those in the community
  trolling lead based paint hazards.               Of the 285 public housing units           with the greatest need.”
  Through the county’s participation,              owned and managed by the Housing
  they are able to provide additional              Authority of Washington County,           Among the collaborative efforts cur-
  funding in the form of grants to                 105 were built before 1978. All have      rently under way to combat poverty
  households with children under the               been inspected for lead-based paint       in Washington County is the follow-
  age of six and under 80% of median               hazards. Although lead-based paint        ing:
  income. In FY 2008, one household                was spotted on exterior surfaces at
  (with two children) was completed                several single-family units and small      In partnership with neighboring
  through the lead hazard control                  apartment complexes, none of the             Multnomah County, Washington
  funded by the lead grant.                        unit interiors contained lead-based          County implements the Work-
                                                   paint. The Housing Authority has             force Investment Act through
  The Housing Rehabilitation staff                 completed lead-based paint abate-            WorkSource Centers, which coor-
  includes one trained and state certi-            ment in all units where it was neces-        dinate employment and training
  fied Risk Assessor to do risk assess-            sary to remove lead-based paint, thus        programs with social service sup-
  ments and paint samplings on prop-               eliminating the possibility of future        port. Located in different areas of
  erties where it is required. The Pro-            hazards.                                     the county, WorkSource Centers
  gram has also contracted with a pri-                                                          offer core services to all job seek-
  vate contractor to perform risk as-                                                           ers as well as pre-employment

Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                      43
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

      training, one-on-one job counsel-                Revolving Fund for Deferral or         ESG funds leveraged $53,538,277 in
      ing, and job placement to eligible               Payment of Permitting or Devel-        other private and other public re-
      persons. Each WorkSystems has                    opment Fees                            sources this past program year. This is
      representatives from the Employ-                                                        substantially higher than last year be-
                                                       Land Banking and Assembly
      ment Division, Vocational Reha-                                                         cause six large HOME projects are
      bilitation, Adult and Family Ser-                Housing Trust Fund                     reflected on this table.
      vices, and Portland Community                    Long-term Affordability Require-
      College.                                         ments                                  Washington County CDBG/HOME
                                                                                              Program
  Compliance with Planning Require-                    Reducing Barriers to Develop-
  ments                                                ment of Housing for Seniors and        HUD has acknowledged that any com-
                                                       People with Disabilities               munity receiving CDBG funds has
  The Washington County Office of                      Employer Assisted Housing              more community development and
  Community Development and De-                                                               affordable housing needs than it can
  partment of Housing Services both                  Faith-based and Other Non-Profit         possibly address with the funds re-
  regularly monitor activities under-                Organization Partnerships                ceived through an annual grant.
  taken with HUD funds. For further                Medium Priority                            Grantees must, therefore, evaluate
  discussion of these activities, see                                                         ways in which its resources can be
  Parts 1h “Self-evaluation”, Part 2a                  Density Bonuses                        stretched to maximize their impact.
  “CDBG”, and Part 3 “HOME.”                           Property Tax Abatements
                                                                                              The Office of Community Develop-
  The 2005-2010 Consolidated Plan                      Real Estate Transfer Tax               ment utilizes three tools to maximize
  was submitted to HUD in May 2005.                                                           its CDBG/HOME resources:
  HUD approved the Plan in July                    CDBG Compliance Activities – The
  2005.                                            City continues to monitor public ser-       Make financial assistance available
                                                   vice contracts for CDBG compliance            in the forms of loans instead of
  City of Beaverton                                and all public facilities/infrastructure      grants.
                                                   projects for Davis-Bacon and Re-
  Strategic Infrastructure Research                lated Acts compliance.                     The Housing Rehabilitation Loan pro-
  and Planning— the City is continu-                                                          gram recaptures significant funds each
  ing to identify and target priority              f. Leveraging Resources                    year in the form of program income.
  infrastructure needs in eligible block                                                      Per HUD regulations, program income
  grant neighborhoods. These targeted              The FY 2008 Action Plan for Wash-          can be added to the annual CDBG al-
  infrastructure needs are above and               ington County and the City of Bea-         location to increase resources. The
  beyond what the City’s Capital Im-               verton describes how the Washing-          amount can be used to figure the 15
  provement Plan can afford to fund.               ton County Consortium’s local enti-        percent and 20 percent caps for public
  Needs such as streets, sewer, water,             tlement programs go about using            services and administration.      This
  storm and sidewalks were all identi-             federal resources to leverage other        year, the CDBG loan program gener-
  fied in the prior year and preliminary           public and private resources, includ-      ated $118,933 in income. HOME
  plans to fund such projects are being            ing any required matching funds, to        loans generated $145,456.
  considered.                                      address priority needs identified in
                                                   the Consolidated Plan.                      Take steps to become aware of
  Affordable Housing Study – In De-                                                              what other agencies in the commu-
  cember 2003, the City Council di-                Tables 1-13 and 1-14 list, by project         nity are doing that will affect the
  rected staff to submit the Study re-             and activity type, the additional re-         need being addressed.
  port to Metro and to pursue the im-              sources that County and City-
  plementation of “high” and                       assisted projects leveraged to meet        Project applications ask the applicant
  “medium” priority strategies identi-             housing and community develop-             to name other agencies in Washington
  fied in the report:                              ment needs. Information is provided        County that are carrying out similar
  High Priority                                    only for those projects that were          activities. The purpose of the question
                                                   completed during the 2008 program          is to identify duplication of efforts as
      Public Education Efforts                     year. Altogether, CDBG, HOME and           well as promote joint efforts to
                                                                                              achieve common goals.
Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                       44
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                                                      Table 1-11
                                                           Washington County Consortium
                                                     Summary of Other Actions Proposed for PY 2008

         Action                                                                                                                             Actual
         Code                                                         Other Actions

                     Obstacles to Meeting Underserved Needs

                     LAND
          A1.1         Reserve, inventory, acquire, and/or facilitate the use of appropriate publicly owned, residentially zoned             
                        surplus properties for affordable housing opportunities, utilizing city, county, state, and federally owned
                        land.
          A1.2         Prepare preliminary site plans and acquire suitable vacant land for affordable housing as sites and financial         
                        resources become available, regardless of whether a specific developer or project has been identified.
          A1.3         Explore and encourage innovative methods of reducing land costs to the developer or occupant, and of                  
                        maintaining housing affordability over time, including community land trusts, deed restrictions, "silent"
                        second mortgages, and other mechanisms.


                     COMMUNITY ACCEPTANCE
          A2.1         Develop affordable housing that people want to live in; examine all proposed housing for standards of siting,         
                        design, construction, amenities, materials, and ongoing management that will assure excellence and long-
                        term compatibility with community goals and expectations.
          A2.2         Design and conduct community education and outreach on the need for affordable housing.                               
          A2.3         Maintain mediation services to facilitate solutions to neighborhood issues involving residents of affordable          
                        housing.
          A2.4         Provide complete and timely information to neighborhood residents and all interested parties to fully advise          
                        the public regarding proposed affordable housing developments; information and outreach shall, when
                        appropriate, include neighborhood meetings, site area advisory committees, design review workshops and
                        other means of communicating accurate and meaningful information to citizens.
          A2.5         Select locations and properties as sites for affordable housing that provide the greatest economic benefit, in        
                        terms of cost effectiveness to develop and finance, and a location convenient to transportation, job markets,
                        shopping, healthcare, and other essential services.
          A2.6         Assure that all sites selected for affordable housing are in full compliance with applicable federal, state, and      
                        local regulatory requirements, including environmental standards and comprehensive land use plans.
          A2.7         Develop affordable housing that is compatible with existing development in the immediate area in terms of             
                        such physical characteristics as size, density, and type of structure and materials.


                     CAPACITY BUILDING
          A3.1         Provide operating grants that support CHDOs.                                                                          

          A3.2           Link intermediaries with local non-profits to promote capacity building initiatives; Explore opportunities to       
                          use matching funds from national intermediaries to strengthen the capacity of local organizations.
          A3.3           Consider creating new CHDOs where existing CHDOs are not meeting identified community needs.

          A3.4           Dedicate the maximum allowable portion of HOME funds for CHDO operating costs and make CHDO set-                    
                          aside amounts available for project-specific technical assistance as well as housing production.
          A3.5           Link the corporate real estate industry with non-profits to explore available (and inexpensive) office space in
                          empty buildings.
          A3.6           Partner with faith organizations in the County to identify land for possible donation and/or join financial
                          ventures to develop housing.
          A3.7           Identify and provide technical assistance and resources to nonprofits to help with organizational                   
                          development, capacity building, housing planning, finance, development and other issues.
          A3.8           Identify and obtain financial resources for predevelopment costs, such as preliminary design, feasibility           
                          studies, consulting fees, environmental analysis and site control for affordable housing development.




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                                        45
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                                              Table 1-11 (continued)
                                                         Washington County Consortium
                                                   Summary of Other Actions Proposed for PY 2008

    Action                                                                                                                         Actual
    Code                                                          Other Actions

                FAIR HOUSING

                Housing
     A4.1          Review the location of existing low income housing relative to the elementary school areas.                      

     A4.2           Expand the efforts of health care via the provision of free health clinics in the County.                       

     A4.3           Take an active effort to meet “fair share” responsibility for the provision of housing in the less than 50%     
                     MFI and 30% MFI range.
     A4.4           Conduct a survey of both assisted and low-income market-based housing to determine whether a
                     disproportionate share of the housing stock is occupied by higher income residents.
     A4.5           Develop data on crime by neighborhood or elementary school areas to determine whether low income is
                     disproportionally sited in areas high crime areas.
     A4.6           Create a trust fund combined with a program of building inspections to improve Housing as a Last Resort
                     without eliminating the housing for the low-income population.
     A4.7           Undertake a study to determine the magnitude and timing of the conversion threat to mobile home parks of        
                     Washington County.
     A4.8           Undertake a Housing Needs Survey to determine, by municipality, the number of rental units that are
                     affordable for low-income large families.
     A4.9           Require that all housing developed with public money, in-kind assistance or other economic or technical
                     assistance from jurisdictions should comply with the accessibility standards of the American with
                     Disabilities Act.
     A4.10          Consider waivers or amortization of SDCs over time, waivers or reduction of application fees, waivers or        
                     reduction in infrastructure requirements or property tax reductions for low-income housing development in
                     local jurisdictions.
     A4.11          Review mechanisms for encouraging and maintaining home ownership for protected class including                  
                     homeownership in mobile home parks.


                Lead Based Paint
   A4.12           Institute a lead based paint inspection program for older housing (both renter and owner occupied) such that
                    housing could be inspected and problems corrected.


                Education and Outreach
     A4.13         Emphasize education for property owners, managers, Realtors, lenders, and tenants.                               

    A.4.14          Provide education on Fair Housing issues to social service providers.                                           

    A.4.15          Educate developers, builders, and architects about Fair Housing and accessibility.                              

    A.4.16          Local jurisdictions should review whether there are landlords that have policies of evicting the victims of
                     domestic violence.


                Homeless
    A.4.17        Local jurisdictions should work with non-profit organizations and others to provide the necessary shelter and     
                   ensure that other gaps in the continuum of care are repaired.
    A.4.18        Regional shelter providers should begin a dialog with their counterparts in other jurisdictions to consider a     
                   revision to the policies, which allow them to refuse placement of domestic violence victims that are
                   accompanied by children including boys over the age of 12.




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                               46
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                                                 Table 1-11 (continued)
                                                            Washington County Consortium
                                                      Summary of Other Actions Proposed for PY 2008

         Action                                                                                                                             Actual
         Code                                                          Other Actions

                     Discrimination
         A.4.19          Adopt ordinances prohibiting discrimination based on the receipt of federal subsidy payments against
                          otherwise qualified applicants for housing.
         A.4.20          Jurisdictions should adopt an ordinance requiring that all housing developed with public money comply with
                          the Limited English Proficiency Plan as adopted by the Department of Housing Services.
         A.4.21          Develop a standard set of rental documents for all publicly owned, managed, or operated housing and these
                          documents should be available in the language of the major linguistically isolated populations.     These
                          should also be marketed to private landlords.
         A.4.22          Programs that receive public assistance should be required to ensure that their programs are accessible to          
                          linguistically isolated populations under reasonable conditions.


                     Other
          A4.23         Maintain strong fair housing education and outreach programs targeting renters and property managers,                
                         including educating managers and owners about rules relating to children; encourage proper design in
                         apartments to accommodate normal childhood activity; educate property owners about issues related to
                         charging premium rent.
          A4.24         Encourage or require the use of alternative formats, reasonable accommodation and affirmative fair housing           
                         marketing practices.
          A4.25         Work to ensure that public transportation does not act as an impediment to fair housing choice in the County
                         with special emphasis on the disabled and families with children.
          A4.26         Strengthen enforcement efforts.                                                                                      

          A4.27          Develop model tenant application form as a pilot project, providing for waivers of terms under identified
                          circumstances, the use of limited cosigners, and the possibility of a central guarantee fund to address upfront
                          risks.
          A4.28          Tie fair housing requirements to funding of affordable housing.

          A4.29          Market the Section 8 Program to owners outside of areas of poverty/minority concentration; Counsel
                          Section 8 tenants as to the location of units outside areas of poverty/minority concentrations and assist them
                          locate these units.
          A4.30          Local jurisdictions should review the membership on their appointive boards and commissions and take the
                          necessary measures to ensure that if possible, membership is developed that fairly reflects the protected class
                          composition of the community overall.


                     Foster and Maintain Affordable Housing

                     LOW-INCOME RENTERS
          B1.1         Redirect revenues from the County’s existing Real Estate Transfer Tax to supporting housing projects
                        serving households with 0-30% MFI.
          B1.2         Provide flexible financing terms for HOME and CDBG projects to increase the feasibility of projects                   
                        serving those at less than 50% of MFI.
          B1.3         Select locations and properties, as sites for affordable housing that are cost-effective and provide the greatest     
                        community benefit.
          B1.4         Provide assistance for the preparation of preliminary site plans and acquire suitable vacant land for                 
                        affordable housing as sites and financial resources become available.
          B1.5         Survey both assisted and low-income market-based housing to determine the income levels of the residents.

          B1.6           Adopt long term affordability requirements as a condition for use of federal, state, and local funds used for       
                          affordable housing projects.
          B1.7           Develop incentives or subsidies to projects providing accessibility repairs of owner-occupied housing.              




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                                        47
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                                                    Table 1-11 (continued)
                                                               Washington County Consortium
                                                         Summary of Other Actions Proposed for PY 2008

         Action                                                                                                                         Actual
         Code                                                          Other Actions
          B1.8           Develop incentives or subsidies to support the acquisition and rehabilitation of existing affordable rental     
                          projects, especially those financed under USDA Rural Development and HUD Multi-Family programs that
                          preserve rental assistance and the acquisition of Tax Credit and Bond financed housing units.
          B1.9           Inventory affordable and/or expiring use properties and collaborate with housing partners to acquire and        
                          preserve that stock.
          B1.10          Support rehabilitation of existing multi-family projects with long-term affordability requirements.             

          B1.11          Maintain the supply of manufactured homes as an affordable housing option by exploring purchase or              
                          financing options for non-profits, including land trusts.
          B1.12          Provide incentives for life skills training for potential and existing tenants in special needs housing.        

          B1.13          Encourage development of mixed-income rental housing with units at market and below market rents to             
                          encourage diversity.
          B1.14          Provide in-kind planning and/or assistance for housing projects serving households with 0-30% MFI.              


                     LOW- AND MODERATE INCOME HOMEOWNERS
          B2.1         Continue and increase financial and program resources devoted to home rehabilitation and weatherization           
                        for lower-income homeowners.
          B2.2         Continue to expand marketing of low-income housing rehabilitation programs, targeting census tracts and           
                        neighborhoods with higher concentrations of substandard and/or older homes.
          B2.3         Provide housing rehabilitation assistance to larger families seeking to make additions to overcrowded             
                        housing.
          B2.4         Continue and increase resources available for mortgage default counseling to enable families to remain in         
                        their homes.


                     HOMEOWNERSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
          B3.1        Establish a program to increase homeownership among underrepresented populations.                                  

          B3.2           Support a first time homebuyer program that assists low and moderate income households to secure                
                          affordable mortgages.
          B3.3           Use public funds to acquire land to enable self-help groups to expand homeownership options.                    

          B3.4           Support pre/post purchase housing counseling and foreclosure prevention programs.                               

          B3.5           Support a first-time homebuyer program that assists income-qualified applicants with downpayment                
                          assistance.
          B3.6           Identify and seek non-County resources to expand first-time homeownership opportunities.                        

          B3.6           Support homeownership education efforts with similar efforts by local lenders and non-profit groups.            

          B3.7           Identify, facilitate and obtain financial and technical resources to implement appropriate demonstration
                          programs in the design, planning and construction of affordable homeownership units and subdivisions.
          B3.8           Encourage private employers to establish first-time homebuyers programs.                                        




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                                    48
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                                                Table 1-11 (continued)
                                                           Washington County Consortium
                                                     Summary of Other Actions Proposed for PY 2008

         Action                                                                                                                         Actual
         Code                                                         Other Actions

                     HOMELESSNESS
          B4.1         Integrate federal housing program resources managed within the County that lead to permanent housing.             

          B4.2           Support housing projects that help homeless households transition into permanent housing.                       

          B4.3           Support housing and social service provider activities that lead to the creation of housing options for the     
                          homeless.
          B4.4           Support programs that provide emergency shelter and services for the homeless, including increasing the         
                          number of shelter beds for single people.
          B4.5           Create a winter shelter network through links with the faith community.                                         

          B4.6           Support the regional program, Bridges to Housing, seeking to expand permanent housing opportunities for         
                          homeless families or families at risk of becoming homeless.
          B4.7           Develop and implement Severe Weather Action Plan.                                                               

          B4.8           Plan and implement a year-round, mobile homeless camp outreach program.                                         

          B4.9           Construct low demand entry points within the Safe Haven model in order to engage homeless clients               
                          immediately.
          B4.10          Conduct ongoing discharge planning to ensure client placement from mental health hospitals, jails, and          
                          treatment programs into appropriate housing environments.


                     ELDERLY / FRAIL ELDERLY
          B5.1         Develop incentives or subsidies to projects targeting elderly and physically disabled households in rental        
                        housing projects.
          B5.2         Develop additional housing for the elderly that offers an integrated array of services and is conveniently        
                        located near public transportation.
          B5.3         Support coordinated programs that integrate housing facility inspections and housing rehabilitation services.     

          B5.4           Assist development partners in efforts to secure 202 grants.

          B5.5           Continue to support real-property tax-deferral opportunities for elderly homeowners.

          B5.6           Develop and implement public education programs to inform people about specific housing needs of the            
                          elderly such as asset conversion, reverse annuity mortgages, housing rehabilitation and weatherization, and
                          shared housing.


                     PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES
          B6.1         Provide incentives to projects that provide more than the minimum number of fully accessible housing units.

          B6.2           Provide incentives to projects targeting chronically mentally ill and developmentally disabled person in
                          rental housing projects.
          B6.3           Evaluate the need for design, and implement innovative, joint housings and services projects appropriate to
                          individual population groups.
          B6.4           Assist development partners in efforts to secure 811 grants.                                                    

          B6.5           Continue to work closely with state treatment facilities when transitioning person with mental or
                          developmental disabilities from institutional settings to community living environments.
          B6.6           Address the housing needs of people who are “dually diagnosed.”                                                 




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                                    49
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                                            Table 1-11 (continued)
                                                       Washington County Consortium
                                                 Summary of Other Actions Proposed for PY 2008

       Action                                                                                                                        Actual
       Code                                                       Other Actions

                  Public Policy Barriers to Affordable Housing

                  REGULATORY ACTIONS
        C1.1        Advocate for fee subsidies to pay for system development charges (SDCs), building permits, and other              
                     planning and development fees; reduce SDCs for housing projects serving households with 0-30% MFI.
        C1.2        Promote the use of design modifications and changes to land use regulations and standards to promote
                     affordable housing.
        C1.3        Encourage the appropriate, permitted use of duplex, attached, and/or specialized housing designs and types –
                     particularly as infill in existing neighborhoods – through examination of regulatory requirements, leadership
                     in design innovations, and community information and education.
        C1.4        Assist non-profits and other developers of affordable housing in meeting state and local permitting               
                     requirements (e.g. by using designated staff to assist affordable housing developers with permitting and
                     application processes.
        C1.5        Advocate for the ability to use inclusionary zoning programs in the development of affordable housing.            

        C1.6          Increase state tax credit awards to Washington County by securing local match dollars.

        C1.7          Reduce parking requirements for housing projects serving households with 0-30% MFI, particularly for
                       those targeted to people with special needs.
        C1.8          Support efforts to fully capitalize the Community Housing Fund.                                                 


                  Institutional Structure

                  The Office of Community Development serves as the lead agency for the Washington County HOME
                  Consortium and for the preparation of Consolidated Plan. The Department of Housing Services maintains overall
                  responsibility for administering Housing Authority programs and Continuum of Care submissions. Among
                  related core activities are the following:

         D1           Provide loans to nonprofit organizations and for-profit developers to enable them to acquire and rehab, or      
                       build new, affordable housing.
         D2           Allocate and develop grant resources for providers of housing and services to the homeless.                     

         D3           Acquire and maintain housing to help preserve an affordable rental stock for low-income residents.              

         D4           Issue housing revenue bonds to finance the construction or purchase of multifamily developments for low-        
                       income renters.
         D5           Help assisted tenants make the transition to non-subsidized housing.                                            

         D6           The seven-member Housing Authority Board of Directors (five elected Commissioners and two appointed             
                       members) serves as the governing board of the Housing Authority of Washington County. The Board also
                       appoints a nine-member Housing Advisory Committee representing a broad spectrum of county residents –
                       two of whom receive housing assistance – to advise DHS and the Housing Authority on housing policies.




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                                 50
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                                           Table 1-11 (continued)
                                                      Washington County Consortium
                                                Summary of Other Actions Proposed for PY 2008
    Action                                                                                                                           Actual
    Code                                                          Other Actions
     D7             The Office of Community Development administers the County's CDBG Program, as described in the                    
                     current Consolidated Plan. The City of Hillsboro attained CDBG entitlement status in PY 2000, but has
                     continued to participate in the urban county CDBG consortium during the current plan period. The City of
                     Beaverton has administered an independent CDBG entitlement program since 1994.
      D8            Both the Office of Community Development and the City of Beaverton assist a variety of affordable housing         
                     activities, most notably single-family rehab loan programs for low- and moderate-income homeowners.
      D9            A variety of governmental agencies, nonprofit corporations, and private for-profit developers are actively        
                     involved with Washington County and local cities in creating housing opportunities for low-income
                     residents. The county’s four nonprofit community housing development organizations (CHDOs)—
                     Community Partners for Affordable Housing, Housing Development Corporation, Tualatin Valley Housing
                     Partners, and Willamette West Habitat for Humanity —are especially active partners in affordable housing
                     development. Even with the participation of many effective and dedicated organizations, however, there is
                     clearly a need to expand the capacity of current or would-be participants, as well as to better inform
                     Washington County's citizens of what is happening in housing.


                Coordination

                The best efforts of a wide-ranging network of community partners will be required to achieve the objectives of
                this Consolidated Plan. Indeed, the urgency and complexity of housing and community development needs
                mandate continued and continuous improvement in the coordination of financial resources, programs,
                organizations, and policies—both locally and throughout the region. There are many local examples of ongoing
                efforts to enhance coordination, both between housing and service providers, and among units of local
                government:

      E1            Washington County and the cities of Beaverton and Hillsboro work in partnership on housing issues and             
                     programs through the Washington County HOME Consortium. County and city staff also work together to
                     coordinate consolidated planning submissions and program activities.
      E2            Washington County, the cities of Beaverton and Hillsboro, and the nonprofit Community Partners for                
                     Affordable Housing actively participate on the Metro regional government’s Affordable Housing Technical
                     Advisory Committee (H-TAC). The committee—which includes representatives from a variety of regional
                     housing stakeholders, the State of Oregon, and HUD—has been delegated the responsibility for making
                     recommendations toward the establishment of regional “fair share” requirements to promote the balanced
                     development of affordable housing region-wide.
      E3            The Housing Advocacy Group is a coalition of housing providers and developers but also includes social            
                     service agencies, consumers, and industry affiliates such as lenders/founders. Its mission is to promote
                     awareness of the need for affordable housing and collectively advocate for additional resources at the local,
                     state and federal level.
      E4            The County’s Housing and Supportive Services Network (Continuum of Care planning process) strives to              
                     help coordinate the local delivery of housing and supportive services for the homeless. The network has
                     become a vital source of technical support and has provided numerous opportunities for information and
                     resource sharing, problem-solving, and strategic planning. The network has promoted a focus on needs
                     across populations, allowing participants to consider and address common issues. Local housing and
                     community development projects frequently benefit from joint funding or coordinated investments from
                     multiple sources.




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                                 51
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                                                Table 1-11 (continued)
                                                           Washington County Consortium
                                                     Summary of Other Actions Proposed for PY 2008

         Action                                                                                                                            Actual
         Code                                                         Other Actions

                     Public Housing Strategy

                     PUBLIC HOUSING AGENCY (PHA) PLANS
                     The Quality Housing and Work Responsibility Act of 1998 requires that each public housing agency develop its
                     own five-year and annual plans. The five-year plan describes the agency’s mission for serving the needs of low-
                     income families in the jurisdiction as well as long-range goals and objectives for achieving this mission. The
                     annual plan contains a housing needs statement in addition to policies, rules, requirements, and other information
                     concerning the agency’s operations, programs, and services. The annual plan must be developed in consultation
                     with residents of assisted housing and be consistent with the jurisdiction’s Consolidated Plan.

           F1.1          Apply for special-purpose vouchers targeted to the elderly.                                                        

           F1.2          Provide ranking preferences to elderly/disabled families on a fixed income.                                        

           F1.3          Constructed needed modifications for public housing based on the Section 504 Needs Assessment for Public           
                          Housing.
           F1.4          Apply for special-purpose vouchers targeted to families with disabilities.                                         

           F1.5          Provide ranking preference to disabled homeless applicants.                                                        

           F1.6          Reduce public housing vacancies and apply for additional vouchers.                                                 

           F1.7          Employ effective maintenance and management policies to minimize the number of public housing units                
                          off-line.
           F1.8          Reduce turnover time for vacated public housing units.                                                             

           F1.9          Reduce time to renovate public housing units.                                                                      

          F1.10          Market the Section 8 program to owners outside of areas of poverty/minority concentrations.                        

          F1.11          Counsel Section 8 tenants as to location of units outside of areas of poverty or minority concentrations and       
                          assist them to locate those units.
          F1.12          Maintain or increase Section 8 lease-up rates by marketing the program to owners, particularly those outside       
                          of areas of minority and poverty concentrations.
          F1.13          Employ admissions preferences for publicly assisted housing aimed at families with economic hardships.             

          F1.14          Adopt rent polices to support t and encourage work.


                     RESIDENT INITIATIVES

                     As the public housing agency for all incorporated cities and Washington County, the Department of Housing
                     Services manages a variety of programs and services aimed toward encouraging self-sufficiency and resident
                     empowerment. Efforts to promote and enable economic independence, home ownership, and participatory
                     management will continue to be an integral part of the department's programs and activities over the period of this
                     plan. Specific ongoing actions to promote "resident initiatives" for tenants of public housing and other recipients
                     of housing assistance include the following:

           F2.1          A Resident Initiatives/Family Self-sufficiency Coordinator oversees efforts to involve public housing              
                          residents in the management of their units, coordinate the provision of job-training opportunities, and
                          encourage participation in homeownership, among other activities.




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                                       52
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                                               Table 1-11 (continued)
                                                          Washington County Consortium
                                                    Summary of Other Actions Proposed for PY 2008

         Action                                                                                                                           Actual
         Code                                                           Other Actions
          F2.2          The award-winning PODER program will continue to offer English-as-a-second-language (ESL) training                 
                         for Spanish-speaking parents. The program involves the entire family in language skills, tutoring for school
                         age children, and employment skills training.
           F2.3         A variety of programs and services, including the Housing Authority of Portland's annual Camp Rosenbaum            
                         program and day camps through the Boys and Girls Club, will remain an integral part of the Housing
                         Authority’s anti-drug initiatives.
           F2.4         A group or residents has formed and maintains a neighborhood watch program, in cooperation with the
                         Department of Housing Services and the local police department.
           F2.5         Consistent with its policy on home occupations, the Housing Authority will continue to permit public
                         housing residents to operate businesses out of their homes.
           F2.6         DHS will continue to undertake new homeownership projects in the coming years and offer appropriate                
                         (e.g., lease/option) opportunities to assisted housing residents.
           F2.7         Mediation services are provided to clients, landlords, and neighbors through a partnership with Beaverton
                         Mediation.
           F2.8         DHS will continue to encourage housing residents to participate in its Family Self-sufficiency program.            

           F2.9         The Housing Advisory Committee, a nine-member policy board appointed by the Board of County                        
                         Commissioners, includes two residents of assisted housing. A separate all-resident advisory board is also
                         being formed.
          F2.10         The Board of Commissioners for the Housing Authority has been expanded from five to seven members and              
                         includes one assisted resident.


                     Lead-Based Paint Hazards
           G1           See also Fair Housing Lead Based Paint recommendation

           G2           The Housing Authority of Washington County abates or encapsulates lead-based paint hazards as part of its          
                         ongoing public housing modernization efforts. The Housing Authority also continues to remodel these units
                         to remove all lead-based paint that was previously abated or encapsulated, thus eliminating the possibility of
                         future hazards.
           G3           Washington County and the City of Beaverton implemented new federal lead-based paint regulations, which            
                         took effect in September 2000. These regulatory changes require practical actions to be taken in housing that
                         receives federal funds to help reduce the risk of lead poisoning.


                     ANTI-POVERTY STRATEGY
           H1          Maximize the production of units for households with 0-50% of MFI.                                                  

           H2           Provide flexible financing terms for HOME and CDBG projects to increase the feasibility of projects                
                         serving those at less than 50% of median income.
           H3           Continue to provide resources to rehabilitation and weatherization programs for low and moderate-                  
                         income homeowners
           H4           Continue to provide the maximum amount available under the federally funded public service and public              
                         housing assistance programs.
           H5           Evaluate projects on the basis of their ability to foster self-sufficiency when allocating resources for           
                         community-based housing and related public services.
           H6           Support ESL and literacy programs to support educational attainment programs and increase job readiness.           

           H7           Offer employment education programs to help residents obtain and retain jobs; offer job education and life         
                         skills training to low income adults.
           H8           Continue to support existing planning and communication networks such as the Housing and Supportive                
                         Services Network.




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                                      53
   Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                                             Table 1–12
                                                         Washington County
                                                             Consortium
                                            List of Other Actions Undertaken in PY 2008
The projects listed below are associated with the actions presented in Table 1–11 by the use of specific action codes.

   Action                                            A4.17       Housing & Supportive Svcs Network    B4.2      Community Action
   Code        Project                                                                                B4.2      Safe Haven
   OBSTACLES TO MEETING                                                                               B4.2      Bridges to Housing
                                                     A4.17       Homeless Shelter/Service Providers
   UNDERSERVED NEEDS                                                                                  B4.3      Emergency Shelter Grant Program
                                                     A4.17       Department of Housing Services
                                                                                                      B4.3      County Safety Levy
   Land                                              A4.17       Department of Housing Services       B4.3      Bridging the Gap Fund
   A1.1     TVHP/Tri-Met Partnership                 A4.18       DVRC                                 B4.4      CDBG Public Services
   A1.1     County Surplus Land                      A4.18       Rafael House                         B4.4      Boys and Girls Aid Youth Shelter
   A1.2     TVHP Merlo Station I and II              A4.23       Fair Housing Council of Oregon       B4.4      County Shelter Providers
   A1.2     CPAH Hilltop Vista                       A4.24       CHDOs                                B4.4      Severe Weather Plan
   A1.3     Consolidated Planning                    A4.25       CHDOs                                B4.5      Severe Weather Plan
   A1.3     HOME Restrictive Covenants               A4.26       Fair Housing Council of Oregon       B4.6      Office of Community Development
   Community Acceptance                              A4.26       BOLI                                 B4.7      HSSN/DHS
   A2.1     HOME Program                             A4.27       Ready to Rent                        B4.7      Housing & Support Services Netw
   A2.1     OR Housing & Community Services          A4.30       Local Governments                    B4.8      PATH Outreach Worker
   A2.2     Housing Advocacy Group                                                                    B4.9      Luke-Dorf
   A2.2     Housing & Supportive Svcs Network        FOSTER AND MAINTAIN AFFORDABLE                   B4.10     Housing & Supportive Svsc Network
   A2.3     Beaverton Mediation Program              HOUSING                                          Elderly/Frail Elderly
   A2.4     Development Review                                                                        B5.1     Community Partners for Afford Hsg
   A2.4     Action Plan                              Low Income Renters                               B5.2     Community Partners for Afford Hsg
   A2.5     TVHP Merlo Station 1 and II              B1.2     HOME Program                            B5.3     Adapt-a-Home
   A2.5     HOME Program                             B1.3     TVHP Merlo Station (I and II)           B5.6     Open Door Counseling Center
   A2.6     HOME Program                             B1.4     CHDO Pre-development                    B5.6     Community Action
   A2.7     HOME Program                             B1.4     CHDOs                                   B5.6     Cable Access Public Notices
   Capacity Building                                 B1.4     Community Housing Fund                  Persons with Disabilities
   A3.1     CHDO Operating Grants                    B1.4     Enterprise Community Partners           B6.4     Sequoia/OCD
   A3.1     Enterprise Community Partners            B1.6     HOME Program                            B6.6     Safe Haven
   A3.2     Enterprise Community Partners            B1.7     HARDE                                   B6.6     Hillsboro Graduated Living
   A3.4     HOME Program                             B1.7     Adapt-a-Home
   A3.6     Inter-Religious Action Network           B1.8     HOME Program                            PUBLIC POLICY BARRIERS TO
   A3.6     Faith Forums                             B1.8     Community Housing Fund                  AFFORDABLE HOUSING
   A3.7     Enterprise Community Partners            B1.9     OHCS
   A3.7     Neighborhood Partnership Fund            B1.11    County/State/Cities                     Regulatory Barriers
   A3.7     TACS                                     B1.12    Tualatin Valley Housing Partners        C1.1       City of Tigard
   A3.8     HOME CHDO Pre-development                B1.12    Families for Independent Living         C1.1       City of Beaverton
   A3.8     Community Housing Fund                   Low/Mod Income Homeowners                        C1.1       Housing Advocacy Group
   A3.8     Enterprise Community Partners            B2.1     County Housing Rehab Program            C1.4       City of Beaverton
   A4.1     Consolidated Planning                    B2.1     City Housing Rehab Programs             C1.5       Statewide Housing Alliance
   A4.2     Essential Health Clinic                  B2.1     Mend-a-Home/Adapt-a-Home                C1.6       HOME Program
   A4.2     Virginia Garcia Health Clinic            B2.1     Community Action                        C1.8       Community Housing Fund
   A4.2     Beaverton Neighborhood Assoc             B2.1     HARDE                                   C1.8       County Budget Process
            Committees                               B2.2     City of Beaverton                       C1.8       City of Hillsboro
   A4.3     HOME Program/CHDOs                       B2.4     Open Door Counseling Center             C1.8       City of Beaverton
   A4.3     Bridges to Housing                       Homeownership Opportunities                      Institutional Structure
   A4.3     Adapt-a-Home/Mend-a-Home                 B3.1     American Dream Downpayment              D1         HOME Program
   Fair Housing                                      B3.1     Section 8 Homeownership                 D2         Emergency Shelter Grant Program
   A4.10    City of Tigard                           B3.1     Willamette West Habitat                 D2         Continuum of Care Application
   A4.10    City of Beaverton                        B3.2     American Dream Downpayment              D5         Ready to Rent
   A4.10    Assessment and Taxation                  B3.3     Willamette West Habitat Projects        D5         CHDOs
   A4.11    Mend-a-Home                              B3.4     Open Door Counseling                    D6         Housing Authority Board
   A4.13    Ready to Rent                            B3.4     Portland Housing Center                 D7         Office of Community Development
   A4.13    Beaverton Mediation Program              B3.5     American Dream Downpayment              D8         Office of Community Development
   A4.13    Open Door Counseling                     B3.5     Portland Housing Center                 D8         City of Beaverton
   A4.13    Portland Housing Center                  B3.6     Open Door Counseling Center             Coordination
   A4.14    Fair Housing Council of Oregon           B3.6     Portland Housing Center                 E1         HOME Consortium
   A4.15    HOME Program                             B3.8     Portland housing Center                 E4         Housing & Supportive Svsc Network
   A4.15    Fair Housing Council of Oregon           Homelessness
   A.4.15 Design and Construction Resource           B4.1     HOME program
            Center (www.fairhousingfirst.org)        B4.2     HopeSpring


 Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
 Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                                  54
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

    PUBLIC HOUSING STRATEGY

    Public Housing Agency Plans
    F1.1-F1.14 Housing Authority
    F2.1-F2.10 Housing Authority
    F2.7          Beaverton Mediation Program
    Lead-Based Paint Hazards
    G2        Housing Authority
    G3        Office of Community Development
    G3        City of Beaverton
    ANTI-POVERTY STRATEGY
    H1        HOME Program
    H2        HOME/CDBG Program
    H3        CDBG Program
    H3        Weatherization Programs
    H3        Rebuilding Together
    H4        County and City CDBG
    H5        CDBG Programs
    H6        OCDC Family Literacy
    H6        Community Corrections Literacy
    H6        PODER
    H6        PCC Basic Skills
    H7        CHDOs
    H8        Department of Housing Services




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)   55
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

    Promote the pledge of matching                 ties. Both the ad and the public no-     ings are the priority housing and
      funds to CDBG projects.                        tice highlighted that the plan was       non-housing (community develop-
                                                     available on line or in hard copy for-   ment) needs as identified in the Con-
   Applications ask project applicants to            mat.                                     solidated Plan.
   identify sources of match for their
   projects. While match is not a HUD                A public hearing on the public com-      Housing Needs
   requirement under the CDBG Pro-                   ment draft as well as to hear citizen
   gram, it is Washington County’s pol-              views on housing and community           Low Income Renters
   icy to award more rating points for               development will be held on Thurs-
   the higher amount of match pledged                day, October 8th at 7:00 p.m. in         The Consortium has exceeded the
   to a project.                                     Hillsboro at Washington County           projected goals by a significant mar-
                                                     Public Services Building cafeteria,      gin. This fourth year of the cycle
   This year, Washington County’s                    155 North First Avenue.                  saw the completion of five very large
   completed CDBG projects leveraged                                                          low income rental projects resulting
   over $4 million, or 45% of the project            h. Self-evaluation                       in 470 units of affordable housing
   cost, from other public and private                                                        being built or rehabilitated. These
   sources.                                          Washington County and the City of        larger projects helped to drive up the
                                                     Beaverton, in an effort to more thor-    number of completed units. In addi-
   City of Beaverton CDBG Program                    oughly reflect progress being made       tion, increases in the weatherization
                                                     on projected five-year goals, have       programs helped to increase the
   The City leveraged approximately;                 created a new section that will ad-      numbers in this category. Original
   $160,487 in State Revenue Sharing                 dress areas where insufficient pro-      low projects are described below.
   funds to supplement the $90,599.70                gress is being made or where the
   in CDBG public service funds; and                 jurisdictions have exceed projections    Owner-occupied Housing Rehab
   $2,812,809 in leveraged funds from                by such a large margin so as to ques-    Programs
   the ten CDBG funded public ser-                   tion the original proposed numbers.
   vices. The State Revenue Sharing                  By looking at the accomplishments        Owner-occupied housing rehab pro-
   funds were leveraged to fund addi-                from both angles, County and City        grams reflect that accomplishments
   tional 20 public service projects.                staff can provide some insight into      at the end of the fourth year are
                                                     where the programs are making an         nearly triple what were projected.
   The Beaverton Downtown Storefront                 impact and where possible strategic      One reason for this was low projec-
   Improvement Program provides up to                changes may be necessary.                tions that originally included only
   $20,000 in matching funds for quali-                                                       housing rehab numbers (not weather-
   fying façade improvement projects in              Analysis of Washington County/City       ization accomplishments). In addi-
   the designated improvement area.                  of Beaverton 2005-2010 Consoli-          tion, the weatherization program has
   The five completed projects lever-                dated Plan Goals and Achievements        served greater numbers than has
   aged the $48,588 in CDBG grants                   based on Performance Measure-            been seen in prior five-year cycles.
   with $106,812 in private funds. For a             ments                                    In the next Consolidated Planning
   listing of leveraged funds by project                                                      process, weatherization numbers will
   type and activity, please refer to Ta-            The following narrative provides an      be included and a five-year annual
   ble 1-13.                                         explanation of the table beginning on    average will be used as a starting
                                                     page 59. Unless otherwise stated,        point in projecting for 2010-2015.
   g. Citizen Comments                               comments are made on behalf of
                                                     both jurisdictions. If the Consor-       Current Consolidated Planning ef-
   A draft version of this CAPER report              tium is meeting goals, no further ex-    forts are looking at 2005-2010 data
   was made available for public review              planation will be provided. An ex-       and making every effort to more re-
   and comment for the 15-day period                 planation will be provided if the        alistically project numbers for the
   beginning September 24 and ending                 Consortium is not meeting goals or       2010-2015 cycle.
   October 8, 2009. The notice ran in                where the Consortium has exceeded
   The Oregonian and the Beaverton                   the original goal by a significant       Prevention and Essential Services
   Valley Times. In addition, about 400              margin (defined as by more than
   notices were mailed to interested par-            30%). The following sections head-       The Consortium has far exceeded the

Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                     56
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                                       Table 1-13
                                             Washington County consortium
                                  Leveraged Resources for Projects Completed in PY 2008




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                             57
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                                  Table 1-14
                                        Washington County Consortium
                       Summary of Leveraged Resources for All Projects Competed in PY 2008
                                                     Federal Entitlement Resources                   Other Public       Private
                                            CDBG Co.        CDBG City       ESG          HOME         Resources       Resources Total Resources
  Total Hom eless Program s                   $300,187        $46,000       $88,662             $0      $3,199,196      $502,532      $4,136,577
  Total Housing Program s                       $391,567        $508,772          $0 $4,532,819         $16,203,962   $30,487,841     $52,124,961
  Total Infrastructure Program s              $1,575,142              $0          $0            $0        $732,505        $78,000      $2,385,647
  Total Public Facility Projects                $906,679              $0          $0            $0         $181,196       $79,606      $1,167,481
  Total Public Service Projects                 $180,815         $44,600          $0            $0       $1,203,448      $763,179      $2,192,042
  Total Econ. Developm ent Projects                    $0        $82,946          $0            $0               $0      $106,812        $189,758
                           All Projects     $3,354,390      $682,318       $88,662     $4,532,819    $21,520,307      $32,017,969   $62,196,466
       % of Leveraging by Resource              5%               1%          0%           7%             35%             51%           100%


  Total Public Resources:                            49%
  Total Private Resources:                           51%

  five-year projections in this category.          Therefore, we do not feel that these              2006, 2007 and 2009 for a 48-unit sen-
  Almost without exception, every                  statistics reflect low achievement;               ior housing project. The project was
  year of this cycle has seen most of              rather the statistics, or lack thereof,           awarded tax credits in the spring of
  the public services funding assisting            reflect a poorly stated (and redun-               2009. Project completion is estimated
  projects that serve the homeless and             dant) need in the original Consoli-               to be in 2011. However, should that
  those at risk of homelessness reflect-           dated Plan. As Washington County                  happen, those units will not be re-
  ing the growing awareness to the                 and the City of Beaverton work to-                flected in this Consolidated Plan year
  County’s homeless population.                    gether on the 2010-2015 Consoli-                  despite best efforts by the Agency.
                                                   dated Plan, creating goals and objec-             Because of the competitive process for
  Emergency Shelter and Permanent                  tives that more directly tie in to per-           HOME dollars, staff cannot predict the
  Supportive Housing                               formance measurement is a high pri-               types of projects that will come in for
                                                   ority.                                            funding. Another project, sponsored
  The Consortium is not meeting goals                                                                by Sequoia Mental Health Services,
  under this category but in part this is          Other Special Needs                               has received Section 811 funding and
  because many of the accomplish-                                                                    will apply for 2010 HOME and CDBG
  ments are reported under other cate-             The Consortium is not meeting five-               funding. If this project moves for-
  gories. Projects that serve needs un-            year goals under this category. This              ward, the 15-units will house the men-
  der emergency shelter are reported               is a medium priority need so staff                tally-ill but they are also persons with
  under “Prevention and Essential Ser-             could have opted to leave it off the              disabilities and substance abuse issues.
  vices.” The ESG and CDBG fund-                   chart. However, because it met a                  So, the units may end up being
  ing that supports service programs               type of housing not addressed else-               counted under another priority need.
  produce significant accomplishment               where, it was decided to reflect it on
  numbers but we report them under                 the chart so that any accomplish-                 Non-Housing Needs
  “Prevention and Essential Services.”             ments could be reflected there. This
  We believe that that category more               category covers other special needs               PUBLIC FACILITIES
  accurately reflects the types of ser-            not covered elsewhere. To date, no
  vices provided. Also, Permanent                  housing projects have been com-                   Neighborhood Facilities
  Supportive Housing units are also                pleted serving a special needs popu-
  reported elsewhere. For example,                 lation. An application for HOME                   Washington County does not typically
  both Safe Haven and Hillsboro                    funding by Community Partners for                 fund neighborhood (area benefit) fa-
  Graduated Independent Living were                Affordable Housing was submitted                  cilities. Typically, facilities fall under
  projects that could be considered                in prior years but site control was a             the limited clientele national objective.
  supportive housing but under CDBG                major barrier for the agency. The                 Because of this, the Consortium
  they are considered Public Facilities.           Agency received HOME funding in                   should probably not have projected


Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                                 58
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)   59
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                             Table 1-15 (continued)
                                Analysis of Washington County/City of Beaverton
                       2005-2010 Consolidated Plan and Action Plan Objectives for PY 2008




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                               60
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

  two facilities. The goal will not be             Handicapped Centers                     variables come into play that affect
  met by the end of year five.                                                             the numbers: reduced federal fund-
                                                   The Consortium received a number        ing, reduced private and other public
  Park Facilities                                  of applications for group homes in      funding, new funding sources that
                                                   this cycle and most of the submittals   may be dedicated for specific pro-
  The Consortium will not meet five-               were successful.                        jects, agency capacity, etc.
  year goals for this category. A final
  park project will be completed in PY             Childcare Centers                       INFRASTRUCTURE
  2009 bringing the total number of
  parks completed to 4 (or 67% of pro-             Washington County has not received      Given the nature of funding area-
  jections). Park projects are becom-              applications under this category.       wide benefit projects, it is extremely
  ing more difficult to qualify because            There are only one or two non-profit    difficult to project the number of per-
  of the area benefit requirements so              agencies in the county that provide     sons served. The discrepancies in
  fewer applications are being submit-             childcare activities as their primary   the table appear to support this prob-
  ted.                                             mission. Also, the high costs of con-   lem.
                                                   struction and the lack of significant
  Health Facilities                                sources of other matching               Water/Sewer Improvements
                                                   (leveraging) funds makes it difficult
  The consortium will not meet its                 to get a project off the ground.        So far only one application has been
  five-year goals for this category.               Washington County will not see any      submitted and completed in this cate-
  Given the competitive nature of the              projects completed under this cate-     gory. The City of Gaston completed
  CDBG program, it is difficult to pro-            gory.                                   its one million gallon water tank in
  ject the number of projects in these                                                     PY 2008. The completed project
  CDBG categories. As of this writ-                Youth Centers                           will serve approximately over 700
  ing, we have conducted four funding                                                      people.
  cycles and no applications under this            The Consortium will not meet this
  category have been submitted. The                goal however as only two projects       Sidewalk Improvements
  cost of these facilities is extremely            were projected for completion, a
  high and the CDBG funds are just a               completion percentage of 50%            Although completion is currently at
  small portion of the total develop-              means that one project was com-         19%, the Consortium will likely
  ment cost which makes finding the                pleted. The Boys and Girls Club         meet the five-year projections upon
  construction dollars difficult. Also,            was completed in 2005 and is serv-      completion of the five year period.
  one potential project could have                 ing greater numbers of children than    Several sidewalk projects are under-
  come in early in the five-year cycle             was first envisioned.                   way so a fair evaluation of this
  but the federal requirements could                                                       should come at the end of year five.
  not be met for procurement and labor             Other Public Facilities
  (given the shared space with another                                                     Street Improvements
  facility under construction). So the             The Consortium will not meet five-
  agency applied for funds under pub-              year goals even after completion of     The Consortium has far exceeded the
  lic services. There will be no facili-           PY 2009.                                projections for this category. Most
  ties constructed by the end of the                                                       of the projects that come in for fund-
  five-year cycle.                                 At the close of PY 2009, it appears     ing under the infrastructure category
                                                   as if 85% of the projected facility     are for street improvements. The
  Parking                                          numbers will be realized. This is the   projections were low from the outset
                                                   first cycle where the Consortium has    especially given the use of census
  This need was a priority for the City            done a comprehensive study of com-      data to generate numbers served.
  of Beaverton but not for Washington              pleted units in comparison to goals.
  County. The City reports that no                 Projecting completion data is not an    Flood Drain Improvements
  applications were received in this               exact science. Staff uses historical
  category.                                        trends and funding trends to come up    No applications were submitted in
                                                   with projections. However, other        this category.



Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                   61
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

   PUBLIC SERVICES                                   ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT                     Plan to begin addressing those needs.
                                                                                              As a result, this year public facilities
   Similar to Infrastructure projects                The City of Beaverton has only re-       were purchased, remodeled, or built;
   (where “persons” is the accomplish-               ceived economic development appli-       sidewalks, curbs, gutters, and water
   ment), it is very difficult to project            cations for storefront rehabilitation    system improvements were con-
   numerical goals for service projects.             projects during the current Consoli-     structed; and public services contin-
   One year, a project might be funded               dated Planning cycle. To date four       ued to support the heaviest needs of
   to serve 8,000 persons under home-                projects have been completed. No         our low-income residents and special
   less services, and the next, a project            applications for assistance that         needs populations: children, victims
   might be funded that serves 12 home-              would result in job creation have        of domestic violence and homeless
   less families with childcare. Both                been received.                           persons including children.
   projects meet a high priority need,
   but both deliver a very different ser-            Neither OCD nor the City of Beaver-      In Part 1a (“Assessment of Three- to
   vice with a very different per person             ton believes that revisions to the       Five-year Goals and Objectives”),
   cost.                                             goals are warranted at this time. We     Table 1-1 provides a quantitative
                                                     will use the information gleaned in      assessment of accomplishments by
   Five priority needs (transportation,              this evaluation to help us in the        comparing proposed versus actual
   childcare services, employment train-             2010-2015 planning process better        accomplishments in the first year of
   ing, substance abuse services and                 project goals for the next five-years.   the five-year cycle. While these
   crime awareness) have not received                                                         numbers give a quick, easy compari-
   any funding and therefore show no                 Entitlement Programs                     son, the bigger picture is lacking.
   accomplishments. No applications                                                           The self-evaluation section of the
   have been submitted for CDBG fund-                The sections that follow present a       CAPER gives us an opportunity to
   ing or they have been submitted                   more detailed program-by-program         focus on the bigger picture by as-
   (example Ride Connection) but did                 discussion of program results and        sessing our impact on the overall
   not rate high enough in the rating                any barriers that may have a negative    goal of developing viable communi-
   process to receive funds. The City of             impact on local strategies.              ties by providing decent housing and
   Beaverton notes that other city fund-                                                      suitable living environments. Viable
   ing did fund projects under substance             Table 1–15 summarizes how CDBG-          communities are built with invest-
   abuse services and crime awareness                and HOME-funded activities that          ments in infrastructure, public facili-
   but those accomplishments are not                 were completed in program year           ties, housing, and human resources.
   reported in this document.                        2008 positively impacted the hous-       Unfortunately, financial resources
                                                     ing and community development            are never able to keep up with the
   The Consortium is making progress                 needs identified by Washington           demand and that, in itself, is the ma-
   under health services, senior services,           County and the City of Beaverton in      jor barrier to fulfilling all of our ob-
   youth services, and other public ser-             their 2005-2010 Consolidated Plan.       jectives.
   vice needs. The Youth Services cate-
   gory has far exceeded projections. In             Washington County CDBG Program           The funded activities positively im-
   all three years, CASA for Children                                                         pact the priority needs and we can
   received funding from both the city               Washington County’s Office of            see the face of our community
   and the county which resulted in lar-             Community Development (OCD)              changing each year because of the
   ger than expected numbers. Because                manages the Community Develop-           role of the Block Grant program.
   “other public service needs” is the               ment Block Grant Program. All            The public facility, public services,
   catch all for other projects not spe-             funded projects meet HUD’s na-           infrastructure, housing and homeless
   cifically identified, the majority of             tional objective of serving low- and     maps (Figures 1 through 6) visually
   the projects are funded under this                moderate-income persons. Commu-          reflect the presence of the Block
   need. Therefore, the original projec-             nity development priority needs are      Grant projects in Washington
   tions were likely too low from the                identified in HUD Table 2B of the        County for this program year. The
   beginning.                                        2005-2010 Consolidated Plan. A list      impacts of these projects can more
                                                     of proposed projects for program         readily be seen in a few of the indi-
                                                     year 2008 was included in the Action     vidual successes:



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                                                         Table 1–16
                                 Summary of Positive Impacts of Activities Assisted in PY 2008
                                          by the Washington County Consortium

                                                                                                   Jurisdiction &
     Priority Needs and Impacts                                                                   Funding Source
     Public Facilities

      Two separate improvement projects to one senior center                                     Tigard (CDBG)
      Acquisition and rehab to seven group homes serving disabled youth and adults
                                                                                             Aloha and Cornelius (CDBG)



     Infrastructure

      Reconstruction of neighborhood streets including curbs, curb cuts, gutter, side- Hillsboro, Cornelius and unincorpo-
        walks resulting in more livable neighborhoods for approximately 1,722 residents.      rated Washington County
                                                                                                       (CDBG)
      Water system improvements that will serve a low income community of 774 resi-                   Gaston
        dents.
     Public Service

      The public service programs directly benefited low- and moderate-income                City of Beaverton CDBG
        women, children, and families whose daily way of life has been improved and
        supplemented by such programs.
      Homeless persons had access to specialized services and focused case manage-          Washington County CDBG
        ment through the more efficient coordination of volunteers.
      Persons lacking insurance had access to free or low cost medical and dental care
        and mental health counseling
      Washington County’s most vulnerable families had access to emergency rent as-
        sistance which can mean the difference between remaining in their home or living
        in their car.
      Children who are wards of the state received individual advocacy through trained
        volunteers with the focus on finding them safe, permanent homes.
      Non-English speaking victims of domestic violence achieved a greater level of
        self-sufficiency through empowerment fund development.
      Low-income and homeless persons received housing placement, tenant educa-
        tion, rental assistance and case management to help stabilize their housing allow-
        ing them to focus on other basic needs.
      Victims of crime received on-going support services even after the conviction.
      Homeless youth had new access to shelter and services through the Safe Place
        Shelter in Hillsboro.
      Homeless persons had improved access to county shelters through a more coor-
        dinated system (one central access point).
      Victims of domestic violence and substance abuse had access to housing and
        supportive services through the HopeSpring program.
      Homeless families had access to childcare which helped them to focus on em-
        ployment and other family issues.
      Residents at Hawthorne Villa received access to on-site services where none
        were available before.




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Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                         63
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                                                Table 1–16 (continued)
                              Summary of Positive Impacts of Activities Assisted in PY 2008
                                       by the Washington County Consortium

     Economic Development
      Five façades completed providing five businesses with improved storefront ap-                City of Beaverton
        pearance.
     Planning
      Not addressed in PY 2008
     Housing for Low Income Renters
      Rehabilitated or constructed 582 rental units in Washington County for occupancy          Washington County and
        by income-qualified persons providing them with an affordable unit in which to              City of Beaverton
        live.                                                                                             CDBG
     Owner-occupied Housing Rehabilitation Programs
      The funded programs, assisting seniors and low-income families, address serious           City of Beaverton CDBG
        life safety issues such as toilet backups, electrical failure, flooding, etc. The City
        has now implemented a successful marketing campaign that has brought more
        low- and moderate-income citizens into the program.
      Housing rehabilitation programs assist mostly low- and extremely low-income per-         Washington County CDBG
        sons to improve substandard conditions in their homes. These enhancements
        maintain suitable living environments by keep housing affordable and comfort-
        able. Between the two jurisdictions, 285 homeowners benefited from the rehab
        and weatherization programs by making their homes more comfortable, safe, and
        energy efficient.
     Homeownership Programs
      Seven first-time homebuyers received downpayment assistance to help them into            Washington County HOME
        their first home thereby providing housing stability. Five families contributed 500
        hours of sweat equity to purchase a single family unit thereby giving them stability
        and affordability in a newly constructed home.
     Homeless Persons (permanent housing, supportive services and shelter)
      Homeless services were provided via a network of non-profits in Washington               Washington County CDBG
        County: counseling and shelter for homeless persons and victims of domestic                       and ESG
        violence, as well as coordinated programs for children, helped promote and de-                      and
        velop self-sufficiency skills and access affordable and stable housing for families.      City of Beaverton CDBG
     Housing for Persons with Disabilities
      One group home rehab project was completed using HOME dollars providing a                    City of Beaverton
        safe, decent, affordable place to live for five persons with disabilities.




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   Five group homes refurbished to               Portland Development Commission           yearly basis, OCD monitors this inter-
     provide a better quality of living            (PDC) for the lead hazard grant --        nally on a quarterly basis. On May 1,
     for residents.                                and the coordination of the various       2009, OCD had a drawdown ratio of
   A larger capacity water reservoir             functions resulted in some delays.        1.23, which is below the 1.5 limita-
     in the City of Gaston increasing              The positive side of these partner-       tion. We continue to discuss this re-
     storage from 330,000 gallons to 1             ship projects is that clients received    quirement with current and potential
     million gallons.                              more assistance through grant mon-        sponsors and highlight the need for
   Two services focused on the pre-              ies for weatherization and lead haz-      regular, timely requests for reimburse-
     vention of homelessness assisted              ard removal than just the limited         ments.
     5,124 persons.                                $25,000 that is available through
   311 households are weatherized                County rehab. Other factors created       Washington County’s CDBG Program
     making the home more comfort-                 delay, two clients died and spouses       is on schedule with implementing and
     able and the utility bills more af-           had to decide what next steps would       completing activities and expending
     fordable.                                     be; one client withdrew due to in-        funds. All goals are on target as speci-
                                                   ability to obtain a matching con-         fied in the Consolidated Plan. The
  Although there are several factors               struction loan; and a fourth client       Office of Community Development
  that may create barriers to the                  had to withdraw because loan funds        does not foresee the need for major
  County’s ability to positively impact            were determined to not be sufficient      adjustments or improvements to its
  on program strategies, the principal             to construct accessibility features for   strategies and activities. The overall
  barriers appear to be limited human              his home. He returned as a grant          assessment of the program as de-
  and financial resources. For exam-               client. For yet another client, staff     scribed in Part 1a reflects the fact that,
  ple, according to the County’s Con-              partnered with PDC for lead hazard        with few exceptions, the funding is
  solidated Plan, the total amount re-             removal and with CA for weatheriza-       being directed towards the higher pri-
  quired to address all Community                  tion; all this work had to be com-        ority needs and specified objectives
  Development needs (not including                 pleted before the loan work could         identified in the Plan.
  Housing) is estimated at over $110               proceed. These three active loans
  million.    However, the average                 are now underway and should be            City of Beaverton CDBG Program
  yearly allocation to the County is               completed within two months.
  approximately $2.7 million. The last                                                       Since the needs of the Beaverton’s resi-
  two years have resulted in decreases             There are seven additional loans cur-     dents, as expressed in the Consolidated
  to the county’s allocation. While the            rently underway with completion           Plan 2005-2010, far outstrip its avail-
  CDBG program regulations do not                  dates in the near future. There are       able resources, the City of Beaverton
  require match, it is Washington                  five new approved loans that have         has taken special care to maximize the
  County’s program policy to give                  not yet begun.       By adding the        positive impact to Beaverton’s low- and
  higher rating points to projects that            2008/09 and 2009 loans approved or        moderate-income citizens with its lim-
  provide matching funds. This year,               underway to date, the count comes to      ited CDBG dollars. A summary of the
  completed CDBG projects have gen-                sixteen. With this activity, the Hous-    Consortium’s progress towards meeting
  erated matching funds in the amount              ing Rehabilitation Program should         its 5-year goals can be found in the Self-
  $4,052,191.                                      be back on track, and the production      Evaluation Table.
                                                   number for 2009/10 should meet
  Both the HARDE and the Housing                   projections.                              The CDBG activities completed in PY
  Rehabilitation Program experienced                                                         2008 have made a positive impact on
  decreases in services levels this year.          Staff is committed to continuing out-     the City of Beaverton by targeting
  Only four Deferred Interest Bearing              reach and advertising efforts             those residents who are low- and mod-
  Loans were completed-fewer than                  (updated brochures to senior and          erate-income. As always, public ser-
  was projected for the PY 2008-2009.              community centers, Community Ac-          vice activities funded by the City con-
  There are several factors that caused            tion, Disability, Aging, and Veterans     tinue to play a crucial role in the safety
  this temporary decline. Staff began              Services, and contractors).               net for Beaverton’s less-affluent citi-
  working more closely with partner                                                          zens. The City served slightly more
  agencies -- Community Action                     OCD continues to monitor its draw-        clients this year through its various
  (CA) for weatherization, Rebuilding              down rate from the US Treasury.           public service partners. Open Door
  Together for volunteer labor, and                While HUD monitors grantees on a          Counseling Center saw far fewer cli-

Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                        65
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   ents during previous years due to the             The City did encounter two unfore-      to work out a $1/year draft lease
   significant decrease in housing sales             seen obstacles for previously funded    agreement for the property in an ef-
   and the difficulty for potential home-            CDBG project. The City purchased        fort to preserve CDBG funds for ad-
   owners to obtain financing due to                 an apartment complex in downtown        ditional projects in the community.
   tightening credit markets. As a re-               Beaverton to preserve affordable        This will allow $1 million dollars
   sult, the level of participation in their         housing in the downtown core.           over a period of five years to be con-
   homebuyer workshops has decreased                 Small rehabilitation activities were    tributed to additional eligible pro-
   significantly. Community Action’s                 completed at the project site, but      jects.
   Energy and Emergency Rent pro-                    when the City completed a compre-
   gram, which provides low- and mod-                hensive review of the site (completed   CDBG Timeliness
   erate-income households with one-                 by Alpha Community Development
   time assistance to prevention eviction            in December 2007), consultants de-      The City of Beaverton CDBG spend
   from their homes due to delinquent                termined that rehabilitation of the     down rate was below our planned
   rent or utility payments, saw a dra-              apartments would cost more than         expectations and the rates achieved
   matic increase in the number of re-               rebuilding the apartments. As a re-     in prior years. By the close of the
   quests for assistance. This is the first          sult, the City submitted an Action      2008 program year (year ending June
   year the City provided funding for                Plan amendment to HUD, and relo-        30, 2009), the City reported a
   this program, and rather than serving             cated the residents under the Uni-      “timeliness” factor of .925 times the
   the estimated 30 Beaverton house-                 form Relocation Act. The City is        current entitlement allocation.
   holds, the program provided assis-                currently preparing to submit another
   tance to 793 Beaverton households.                Action Plan amendment to HUD to         CDBG Substantial Amendments
                                                     allow the City to demolish the build-   None.
   The City completed a request for pro-             ings at the project site, and turn it
   posal process to select a new provider            into a parking lot to support a new     Washington County HOME Program
   for the City’s Housing Rehabilitation             affordable housing development that
   Loan program. Unlimited Choices                   is planned across the street.           The Washington County HOME
   was selected and now administers the                                                      Consortium pursued a range of ac-
   Hope-4-Homes program. The pro-                    Two activities which were included      tivities designed to leverage HOME
   gram was not fully up and running                 in the PY2008 Action Plan that were     Investment Partnerships (HOME)
   until mid-way through the PY 2008                 cancelled. The Edwards Center/          Program resources along five areas
   program year, and as a result, fewer              Canby House project, which entailed     of need:
   funds were expended, and fewer                    rehabilitation of an existing group
   households received assistance than               home for the developmentally dis-        Low-Income Renters
   anticipated during the program year.              abled, withdrew their application        Housing Rehabilitation Programs
   This is similar to the pattern the City           after July 1, 2008. When developing      Homeownership Programs
   observed when the Mend-a-Home                     a new scope of work, the organiza-       Permanent housing and suppor-
   and Adapt-a-Home programs were                    tion determined that accessibility         tive services for the homeless
   launched. All funds that were allo-               improvements within the home are         Housing for the Disabled
   cated to Hope-4-Homes were carried                sorely needed, but unfeasible due to
   forward to PY 2009 and an additional              the layout of the home. As a result,    The Consortium has a long-standing
   $100,000 was added to its budget.                 they are looking for a single level     programmatic focus on developing
                                                     home they can purchase and rehabili-    new and preserving existing rental
   Adapt-a-Home and Mend-a-Home                      tate with proceeds from the sale of     housing for very-low income house-
   both expended 100% of their funding               their current home.                     holds. In addition, the Consortium
   and currently have a waiting list of                                                      has an equally strong focus on devel-
   Beaverton clients to service during               The second cancelled project was        oping housing for protected classes
   PY 2009. Adapt-a-Home exceeded                    funding that was set aside to allow     such as the elderly, the disabled,
   its estimated number of households                Tualatin Valley Housing Partners to     farmworker households and house-
   served (26 household), but Mend-a-                purchase a City-owned block in          holds impacted by HIV/AIDs as it
   Home served 15 households (total of               downtown Beaverton for the devel-       relates to prospective tenants in
   17 units rather than the anticipated 25           opment of a mixed-use affordable        rental housing. The Consortium also
   units).                                           housing project. The City was able      has a long-standing focus on owner-

Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
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  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

  occupied rehab and single-family                     provides education to decision-        some or all of the above costs. The
  homebuyer projects. Through the                      makers on the impact that hous-        County established a $300,000 chal-
  combined undertaking of the citizen                  ing program policy design has on       lenge grant to initiate fundraising
  participation processes associated                   their ability to serve people living   for this venture. Affordable housing
  with the 2005-2010 Consolidated                      in poverty.                            developers are hoping that within
  Plan and the update to the Washing-                                                         three years this venture raises suffi-
  ton County Fair Housing Plan, the                Input from all of these sources is         cient new resources to work with
  Consortium received significant in-              used in developing our annual pro-         federal programs to reduce the cost
  put from stakeholders that refreshed             ject planning cycle through the tiered     of development of affordable hous-
  our understanding of the unmet                   decision-making bodies in Washing-         ing in Washington County. In June
  housing need in Washington County.               ton County led by Washington               2009, the County Board of Com-
                                                   County Board of County Commis-             missioners approved $110,000 for
  The Consortium continues to fund                 sioners and the CDBG/HOME Pol-             the Community Housing Fund as
  diverse housing projects either                  icy Advisory Board (PAB).                  part of the 09/10 budget process.
  through new construction or acquisi-                                                        The cities of Hillsboro and Beaver-
  tion/rehabilitation that shore up gaps           Through participation in focus             ton also approved a $1/city resident
  in the continuum of affordable hous-             groups, one-on-one interviews and          allocation to the Community Hous-
  ing stock in our communities. In PY              strong relationships with the devel-       ing Fund. The city of Tigard also
  2008, the Consortium had 13 afford-              opment community and social ser-           gives $10,00 per year.
  able housing projects underway, in-              vice providers, the Consortium
  cluding eight rental projects, one               sought out and gathered significant        The Community Housing Fund is an
  group home project, three single-                amounts of new information into the        active participant in the funding of
  family housing developments for                  2005-2010 Consolidated Plan that           developments in the County. OCD
  first time homebuyers and one                    will serve as both a measure of what       and the Community Housing Fund
  downpayment assistance program.                  has been accomplished and what we          have developed a streamlined proc-
                                                   need to focus on over the next five-       ess for funding predevelopment
  The Consortium acknowledges that                 years.                                     costs associated with housing devel-
  the impact is small, but year-by-year,                                                      opment that assist the CHDO devel-
  we are consistently improving the                The County has identified barriers to      opers with obtaining upfront fund-
  delivery of clean, healthy, safe hous-           creating affordable housing in Wash-       ing to determine project feasibility.
  ing stock to people living in impov-             ington County which are similar to         These combined sources as well as
  erished circumstances.                           those found across the country:            a new streamlined process for ac-
                                                                                              cessing the funds is seen as a real
  The County receives input each year               Lack of a means to offset prop-         improvement over the past.
  from the citizen participation process              erty tax costs in the creation and
  used in developing the annual Action                operation of affordable housing.        The Consortium highly values the
  Plan. In addition, Consortium mem-                Availability of buildable land in       HOME funds allocated to this Par-
  bers regularly participate in meetings              general and high cost of land that      ticipating Jurisdiction. HOME funds
  with two area-wide advocacy                         is available.                           continue to serve as a crucial re-
  groups:                                           Expensive local development             source supporting both the develop-
                                                      charges and fees.                       ment of affordable housing and on-
   Washington County Housing and                  Negative attitudes towards af-          going support of Community Hous-
     Supportive Services Network                      fordable housing in general and         ing Development Organizations
     which focuses on issues related to               higher density housing develop-         (CHDO) as well as other develop-
     chronic homelessness and dis-                    ment in particular often required       ment partners in Washington
     abilities, and as a group develops               in affordable housing projects.         County. The combined efforts of
     the annual Continuum of Care                                                             public agencies, nonprofit organiza-
     application in partnership with               Washington County, housing advo-           tions and for-profit enterprises using
     the Washington County Depart-                 cates and jurisdictions worked to          HOME funds carry out high priority
     ment of Housing Services.                     develop a Community Housing Fund           activities identified in the 2005-
                                                   whose emerging mission is to assist        2010 Consolidated Plan.
   Housing Advocacy Group that                   affordable housing developers offset

Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                          67
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

  As can be seen from the above discus-              that its rank placement does not
  sion, the availability of HOME funds               change from year to year. Neither
  has been instrumental in leveraging a              is an issue for Washington County.
  variety of private, State and Federal
  resources, including: mortgages from
  commercial financial institutions, Low
  Income Housing Tax Credits, State of
  Oregon Farmworker Tax Credits,
  State of Oregon Affordable Housing
  Lenders Credits, State of Oregon Risk
  Share Bonds, State of Oregon Housing
  Development Grants, USDA Rural
  Development Farm Labor Housing
  Loan and Grant, and Private Activity
  Bonds and Housing Authority Bonds
  issued by the Washington County
  Housing Authority.

  The Washington County HOME Con-
  sortium, using HUD's HOME Program
  SNAPSHOTS database, dated June
  30, 2009, can describe its accomplish-
  ments using $21,896,361 in HOME
  allocations since 1992, by relaying the
  following accomplishments through
  PY 2008.

  Evaluation of Snapshot Statistics

  HUD’s snapshot of the Washington
  County’s HOME Program reflects
  some drops in a number of the meas-
  urement areas. In two of the measure-
  ment areas, the County is first place
  amongst the Oregon Participating Ju-
  risdictions. In four areas, the County
  dropped its ranking. None of the crite-
  ria measured resulted in red flag indi-
  cators as assigned by HUD. OCD will
  continue to monitor these reports and
  assess our impact in these areas. It is
  important to note that the Oregon ju-
  risdictions are very close to one an-
  other in the various measurement ar-
  eas. One jurisdiction might pull ahead
  of another; however, the change in
  measurement might be very small.
  The issue to focus most specifically on
  is whether a jurisdiction has a red flag
  indicator or where a jurisdiction notes




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                             68
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009




    HOME Program Progress



    Progress Measurement                   Benchmark                    Change


    89.00% Funds Committed                  6th of 6 PJs in the State   -6.71% Dropped 5 ranking lev-
                                                                        els to number 6.
    87.42% Funds Disbursed                 4th of 6 PJs in the State    -12% Dropped 2 ranking levels
                                                                        to number 4.
    8.04 Leveraging ratio (rental          1st of 6 PJs in the State    +.45 No change in ranking.
    housing)
    100% Completed Rental Dis-             1st of 6 PJs in the State    +14.56% Jumped 5 ranking lev-
    bursements to Commitments                                           els to number 1.
    83.85% Completed CHDO        2nd of 6 PJs in the State              +31.02% Jumped 4 ranking lev-
    Disbursements to Reservation                                        els to number 2.


    76.00% of all rental units af-         6th of 6 PJs in the State    -1.08% No change in ranking.
    fordable to renters 0-50%
    28.80% of all rental units af-         6th of 6 PJs in the State    -4.53% Dropped one ranking
    fordable to renters 0-30%                                           level to number 6.


    98% of Occupied Rental Units 6th of 6 PJs in the State              -2% Dropped 5 ranking levels to
    to all Units                                                        number 6.


    Overall Ranking


    4th of 6 PJs in the State                                           Jumped one ranking level to
                                                                        number 4.
    66th of 555 PJs Nationally                                          Dropped 22 places in national
                                                                        ranking.




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Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
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  Part 1. Geographic Distribution Maps
  Washington County and the City of Beaverton




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Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
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  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009




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  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009




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  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

  Part 2. Community Development Block Grant Narrative
  Washington County and the City of Beaverton


   Washington County                                                                                The following tables assess the rela-
                                                     Assessment of Relationship of                  tionship of the CDBG funds to the
   The Office of Community Develop-                  CDBG Funds to Priority Needs/                  needs identified in the 2005-2010
   ment administers Washington                       Objectives:                                    Consolidated Plan. All projects
   County’s Community Development                                                                   benefited low and moderate-income
   Block Grant (CDBG). Total available               The County used an allocation for-             persons. The tables include carry-
   resources for the 2008 program year               mula developed by the Policy Advi-             forward projects from previous years
   were $5,295,005. This amount is                   sory Board during the CDBG Plan-               to depict all program year activity.
   made up of the entitlement grant of               ning process to address the needs              Program year 2008 projects are rep-
   $2,634,338, program income totaling               and priorities stated in the Consoli-          resented in bold.
   $118,932 and a carry-forward bal-                 dated Plan.
   ance from the previous program year                                                              Public Facilities
   of $2,541,735.                                    The major areas of priority need are
                                                     shown below followed by the rele-              CDBG Long-Range Objective:
   The City of Hillsboro renewed its                 vant CDBG long-range objective.
   Intergovernmental Agreement with                  All CDBG Program activities must                Develop and improve a variety of
   the County to continue the partner-               address these objectives.                         public facilities to benefit in-
   ship that allows the city to remain in                                                              come-qualifying neighborhoods
   the Consortium and participate as a               Public Facilities                                 or income-qualified, special
   joint entitlement. Under this agree-                                                                needs populations.
   ment, the Washington County Office                Develop and improve public facili-
   of Community Development (OCD)                    ties to benefit income-qualifying              Specific Objectives Achieved:
   manages the housing rehabilitation                n e i g h b o r h o o d s a n d i n c o me -
   and public services funds to continue             qualified, special needs populations.           Improve existing homeless shel-
   providing countywide service in                                                                     ters.
   those areas. Per the Agreement, the               Infrastructure Improvements                     Improve, construct, or purchase
   City can use 40% of its allocation to                                                               facilities to serve persons with
   fund a project at its discretion, pro-            Improve the infrastructure of in-                 disabilities.
   vided it complies with HUD national               come-qualified areas to ensure the              Provide adequate community
   objectives and eligibility require-               health and safety of communities and              spaces for seniors to meet, recre-
   ments. HUD set the City’s 2008 allo-              increase neighborhood pride and vi-               ate, and access various services.
   cation at $647,921 and the County’s               ability.
   at $1,986,417 for a combined entitle-                                                            Table 2a-1 on page 86 describes the
   ment of $2,634,338. Hillsboro se-                 Public Services                                relationship of CDBG funds to the
   lected one project to fund out of the                                                            public facility priorities. Five com-
   40% set-aside ($259,168): Bi-                     Provide limited public services that           pleted high priority activities ex-
   centennial Park Renovations.                      ensure the health and welfare of in-           pended $474,920. Three other pro-
                                                     come-qualified people living in the            jects are underway.
   Total disbursements for the 2008 pro-             community.
   gram year were $3,290,359. This                                                                  Infrastructure
   leaves a carry-forward balance of                 Housing
   $2,004,646 into the 2009 program                                                                 CDBG Long-Range Objective:
   year.                                             Ensure existing housing occupied by
                                                     income-qualified persons is structur-           Improve the infrastructure of in-
   All of the reports generated from                 ally safe, accessible, and energy effi-           come-qualified areas to ensure
   HUD’s Integrated Disbursement and                 cient.                                            the health and safety of commu-
   Information System are included in                                                                  nities and increase neighborhood
   Volume 2 of the CAPER.                                                                              pride and viability.

Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                          85
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

  Specific Objective Achieved:                         Provide other public services               less, at-risk of homelessness,
                                                         such as counseling for victims of           pregnant, or parenting and/or ex-
   Replace, repair or develop streets                  crime, emergency basic needs,               periencing emotional disturbance,
     and related infrastructure                          access to affordable housing,               and mental health related or psy-
   Construct, repair, and replace                      homeownership classes, literacy             cho-social crisis.
     sidewalks to provide a safe pe-                     programs, job education, and life         Offer money management,
     destrian environment.                               skills training and professional            guardian and conservatorship
   Construct new facilities to in-                     development.                                services to aid seniors who need
     crease system capacity.                           Offer emergency, basic needs                assistance managing their affairs.
                                                         assistance to families in crisis.
  Table 2a-2 describes the relationship                Obtain resources to coordinate           Public service projects funded by
  of CDBG funds to the infrastructure                    volunteers and donations for the         CDBG served 12,034 low and mod-
  priorities. The table shows that four                  homeless population.                     erate income persons this year.
  completed high-priority activities                   Provide quality support for chil-
  expended $1,094,183. Three pro-                        dren involved in custody litiga-         Ten of the sixteen public service
  jects are underway and have not ex-                    tion.                                    projects target their assistance to the
  pended any funds to date.                            Offer support services to post-          homeless and are meeting the overall
                                                         adjudicated victims of crime.            county objectives to “develop home-
  Public Services                                      Improve access to affordable             less facilities to shelter homeless
                                                         housing for low-income families.         persons, families and youth” and “to
  CDBG Long-Range Objective:                           Provide support services such as         provide homeless prevention and
                                                         child care, housing education,           other essential services to homeless
   Provide limited public services                     addiction counseling, and em-            persons.” Those ten projects served
     that ensure the health and welfare                  ployment training to homeless,           8,141 homeless persons (out of the
     of income-qualified people living                   mentally ill and transitioning in-       12,034 noted above).
     in the community.                                   dividuals.
                                                                                                  Table 2a-3 describes the relationship
                                                       Develop stable living conditions
  Specific Objectives Achieved:                                                                   of CDBG funds to the public service
                                                         for youth by providing educa-
                                                                                                  priorities. The table identifies nine
                                                         tional and vocational training,
   Improve access to health and                        housing, family counseling and
                                                                                                  completed high priority public ser-
     dental care services and/or educa-                                                           vice activities that expended
                                                         mediation services, and support
     tion to low-income families.                                                                 $246,762. Seven other projects are
                                                         services to youth that are home-
                                                                                                  underway and expended $134,996.

                                                         Table 2a-1
                                             Relationship of Washington County
                                            CDBG Funds to Public Facility Priorities
                                                                                  Funds                                Special
                                                                                 Expended                  % L/M       Needs
                Sub Need    Priority                      Activity                 in PY        Status     Benefit     Group
              Parks and
                              H        Hillsboro Bi-centennial Park              $31,306     Underway     66.4%
              Recreation

                                       Albertina Kerr Group Home Rehab (536)     50,883.40   Completed    100%       Disabled
                                       Albertina Kerr Group Home Purchase
              Other           H        (591)                                     $250,000    Completed    100%       Disabled
                                       Edwards Center Florence Group Home
                                       (625)                                     $10,000     Completed    100%       Disabled
                                       Forest Grove School Health Center (590)   $444,356    Underway     100%

              Homeless
                              H        CA Shelter Improvements (589)             $15,509     Underway     100%       Homeless
              Facilities


              Senior          H        Tigard Senior Center Phase I (538)        $18,928     Completed    57%        Elderly
              Center                   Tigard Senior Center Phase II (592)       $145,109    Completed    57%        Elderly



Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                           86
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009
                                                         Table 2a-2
                                             Relationship of Washington County
                                            CDBG Funds to Infrastructure Priorities
                                                                                         Funds
                        Sub Need                                                        Expended                    % L/M
                                     Priority                   Activity                  in PY        Status       Benefit

                        Streets         H       Washington County Sell & Turk Roads
                                                (596)                                   $191,142      Completed     48.2%
                                                King City Cul-de-Sac Repaving (595)     $0            Underway      57.9%


                        Sidewalks       H       Hillsboro 21st St. Sidewalks (497)      $265,000      Completed     50.7%
                                                Forest Grove 18th Ave Sidewalks (541)   $0            Underway      55.3%
                                                Forest Grove A St. Sidewalks (594)      $0            Underway      75.6%

                        Water           H       Gaston Water Reservoir (495)            $208,041      Completed     59.5%
                                                Cornelius 12th Ave & Dogwood (540)      $430,000      Completed     54.5%


    Per 24 CFR 570.201 (e) (1), the                   34 households (Table 2a-4 and 2a-                The Community Development
    amount of CDBG funds used for                     6).                                                Block Grant-Recovery Program
    public services shall not exceed 15                                                                  award of $715,525 was added to
    percent of each year’s allocation                 Changes in Program Objectives:                     the Action Plan.
    plus 15 percent of program income.                                                                 Edwards Center Florence Group
                                                       There was one addition to the                   Home received an award of
    CDBG funds addressed only high-                      2008 Action Plan. Furthermore,                  $10,000.
    priority projects this year. In total,               three projects received additional            Forest Grove School Based
    CDBG housing rehabilitation activi-                  funds from Reprogrammable In-                   Health Center received an addi-
    ties expended $150,075 and served                    come:                                           tional $73,370.
                                                          Table 2a-3
                                              Relationship of Washington County
                                            CDBG Funds to Public Service Priorities
                                                                             Funds
                                                                            Expended                     % L/M        Special Needs
              Sub Need    Priority                  Activity                  in PY         Status       Benefit         Group

                                      EMO Shared Housing (547)              $21,745       Underway                   Elderly, Disabled
                                      Community Corrections Post
            Other               H     Conviction Specialist (602)           $31,411       Completed
                                      Forest Grove Senior
                                      Guardianship Assistance (604)         $20,865       Underway                   Elderly


            Health                    Virginia Garcia Oral Health (505)     $0            Completed
                                H
            Services                  WA County Project Access. (550)       $24,702       Completed

                                                                                                        All 100%
                                      CA Emergency Basic Needs (597)        $30,000       Completed     percent
                                      LCSNW HopeSpring (544)                $32,800       Completed     per local
                                      CA Shelter Waitlist (500)             $22,429       Completed      policy
                                      Family Bridge Expanding
                                      Volunteers (502)                      $20,760       Completed
                                      Boys and Girls Aid Safe Place (543)   $48,202       Completed
                                      CA Bridges to Houses Child Care
            Homeless            H                                                                                        Homeless
                                      Assistance (598)                      $3,153        Underway
                                      St Vincent de Paul Rent Assistance
                                      (599)                                 $15,000       Underway
                                      LCSNW Breaking the Homeless
                                      Cycle (600)                           $58,036       Underway
                                      DVRC Empowerment Fund (601)           $569          Underway
                                      TVHP Eviction Prevention (603)        $15628        Underway

            Childcare
            services            H     CASA Children’s Advocate (498)        $36,458       Completed
            (youth)

Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                            87
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009
                                                                           Table 2a-4
                                                         Relationship of Washington County
                                                         CDBG Funds to Housing Priorities
                                                                                   Funds                                    Housing
                                                                                  Expended                     % L/M         Need
                         Need              Priority             Activity            in PY         Status       Benefit     Addressed

                                                        2005 Housing Rehab        $5,593        Completed      100%
                                                        2006 Housing Rehab        $64,459       Underway       100%      L/M Income
                                                        2007 HARDE*               $39,334       Completed      100%      Homeowners
                         Housing
                                              H         2007 Housing Rehab        $0            Underway       100%      and Renters
                         Rehabilitation
                                                        2008 Housing Rehab        $0            Underway       100%
                                                        2008 HARDE *              $30,689       Underway       100%
                                                        Rebuilding Together       $10,000       Completed      100%

                                                                                                                         Low Income
                         Weatherization                 2008 CA Self Help Wx      $25,000       Completed      100%       renters and
                                              H
                                                        2008 CA Comp Wx           $20,000       Completed      100%      L/M Income
                                                                                                                         homeowners
                             *HARDE = Home Access and Repair for Disabled and Elderly


   Hillsboro, Bi-centennial Park                    demolition activities undertaken this            and reconstruction of a 1,200 sq. ft.
     received an additional $11,170.                  year. Two projects included the re-              of 4” driveway and walkway ramp to
                                                      habilitation of seven group homes.               a facility’s front door, installation of
  Carrying Out Planned Actions:                                                                        fire sprinkler systems, and new
                                                      The rehabilitation work associated               roofs. No tenant had to be either
  Washington County funded 27 pro-                    with the group homes was limited to              temporarily or permanently relo-
  jects from the 2008 allocation. Spe-                the following activities: installation           cated in order to accommodate the
  cific details on each of the activities             of a new furnaces and central air                installation of these work items.
  can be found in Volume II. Wash-                    conditioning systems, demolition
  ington County pursued all resources                                                         Table 2a-5
  that were specified in the 2008 Ac-                               Washington County CDBG Activities Completed in
  tion Plan: CDBG funds, HOME                                         PY 2008 Compared to National Objectives *
  funds (including ADDI), ESG funds,
                                                      National Objective                    Activity
  program income, and leveraged/
                                                                                            495 Gaston Water Reservoir
  matching funds.           Washington                570.208(a)(1)
                                                                                            497 Hillsboro 21 Ave Sidewalk Improvement
  County supported applications by                    Low /Mod Area
                                                                                            540 Cornelius 12 Ave & Dogwood
                                                      (LMA)
  other entities, in a fair and impartial                                                   596 Washington County Sell and Turk Road
  manner, by providing the required                                                         547 Ecumenical Ministries Shared Housing
                                                                                            498 CASA for Children
  certification of consistency for HUD                                                      544 LCSNW HopeSpring
  programs. In carrying out the above,                                                      597 CA Basic Needs
  Washington County did not hinder                                                          536 Albertina Kerr Group Home Refurbishment
  Consolidated Plan implementation                                                          500 CA Shelter Waitlist
                                                      570.208(a)(2)                         502 Family Bridge Expanding Volunteers
  by action or willful inaction.
                                                      Low/Mod Ltd. Clientele                505 Virginia Garcia Oral Health Expansion
                                                      (LMC)                                 550 Project Access Washington County
  National Objectives:                                                                      602 Community Corrections Post Conviction
                                                                                            443 Good Neighbor Center
  All Community Development Block                                                           543 Boys and Girls Aid Safe Place
                                                                                            601 DVRC Empowerment Fund
  Grant funds are used exclusively to                                                       600 LCSNW Breaking Homeless Cycle
  benefit low and moderate-income                                                           591 Albertina Kerr Group Home Purchase
  persons within Washington County                                                          538/592 Tigard Senior Center Remodel I & II
  (See Table 2a-5).                                                                         625 Edwards Center Florence Group Home
                                                      570.208(a)(3)                         461 OCD Housing Rehabilitation
                                                      Low/Mod Housing                       555 OCD HARDE
  Acquisition, Rehabilitation or                      (LMH)                                 607 Rebuilding Together
  Demolition of Occupied Real                                                               605 CAO Comprehensive Weatherization
  Property:                                                                                 606 CAO Self-Help Weatherization
                                                                   * Includes multi-year public service projects that have on-going accomplishments

  There was one acquisition and no

Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                                         88
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                                                                             meet the income eligibility require-
                                         Table 2a-6                                          ments of the program.”
                         Housing Rehabilitation Statistics
                             for Washington County                                           Project sponsors are required to
                                                                                             document income and ethnicity data.
                                                                                             This information is then provided to
                                                   Units        Amount of                    the Office of Community Develop-
                Program                            Completed    CDBG $
                                                                                             ment with each request for reim-
                Housing Rehab Loan Program               4      $70,052                      bursement.

                                                                                             Program Income:
                HARDE                                   26      $70,023

                                                                                             The County receives program in-
                Rebuilding Together                      4      $10,000                      come in the form of interest pay-
                                                                                             ments and loan payoffs from the
                Weatherization                          311     $45,000                      Home Access and Repair for the
                                                                                             Disabled and Elderly (HARDE) and
                                                                                             Housing Rehabilitation Loan Pro-
                TOTAL                                   345     $195,075
                                                                                             gram. This year, the County re-
                                                                                             corded program income receipts in
   Economic Development:                             sons as described in 24 CFR 91.520      the amount of $118,932.         This
                                                     can be seen in Part 1 of the CAPER      amount is added to the yearly HUD
   Economic development activities are               as well as in the CDBG Activity         allocation and factored into the
   not funded through the Washington                 Summary and the Summary of Ac-          budget for public services and ad-
   County’s CDBG program.                            complishments in Volume 2.              ministration (based on the respective
                                                                                             caps of 15 percent and 20 percent).
   Limited Clientele:                                According to the County’s CDBG          Program income is broken down in
                                                     Program Policy Manual,           “The   Chart C.
   The extent to which CDBG funds                    Washington County CDBG Program
   were used for activities that bene-               requires that 100% of the beneficiar-   Neighborhood Revitalization:
   fited low and moderate-income per-                ies of a public services project must
                                                                                             Washington County does not have a
                                                                                             HUD-approved neighborhood revi-
                                                                                             talization strategy; therefore, there is
                                                                                             no report on progress against bench-
                                                                                             marks for the program year 2008.




    HARDE Grant used for handrail
    New roof funded through Housing Rehab Loan


Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                      89
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

  Housing Rehabilitation:                                       PROGRAM INCOME RE-CAP
                                                                    2008/09
  The Washington County Office of Com-
  munity Development (OCD) adminis-                             Payoffs by Loan Year:
  ters the County’s Housing Rehabilita-
  tion Program. The program offers low-                                                             1984 $     9,566.00
  interest housing repair loans (up to                                                              1985 $          -
  $25,000) to low and moderate-income                                                               1986            -
  families that own and occupy single-                                                              1987            -
  family homes.                                                                                     1988            -
                                                                                                    1990            -
  The owners qualify if the dwelling: a)                                                            1991            -
  does not meet the standards set forth in                                                          1992       8,120.83
  the Uniform Housing Code (1979 Edi-                                                               1993            -
  tion or later editions as published); b)                                                          1994       2,058.29
  does not meet the Housing Quality Stan-                                                           1995            -
  dards established by HUD; or c) if the                                                            1996       6,732.25
  dwelling has one or more major systems                                                            1997            -
  in need of repair because of failure or                                                           1999      30,730.75
  near failure.                                                                                     2000            -
                                                                                                    2001      25,076.64
  OCD continues the loan program to sup-                                                            2003      16,419.75
  port the housing rehabilitation needs in                                                          2004       4,356.86
  Washington County. Because it is a                                                                2005            -
  yearly allocation, the CAPER may re-
  flect multiple “underway” activities.                                                  Subtotal            103,061.37

  OCD continued to fund the Home Ac-                            Interest by Loan Year:
  cess and Repair for Disabled and Eld-                                                             1984 $          -
  erly (HARDE) Program with an alloca-                                                              1985 $          -
  tion of $75,000. This program offers                                                              1986            -
  loans and grants up to $4,500 to assist                                                           1988         874.12
  qualified homeowners and renters with                                                             1995       2,880.00
  accessibility improvements and small                                                              1996         924.00
  repairs.                                                                                          1997         693.25
                                                                                                    1998       4,160.50
  The Office of Community Development                                                               1999       1,458.00
  continues to set aside $10,000 each year                                                          2000
  to fund Rebuilding Together, a program                                                            2001       2,869.58
  providing no-cost home repairs to low                                                             2003       1,555.44
  income, disabled or elderly home own-                                                             2005         456.34
  ers.
                                                                                         Subtotal             15,871.23
  During program year 2008, 30 homes
  were assisted with CDBG funds set
  aside for the home repair programs                            TOTAL PROGRAM INCOME:                        118,932.60
  (including Rebuilding Together). An-
  other 311 homes received weatheriza-
  tion assistance through Community Ac-
  tion’s weatherization programs. See
  Table 2a-6.



Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                             90
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

   PART 2 Community Development                      a carry-over balance of $558,867.06     The City of Beaverton was allocated
   Block Grant Narrative                             for the 2009 program year. This re-     $603,998 in CDBG entitlement funds
                                                     port summarizes CDBG activities         from the U.S. Department of Housing
   City of Beaverton                                 undertaken for the program year July    and Urban Development (HUD) in
                                                     1, 2008 through June 30, 2009.          2008. These funds were allocated and
   Total available resources for the 2008                                                    disbursed through an internal priority
   program year for the City of Beaver-              The CDBG Activity Summary, Sum-         needs assessment in tandem with the
   ton were $1,194,135.55. This                      mary of Accomplishments, CDBG           Washington County HOME Consor-
   amount includes the entitlement grant             Housing Activities Report, and the      tium (2005-2010 Consolidated Plan)
   of $603,998, program income total-                Summary of Consolidated Plan Pro-       citizen participation process. A com-
   ing $14,914.62 and a carry-over bal-              jects are included in Volume 2 to       petitive application process for public
   ance from the previous program year               this report.                            service projects was also conducted.
   of $575,222.93.                                                                           Public Facilities
                                                     Assessment of Relationship of
   Total disbursements for the 2008 pro-             CDBG Funds to Priority Needs/           No Public Facility projects were un-
   gram year were $635,268.49, leaving               Objectives                              dertaken by the City in 2008.

                                                        Table 2b-1
                             Relationship of Beaverton CDBG Funds to Public Service Priorities
                                                                             CDBG
                                                                             Funds                            Housing
                                                                            Expended               % L/M       Need
                        Sub Need        Priority            Activity          in PY      Status    Benefit   Addressed
                     Services to
                     Persons with          H
                     Disabilities
                     Transportation
                                           H
                     Services
                     Substance
                     Abuse                 H
                     Services
                     Employment
                                           H
                     Training
                     Health
                                           H
                     Services
                                                                            $14,000     Complete   100%      Homeless
                                                   - DVRC/Monika’s House
                                                                            $12,000     Complete   100%      Homeless
                                                   - Good Neighbor Center
                                                                            $6.786.70   Complete   100%      Homeless
                     Other Public                  - Community Action
                     Service Needs                    Energy and
                                           H
                                                      Emergency Rent
                                                   - Open Door Counseling
                                                                              $8,500    Complete   77.2%     Homeless &
                                                      Center
                                                                             $20,000    Complete   100%         other
                                                   -Boys and Girls Aid
                                                                                                              Homeless
                     Youth
                                           H
                     Centers
                     Childcare
                                           M
                     Centers
                                                   - CASA - Washington      $12,000
                                                                                        Complete   100%         N/A
                     Youth                         County
                                           H
                     Services                      - Lifeworks NW - New
                                                                                        Complete   95.6%        N/A
                                                   Parent Network           $15,000
                     Child Care
                                           H
                     Services
                     Other Youth
                                           H
                     Programs
                     Senior
                                           H
                     Centers
                     Senior                        - Loaves & Fishes –
                                           H                                $ 2,313     Complete   100%         N/A
                     Services                      Beaverton
                     Other Senior
                                           H
                     Programs

Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                     91
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                                         Table 2b-2
                                 Relationship of Beaverton CDBG Funds to Housing Priorities
                                                                            CDBG
                                                                                                                      Housing
                                                                            Funds
                                                                                                                       Need
                                                                           Expended                      % L/M
                                                                                                                     Addressed
                          Sub Need          Priority       Activity          in PY          Status       Benefit
                                                                                                                    Low Income
                        Low Income             H       1st/Main
                                                                          $63,336.14      Complete                  renters
                        Renters                        Relocation                                         100%

                        Housing                H       Citywide           $ 32,709.93     Complete        100%      Low/Mod
                        Rehabilitation/                Housing                                                      homeowners
                        Weatherization                 Rehabilitation
                        Programs                       Loan Program

                                                       Hope-4-Homes       $54,394         Underway        100%      Low/Mod
                                                                                                                    homeowners
                                                                                                                    Low/Mod
                                                       Adapt-a-Home       $ 70,933.58     Complete        100%      homeowners
                                                                                                                    and renters

                                                       Mend-a-Home        $56,270.92      Complete        100%      Low/Mod
                                                                                                                    homeowners
                        Home-
                        ownership              H
                        Programs
                        Homeless
                                               H       Please see projects listed under Other Public Service Needs in Table Tb-1
                        Persons
                        Persons w/
                        Other Special        H/M
                        Needs



  Infrastructure                                   opment needs: Public Service, Youth               The Hope-4-Homes program meets
                                                   Programs, and Senior Programs.                    the high priority need of low and
  No Infrastructure projects were un-                                                                moderate income homeowners. A
  dertaken by the City in 2008.                    Expenditures of the ten (10) CDBG-                total of $  54,394.00  in CDBG funds
                                                   funded public service agencies are                were expended in 2008 to fund
  Public Services                                  summarized in Table 2b-1 below, with              Hope-4-Homes project delivery
                                                   the “sub-needs” of the Priority Com-              costs, marketing for the program, and
  All of the public services funded by             munity Development/Public Service                 the completion of three (3) rehabili-
  the City must serve at least 51% low-            Needs.                                            tation projects, as described in Table
  and moderate-income persons and                                                                    1-7. These expenses were recorded
  households; in practice all or nearly all        Housing                                           under IDIS activity #252. The City’s
  persons served by Beaverton public                                                                 previous housing rehabilitation loan
  services are low/moderate income per-            The housing activities funded by the              provider, Portland Development
  sons. All “non-presumed” low and                 City of Beaverton include several                 Commission expended $32,709.93 in
  moderate income public service activi-           owner-occupied housing rehabilita-                CDBG funds during PY2008, but all
  ties qualify for CDBG funding by col-            tion projects, an accessibility rehab             beneficiaries were reported during
  lecting income and family size for eli-          program for owners and renters, an                PY2007 under IDIS activity #223, or
  gibility; this is verified through an on-        emergency repair program for mo-                  under activity #252 if the activity
  site monitoring of the public services           bile home owners (grants), and relo-              was underway during the transition
  agencies by the City on an annual ba-            cation activities for a multi-family              between providers.
  sis. The public service activities that          property that was purchased by the
  were funded by the CDBG program                  City during previous program years.               The Adapt-a-Home program meets
  address the high priority needs of the           All housing activities benefited low              the high priorities of both low-
  following Priority Community Devel-              and moderate income residents of                  income renters and homeowners. A
                                                   Beaverton. See Table 2b-2.                        total of $80,223.13 in CDBG funds
                                                                                                     was expended in 2008 to fund acces-

Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                             92
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                                   Table 2b-3
                                  Beaverton CDBG Activities Completed in PY 2008
                                     Compared to National Program Objectives
                 National Objective                  Activity Name
                                                     CASA - Washington County
                                                     DVRC/Monika’s House
                                                     Lifeworks NW – New Parent Network
                 570.208(a)(2)
                                                     Good Neighbor Center
                 Low/Mod Limited Clientele
                                                     Loaves & Fishes - Beaverton
                                                     Community Action-Energy and Emergency Rent
                                                     Open Door Counseling Center
                                                     Boys and Girls Aid

                                                     Low Interest Housing Rehabilitation Loan Program (PDC)
                                                     Hope-4-Homes
                 570.208(a)(3)
                                                     Adapt-a-Home
                 Low/Moderate Housing
                                                     Mend-a-Home
                                                     1st/Main Relocation
                 570.208(b)(1)
                                                     Downtown Storefront Improvement Program
                 Area Blight

                 570.206                             CDBG Program Administration




  sibility modifications and related      relocate the residents of the building.                 99-year term lease with a $1 a year fee
  costs for a total of 26 housing units.  $134,792.35 was spent to relocate the                   would better serve the public interest.
  Adapt-a-Home activities were re-        current residents during PY 2007, and                   The funding for this project was re-
  ported under IDIS activity #237.        $63,336.14 was expended in PY2008.                      programmed through the PY2009 An-
                                          Eight low income households and one                     nual Action Plan, which was submit-
  The Mend-a-Home program meets non-profit were relocated as a result of                          ted to HUD in May 2009.
  the high priority need of low- and this activity.
  moderate-income homeowners by                                                                   Carrying Out Planned Actions
  proving grants for local mobile home Changes in Program Objectives:
  owners and homeowners with imme-                                                                The City provided funding to ten of
  diate/emergency rehabilitation needs The City of Beaverton receives citizen                     the 12 projects outlined in the
  and cannot access the Hope-4-Homes input on a regular basis through its                         PY2008 Annual Action Plan. Fund-
  program to undertake rehabilitation Neighborhood Action Committees and                          ing from the cancelled Edward Cen-
  projects. Fifteen households bene- regular public hearing processes. There                      ter Canby House project was reallo-
  fited from the program, and $89,385 has been no adverse citizen response to                     cated to the Adapt-a-Home and
  in CDBG funds was expended during those priorities set during the Comprehen-                    Mend-a-Home programs, which
  PY 2008. Mend-a-Home activities sive Planning process.                                          were approved in the PY2007 An-
  were reported under IDIS activity                                                               nual Action Plan. Specific details on
  #238.                                   The Edwards Center Canby House project                  each activity can be found in Vol-
                                          withdrew its application for CDBG fund-                 ume II. The City pursued all re-
  The City of Beaverton purchased an ing shortly after the beginning of the                       sources that were specified in the
  existing apartment complex in down- PY2008 program year. Funding from that                      2008 Action Plan, including CDBG,
  town Beaverton in 2005. A compre- project was reallocated to the Adapt-a-                       program income, and leveraged/
  hensive assessment was completed Home ($21,178) and Mend-a-Home                                 matching funds. The City supported
  by Alpha Community Development ($35,000) programs.                                              applications by other entities in a fair
  to determine the full scope of reha-                                                            and impartial manner, by providing
  bilitating the property, but the con- The City had also allocated $106,000 for                  the required certification of consis-
  clusion of their assessment was that it Tualatin Valley Housing Partners’ acqui-                tency for HUD programs. In carry-
  would cost more to rehabilitate the sition of a city-owned parcel in downtown                   ing out the above, the City did not
  complex than to rebuild it. As a re- Beaverton. Through the development of                      hinder Consolidated Plan implemen-
  sult, the City submitted an Action the Disposition and Development Agree-                       tation by action or willful inaction.
  Plan amendment in January 2008 to ment, the City and TVHP decided that a

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Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                           93
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                                     Table 2b-4
                              Housing Rehabilitation Statistics for the City of Beaverton
                                          Units          Amount of     Amount of      Other $
                        Program         Completed         CDBG $        HOME $        Sources        Total $
                      Low Interest
                      Housing
                      Rehabilitation
                                        3                 $87,103.93      N/A           N/A          $87,103.93
                      Loan
                      Program
                      (PDC & UCI)
                      Adapt-a-
                                        26                $80,233.13      N/A           N/A          $80,233.13
                      Home
                      Mend-a-
                                        15                $89,385.00      N/A           N/A          $89,385.00
                      Home




  National Objectives:                             the Old Town section of downtown           erate income beneficiaries (a number
                                                   Beaverton. The funds (matching             of these could have reported under
  Table 2b-3 indicates each completed,             grant up to $20,000) are being used        presumed benefit, but collected in-
  funded CDBG activity and its corre-              to help local businesses improve-          come data, which was used by the
  sponding National Objective.                     ment their appearance and attract          City). Income determinations were
                                                   future investment in our downtown.         made for all beneficiaries assisted by
  Acquisition, Rehabilitation or                   To date, nine projects have been           these programs to determine the per-
  Demolition of Occupied Real Prop-                completed (one in PY 2006, three in        cent of low and moderate income
  erty:                                            PY2007, and five in PY2008). Five          beneficiaries.
                                                   projects are currently under con-
  During PY2008, the City completed                struction/bidding process, and three       All public service sub-recipients re-
  the relocation of the eight house-               are in the design/application process.     ceived training and technical assis-
  holds that resided at the 1st and Main           A total of $93,415.87 was expended         tance from staff regarding proper cli-
  property. After asbestos remediation             for the downtown storefront im-            ent intake procedures based on the
  was complete, the City began the                 provement program during PY 2008.          most recent income limits set by HUD.
  demolition of the unsafe buildings at            These funds include the grants made        The City monitors a portion of recipi-
  the 1st and Main site using City staff.          to the business owners and the archi-      ents for compliance with applicable
  As the City completes the demolition             tectural services that were provided       eligibility, fiscal, and programmatic
  it will comply with URA and 1:1                  during the design process (the City        requirements annually. Open Door
  replacement requirements as re-                  provides up to $3,700 in design as-        Counseling and Lifeworks Northwest
  quired by CDBG regulations.                      sistance per project).                     had on-site monitoring visits,

  The City completed a total of three              Limited Clientele:                         Program Income:
  housing rehabilitation loans, 26 ac-
  cessibility rehabilitation grants, and           The City funded eight public service       The City reported a total of
  15 mobile home rehabilitation/repair             agencies with PY 2008 CDBG funds.          $14,914.62 in CDBG program in-
  grants with CDBG funding. None of                Of these, two reported their beneficiar-   come within PY 2008. This program
  these households were displaced as a             ies under the presumed benefit cate-       income is comprised of the follow-
  result of the housing rehabilitation             gory: Washington County Court Ap-          ing:
  activities.                                      pointed Special Advocates (CASA)
                                                   (victims of abuse under 18 years) and       $12,394.33 Housing Rehabilita-
  Economic Development:                            Open Door Counseling counted their            tion Program Income (PDC &
                                                   homeless program beneficiaries under          UCI)
  The City initiated a storefront im-              presumed benefit.
  provement program in PY 2005.                                                                $1,250.00 S p e n c e r H o u s e
  This program offers matching grants              The seven public service activities
                                                                                                 CDBG Loan repayment
  to property owners or businesses in              assisted non-presumed low and mod-


Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                      94
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

   $1,270.29        1st and Main Refund            Neighborhood       Revitalization
                                                     Strategy:

                                                     The City of Beaverton does not have
  Housing Rehabilitation:                            a HUD-approved neighborhood revi-
                                                     talization strategy; therefore, there
  The City works in cooperation with                 are no benchmarks to report against
  Unlimited Choices to manage admini-                for PY2008.
  stration of the Citywide Housing Re-
  habilitation program (Hope-4-Homes).
  The program offers low interest loans
  (0-5%) up to $20,000 to low and mod-
  erate income homeowners for housing
  rehabilitation. Portland Development
  Commission also drew down CDBG
  funds while it completed a number of
  projects it had initiated during PY2007
  (these projects were reported under the
  PY2007 CAPER or under the Hope-4-
  Homes PY2008 achievements).

  The Hope-4-Homes Program completed
  three (3) rehabilitation projects in 2008
  that were funded with CDBG funds. No
  housing rehabilitation activities were
  undertaken that involved acquisition,
  rehabilitation, or demolition of occupied
  real property within 2008. The Adapt-a-
  Home Program completed 26 projects
  within 2008 that improved the accessi-
  bility of homes, mobile homes, and
  apartments for low income seniors and
  persons with disabilities. The Mend-a-
  Home program provided grants of up to
  $5,000 to mobile home owners and
  home owners who cannot access the
  Hope-4-Homes program to complete
  emergency repair/rehabilitation. Fifteen
  Mend-a-Home projects were completed
  during PY2008. See Table 2b-4.




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                95
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)   96
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009


  Part 2. CDBG Financial Summaries
  Washington County and the City of Beaverton




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)   97
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)   98
    Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009
IDIS - C04PR26                                 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT       DATE: 08-10-09
                                              OFFICE OF COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT            TIME:    16:56
                                                      ATED DISBURSEMENT AND INFORMATION SYSTEM        PAGE:        1
                                                       CDBG FINANCIAL SUMMARY FOR PROGRAM YEAR 2008
                                                                07-01-2008 TO 06-30-2009
                                                          WASHINGTON COUNTY CONSORTIUM, OR


PART I:      SUMMARY OF CDBG RESOURCES

       01    UNEXPENDED CDBG FUNDS AT END OF PREVIOUS PROGRAM YEAR                                     2,541,734.65
       02    ENTITLEMENT GRANT                                                                         2,634,338.00
       03    SURPLUS URBAN RENEWAL                                                                             0.00
       04    SECTION 108 GUARANTEED LOAN FUNDS                                                                 0.00
       05    CURRENT YEAR PROGRAM INCOME                                                                 118,932.60
       06    RETURNS                                                                                           0.00
       07    ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL AVAILABLE                                                             0.00
       08    TOTAL AVAILABLE (SUM, LINES 01-07)                                                        5,295,005.25


PART II:     SUMMARY OF CDBG EXPENDITURES

       09    DISBURSEMENTS OTHER THAN SECTION 108 REPAYMENTS AND PLANNING/ADMINISTRATION               2,860,101.92
       10    ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL AMOUNT SUBJECT TO LOW/MOD BENEFIT                                     0.00
       11    AMOUNT SUBJECT TO LOW/MOD BENEFIT (LINE 09 + LINE 10)                                     2,860,101.92
       12    DISBURSED IN IDIS FOR PLANNING/ADMINISTRATION                                               430,257.56
       13    DISBURSED IN IDIS FOR SECTION 108 REPAYMENTS                                                      0.00
       14    ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL EXPENDITURES                                                     68,018.34
       15    TOTAL EXPENDITURES (SUM, LINES 11-14)                                                     3,358,377.82
       16    UNEXPENDED BALANCE (LINE 08 - LINE 15)                                                    1,936,627.43


PART III: LOWMOD BENEFIT THIS REPORTING PERIOD

       17    EXPENDED FOR LOW/MOD HOUSING IN SPECIAL AREAS                                                     0.00
       18    EXPENDED FOR LOW/MOD MULTI-UNIT HOUSING                                                           0.00
       19    DISBURSED FOR OTHER LOW/MOD ACTIVITIES                                                    2,860,101.92
       20    ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL LOW/MOD CREDIT                                                        0.00
       21    TOTAL LOW/MOD CREDIT (SUM, LINES 17-20)                                                   2,860,101.92
       22    PERCENT LOW/MOD CREDIT (LINE 21/LINE 11)                                                       100.00%


LOW/MOD BENEFIT FOR MULTI-YEAR CERTIFICATIONS

       23    PROGRAM YEARS(PY) COVERED IN CERTIFICATION                                        PY     PY    PY
       24    CUMULATIVE NET EXPENDITURES SUBJECT TO LOW/MOD BENEFIT CALCULATION                               0.00
       25    CUMULATIVE EXPENDITURES BENEFITING LOW/MOD PERSONS                                               0.00
       26    PERCENT BENEFIT TO LOW/MOD PERSONS (LINE 25/LINE 24)                                            0.00%




PART IV:     PUBLIC SERVICE (PS) CAP CALCULATIONS

       27    DISBURSED IN IDIS FOR PUBLIC SERVICES                                                       381,758.59
       28    PS UNLIQUIDATED OBLIGATIONS AT END OF CURRENT PROGRAM YEAR                                  206,471.77
       29    PS UNLIQUIDATED OBLIGATIONS AT END OF PREVIOUS PROGRAM YEAR                                 316,467.14
       30    ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL PS OBLIGATIONS                                                        0.00
       31    TOTAL PS OBLIGATIONS (LINE 27 + LINE 28 - LINE 29 + LINE 30)                                271,763.22
       32    ENTITLEMENT GRANT                                                                         2,634,338.00
       33    PRIOR YEAR PROGRAM INCOME                                                                   236,192.58
       34    ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL SUBJECT TO PS CAP                                                     0.00
       35    TOTAL SUBJECT TO PS CAP (SUM, LINES 32-34)                                                2,870,530.58
       36    PERCENT FUNDS OBLIGATED FOR PS ACTIVITIES (LINE 31/LINE 35)                                      9.47%




  Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                99
   Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

PART V:      PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION (PA) CAP

     37 DISBURSED IN IDIS FOR PLANNING/ADMINISTRATION                                    430,257.56
     38 PA UNLIQUIDATED OBLIGATIONS AT END OF CURRENT PROGRAM YEAR                             0.00
     39 PA UNLIQUIDATED OBLIGATIONS AT END OF PREVIOUS PROGRAM YEAR                            0.00
     40 ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL PA OBLIGATIONS                                        68,018.34
     41 TOTAL PA OBLIGATIONS (LINE 37 + LINE 38 - LINE 39 +LINE 40)                      498,275.90
     42 ENTITLEMENT GRANT                                                              2,634,338.00
     43 CURRENT YEAR PROGRAM INCOME                                                      118,932.60
     44 ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL SUBJECT TO PA CAP                                          0.00
     45 TOTAL SUBJECT TO PA CAP (SUM, LINES 42-44)                                     2,753,270.60
  46 PERCENT FUNDS OBLIGATED FOR PA ACTIVITIES (LINE 41/LINE 45)         18.10%


LINE 17 DETAIL: ACTIVITIES TO CONSIDER IN DETERMINING THE AMOUNT TO ENTER ON LINE 17

                        NONE FOUND


LINE 18 DETAIL: ACTIVITIES TO CONSIDER IN DETERMINING THE AMOUNT TO ENTER ON LINE 18

                        NONE FOUND




 Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
 Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                100
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

IDIS - C04PR26                          U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT           DATE: 08-10-09
                                         OFFICE OF COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT              TIME:    16:56
                                         INTEGRATED DISBURSEMENT AND INFORMATION SYSTEM            PAGE:        5
                                          CDBG FINANCIAL SUMMARY FOR PROGRAM YEAR 2008
                                                     07-01-2008 TO 06-30-2009
                                                 WASHINGTON COUNTY CONSORTIUM, OR


LINE 19 DETAIL: ACTIVITIES INCLUDED IN THE COMPUTATION OF LINE 19

PGM      PROJ       IDIS                                                     MATRIX    NTL
YEAR      ID       ACT ID        ACTIVITY NAME                                CODE     OBJ        DRAWN AMOUNT
----     ----      ------        ----------------------------------------    ------   -----   ----------------
2005     0022         461        OCD-HOUSING REHABILITATION PROGRAM          14A      LMH             3,140.13
2005     0022         461        OCD-HOUSING REHABILITATION PROGRAM          14A      LMH             2,453.18
2006     0004         495        CITY OF GASTON WATER RESERVOIR              03J      LMA            49,577.26
2006     0004         495        CITY OF GASTON WATER RESERVOIR              03J      LMA            70,073.74
2006     0004         495        CITY OF GASTON WATER RESERVOIR              03J      LMA            83,615.34
2006     0004         495        CITY OF GASTON WATER RESERVOIR              03J      LMA             4,774.16
2006     0006         497        CITY OF HILLSBORO 21ST AVE SIDEWALK IMP     03L      LMA           259,617.40
2006     0006         497        CITY OF HILLSBORO 21ST AVE SIDEWALK IMP     03L      LMA             5,382.60
2006     0007         498        CASA- CHILDREN'S ADVOCATES                  05N      LMC            10,369.64
2006     0007         498        CASA- CHILDREN'S ADVOCATES                  05N      LMC             5,360.61
2006     0007         498        CASA- CHILDREN'S ADVOCATES                  05N      LMC             2,350.33
2006     0007         498        CASA- CHILDREN'S ADVOCATES                  05N      LMC             8,368.99
2006     0007         498        CASA- CHILDREN'S ADVOCATES                  05N      LMC             8,775.56
2006     0007         498        CASA- CHILDREN'S ADVOCATES                  05N      LMC             1,232.81
2006     0009         500        COMMUNITY ACTION SHELTER WAITLIST           05       LMC             3,438.17
2006     0009         500        COMMUNITY ACTION SHELTER WAITLIST           05       LMC             6,177.71
2006     0009         500        COMMUNITY ACTION SHELTER WAITLIST           05       LMC             3,410.92
2006     0009         500        COMMUNITY ACTION SHELTER WAITLIST           05       LMC               682.70
2006     0009         500        COMMUNITY ACTION SHELTER WAITLIST           05       LMC             1,403.97
2006     0009         500        COMMUNITY ACTION SHELTER WAITLIST           05       LMC             2,768.18
2006     0009         500        COMMUNITY ACTION SHELTER WAITLIST           05       LMC             2,205.99
2006     0009         500        COMMUNITY ACTION SHELTER WAITLIST           05       LMC             2,340.99
2006     0011         502        FAMILY BRIDGE-EXPANDING VOLUNTEER MNGMT     05       LMC             6,020.14
2006     0011         502        FAMILY BRIDGE-EXPANDING VOLUNTEER MNGMT     05       LMC             6,311.50
2006     0011         502        FAMILY BRIDGE-EXPANDING VOLUNTEER MNGMT     05       LMC             6,315.49
2006     0011         502        FAMILY BRIDGE-EXPANDING VOLUNTEER MNGMT     05       LMC             2,113.35
2006     0018         509        OCD- HOUSING REHABILITATION PROGRAM         14A      LMH            11,764.71
2006     0018         509        OCD- HOUSING REHABILITATION PROGRAM         14A      LMH            18,484.39
2006     0018         509        OCD- HOUSING REHABILITATION PROGRAM         14A      LMH             4,855.76
2006     0018         509        OCD- HOUSING REHABILITATION PROGRAM         14A      LMH             6,384.53
2006     0018         509        OCD- HOUSING REHABILITATION PROGRAM         14A      LMH            18,169.15
2006     0018         509        OCD- HOUSING REHABILITATION PROGRAM         14A      LMH             4,800.30
2007     0001         536        ALBERTINA KERR CENTER-GROUP HOME REFURB.    03B      LMC            10,587.77
2007     0001         536        ALBERTINA KERR CENTER-GROUP HOME REFURB.    03B      LMC             7,617.62
2007     0001         536        ALBERTINA KERR CENTER-GROUP HOME REFURB.    03B      LMC            24,808.75
2007     0001         536        ALBERTINA KERR CENTER-GROUP HOME REFURB.    03B      LMC             7,869.26
2007     0003         538        CITY OF TIGARD-TIGARD SR. CENTER REMODEL    03A      LMC            18,927.86
2007     0005         540        CITY OF CORNELIUS-12TH AVE. & S. DOGWOOD    03J      LMA           430,000.00
2007     0008         543        BOYS & GIRLS AID SOCIETY OF OREGON          05D      LMC            11,820.14
2007     0008         543        BOYS & GIRLS AID SOCIETY OF OREGON          05D      LMC            12,484.07
2007     0008         543        BOYS & GIRLS AID SOCIETY OF OREGON          05D      LMC            12,463.04
2007     0008         543        BOYS & GIRLS AID SOCIETY OF OREGON          05D      LMC            11,434.49
2007     0009         544        LUTHERAN COMMUNITY SERVICES- HOPESPRING     05       LMC             3,777.35
2007     0009         544        LUTHERAN COMMUNITY SERVICES- HOPESPRING     05       LMC             1,649.66
2007     0009         544        LUTHERAN COMMUNITY SERVICES- HOPESPRING     05       LMC             5,673.16
2007     0009         544        LUTHERAN COMMUNITY SERVICES- HOPESPRING     05       LMC             1,556.66
2007     0009         544        LUTHERAN COMMUNITY SERVICES- HOPESPRING     05       LMC             7,259.52
2007     0009         544        LUTHERAN COMMUNITY SERVICES- HOPESPRING     05       LMC             4,261.66
2007     0009         544        LUTHERAN COMMUNITY SERVICES- HOPESPRING     05       LMC             2,095.66
2007     0009         544        LUTHERAN COMMUNITY SERVICES- HOPESPRING     05       LMC             4,434.32
2007     0009         544        LUTHERAN COMMUNITY SERVICES- HOPESPRING     05       LMC             2,092.01



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Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                101
   Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

2007     0012           547      ECUMENICAL MINISTRIES OF OR-SHARED HSG.    05    LMC     2,594.25
2007     0012           547      ECUMENICAL MINISTRIES OF OR-SHARED HSG.    05    LMC     6,720.77
2007     0012           547      ECUMENICAL MINISTRIES OF OR-SHARED HSG.    05    LMC     6,217.46
2007     0012           547      ECUMENICAL MINISTRIES OF OR-SHARED HSG.    05    LMC     6,212.66
2007     0015           550      WASHINGTON COUNTY-PROJECT ACCESS           05M   LMC    24,702.00
2007     0020           555      OCD- HARDE                                 14A   LMH     4,500.00
2007     0020           555      OCD- HARDE                                 14A   LMH     4,639.97
2007     0020           555      OCD- HARDE                                 14A   LMH     6,973.50
2007     0020           555      OCD- HARDE                                 14A   LMH    11,369.61
2007     0020           555      OCD- HARDE                                 14A   LMH     9,043.00
2007     0020           555      OCD- HARDE                                 14A   LMH     2,114.98
2007     0020           555      OCD- HARDE                                 14A   LMH       693.03
2008     0001           589      CA-SHELTER IMPROVEMENTS                    03C   LMC     8,377.10
2008     0001           589      CA-SHELTER IMPROVEMENTS                    03C   LMC        17.49
2008     0001           589      CA-SHELTER IMPROVEMENTS                    03C   LMC     6,848.19
2008     0001           589      CA-SHELTER IMPROVEMENTS                    03C   LMC       265.75
2008     0002           590      FOREST GROVE SCHOOL DIST-HEALTH CENTER     03P   LMC   444,355.63
2008     0003           591      ALBERTINA KERR GROUP HOME PURCH-REFURB     01    LMC   250,000.00
2008     0004           592      CITY OF TIGARD SENIOR CENTER REMODEL PH2   03A   LMC   103,269.88
2008     0004           592      CITY OF TIGARD SENIOR CENTER REMODEL PH2   03A   LMC    41,839.12
2008     0005           593      CITY OF HILLSBORO-BICENTENNIAL PARK RENO   03F   LMC    31,305.85
2008     0008           596      WA CNTY, DLUT SELL & TURK RD SRFC TRTMNT   03K   LMA     3,649.88
2008     0008           596      WA CNTY, DLUT SELL & TURK RD SRFC TRTMNT   03K   LMA   187,492.44
2008     0009           597      COMMUNITY ACTION-BASIC NEEDS ASSISTANCE    05    LMC     7,255.00
2008     0009           597      COMMUNITY ACTION-BASIC NEEDS ASSISTANCE    05    LMC    10,012.00
2008     0009           597      COMMUNITY ACTION-BASIC NEEDS ASSISTANCE    05    LMC    12,733.00
2008     0010           598      COMMUNITY ACTION-BRIDGES TO HOUSING        05L   LMC     3,103.00
2008     0010           598      COMMUNITY ACTION-BRIDGES TO HOUSING        05L   LMC        50.00
2008     0011           599      ST VINCENT DE PAUL ST MATHEWS RENT ASST    05    LMC     2,500.00
2008     0011           599      ST VINCENT DE PAUL ST MATHEWS RENT ASST    05    LMC     1,250.00
2008     0011           599      ST VINCENT DE PAUL ST MATHEWS RENT ASST    05    LMC     1,250.00
2008     0011           599      ST VINCENT DE PAUL ST MATHEWS RENT ASST    05    LMC     2,500.00
2008     0011           599      ST VINCENT DE PAUL ST MATHEWS RENT ASST    05    LMC     2,500.00
2008     0011           599      ST VINCENT DE PAUL ST MATHEWS RENT ASST    05    LMC     1,250.00
2008     0011           599      ST VINCENT DE PAUL ST MATHEWS RENT ASST    05    LMC     2,500.00
2008     0011           599      ST VINCENT DE PAUL ST MATHEWS RENT ASST    05    LMC     1,250.00
2008     0012           600      LCSNW-BREAKING THE HOMELESS CYCLE          05O   LMC     6,168.89
2008     0012           600      LCSNW-BREAKING THE HOMELESS CYCLE          05O   LMC     7,073.76
2008     0012           600      LCSNW-BREAKING THE HOMELESS CYCLE          05O   LMC    13,688.31
2008     0012           600      LCSNW-BREAKING THE HOMELESS CYCLE          05O   LMC     8,870.48
2008     0012           600      LCSNW-BREAKING THE HOMELESS CYCLE          05O   LMC     4,204.75
2008     0012           600      LCSNW-BREAKING THE HOMELESS CYCLE          05O   LMC     4,283.30
2008     0012           600      LCSNW-BREAKING THE HOMELESS CYCLE          05O   LMC     4,587.68
2008     0012           600      LCSNW-BREAKING THE HOMELESS CYCLE          05O   LMC     9,159.18
2008     0013           601      DVRC-EMPOWERMENT FUND                      05    LMC       569.24
2008     0014           602      POST CNVCTN CRIME VICTIMS' SPECIALIST      05    LMC     8,835.13
2008     0014           602      POST CNVCTN CRIME VICTIMS' SPECIALIST      05    LMC     8,696.45
2008     0014           602      POST CNVCTN CRIME VICTIMS' SPECIALIST      05    LMC     5,282.04
2008     0014           602      POST CNVCTN CRIME VICTIMS' SPECIALIST      05    LMC     8,597.38
2008     0015           603      TVHP-EVICT PRVNTN & LIFE ENHANCEMENTS      05    LMC    12,344.31
2008     0015           603      TVHP-EVICT PRVNTN & LIFE ENHANCEMENTS      05    LMC     3,283.55
2008     0016           604      FOREST GROVE SENIOR GARDIANSHIP ASST       05A   LMC     1,506.08
2008     0016           604      FOREST GROVE SENIOR GARDIANSHIP ASST       05A   LMC     4,220.07
2008     0016           604      FOREST GROVE SENIOR GARDIANSHIP ASST       05A   LMC     1,883.50
2008     0016           604      FOREST GROVE SENIOR GARDIANSHIP ASST       05A   LMC     4,083.62
2008     0016           604      FOREST GROVE SENIOR GARDIANSHIP ASST       05A   LMC     3,472.44
2008     0016           604      FOREST GROVE SENIOR GARDIANSHIP ASST       05A   LMC     1,497.27
2008     0016           604      FOREST GROVE SENIOR GARDIANSHIP ASST       05A   LMC     1,892.78
2008     0017           605      COMMUNITY ACTION COMPREHENSIVE WX          14H   LMH     2,031.26
2008     0017           605      COMMUNITY ACTION COMPREHENSIVE WX          14H   LMH     1,489.63
2008     0017           605      COMMUNITY ACTION COMPREHENSIVE WX          14H   LMH     2,906.95
2008     0017           605      COMMUNITY ACTION COMPREHENSIVE WX          14H   LMH     1,481.68
2008     0017           605      COMMUNITY ACTION COMPREHENSIVE WX          14H   LMH     2,916.90
2008     0017           605      COMMUNITY ACTION COMPREHENSIVE WX          14H   LMH     3,352.51
2008     0017           605      COMMUNITY ACTION COMPREHENSIVE WX          14H   LMH     2,879.57


 Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
 Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                       102
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

2008     0017           605      COMMUNITY ACTION COMPREHENSIVE WX       14H   LMH              1,420.85
2008     0017           605      COMMUNITY ACTION COMPREHENSIVE WX       14H   LMH              1,520.65
2008     0018           606      COMMUNITY ACTION SELF HELP WX           14H   LMH              2,539.43
2008     0018           606      COMMUNITY ACTION SELF HELP WX           14H   LMH              2,468.00
2008     0018           606      COMMUNITY ACTION SELF HELP WX           14H   LMH              5,342.58
2008     0018           606      COMMUNITY ACTION SELF HELP WX           14H   LMH              4,023.92
2008     0018           606      COMMUNITY ACTION SELF HELP WX           14H   LMH              4,807.11
2008     0018           606      COMMUNITY ACTION SELF HELP WX           14H   LMH              2,524.73
2008     0018           606      COMMUNITY ACTION SELF HELP WX           14H   LMH              3,294.23
2008     0019           607      REBUILDING TOGETHER-WASHINGTON COUNTY   14H   LMH              2,500.00
2008     0019           607      REBUILDING TOGETHER-WASHINGTON COUNTY   14H   LMH              2,500.00
2008     0019           607      REBUILDING TOGETHER-WASHINGTON COUNTY   14H   LMH              2,500.00
2008     0019           607      REBUILDING TOGETHER-WASHINGTON COUNTY   14H   LMH              2,500.00
2008     0021           609      OCD-HARDE                               14A   LMH              2,319.46
2008     0021           609      OCD-HARDE                               14A   LMH              8,279.00
2008     0021           609      OCD-HARDE                               14A   LMH              5,906.52
2008     0021           609      OCD-HARDE                               14A   LMH                943.91
2008     0021           609      OCD-HARDE                               14A   LMH             12,427.79
2008     0021           609      OCD-HARDE                               14A   LMH                812.20
2008     0022           610      OCD-HOUSING ADMINISTRATION              14H   LMH             19,235.00
2008     0022           610      OCD-HOUSING ADMINISTRATION              14H   LMH             10,913.23
2008     0022           610      OCD-HOUSING ADMINISTRATION              14H   LMH             53,063.63
2008     0022           610      OCD-HOUSING ADMINISTRATION              14H   LMH            139,783.26
2008     0034           625      EDWARDS CTR, FLORENCE GROUP HOME        03B   LMC              2,500.00
2008     0034           625      EDWARDS CTR, FLORENCE GROUP HOME        03B   LMC              7,500.00
                                                                                        ----------------
                                                                               TOTAL:       2,860,101.92




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                          103
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

IDIS - C04PR26                       U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT        DATE: 08-07-09
                                      OFFICE OF COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT           TIME:    12:10
                                     INTEGRATED DISBURSEMENT AND INFORMATION SYSTEM          PAGE:        1
                                      CDBG FINANCIAL SUMMARY FOR PROGRAM YEAR 2008
                                                07-01-2008 TO 06-30-2009
                                                     BEAVERTON, OR

 PART I:        SUMMARY OF CDBG RESOURCES

01   UNEXPENDED CDBG FUNDS AT END OF PREVIOUS PROGRAM YEAR                                      575,222.93
02   ENTITLEMENT GRANT                                                                          603,998.00
03   SURPLUS URBAN RENEWAL                                                                            0.00
04   SECTION 108 GUARANTEED LOAN FUNDS                                                                0.00
05   CURRENT YEAR PROGRAM INCOME                                                                 16,120.28
06   RETURNS                                                                                          0.00
07   ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL AVAILABLE                                                       -1,205.66
08   TOTAL AVAILABLE (SUM, LINES 01-07)                                                       1,194,135.55

 PART II:       SUMMARY OF CDBG EXPENDITURES

09   DISBURSEMENTS OTHER THAN SECTION 108 REPAYMENTS AND PLANNING/ADMINISTRATION                  542,264.78
10   ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL AMOUNT SUBJECT TO LOW/MOD BENEFIT                                      0.00
11   AMOUNT SUBJECT TO LOW/MOD BENEFIT (LINE 09 + LINE 10)                                        542,264.78
12   DISBURSED IN IDIS FOR PLANNING/ADMINISTRATION                                                 93,003.71
13   DISBURSED IN IDIS FOR SECTION 108 REPAYMENTS                                                       0.00
14   ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL EXPENDITURES                                                           0.00
15   TOTAL EXPENDITURES (SUM, LINES 11-14)                                                        635,268.49
16   UNEXPENDED BALANCE (LINE 08 - LINE 15)                                                       558,867.06


 PART III: LOWMOD BENEFIT THIS REPORTING PERIOD

17   EXPENDED FOR LOW/MOD HOUSING IN SPECIAL AREAS                                                      0.00
18   EXPENDED FOR LOW/MOD MULTI-UNIT HOUSING                                                            0.00
19   DISBURSED FOR OTHER LOW/MOD ACTIVITIES                                                       448,850.91
20   ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL LOW/MOD CREDIT                                                         0.00
21   TOTAL LOW/MOD CREDIT (SUM, LINES 17-20)                                                      448,850.91
22   PERCENT LOW/MOD CREDIT (LINE 21/LINE 11)                                                         82.77%

LOW/MOD BENEFIT FOR MULTI-YEAR CERTIFICATIONS

23   PROGRAM YEARS(PY) COVERED IN CERTIFICATION                                         PY   PY      PY
24   CUMULATIVE NET EXPENDITURES SUBJECT TO LOW/MOD BENEFIT CALCULATION                                0.00
25   CUMULATIVE EXPENDITURES BENEFITING LOW/MOD PERSONS                                                0.00
26   PERCENT BENEFIT TO LOW/MOD PERSONS (LINE 25/LINE 24)                                             0.00%

 PART IV:       PUBLIC SERVICE (PS) CAP CALCULATIONS

27   DISBURSED IN IDIS FOR PUBLIC SERVICES                                                         90,599.70
28   PS UNLIQUIDATED OBLIGATIONS AT END OF CURRENT PROGRAM YEAR                                        27.00
29   PS UNLIQUIDATED OBLIGATIONS AT END OF PREVIOUS PROGRAM YEAR                                        0.00
30   ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL PS OBLIGATIONS                                                         0.00
31   TOTAL PS OBLIGATIONS (LINE 27 + LINE 28 - LINE 29 + LINE 30)                                  90,626.70
32   ENTITLEMENT GRANT                                                                            603,998.00
33   PRIOR YEAR PROGRAM INCOME                                                                     27,463.24
34   ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL SUBJECT TO PS CAP                                                      0.00
35   TOTAL SUBJECT TO PS CAP (SUM, LINES 32-34)                                                   631,461.24
36   PERCENT FUNDS OBLIGATED FOR PS ACTIVITIES (LINE 31/LINE 35)                                      14.35%




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                              104
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

   PART V:        PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION (PA) CAP

  37    DISBURSED IN IDIS FOR PLANNING/ADMINISTRATION                                                93,003.71
  38    PA UNLIQUIDATED OBLIGATIONS AT END OF CURRENT PROGRAM YEAR                                        0.00
  39    PA UNLIQUIDATED OBLIGATIONS AT END OF PREVIOUS PROGRAM YEAR                                       0.00
  40    ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL PA OBLIGATIONS                                                        0.00
  41    TOTAL PA OBLIGATIONS (LINE 37 + LINE 38 - LINE 39 +LINE 40)                                  93,003.71
  42    ENTITLEMENT GRANT                                                                           603,998.00
  43    CURRENT YEAR PROGRAM INCOME                                                                  16,120.28
  44    ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL SUBJECT TO PA CAP                                                     0.00
  45    TOTAL SUBJECT TO PA CAP (SUM, LINES 42-44)                                                  620,118.28
  46    PERCENT FUNDS OBLIGATED FOR PA ACTIVITIES (LINE 41/LINE 45)                                     15.00%

   LINE 17 DETAIL: ACTIVITIES TO CONSIDER IN DETERMINING THE AMOUNT TO ENTER ON LINE 17

               NONE FOUND

  LINE 18 DETAIL: ACTIVITIES TO CONSIDER IN DETERMINING THE AMOUNT TO ENTER ON LINE 18

           NONE FOUND
  LINE 19 DETAIL: ACTIVITIES INCLUDED IN THE COMPUTATION OF LINE 19

  PGM       PROJ        IDIS                                                   MATRIX    NTL
  YEAR       ID        ACT ID       ACTIVITY NAME                               CODE     OBJ        DRAWN AMOUNT
  ----      ----       ------       ----------------------------------------   ------   -----   ----------------
  2006      0003          223       OWNER-OCCUPIED HOUSING REHAB               14A      LMH            23,966.09
  2006      0003          223       OWNER-OCCUPIED HOUSING REHAB               14A      LMH             2,495.37
  2006      0003          223       OWNER-OCCUPIED HOUSING REHAB               14A      LMH             6,248.47
  2007      0003          237       ADAPT-A-HOME                               14A      LMH            10,392.86
  2007      0003          237       ADAPT-A-HOME                               14A      LMH             9,306.71
  2007      0003          237       ADAPT-A-HOME                               14A      LMH             6,292.86
  2007      0003          237       ADAPT-A-HOME                               14A      LMH             6,449.79
  2007      0003          237       ADAPT-A-HOME                               14A      LMH             6,277.86
  2007      0003          237       ADAPT-A-HOME                               14A      LMH             4,969.64
  2007      0003          237       ADAPT-A-HOME                               14A      LMH             7,285.72
  2007      0003          237       ADAPT-A-HOME                               14A      LMH             7,195.72
  2007      0003          237       ADAPT-A-HOME                               14A      LMH             5,343.67
  2007      0003          237       ADAPT-A-HOME                               14A      LMH            16,718.30
  2007      0003          238       MEND-A-HOME                                14A      LMH            26,425.00
  2007      0003          238       MEND-A-HOME                                14A      LMH             4,823.34
  2007      0003          238       MEND-A-HOME                                14A      LMH            10,681.26
  2007      0003          238       MEND-A-HOME                                14A      LMH            11,806.26
  2007      0003          238       MEND-A-HOME                                14A      LMH             7,441.18
  2007      0003          238       MEND-A-HOME                                14A      LMH             3,931.26
  2007      0003          238       MEND-A-HOME                                14A      LMH             5,628.76
  2007      0003          238       MEND-A-HOME                                14A      LMH             4,316.26
  2007      0003          238       MEND-A-HOME                                14A      LMH             6,186.26
  2007      0003          238       MEND-A-HOME                                14A      LMH             8,145.42
  2007      0003          240       1ST AND MAIN TENANT RELOCATION             08       LMH             2,960.86
  2007      0003          240       1ST AND MAIN TENANT RELOCATION             08       LMH            58,375.28
  2007      0003          241       1ST AND MAIN DEMO/PARKING LOT              04       LMH               920.00
  2007      0003          241       1ST AND MAIN DEMO/PARKING LOT              04       LMH             1,610.74
  2007      0003          241       1ST AND MAIN DEMO/PARKING LOT              04       LMH            14,294.50
  2007      0003          241       1ST AND MAIN DEMO/PARKING LOT              04       LMH            18,057.52
  2007      0003          241       1ST AND MAIN DEMO/PARKING LOT              04       LMH             5,310.25
  2008      0002          243       CAO ENERGY AND EMERGENCY RENT PROGRAM      05       LMC               349.70
  2008      0002          243       CAO ENERGY AND EMERGENCY RENT PROGRAM      05       LMC             6,437.00
  2008      0002          244       CASA WASHINGTON COUNTY                     05D      LMC             7,521.00
  2008      0002          244       CASA WASHINGTON COUNTY                     05D      LMC             4,479.00
  2008      0002          245       DVRC-MONICA'S HOUSE                        05G      LMC             3,500.00
  2008      0002          245       DVRC-MONICA'S HOUSE                        05G      LMC             3,500.00
  2008      0002          245       DVRC-MONICA'S HOUSE                        05G      LMC             3,500.00




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                105
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

2008      0002           245      DVRC-MONICA'S HOUSE                       05G   LMC              3,500.00
2008      0002           246      GOOD NEIGHBOR CENTER                      05    LMC              3,000.00
2008      0002           246      GOOD NEIGHBOR CENTER                      05    LMC              3,000.00
2008      0002           246      GOOD NEIGHBOR CENTER                      05    LMC              3,000.00
2008      0002           246      GOOD NEIGHBOR CENTER                      05    LMC              3,000.00
2008      0002           247      LWNW-NEW PARENT NETWORK                   05    LMC              3,750.00
2008      0002           247      LWNW-NEW PARENT NETWORK                   05    LMC              3,750.00
2008      0002           247      LWNW-NEW PARENT NETWORK                   05    LMC              3,750.00
2008      0002           247      LWNW-NEW PARENT NETWORK                   05    LMC              3,750.00
2008      0002           248      LOAVES & FISHES MINORITY OUTREACH         05A   LMC              2,313.00
2008      0002           249      OPEN DOOR COUNSELING CENTER               05    LMC              2,125.00
2008      0002           249      OPEN DOOR COUNSELING CENTER               05    LMC              2,125.00
2008      0002           249      OPEN DOOR COUNSELING CENTER               05    LMC              2,125.00
2008      0002           249      OPEN DOOR COUNSELING CENTER               05    LMC              2,125.00
2008      0002           250      BOYS AND GIRLS AID SAFE PLACE FOR YOUTH   05D   LMC              5,000.00
2008      0002           250      BOYS AND GIRLS AID SAFE PLACE FOR YOUTH   05D   LMC              5,000.00
2008      0002           250      BOYS AND GIRLS AID SAFE PLACE FOR YOUTH   05D   LMC              5,000.00
2008      0002           250      BOYS AND GIRLS AID SAFE PLACE FOR YOUTH   05D   LMC              5,000.00
2008      0003           252      HOPE-4-HOMES (HOUSING REHAB LOAN PGRM)    14A   LMH              4,200.00
2008      0003           252      HOPE-4-HOMES (HOUSING REHAB LOAN PGRM)    14A   LMH             11,688.00
2008      0003           252      HOPE-4-HOMES (HOUSING REHAB LOAN PGRM)    14A   LMH             20,906.00
2008      0003           252      HOPE-4-HOMES (HOUSING REHAB LOAN PGRM)    14A   LMH              4,600.00
2008      0003           252      HOPE-4-HOMES (HOUSING REHAB LOAN PGRM)    14A   LMH              4,200.00
2008      0003           252      HOPE-4-HOMES (HOUSING REHAB LOAN PGRM)    14A   LMH              4,600.00
2008      0003           252      HOPE-4-HOMES (HOUSING REHAB LOAN PGRM)    14A   LMH              4,200.00
                                                                                           ----------------
                                                                                  TOTAL:         448,850.91




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                            106
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009


  Part 3. HOME Investments Partnerships Program
  Washington County and the City of Beaverton


    In 2009, the Washington County                   will fund site work and on-site infra-   Homeownership programs for mod-
   HOME Consortium saw tremendous                    structure at the site in Beaverton to-   erate income households and hous-
   progress in a number of large con-                wards the production of five single-     ing for seniors, farmworkers and per-
   struction and rehabilitation activities           family homes. In addition, the last      sons with substance abuse issues are
   for HOME rental projects. The Con-                home assisted with downpayment           a medium priority.
   sortium witnessed the completion of               assistance was purchased at Wil-
   construction of 128 total units at                lamette West Habitat’s Lindsay Lane      Washington County’s current
   Merlo Station Apartments I and II in              site bringing to close a project that    CAPER report submission describes
   Beaverton, accessibility improve-                 was started with Land Acquisition        and assesses how a variety of federal
   ments to ten units at Gateway Com-                funds back in 1997.                      housing resources—including
   mons Apartments in Hillsboro, the                                                          HOME funds—were used during the
   major rehabilitation of 205 units at              HOME investment in these projects        reporting period to meet these prior-
   Sunset Gardens and Sierra West                    completed between July 1, 2008 to        ity needs and other local objectives.
   Apartments in Hillsboro and Willow                June 30, 2009 include predevelop-
   Park in Forest Grove, and the minor               ment, systems development charges        The Consortium continues to make
   rehabilitation of the Bonnie Brae                 (SDCs), acquisition, construction,       HOME funding available through an
   five-bedroom group home in Beaver-                rehabilitation and development costs     open, competitive application proc-
   ton.                                              with commitment levels up to $2.91       esses to meet the needs of all priority
                                                     million in new construction and          groups. Activities carried out under
   The Consortium has also made great                $1.57 million in rehabilitation re-      the HOME program are evaluated on
   progress with its homebuyer pro-                  spectively. This HOME investment         the basis of their consistency with
   grams and projects. Washington                    leveraged an additional $46.5 mil-       the County’s adopted housing strat-
   County has now spent all of its avail-            lion for these completed projects        egy, and projects making use of pro-
   able American Dream Downpayment                   with total development costs in ex-      gram funds are expected to address
   Initiative funds first awarded in 2003.           cess of $50.9 million. As a result,      these identified priorities. Washing-
   Habitat for Humanity continues to                 483 units were constructed or reha-      ton County continues to be success-
   have two homebuyer projects in de-                bilitated with 61 HOME-assisted          ful at making its HOME funds avail-
   velopment at Farmington Road and                  units added to the affordable housing    able to projects serving a wide vari-
   Huntting Park (formerly Leadership                inventory in Washington County.          ety of priority housing needs. The
   Row II). Farmington Road, a scat-                                                          County remains successful at using
   tered site project located at the corner          The Washington County Consor-            its HOME funds to leverage tax
   of 160th and Farmington (Vance                    tium’s 2005-2010 Consolidated Plan       credits and bond financing. Closer
   Place) and 170th and Farmington                   has established the following high       coordination of the County's HOME
   (Lawson Place), now has seven of its              priorities for assisting low-income      funding process with the State of
   proposed fourteen single-family                   residents and allocating federal af-     Oregon's consolidated funding cycle
   homes already constructed at both                 fordable housing resources:              has helped to facilitate this trend.
   sites with families having moved into
   all seven homes as of July 2009. The               Housing for low-income renters        In addition to the seven HOME-
   last remaining ADDI funds were also                  (including households with chil-      assisted projects that were completed
   provided to a household at the Vance                 dren)                                 this year, four projects are still under
   Place site in July 2009. Huntting                  Owner-occupied housing reha-          development as of June 30, 2009.
   Park, the other ongoing Habitat for                  bilitation programs                   Each of these projects meets one of
   Humanity project, received another                 Homeownership programs                the County’s identified priorities for
   award of HOME funds from the City                  Housing and supportive services       affordable housing:
   of Beaverton in 2009 after its initial               for the homeless
   award came in 2007 for acquisition                 Housing and supportive services
   of the property. The additional award                for persons with disabilities

Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                       107
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

  Housing for Low-Income Renters                       Hillsboro was completed as of         Homeownership Programs
  (including households with children)                 June 30, 2009 to close out a pro-
                                                       ject that initially received HOME     Completed Projects
  Completed Projects                                   funds for new construction of 138
                                                       units in 2002. The remaining ac-       Seven homes purchased by low-
   New construction of 80 units                      cessibility improvements con-            income, first-time homebuyer
     (Merlo I) for large families built                sisted of work to the parking area       households through the ADDI
     next to a MAX light rail station                  of one building, including the           program. Three of the house-
     planned to include housing for                    designation of accessible parking        holds had median family incomes
     developmentally disabled adults                   spaces and the improvement of a          (MFI) of less than 50%. 4 home-
     and an infusion of federal and                    ramp. The project was scheduled          owners had incomes between
     state tax credits along with a part-              to occur over three years to elimi-      50% - 80% MFI. Four households
     nership with our regional trans-                  nate the need to move tenants            assisted with ADDI funds also
     portation district (Beaverton).                   (only vacant units were involved)        received HOME homebuyer as-
     This project began occupancy in                   and to spread out the cost to the        sistance at the Farmington Road
     June 2008 but still had out-                      project owner.                           project. One additional home-
     standing expenditures beyond                                                               owner at Lindsay Lane
     June 30, 2008. As of June 30,                                                              (completed project in 2008) re-
     2009, beneficiary data has now                Projects Under Development                   ceived ADDI assistance.
     been entered in IDIS to complete
     the project.                                   New construction of 48 units of        See Chart B (on page ??) for visual
                                                      rental housing for seniors at The      representation of the combined fund-
   New construction of 48 units                     Knoll at Tigard Apartments lo-         ing from CDBG, HOME and ADDI
     (Merlo II) for large families built              cated at a site in the City of Ti-     the American Dream Downpayment
     next to a MAX light rail station                 gard Urban Renewal Area. The           Initiative (ADDI).
     with an infusion of federal and                  sponsor of the project is Commu-
     state tax credits along with a part-             nity Partners for Affordable           Projects Under Development
     nership with our regional trans-                 Housing. The CHDO funds for
     portation district (Beaverton).                  this project were initially re-         New construction of 14 single-
     This project began occupancy in                  served in December 2006 and the           family units for homeownership
     June 2008 but still had out-                     project received an additional            at Farmington Road in Aloha.
     standing expenditures beyond                     award in February 2009 for a to-          Seven of the fourteen units have
     June 30, 2008. As of June 30,                    tal commitment of $1.5 million.           now been constructed and sold to
     2009, beneficiary data has now                   Predevelopment activities for the         eligible households. All five
     been entered in IDIS to complete                 project have now been completed           HOME-assisted units at Lawson
     the project.                                     with construction to commence in          Place at 170th and Farmington
                                                      April 2010 after successfully be-         have now been constructed and
   Acquisition and rehabilitation of                ing awarded federal tax credits           sold. Two of the five remaining
     204 units of housing for large                   from the State of Oregon in May           HOME-assisted units at Vance
     families and farmworkers at Si-                  2009.                                     Place at 160th and Farmington
     erra West and Sunset Gardens in                                                            have been constructed and sold
     Hillsboro and Willow Park in                  Owner-Occupied Housing Rehabili-             with a remaining schedule of two
     Forest Grove. The final rehabili-             tation Programs (HOME-funded)                to three homes expected to be
     tation work was completed as of                                                            constructed in the next program
     June 30, 2009 and the beneficiary             No HOME dollars are being allo-              year.
     was entered into IDIS for com-                cated to housing rehab programs ei-
     pletion.                                      ther for the County or the City of         New construction of five single-
                                                   Beaverton.                                   family units for homeownership
   Accessibility improvements to                                                              at the Huntting Park (formerly
     ten units (7 for mobility impair-                                                          Leadership Row Phase II) site in
     ments and 3 for sensory impair-                                                            Beaverton. The land purchase
     ments) at Gateway Commons in                                                               was completed early in PY 2007.

Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                       108
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                                                              3a-1
                                              Relationship of Washington County
                                              HOME Funds to Housing Priorities
                                                                              Funds
                                                                            Expended in         $ Drawn after                           % L/M
            Sub Need            Priority             Activity                   PY                June 30t h           Status           B enefit

      Low Income Renters        H           Merlo I                       $30,690                                  Completed          100%
                                            Merlo II                      $123,299                                 Completed          100%
                                            HDC Sierra West               $0                                       Completed          100%
                                            HDC Sunset Gardens            $14,312                                  Completed          100%
                                            HDC Willow Park               $0                                       Completed          100%
                                            Gateway Commons               $6,628                                   Completed          100%
                                            CPAH The Knoll                $91,094              $7,468              Underway           100%

      Homeownership             H           WWHfH Farmington Road         $335,753                                 Underway           100%
      Programs                              American Dream (ADDI)         $70,000              $2,316              Underway           100%
                                            Huntting Park (Leadership
                                            Row)                          $0                                       Underway           100%

      Special Needs             H           Edwards Center Bonnie
      Housing                               Brae Group Home               $0                                       Completed          100%

      CH DO Capacity            H           TVHP C HDO Op                 $26,420                                  Completed
      Building                              CPAH CHDO Op                  $26,420                                  Completed          N/A
                                            Bienestar CHDO Op             $19,815              $6,605              Completed

      Admin                     N/A         HOME Administration           $0                   $171,210            Completed          N/A

                                                                          $744,431 (as         $187,599 (not
                                                                          shown in IDIS)       reflected in
                                                                                               IDIS)

          Total expended in the HOME Program (agrees with County          $932,030
                                                financial records)


   Note: HUD ’s IDIS system is not an accounting system. Therefore, for the HOME Program, accrued expenses drawn down after June 30 th
                                                                                                 th                                               th
   are not reflected in IDIS reports. The column above entitled “$ Drawn Down after June 30 ” has been added to reflect draws after June 30 .
   If one adds the columns together, one will have a true reflection of the total fiscal year expenditures which will agree with the County’s audit.
   However, the column entitled “Funds Expended in PY” will agree with the IDIS reports.



        The City of Beaverton allocated                Edwards Centers’ Bonnie Brae                       On Site Inspections
        portions of its prior year HOME                group home is a five-bedroom group
        funding and program income to                  home for persons with developmen-                  Washington County annually moni-
        assist Willamette West Habitat                 tal disabilities located in Beaverton.             tors HOME-assisted units in com-
        for Humanity with this project.                As of June 30, 2008, it had a few                  pleted affordable housing projects
        The City of Beaverton allocated                remaining outstanding expenditures                 subject to HOME affordability re-
        its entire 2009 HOME funding                   so it was to be completed in this pro-             strictions. Washington County de-
        allocation to Willamette West                  gram year. In August 2008, benefici-               velops an annual work plan that es-
        Habitat for Humanity for site                  ary data was entered into IDIS to                  tablishes which HOME-assisted pro-
        work and on-site infrastructure                complete this project.                             jects are subject to monitoring re-
        now that the land has been pur-                                                                   view in that year. This work plan is
        chased.                                        Projects in Development                            based on the HOME requirements
                                                                                                          that projects are monitored annually,
    Housing and Supportive Services for                None.                                              every two years or every three years,
    the homeless and persons with spe-                                                                    based on the total number of units in
    cial needs.                                        Onsite Inspections, Affirmative                    the project.
                                                       Marketing, and MBE/WBE Par-
    Completed Projects                                 ticipation                                         The requirements for onsite monitor-
                                                                                                          ing are followed to determine that

Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                                          109
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

  compliance with HOME property                      oped a chapter on monitoring which
  and affordability standards are main-              includes an outline of the process        In examining the racial and demo-
  tained. In PY 2008-2009, Washing-                  used by staff. Checklists will be pro-    graphic makeup of projects assisted
  ton County monitored 29 affordable                 vided as well. The HOME rehabili-         by the HOME Consortium, it is evi-
  housing projects. The monitoring                   tation standards have also been           dent that minority residents are over-
  schedule drafted last year was imple-              drafted and are in use for future reha-   represented in these projects than in
  mented this year and all units were                bilitation projects.                      the County population as a whole. In
  monitored as planned.                                                                        comparison with 2007 American
                                                     Affirmative Marketing                     Community Survey (2008 American
  The “physical standards” of the units                                                        Community Survey data not avail-
  reviewed this Program Year met                     Currently, the Washington County          able until Sept. 22, 2009) estimates
  HQS standards at the initial review.               HOME Consortium has made great            from the U.S. Census, the percent-
  The “HOME rents” category, includ-                 strides in ensuring outreach and af-      ages of Hispanics, Blacks and Native
  ing using appropriate utility allow-               firmative marketing procedures in-        Hawaiians/ Pacific Islanders (42.0%,
  ances, current income guidelines,                  crease equitable access so that Wash-     4.1%, and 0.8% respectively) were
  and HOME leases met HOME stan-                     ington County residents least likely      higher in the Consortium’s rental
  dards at the initial review. The                   to apply to federally-assisted housing    projects (using HUD Dashboard re-
  “occupancy standards” category was                 might have ample opportunities to         port data) than in rental households
  satisfactory.    All residents were                do so. In assessing current affirma-      within the County overall (14.1%,
  qualified income-eligible house-                   tive marketing procedures, it is ap-      1.7%, and 0.6% respectively). Mean-
  holds. Minor issues were addressed                 parent that developers and Commu-         while, the white population in rental
  and the owners made necessary re-                  nity Housing Development Organi-          households was higher in the County
  pairs to units or corrections to files.            zation (CHDOs) continue to inform         overall (69.6%) than in the Consor-
  All issues identified during the                   the public through the prominent          tium’s rental projects (49.4%).
  monitoring visits were corrected.                  display of fair housing marketing
                                                     posters and in all advertising and        In homebuyer projects, a similar
  As part of our work on a HOME                      outreach materials to affirmatively       trend of affirmatively marketing
  Procedures Manual, staff have devel-               market their HOME-assisted units.         units to minorities appears to hold

                               Racial Groups Served by HOME-Funded Rental and Homebuyer Projects
                                           as Compared with Rental and Ownership Rates
                                                  for Washington County Overall
                                White        Black         Am. Indian/    Asian          Pacific Is/   Hispanic      Other
                                                           Alaskan                       Hawaiian
          Rental Units
          (Highlights show areas with higher percentages than those of the county overall)
          2007 ACS        69.6 %    1.7%       1.5%          5.8%           0.6%        14.1%                        6.8%
          Data for Wash
          Co.
          Wash Co.        49.4%     4.1%       0%            1.2%           0.8%        42.0%                        0.8%
          Dashboard
          Report
          6/30/09
          Owned Units
          (Highlights show areas with higher percentages than those of the county overall)
          2007 ACS        82.3%     .5%        .2%           7.6%           .1%         5.3%                         4%
          Data for Wash
          Co.
          Wash Co.        54.0%     4.8%       3.2%          7.9%           1.6%        27.0%                        0%
          Dashboard
          Report
          6/30/09

Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                      110
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

  true. Hispanics comprise 27.0% of                 by women were hired as subcontrac-
  homebuyers in the Consortium’s                    tors in these rehabilitation and new
  homebuyer projects while Hispanics                construction projects. The consor-
  only constitute 5.3% of homeowners                tium will continue to revisit its
  in the County overall. American In-               MBE/WBE Policies and Procedures
  dian/ Alaskan Native residents also               on an annual basis to ensure it is still
  constitute a higher percentage of                 applicable to current projects and
  homebuyers in the Consortium’s                    ensures that minority- and women-
  projects at 3.2% than in the County               owned businesses are sought out to
  as a whole with only 0.2% of the                  bid on contracts and subcontracts
  homeowner population. Pacific Is-                 issued using HOME Consortium
  lander/Hawaiian residents also con-               funding.
  stitute a higher percentage of home-
  buyers in the Consortium’s projects               Program Income
  at 1.6% than in the County as a
  whole with only 0.1% of the home-                 HOME program income recorded
  owner population. In 2009, the                    this year was $145,455.99.
  Asian population residing in the
  County’s homebuyer projects also                  Match
  joined the ranks of the overrepre-
  sented homeowner populations with                 Washington County uses the IDIS
  7.9% in comparison to 7.6% of the                 HOME Matching Liability Report to
  overall County population. This                   determine the match liability each
  demographic data highlights that                  year. The match liability for 2008 is
  residents least likely to apply for fed-          $683,892. Match credit is measured
  eral housing and/or populations un-               from July 1, 2008 through June 30,
  derrepresented in Washington                      2009.
  County have successfully accessed
  federally-assisted rental and owner-              The HOME Match Report details the
  occupied housing units in greater                 value of match generated this year
  proportions than their demographic                and reflects the carryover match
  numbers indicate in this HOME                     amount. $693,308 in match was
  Consortium.                                       generated this year. In actuality,
                                                    more match was generated this year
  MBE/WBE Participation                             however match regulations only al-
                                                    low bond financed match to equal
  The Washington County HOME                        25% of the match liability. A large
  Consortium also engages in outreach               amount of bond match will be car-
  to minority- and women-owned busi-                ried over into the next fiscal year
  nesses in its most recent opportuni-              (see notes at the bottom of the match
  ties for construction contracts and               report).
  subcontracts for rehabilitation and
  new construction projects. In this                This results in an excess match car-
  reporting period, there were nineteen             ried over to PY 2009 in the amount
  (19) minority-owned businesses                    of $670,814.
  hired as subcontractors in these pro-
  jects with seventeen (17) businesses
  owned by Hispanics, one business
  owned by a Black, not Hispanic indi-
  vidual and one business owned by an
  American Indian or Alaska Native.
  In addition, six (6) businesses owned

Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                  111
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)   112
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

    Part 3. HOME Reports
    Washington County and the City of Beaverton




                                     Bienestar rehabilitation project — Sunset Gardens Apartments before and after.




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
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  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
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  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
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  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
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  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
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  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009




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  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009


Part 4. Housing Opportunities for Persons With AIDS
(HOPWA)
Washington County and the City of Beaverton



    This section is not applicable to
    Washington County, the City of Bea-
    verton or the Washington County
    Consortium at this time. The City of
    Portland manages the HOPWA grant
    for the Portland Metropolitan Area.




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
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  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
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  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009


Part 5. Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG)
Washington County ESG-Supported Activities

    Prior to program year 2001, Wash-                from the County. PY 2008 was the          Levy funds, Community Action’s
    ington County was the direct recipi-             fifth year of this relationship and it    Emergency Housing account, and
    ent of ESG funds. However, in 2000               continued to work well for both enti-     Continuum of Care funds.
    Hillsboro became its own entitle-                ties.
    ment and therefore the city’s popula-                                                      ESG funds were used to provide
    tion was taken out of the County’s               In PY 2008, 1,200 persons were            homeless prevention activities, shel-
    overall population in order to figure            served under the ESG program. This        ter operations and other essential
    the allocation for CDBG and ESG.                 is below the annual goal of 1,450         services (See Tables 5-2a and 5-2b).
    This resulted in the ESG funds being             established in the Consolidated Plan.
    redirected to the State of Oregon.               However, when combined with the           Community Action expended
    By 2004, the County’s population                 homeless services provided under          $4,433, or 5%, on administrative
    increased sufficiently to make it eli-           the CDBG program, the numbers far         costs to run the program. This is the
    gible to receive ESG funds directly              exceed the annual goals. See Table        maximum allowable under the pro-
    from HUD. In the intervening years               5-1 for an overall look at the number     gram. Volume II provides additional
    of 2001-2003, the State had subcon-              of people served via the CDBG and         program information via IDIS-
    tracted the ESG funds to Community               ESG programs.                             generated reports.
    Action, which in turn, partnered with
    county homeless providers. The re-               Under the ESG program, each sub-          In November 2006, a ballot measure
    lationship between Community Ac-                 grantee, other than the jurisdiction,     was passed to fund another public
    tion and the non-profits worked well.            must match the funding provided by        safety levy which included funds for
    When the County resumed responsi-                HUD with an equal amount of funds         homeless services. This funding will
    bility for the ESG program, it was               from other sources. Each non-profit       be available through 2010-11.
    agreed that Community Action                     supplied the required match. Match-
    would continue to administer the                 ing funds were available from the         In February 2009, Congress enacted
    grant with management oversight                  Washington County Public Safety           the Homelessness Prevention and

                                                    Table 5-1
                          Homeless Statistics Reported Under CDBG and ESG Programs
                                    Non-Profit Provider                  County CDBG          City CDBG      ESG

                     Community Action                                              4,926                         177

                     DVRC                                                              5                         201

                     HopeSpring                                                       43                           44

                     Good Neighbor Center                                                                        264

                     Family Bridge                                                    81                           67

                     Open Door Counseling Center                                                                 447

                     Boys and Girls Aid Safe Place Shelter                            63

                     St Vincent de Paul Rent Assistant                             3,051

                     TVHP - Eviction Prevention                                      156

                     LCSNW - Breaking the Homeless Cycle                              89

                     TOTAL                                                         8,414            -           1,200


Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
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  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

  Rapid Re-Housing Program. The                    tance and housing placement and
  ESG allocation formula was used to               stabilization services. The reporting
  allocate the HPRP resources and the              will be handled outside of the CA-
  funding was passed through to exist-             PER reporting process utilizing in-
  ing ESG entitlement jurisdictions.               stead the reporting mechanisms asso-
  However, the connection to ESG                   ciated with the Continuum of Care
  ends there. The program has differ-              funding. Washington County will
  ent program rules and is targeted to             receive $824,990 to assist in the
  short and medium term rental assis-              homelessness prevention and rapid
                                                   re-housing efforts.

                                                                Table 5-2a
                                                                ESG Match
                                                   ESG            Match                                   Match
                     AGENCY                       Amount         Amount           Match Source            Grantor
                 Community Action                 $13,299        $13,299      Wash Co Safety Levy         County
                 Good Neighbor Center             $13,299        $13,299      Wash Co Safety Levy         County

                 LCSNW HopeSpring                 $22,166        $22,166      Continuum of Care           HUD

                 Open Door Counseling             $13,300        $13,300      Emergency Housing Acct      CA
                 DVRC                             $13,299        $13,299      Wash Co Safety Levy         County
                 Family Bridge                    $13,299        $13,299      Wash Co Safety Levy         County




                                                           Table 5-2b
                                                     Summary of ESG Services
                                                                 Essential     Homeless       Operating
        Project Sponsor                            Total         Services      Prevention       Costs         Admin Costs
        Community Action                            $13,299                                          $8,866         $4,433

        Good Neighbor Center                        $13,299                                         $13,299
        LCSNW HopeSpring                            $22,166         $12,579         $9,587
        Open Door Counseling Center                 $13,300         $13,300

        DVRC                                        $13,299                                         $13,299

        Family Bridge                               $13,299                                         $13,299
                                     TOTAL          $88,662         $25,879         $9,587          $48,763         $4,433
                                                       100%            29%             11%             55%             5%




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                                122
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009


Part 6. Public Participation
Washington County and the City of Beaverton



    Notice of the availability of a draft
    2008 Consolidated Annual Perform-
    ance and Evaluation Report for pub-
    lic review and comment was pub-
    lished The Oregonian, El Hispanic,
    and The Beaverton Valley Times on
    September 17, 2009. Copies of the
    report were made available for re-
    view beginning Thursday, Septem-
    ber 24th at the Office of Community
    Development, 328 West Main, Suite
    100, Hillsboro, Oregon. Public com-
    ments on the draft plan were ac-
    cepted through October 8, 2009.




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
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  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009

                      NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING AND COMMENT PERIOD
                                             ON
                                    WASHINGTON COUNTY’S
               CONSOLIDATED ANNUAL PERFORMANCE AND EVALUATION REPORT
                                           (CAPER)
                                FOR PROGRAM YEAR 2008/2009
                                             AND
            PUBLIC HEARING ON 2010-15 HOUSING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

  Washington County and the City of Beaverton have prepared their 2008 CAPER report as required by
  federal regulations. The report details project accomplishments as well as expenditures throughout
  the period July 1, 2008 through June 30, 2009 for the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)
  Program, the Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG), the American Dream Downpayment Initiative (ADDI)
  and the HOME Investment Partnerships (HOME) Program. The purpose of the report is to measure
  to what extent the jurisdictions are meeting priority needs, goals and strategies as outlined in the 2005-
  2010 Consolidated Plan.

  The report is presented in two volumes. Volume One contains the narrative describing the CDBG,
  ESG, ADDI and HOME activities according to HUD’s prescribed format. Volume Two contains re-
  ports generated from HUD’s Integrated Disbursement and Information System. Both are available for
  review and comment and can be downloaded from the County’s web site at: http://
  www.co.washington.or.us/CommunityDevelopment/Planning/annual-performance-report.cfm

  The report is due to HUD on October 16th. A 15-day public comment period on the report begins on
  Thursday, September 24th and runs through 5:00 p.m., Thursday, October 8th. A public hearing on
  October 8th will be held to receive comments on the CAPER. The hearing will also be an opportunity
  to accept public comment on housing and community development needs in the County as part of the
  preparation of the 2010-2015 Consolidated Plan. The hearing will take place in the Washington
  County Public Services Building, 155 North First Avenue, Hillsboro, located in the Cafeteria. The
  public hearing starts at 7:00 p.m.

                                          Comments on the CAPER may be directed to:
                                                       Jennie H. Proctor
                                      Washington County Office of Community Development
                                                 328 W. Main Street, Suite 100
                                                     Hillsboro, OR 97123
                                                     Phone: 503-846-8814
                                                      Fax: 503-846-2882
                                                             or by
                                         E-mail: jennie_proctor@co.washington.or.us

  The meeting room is accessible to persons with mobility impairments. Please notify the Office of Commu-
  nity Development at least 7 days before a hearing if special equipment or interpreting service is needed. If
  you have a disability or are hearing impaired and need assistance, please make arrangements in advance by
  calling 503-846-8814 or TTY 503-846-4598.




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)                                                    124
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)   125
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
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  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report 2008-2009




Washington County Consortium of Washington County, Oregon
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)   127
                 Washington County Office of Community Development
                       328 West Main Street, Suite 100, MS7
                             Hillsboro, OR 97123
                             Phone (503) 846-8814
                             Fax (503) 846-2882
                             TTY (503) 846-4598
Internet: http://www.co.washington.or.us/CommunityDevelopment/index.cfm

				
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