The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Safety Manual

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					The Crown Estate
Offshore Aerial Survey Safety Manual




                                       6th August 2010
Offshore Aerial Survey Safety Manual
Part A – General

Part B – Aircraft Specific

Part B1 – Aircraft Example

Part C – Route and Aerodromes

Part D – Training

Part E – Audit
Part A General

CONTENTS

Part A General ............................................................................................................................................... 1

Abbreviations and Symbols.............................................................................................................................. 7

Part A General ............................................................................................................................................... 8

SECTION 0: ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL ........................................ 8
     0.1   Introduction................................................................................................................................. 8
     0.2   System of Amendment and Revision ......................................................................................... 9

SECTION 1:          ORGANISATION AND RESPONSIBILITIES ......................................................................... 10
     1.0            General..................................................................................................................................... 10
     1.0.1          Laws, Regulations and Procedures – Operators Responsibilities ........................................... 10
     1.0.2          Operating Region and Aircraft.................................................................................................. 10
     1.1            Organisational Structure........................................................................................................... 10
     1.2            Appointments and Names of Staff with Specified Duties and Responsibilities.............. 11
     1.3            Responsibilities and Duties of Operations Management Personnel ........................................ 11
     1.4            Authority, Duties and Responsibilities of the Commander ....................................................... 12
     1.5            Technical Specialist (Crew Member) Responsibilities ............................................................. 14

SECTION 2:          OPERATIONAL CONTROL AND SUPERVISION ................................................................. 15
     2.1            Supervision of the Operation by the Operator.......................................................................... 15
     2.2            System of Communication of Additional Operational Instructions and Information ................. 15
     2.3            Accident Prevention and Flight Safety Programme ................................................................. 16
     2.4            Operational Control .................................................................................................................. 16
     2.5            Power to Inspect....................................................................................................................... 17
     2.6            Production, Retention and Document Records........................................................................ 17

SECTION 3:          SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM ....................................................................................... 18
     3.1            Safety Management System .................................................................................................... 18
     3.2            Appointments, Names of Post Holders .................................................................................... 18
     3.3            Safety Management System Policy.......................................................................................... 18
     3.4            Purpose of the Safety Management System............................................................................ 18
     3.6            External and Internal SMS Audits ............................................................................................ 19
     3.7            Procedure for SMS Audits........................................................................................................ 19
     3.8            Review of Audits and Procedures ............................................................................................ 20
     3.9            Quality Control of Sub-contractors ........................................................................................... 20
     3.10           Training of Quality Personnel ................................................................................................... 20

SECTION 4: CREW COMPOSITION ........................................................................................................... 21
     4.1   Crew Composition .................................................................................................................... 21

SECTION 5: QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS ...................................................................................... 22
     5.1   Flight Crew ............................................................................................................................... 22
     5.2   Training, Checking and Supervising Personnel ....................................................................... 22

SECTION 6:          CREW HEALTH PRECAUTIONS ........................................................................................... 23
     6.1            Alcohol ...................................................................................................................................... 23
     6.2            Aeromedical Advice .................................................................................................................. 23
     6.3            Blood Donation ......................................................................................................................... 23
     6.4            Narcotics, Drugs and other Medication ..................................................................................... 23
     6.5            Diving........................................................................................................................................ 23
     6.6            Fitness ...................................................................................................................................... 23
     6.7            Sleep and Rest ......................................................................................................................... 23



The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual                                    Part A      General                                  Page 1 of 48
SECTION 7:         FLIGHT TIME LIMITATIONS .................................................................................................. 24
     7.1           Fatigue of Crew and Flight Time Limitations............................................................................ 24
     7.2           FDP Limits ................................................................................................................................ 25
     7.3           Records .................................................................................................................................... 26

SECTION 8:         OPERATING PROCEDURES ................................................................................................. 27
     8.1           Flight Preparation Instructions.................................................................................................. 27
     8.1.1         Minimum Flight Altitudes .......................................................................................................... 27
     8.1.2         Criteria for Determining the Usability of Aerodromes............................................................... 28
     8.1.3         Methods for the Determination of Aerodrome Operating Minima ............................................ 28
     8.1.4         En route Operating Minima for VFR Flights ............................................................................. 29
     8.1.5         Determination of the Quantities of Fuel and Oil Carried .......................................................... 29
     8.1.6          Mass and Centre of Gravity..................................................................................................... 30
     8.1.7         ATS Flight Plan......................................................................................................................... 31
     8.1.8         Operator’s Aeroplane Technical Log........................................................................................ 31
     8.1.9         List of documents, forms and additional information to be carried........................................... 34
     8.2           Ground Handling Instructions................................................................................................... 35
     8.2.1         Fuelling Procedures ................................................................................................................. 35
     8.2.2         Aeroplane and Passenger Handling Procedures Related to Safety ........................................ 36
     8.2.3         De-icing and Anti-icing on the Ground ..................................................................................... 36
     8.2.4         Stowage of Baggage and Cargo .............................................................................................. 36
     8.3.2         Navigation Procedures ............................................................................................................. 37
     8.3.3         Altimeter Setting Procedures.................................................................................................... 37
     8.3.4         Policy and Procedures for In-Flight Fuel Management ............................................................ 38
     8.3.5         Adverse and Potentially Hazardous Atmospheric Conditions .................................................. 38
     8.3.6         Wake Turbulence ..................................................................................................................... 39
     8.3.7         Crew Members at their Stations ............................................................................................... 39
     8.3.8         Use of Safety Belts for Crew and Passengers ......................................................................... 39
     8.3.9         Use of Vacant Crew Seats ....................................................................................................... 40
     8.3.10        Cabin Safety Requirements ..................................................................................................... 40
     8.3.11        Passenger Briefing Procedures................................................................................................ 40
     8.3.12        Additional Crew Members ........................................................................................................ 41
     8.4           Use of Minimum Equipment Lists and Configuration Deviation Lists....................................... 41
     8.5           Oxygen Requirements.............................................................................................................. 42
     8.6           Aeroplane Maintenance ........................................................................................................... 42

SECTION 9:         DANGEROUS GOODS AND WEAPONS .............................................................................. 43
     9.1           Policy on the Transport of Dangerous Goods .......................................................................... 43
     9.2           Duties of all personnel involved................................................................................................ 44
     9.3           Acceptance of Dangerous Goods ............................................................................................ 44

SECTION 10: SECURITY............................................................................................................................. 45
     10.1 General..................................................................................................................................... 45

SECTION 11: HANDLING OF ACCIDENTS AND OCCURRENCES.......................................................... 46
     11.1 Events....................................................................................................................................... 46
     11.3 Confidentiality ........................................................................................................................... 47
     11.4 Links to Online Reporting ......................................................................................................... 47

SECTION 12: RULES OF THE AIR ............................................................................................................. 48




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The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual               Part A   General           Page 3 of 48
AMENDMENT RECORD


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The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual   Part A   General               Page 4 of 48
DEFINITIONS AND ABBREVIATIONS
The following lists of Definitions and Abbreviations are derived and expanded from the International Civil
Aviation Organisation’s (ICAO) Annex 6 to the Convention on International Civil Aviation: Part 2 for
International General Aviation. The edition of Annex 6 used is the consolidated 7th.



DEFINITIONS

When the following terms are used in The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual, they have the
following meanings:

Aerial work. An aircraft operation in which an aircraft is used for specialized services such as agriculture,
construction, photography, surveying, observation and patrol, search and rescue, aerial advertisement, etc.

Aerodrome. A defined area on land or water (including any buildings, installations and equipment) intended
to be used either wholly or in part for the arrival, departure and surface movement of aircraft.

Aeroplane. A power-driven heavier-than-air aircraft, deriving its lift in flight chiefly from aerodynamic reactions
on surfaces which remain fixed under given conditions of flight.

Aircraft. Any machine that can derive support in the atmosphere from the reactions of the air other than the
reactions of the air against the earth’s surface.

Alternate aerodrome. An aerodrome to which an aircraft may proceed when it becomes either impossible or
inadvisable to proceed to or to land at the aerodrome of intended landing.

Commercial air transport operation. An aircraft operation involving the transport of passengers, cargo or
mail for remuneration or hire.

Dangerous goods. Articles or substances which are capable of posing a risk to health, safety, property or the
environment and which are shown in the list of dangerous goods in the Technical Instructions or which are
classified according to those Instructions.

Flight crew member. A licensed crew member charged with duties essential to the operation of an aircraft
during a flight duty period.

Flight manual. A manual, associated with the certificate of airworthiness, containing limitations within which
the aircraft is to be considered airworthy, and instructions and information necessary to the flight crew
members for the safe operation of the aircraft.

Flight plan. Specified information provided to air traffic services units, relative to an intended flight or portion
of a flight of an aircraft.

General aviation operation. An aircraft operation other than a commercial air transport operation or an aerial
work operation.

Industry codes of practice. Guidance material developed by an industry body, for a particular sector of the
aviation industry to comply with the requirements of the ICAO’s Standards and Recommended Practices,
other aviation safety requirements and the best practices deemed appropriate.

Instrument meteorological conditions (IMC). Meteorological conditions expressed in terms of visibility,
distance from cloud, and ceiling, less than the minima specified for visual meteorological conditions.

Maintenance. The performance of tasks required to ensure the continuing airworthiness of an aircraft,
including any one or combination of overhaul, inspection, replacement, defect rectification, and the
embodiment of a modification or repair.

Maintenance release. A document which contains a certification confirming that the maintenance work to
which it relates has been completed in a satisfactory manner, either in accordance with the approved data
and the procedures described in the maintenance organization’s procedures manual or under an equivalent
system.

The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual           Part A   General                      Page 5 of 48
Meteorological information. Meteorological report, analysis, forecast, and any other statement relating to
existing or expected meteorological conditions.

Night. The hours between the end of evening civil twilight and the beginning of morning civil twilight or such
other period between sunset and sunrise, as may be prescribed by the appropriate authority.

Note. — Civil twilight ends in the evening when the centre of the sun’s disc is 6 degrees below the horizon
and begins in the morning when the centre of the sun’s disc is 6 degrees below the horizon.

Operating base. The location from which operational control is exercised.
Note. — An operating base is normally the location where personnel involved in the operation of the
aeroplane work and the records associated with the operation are located. An operating base has a degree of
permanency beyond that of a regular point of call.
Operational flight plan. The operator’s plan for the safe conduct of the flight based on considerations of
aeroplane performance, other operating limitations and relevant expected conditions on the route to be
followed and at the aerodromes concerned.

Operations manual. A manual containing procedures, instructions and guidance for use by operational
personnel in the execution of their duties.

Operator. A person, organization or enterprise engaged in or offering to engage in an aircraft operation.

Note. — In the context of The Crown Estate Manual, the operator is not engaged in the transport of
passengers, cargo or mail for remuneration or hire.

Pilot-in-command. The pilot designated by the operator or the owner as being in command and charged with
the safe conduct of a flight.

Psychoactive substances. Alcohol, opioids, cannabinoids, sedatives and hypnotics, cocaine, other
psychostimulants, hallucinogens, and volatile solvents, whereas coffee and tobacco are excluded.

Repair. The restoration of an aeronautical product to an airworthy condition to ensure that the aircraft
continues to comply with the design aspects of the appropriate airworthiness requirements used for the
issuance of the type certificate for the respective aircraft type, after it has been damaged or subjected to
wear.

Safety management system. A systematic approach to managing safety, including the necessary
organisational structures, accountabilities, policies and procedures.

State of Registry. The State on whose register the aircraft is entered.

Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC). Meteorological conditions expressed in terms of visibility,
distance from cloud, and ceiling, equal to or better than specified minima.




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual          Part A   General                    Page 6 of 48
Abbreviations and Symbols


When the following abbreviations and symbols are used in The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual,
they have the following meanings:


 Abbreviations

 AAIB        Air Accidents Investigation Branch          ILS                 Instrument landing system
 ADS         Automatic dependent surveillance            IMC                 Instrument meteorological conditions
 ADF         Automatic direction finding                 IS-BAO              International standard for business
 Agl         Above ground level                                              aircraft operations
 AIC         Aeronautical information circulars          JAA                 Joint Aviation Authorities
 AIP         Aeronautical information publication        kg                  Kilogram
 AIS         Aeronautical information service            km                  Kilometre
 AOC         Air Operator’s Certificate                  km/h                Kilometres per hour
 APS         Aeroplane prepared for service              kt                  Knot
 ARC         Airworthiness renewal certificate           LARS                Low level aviation radar service
 ATC         Air traffic control                         m                   Metre
 ATPL        Airline Transport Pilot’s Licence           MEL                 Minimum equipment list
 ATS         Air traffic services                        MHz                 Megahertz
 C of A      Certificate of Airworthiness                MMEL                Master minimum equipment list
 C of G      Centre of gravity                           MOR                 Mandatory occurrence reporting
 CAP         Civil Aviation Publication                  MORA                Minimum off-route altitude
 CDL         Configuration deviation list                NAV                 Navigation
 cm          Centimetre                                  NDB                 Non-directional beacon
 CRM         Crew resource management                    NM                  Nautical mile
 c/s         Callsign                                    NOTAM               Notices to Airmen
 DME         Distance measuring equipment                QFE                 Pressure height above airfield
 DOM         Dry operating mass                          QNH                 Area pressure
 EASA        European Aviation Safety Agency             R/T                 Radiotelephony
 ELT         Emergency locator transmitter               RWY                 Runway
 FDP         Flight duty period                          SAR                 Search and Rescue
 FIR         Flight information region                   SOP                 Standard operating procedure
 FL          Flight level                                SRP                 Sector record page
 FM          Frequency modulation                        TACAN               Tactical air navigation (UHF nav aid)
 FODCOM      Flight operations department                TMA                 Terminal area
             communication                               UHF                 Ultra high frequency
 ft          Foot                                        VFR                 Visual flight rules
 FTL         Flight time limitation                      VMC                 Visual meteorological conditions
 g           Normal acceleration                         VOR                 VHF omnidirectional radio range
 GASIL       General aviation safety information
             leaflet                                     Symbols
 IBAC        International Business Aviation Council
 ICAO        International Civil Aviation Organisation   °C                  Degrees Celsius
 IFR         Instrument flight rules                     %                   Per cent




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual            Part A   General                       Page 7 of 48
Part A General

SECTION 0: ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL

0.1     Introduction

0.1.1        This generic Offshore Operations Manual (“the manual”) is derived from the European
             operations guidance in EU-Ops 1, itself based on ICAO Annex 6. It follows the UK CAA’s
             guidance for A to A commercial air transport operations and also the work which was conducted
             by the Joint Aviation Authorities (JAA) in developing a harmonised set of requirements for Aerial
             Work operations in Europe. The JAA guidance was developed further by the International
             Business Aircraft Council (IBAC) and is the basis for the International Standard for Business
             Aircraft Operations (IS-BAO). Particular acknowledgement is made to the copyrighted IS-BAO
             Audit Protocol which has been adapted to suit this specialist aerial survey activity. This
             document is an interim measure produced by The Crown Estate to establish minimum
             acceptable operational standards for offshore survey operations in the vicinity of wind farms or
             prospective sites for such installations. The guidance is also intended to put in place a “best
             practice” culture for this type of aerial work which has not yet been addressed by the European
             Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) as further development of the JAA work. The EASA guidance
             on Aerial Work is currently estimated for 2012.

0.1.2        The manual is for the use and guidance of all company operating staff, who are to ensure that all
             offshore survey flights are planned and executed in accordance with its policies and
             requirements.

0.1.3        The manual is sub-divided into the following Parts, which may be supplemented by such other
             publications as the aeroplane flight manual or pilot’s operating handbook:

              Part A     General Information, Requirements and Operations.

              Part B     Aeroplane Type Operating Procedures and Requirements.

              Part C     Flight Guide.

              Part D     Training Manual.

             Part E      Audit Protocol.

0.1.4        Where necessary, specific terms are defined at the beginning of the sections to which they are
             appropriate.

0.1.5        The pronoun ‘he’ is used throughout all Parts. Where appropriate, the pronoun ‘she’ should be
             inferred or assumed.


0.1.6        ICAO definition of an Aerial Work Operation

             an aircraft operation in which an aircraft is used for specialised services such as agriculture,
             construction, photography, surveying, observation and patrol, search and rescue, or aerial
             advertisement.
             NOTE: This manual is not intended to cover Commercial Air Transport or Corporate Aviation.




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual        Part A   General                  Page 8 of 48
0.1.7       Common Language

             The common language for all aerial survey operations will be ENGLISH. This will include all
             ground and flight publications, instructions, manuals and all verbal communication internally and
             to third parties.


0.2     System of Amendment and Revision

0.2.1        This manual is issued on the authority of [the Company], and the Chief Pilot will authorise all
             amendments to it, as required by the Company or by The Crown Estate. All amendments to all
             parts of it will be in the form of printed replacement pages. Revision pages will be annotated to
             show the date of issue (and date of effect if different); the amendment list number, and the
             portion of amended text will be indicated by a vertical marginal line adjacent to the changes.
             Each amendment will be accompanied by a revised list of effective pages, with their dates of
             issue, and by a certificate of receipt/incorporation. An amendment list record will be maintained
             at the front of each manual.

0.2.2        The Company will ensure that a copy of the manual is readily available and held in the Company
             Operations Office. Sufficient additional copies will be provided to ensure that all operating staff
             and any training staff have ready access to them when required, and to enable one copy to be
             lodged with The Crown Estate. The Company will maintain an up-to-date list of manuals,
             together with their copy numbers and their locations, or the name/appointment of the copy
             holder, as appropriate. Amendments will be issued to copy holders or nominated individuals who
             will be required to amend particular number copies. Amendments should be entered on receipt,
             and the amendment record completed. Certificates of incorporation should be returned to the
             Company as soon as possible after the amendments have been completed.

0.2.3        Details of revisions which may be urgently required in the interests of flight safety, or which are
             supplementary to this manual, will be promulgated as Flying Staff Instructions. Those of a
             temporary nature will be cancelled as soon as they are no longer relevant. Those of long-term
             application will be incorporated into the manual when it is next amended, or within six months of
             their effective date, whichever is the sooner.

0.2.4        Manuscript amendments are not permitted.




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual        Part A   General                    Page 9 of 48
SECTION 1: ORGANISATION AND RESPONSIBILITIES


1.0       General

          The operator of the aircraft will be [                                       ], ‘the Company’.

1.0.1     Laws, Regulations and Procedures – Operators Responsibilities

              The operator will ensure that all employees and crew members comply with the laws, regulations
              and procedures of those states in which the operations are conducted and which are pertinent to
              the performance of their duties.

1.0.2     Operating Region and Aircraft

1.0.2.1       The operating region is defined as The United Kingdom extending to the Flight Information
              Region (FIR) boundaries over the sea.

1.0.2.2       The aircraft used for survey operations are [                ] and [              ]


1.1       Organisational Structure




                                                          Managing Director
                                                    Accountable and Safety Manager




                                                                                     Maintenance
                                                                                      Company

                                                                                  Chief Engineer




                                                                                          Flight Safety
                           Operations        Chief Pilot       Training Captain          and Accident       Security Officer
                            Manager                                                    Prevention Officer

                          Operations
                          Assistant          Line Pilot




[The actual structure of your company should be posted in to replace the example above]




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual                 Part A     General                           Page 10 of 48
1.2       Appointments and Names of Staff with Specified Duties and Responsibilities.

1.2.1         Managing Director                            [       ]
              Telephone: [      ]

1.2.2         Accountable and Safety Manager               [       ]
              Telephone: [      ]

1.2.3         Operations Manager                           [       ]
              Telephone: [      ]

1.2.4        Operations Assistant                          [       ]
             Telephone: [        ]

1.2.5         Chief Pilot                                  [       ]
              Telephone: [        ]

1.2.6         Chief Engineer                               [       ]
              Telephone: [        ]

1.2.7         Security Officer                             [       ]
              Telephone: [        ]

1.2.8         Flight Safety and Accident Prevention Officer        [       ]
              Telephone [        ]

1.2.9         Training Captain                             [       ]
              Telephone [         ]


1.3       Responsibilities and Duties of Operations Management Personnel

1.3.1         The aviation responsibilities and duties of personnel covered by Paras 1.1 and 1.2, above are
              listed below. These are in broad terms and should be agreed by all concerned.

1.3.1.1       Managing Director

              Responsible for the overall direction of [Company] aviation and overall responsibility for safety.

1.3.1.2       Accountable and Safety Manager

              Overall responsibility for the safe conduct of air operations and liaison officer with third party
              maintenance organisations. Overall responsibility for the Company SMS.

1.3.1.3      Operations Manager

              Responsible to the Managing Director for the general running of the Company’s Operations
              Department; aircraft maintenance scheduling; monitoring operations for compliance with
              legislation; delegation of responsibility; training of staff other than flight crew members; content
              and amendment of Operations Manuals. The Operations Manager may authorise his Operations
              Staff to act on his behalf.




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual          Part A   General                   Page 11 of 48
1.3.1.4       Operations Assistant

              Responsible to the Operations Manager for the smooth and safe day-to-day running of the
              Operations Department.

1.3.1.5       Chief Pilot

              Responsible to the Managing Director for aircrew conduct, discipline and supervision; flight
              safety; accepting/signing for training/testing on behalf of the Company; issue of flying staff
              instructions; Flight Time Limitations (FTL) Scheme: overall responsibility for efficient operation of
              FTL Scheme; checking returned documentation to ensure compliance; processing Commander’s
              Discretion Reports; overall responsibility for dangerous goods including briefings, where
              required, on dangerous goods policy; preparation and monitoring the validity of: Performance
              Data; Loading instructions and Dry Operating Mass (DOM) data; Commander’s Flight Briefs;
              Operational Flight Plans; Allowable Deficiencies/MEL; Checklists. He may authorise flight crew
              to act on his behalf.

1.3.1.6      Chief Engineer (Third Party Maintenance)

              Responsible for ensuring smooth and safe operation of the engineering support.

1.3.1.7       Security Officer

              Responsible to the Managing Director for all matters affecting security, including the
              establishment and maintenance of security procedures within the Company. The Security Officer
              will keep the Operations Department informed of all relevant security matters.

1.3.1.8       Flight Safety and Accident Prevention Officer

              Responsible for the Accident Prevention and Flight Safety Programme shown at 2.3

1.3.1.9       Training Captain

              Responsible to the Managing Director for accepting/signing for training/testing on behalf of the
              Company, training standards and overall responsibility for training. He shall also assist the Chief
              Pilot in maintaining the highest possible standard of flying in the Company.

1.3.1.10      All persons involved in ground and flight operations will be fully aware of all Company rules and
              regulations, will carry out their particular duties to a satisfactory standard and will be aware of
              their responsibilities and the relationship of such duties to the operation as a whole.


1.4       Authority, Duties and Responsibilities of the Commander

1.4.1         The Commander shall:

              (a)   be responsible for the safe operation of the aeroplane and the safety of its occupants
                    during flight time;

              (b)   have authority to give all commands he deems necessary for the purpose of securing the
                    safety of the aeroplane and of persons or property carried therein, and all persons carried
                    in the aeroplane shall obey such commands;

              (c)   have authority to disembark any person, or any part of the cargo, which in his opinion, may
                    represent a potential hazard to the safety of the aeroplane or its occupants;

              (d)   not allow any person to be carried in the aeroplane who appears to be under the influence
                    of alcohol or drugs to the extent that the safety of the aeroplane or its occupants is likely to
                    be endangered;


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              (e)   ensure that any passengers are briefed on the location of emergency exits and the location
                    and use of relevant safety and emergency equipment;

              (f)   ensure that all operational procedures and checklists are complied with;

              (g)   ensure that the weather forecast and reports for the proposed operating area and flight
                    duration indicate that the flight may be conducted without infringing Company operating
                    minima;

              (h)   decide whether the flight can be safely undertaken after consideration of any
                    unserviceabilities permitted under the Configuration Deviation List (CDL) or Minimum
                    Equipment List (MEL);

              (i)   ensure that the aeroplane, and any required equipment is serviceable prior to commencing
                    the flight;

              (j)   ensure that aircraft refuelling is adequately supervised and that fuel and oil are loaded in
                    sufficient quantity for the proposed flight to be undertaken safely;

              (k)   ensure that the aeroplane mass and balance is within the calculated limits for the operating
                    conditions;

              (l)   confirm that the aeroplane’s performance will enable it to complete the proposed flight
                    safely;

              (m) not permit any person on board to perform any activity during take-off, initial climb, final
                  approach and landing except those duties required for the safe operation of the aeroplane;

              (n)   ensure that before take-off and before landing all persons on board are properly secured in
                    their allocated seats;

              (o)   ensure that whenever the aeroplane is taxiing, taking off or landing, or whenever he
                    considers it advisable (e.g. in turbulent conditions), all persons on board are properly
                    secured in their seats, and baggage and equipment is securely stowed;

              (p)   ensure that the documents and manuals in Para 8.1.9 are carried and will remain valid
                    throughout the flight or series of flights;

              (q)   ensure that the pre-flight inspection has been carried out and that the aircraft is fit to fly;

              (r)   ensure that no person hides himself or cargo on board the aeroplane;

              (s)   ensure that no person uses a portable electronic device on board the aeroplane that can
                    adversely affect the performance of the aeroplane’s systems and equipment;

              (t)   ensure that no person on board the aircraft is allowed to smoke at any time;

              (u)   ensure that any passengers are seated where, in the event that an emergency evacuation
                    is required, they may best assist rather than hinder evacuation from the aeroplane, and
                    that relevant emergency equipment remains easily accessible for immediate use; and

              (v)   ensure the medical first aid kit and fire extinguisher are present and serviceable.

1.4.2        The pilot-in-command shall, in an emergency situation that requires immediate decision and
             action, take any action he considers necessary under the circumstances. In such cases he may
             deviate from rules, operational procedures, and methods in the interest of safety. Such
             deviation must be reported in writing to the Chief Pilot for the consideration of the Accountable
             Manager as soon as possible after the flight.

1.4.3        The Commander has the authority to apply greater safety margins, including aerodrome
             operating minima, if he deems it necessary.

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1.4.4        The Commander must ensure that, in the event of third party maintenance being required whilst
             away from base, the procedures referred to in Para 8.1.8.7 are followed.

1.4.5        The Commander must ensure that a continuous listening watch is maintained on the appropriate
             radio communication frequency at all times whenever the flight crew is manning the aeroplane
             for the purpose of commencing and/or conducting a flight and when taxiing.


1.5     Technical Specialist (Crew Member) Responsibilities

1.5.1        A Technical Specialist (crew member) shall be responsible for the proper execution of his duties
             that are related to the safety of the aircraft and its occupants, and that are specified in the
             instructions and procedures laid down in this manual.

1.5.2        A crew member shall report to the Commander any incident that has endangered, or may have
             endangered, safety, and make use of the incident reporting schemes as laid down in Section 11.

1.5.3        A crew member shall adhere to the health precautions as laid down in Section 6.

1.5.4        A crew member shall not perform any activities during critical phases of the flight other than
             those required for the safe operation of the aeroplane. The aeroplane check lists shown in Part
             B for operation of the aeroplane under normal, abnormal and emergency conditions shall be
             used to ensure that the correct operating procedures are used at all times. Simulated abnormal
             or emergency situations shall not be performed with any passenger on board other than the
             normal crew complement and/or an additional correctly licensed pilot.




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SECTION 2: OPERATIONAL CONTROL AND SUPERVISION


2.1       Supervision of the Operation by the Operator

2.1.1          The Chief Pilot will control the numbers of personnel required to operate the aeroplanes
               involved. He will always be in a position to confirm that:

               (a) crew licences and qualifications are valid for the periods throughout which crew members
                   are scheduled to fly;

               (b) crew members’ proficiency has been checked and found satisfactory at the specified
                   intervals;

               (c) the requisite flight, personnel and maintenance records are being retained, analysed and
                   stored for the required periods in order that the Company’s established quality control
                   procedures may be effectively implemented; and

               (d) operations personnel are competent to perform their duties and that levels of competence
                   are monitored.


2.2       System of Communication of Additional Operational Instructions and Information

          As stated in Para 0.2.3, additional operational instructions and information will be made the subject of
          Flying Staff Instructions. These will be incorporated into this manual and brought to the attention of all
          crew members, and copies will be distributed to all departments on a ‘need to know’ basis.

2.2.1           Publications

2.2.1.1         The following publications are held in the Company Operations Office either in hard copy or
                electronic form and amended by the Chief Pilot when required:

               (a)   The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual;

               (b)   The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Guidelines;

               (c)   CAP 393 – Air Navigation: the Order and the Regulations;

               (d)   Aeronautical Information Circulars (AICs);

               (e)   The UK Air Pilot; and

               (f)   FODCOMS.

2.2.1.2         The following publications are available and kept up to date in the Operations Office:

               (a)   NOTAMS and Navigation Warning Bulletins.

2.2.2           Documentation

2.2.2.1        A folder is to be kept for each aeroplane, containing the following documents:

               (a)   Certificate of Registration;

               (b)   Certificate of Airworthiness;

               (c)   Noise certificate;

               (d)   Aeroplane radio licence; and


The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual           Part A   General                   Page 15 of 48
               (e)   Third Party Liability Insurance certificate(s).

2.2.2.2        The pilot’s licence must be readily available.


2.3       Accident Prevention and Flight Safety Programme

          A flight safety awareness programme will be maintained with regular meetings to discuss and review
          operational procedures and policies. In addition, the latest accident reports, incident bulletins,
          General Aviation Safety Information Leaflets (GASILs) and flight safety magazines are to be
          circulated to operational staff. Incidents and accidents involving aeroplane types or equipment
          operated by the Company will be highlighted, and the appointed flight safety officer [the Chief Pilot]
          will bring to the attention of the appropriate staff any occurrences which indicate that the Company’s
          procedures may need revising in the interests of flight safety. This will be done verbally at a meeting
          of the appropriate managers and operations personnel, and in writing when deemed necessary by the
          Chief Pilot. Operations away from base and on a one-off basis must include a flight safety review and
          survey by the Chief Pilot.


              The Chief Pilot should address the following:

              Flight Safety Co-ordination;
              Accident and Incident procedures;
              MOR procedure;
              Action on receipt of reports;
              Feedback of action/circulation of results;
              Processing pilot reports;
              Dissemination of information to crews and staff:
                     AICs;
                     FODCOMs;
                     ADs (Operational aspects);
                     NOTAMs



2.4       Operational Control

2.4.1          Whenever possible, advance information of the individual weights of persons and equipment to
               be carried shall be obtained so as to enable an initial calculation of the permissible fuel load, and
               of the limiting duration of the flight.


2.4.2          The Chief Pilot is to carry out random checks of the programme in accordance with the Quality
               Audit system to ensure that the Company’s requirements in respect of pilot qualification and
               aeroplane equipment are being met. He will liaise with the Operations Office and the
               engineering support to ensure that all paperwork concerned with the operation is valid and up to
               date.




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2.5     Power to Inspect

2.5.1       Subject to prior arrangement, any person authorised by The Crown Estate will be permitted to
            board any aircraft operating in accordance with this manual as part of The Crown Estate’s
            maintenance of acceptable standards for such operations. Flying with the crew is not a
            requirement of a Crown Estate audit. However, should it be agreed with the operator that an
            auditor can or should fly, a check list is provided at the end of Annex B to Section 3.

2.5.2        Notwithstanding Para. 2.5.1, the Commander may refuse access if, in his opinion, the safety of
             the aircraft would thereby be endangered.


2.6     Production, Retention and Document Records

2.6.1        The Company shall permit any person authorised by the CAA or The Crown Estate access to
             any documents and records which are related to flight operations or maintenance, and shall,
             within a reasonable period of time, produce all such documents when so requested by the CAA
             or The Crown Estate.

2.6.2        The Commander shall, within a reasonable period of time of being requested to do so by a
             person authorised by the CAA, produce to that person the documentation required to be carried
             on board.

2.6.3        Crew Flying Duty Period records and all flight crew and crew training records will be retained for
             3 years. Crew member records will be made available to a new operator if that crew member
             becomes employed by that new operator. Load sheets, flight plans and mass and balance
             documentation when used, will be retained for 3 calendar months. Technical logs will be retained
             for 3 years after the date of the last entry.

2.6.4        For at least the duration of each flight, copies of the technical log, load sheet (when appropriate),
             route specific NOTAM information (when appropriate) and flight plan (when appropriate) shall be
             retained in the Operations Office.

2.6.5        The following information and forms will be carried on each flight:

              (a)    Flight plan information;

              (b)    Aeroplane Technical Log;

              (c)    Appropriate NOTAM information;

              (d)    Appropriate meteorological information;

              (e)    Mass and balance documentation;

              (f)    Current 1:500 000 scale chart providing coverage for the planned flight; and

              (g)    Essential information concerning search and rescue facilities.




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SECTION 3: SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

3.1     Safety Management System

3.1.1        The Managing Director, as the Accountable Manager, will act as Safety Manager and will
             institute and maintain a Safety Management System (SMS) to ensure that the procedures and
             requirements contained in this manual are followed by all operating staff. The Company will
             liaise with The Crown Estate to ensure that this SMS is acceptable to them.

3.1.2        The SMS Audit Protocols in Part E Annex B will be used on a regular basis to ensure
             compliance. Regular meetings of department heads or their deputies will take place when
             operational and quality matters will be discussed and any necessary corrective procedures put
             into place. Completed SMS reports will be kept by the Accountable Manager and used to
             determine progress.


3.2     Appointments, Names of Post Holders

3.2.1        Accountable and Safety Manager                [                    ]
             Telephone: […….]

3.2.2        The Accountable Manager has responsibility to ensure that all operations and maintenance
             activities can be financed and carried out to the standard required by The Crown Estate and any
             additional requirements defined by the Company.

3.2.3        The Safety Manager will monitor compliance with, and the adequacy of, procedures required to
             ensure safe operational practices and airworthy aeroplanes. He will ensure that the appropriate
             standards are being maintained by the Chief Pilot, the Chief Engineer and the Operations
             Manager in all operational aspects.


3.3     Safety Management System Policy

        The SMS is intended to ensure that all relevant hazards are identified; that these hazards are either
        eliminated or adequately controlled; that all control measures are clearly communicated to employees
        (and others who may be affected); that suitable training programmes are established to measure and
        monitor competence; and, that a suitable system of monitoring and review is established, thus
        meeting or exceeding The Crown Estate specified requirements and in particular to ensure
        compliance with:

             (a) CAA Licensing requirements;

             (b) The minimum standards set out in this manual; and

             (c)   The associated company Operations and Training Manuals.



3.4     Purpose of the Safety Management System

        The SMS provides a formal structure for:
            (a)    Identifying significant hazards to the health and safety of people, and the associated level
                   or severity of the risk;
            (b)    The policies and procedures required to control all risks;
            (c)    The organisational arrangements and structure provided to control risks, including roles
                   and responsibilities;
            (d)    The training and competency needed to manage/mitigate all associated risks;
            (e)    The systems and control measures developed to report and record failure events
                   (accidents and incidents, near hits, unsafe acts, etc.); and
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            (f)   The monitoring and review arrangements needed to ensure the ongoing effectiveness of
                  the control measures.


3.5     Description of the Safety Management and Quality Systems

        The SMS uses a programme of internal and external audits and provision for suggestions and reports
        from both staff and external auditors. The system is controlled by the Safety Manager who is
        responsible to the Accountable Manager but, if possible, independent of the normal management
        structure. The Safety Manager has free access to all aspects of the offshore survey operation.
        Audits are programmed by the Safety Manager and should be conducted by auditors who are not
        normally involved in the business of the area to be audited. Non-conformances are recorded on the
        Audit Completion Certificate (Part E Annex C) and a timescale for corrective action agreed with the
        responsible manager. The Safety Manager maintains a record of non-conformances and ensures
        that a follow-up audit is undertaken at the end of the agreed timescale to ensure that corrective action
        has been achieved. Non-effectiveness of any corrective action is reportable to the Accountable
        Manager.
        All staff may have access to Non-Conformance Report forms (Part E Annex D), which are completed
        and passed to the Safety Manager. Corrective action is decided upon with the Training Captain and
        the originator is kept informed of progress. A record of all Non-Conformance Reports and corrective
        or preventative actions is kept by the Safety Manager.


3.6     External and Internal SMS Audits

        The Crown Estate will carry out a full external SMS audit annually to ensure compliance with all
        aspects of licensing and the operating standards established by The Crown Estate. A rolling
        programme will be established by the Safety Manager to ensure that each area of the operation is
        subject to internal audit at least every 12 months. The auditors will have access to all training records,
        manuals, notes, equipment and facilities and operations and aircraft documentation. In addition, they
        will monitor any activity, training or otherwise, that they deem appropriate.


3.7     Procedure for SMS Audits

        The audit will examine, but is not necessarily confined to, the items included in the appropriate Audit
        Protocols. Prior to the audit, the auditor will refer to the appropriate previous audit report for any non-
        conformances and pay particular attention to these. On completion, the auditor will debrief the
        responsible manager on the audit results and agree a timescale for remedial action to be completed.
        The Audit Completion Certificate will then be signed by the auditor and the Responsible Manager and
        copies of the audit report will be distributed to:
            (a)   The auditor;
            (b)   The Safety Manager; and
            (c)   The Accountable Manager, if a separate entity.
        On completion of any agreed corrective action, the responsible manager will submit a Corrective
        Action Report (Part E Annex E). The Safety Manager will confirm that the required corrective action
        has been completed within the agreed timescale. Failure to complete corrective action by the agreed
        date will be reported to the Accountable Manager. A follow-up audit may be carried out after a
        suitable period to assess the effectiveness of the corrective action/s. Audit Completion Certificates,
        Non-conformance Reports and Corrective Action Reports will be held by the Safety Manager and will
        be retained for at least 3 years.




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3.8     Review of Audits and Procedures

        The Safety Manager, in consultation with the Training Captain, will carry out an annual review of the
        SMS to determine its effectiveness; to identify any repetitive non-conformances and to specify any
        corrective action. After each audit review the Safety Manager may revise the audit schedule for the
        following 12 month period to reflect any required changes.


3.9     Quality Control of Sub-contractors

        Sub-contractors shall be deemed part of the Company’s quality control procedure and shall be
        audited in accordance with rules and regulations required to perform their contractual duties.


3.10    Training of Quality Personnel

        Company policy is to ensure that all personnel are trained and experienced to the extent necessary to
        undertake their assigned tasks. It is the responsibility of managers to ensure that staff allocated
        specific tasks are suitably qualified and experienced. The Safety Manager and auditors will have
        received appropriate training in quality procedures and the Safety Manager is to retain records of all
        such training.




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SECTION 4: CREW COMPOSITION


4.1     Crew Composition

4.1.1         General

             The minimum flight crew to be carried shall never be less than is stipulated in the aeroplane’s
             Certificate of Airworthiness or the aeroplane’s Flight Manual. The standard crew for Company
             aeroplanes is one pilot. For training and testing purposes, the Training Captain will normally
             occupy the right hand pilot’s seat and be in command. Exceptionally, he may occupy the left
             hand pilot’s seat while the pilot under training/test is being cleared for right hand seat flying in
             the survey role. The training captain has to occupy the left hand seat when checking out other
             training captains to operate from the right seat.




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SECTION 5: QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

5.1       Flight Crew

5.1.1         Commanders

              The minimum qualification requirements for pilots to act as Commander of an aerial survey flight
              are:

              (a)   successful completion of the training course specific to the single crew role if conducting
                    single crew operations;

              (b)   an Airline Transport ’Pilot’s Licence or validation of a foreign ATPL; or

              (c)   a Commercial Pilot’s Licence and

              (d)   valid recurrent checks.

5.1.1.1       Recency

               A minimum of 3 take-offs and 3 landings as pilot flying in the preceding 90 days. If a pilot has
               not flown that type or class of aircraft in the previous 30 days a dual check with the Chief Pilot
               shall take place to the satisfaction of the Chief Pilot.


5.2       Training, Checking and Supervising Personnel

5.2.1         The Chief Pilot is responsible for appointing adequately trained and experienced staff to carry
              out conversion and operational training for both ground and air activities and to conduct the
              appropriate competency tests on the Company’s behalf.

5.2.2         Pilots appointed to carry out such duties (i.e. Training Captain) should have, as a minimum, the
              following qualifications:

              (a)   a commercial pilot’s licence;

              (b)   a minimum of 1,000 hours flying experience of which at least 50 hours P1 shall be on the
                    aeroplane type or class on which he is required to instruct and/or examine;

              (c)   aeroplane type or class rating authority issued by the CAA for the appropriate aeroplane
                    type;

              (d)   where the Training Captain is only required to carry out conversion to type or class training
                    and not the subsequent flying tests, the authorised examiner qualification may be waived
                    in favour of a full flying instructor rating.

5.2.3         There are no specific qualifications for ground instructors, but Training Captains will be required
              to give ground instruction to supplement the guided study which newly selected pilots will be
              expected to complete. Non-flying instructors may be appointed from suitably qualified personnel
              (e.g. maintenance engineers) to assist with technical subjects and emergency and survival
              topics.




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SECTION 6: CREW HEALTH PRECAUTIONS


6.1     Alcohol

        No crew member may commence a flying duty period with a blood alcohol level in excess of 20 mg of
        alcohol per 100 ml of blood. Furthermore, it is considered prudent for a pilot to abstain from alcohol for
        at least 24 hours before flying and to refrain from drinking alcohol to excess at any time.


6.2     Aeromedical Advice

        A pilot shall seek aeromedical advice before returning to flying duties:

        (a)       following a period of absence from duty due to sickness exceeding 10 days;

        (b)       following any surgical procedure; and

        (c)       following any immunisation.


6.3     Blood Donation

        Crew members may not fly for at least 24 hours after giving blood.


6.4     Narcotics, Drugs and other Medication

        Crew members are not to take narcotics or drugs or any pharmaceutical preparations, including sleep
        inducing drugs, which have not been prescribed by a medical practitioner. If such medications are
        deemed necessary then aeromedical advice is to be sought before undertaking flying duties.

6.5     Diving

        Crew members may not fly within 24 hours of any diving activity in excess of 10 metres.


6.6     Fitness

        Crew members may not fly if their mental or physical condition is impaired in such a way that it could
        endanger the safety of the aircraft or other crew members.


6.7     Sleep and Rest

        Although the controls on flight and duty periods are intended to ensure that adequate opportunities
        are provided for crew members to obtain rest and sleep, individuals must ensure that proper
        advantage is taken of such opportunities.




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SECTION 7: FLIGHT TIME LIMITATIONS


7.1       Fatigue of Crew and Flight Time Limitations

7.1.1         Introduction

              This Section 7 provides a scheme (FTL scheme), as required by the Air Navigation Order, for
              the regulation of flight time for flight crew members and is approved by the CAA. It also provides
              guidance to flight crew members on their responsibilities regarding the avoidance of fatigue. This
              scheme remains valid only so long as the Company’s flying activities are confined to the aerial
              work survey activities, including prepositioning and recovery of the aircraft to its operating base.

7.1.2         Aim

              The aim of the FTL scheme is to follow the intent of the published relevant documents, thereby
              taking all reasonable precautions to ensure that crew members are adequately rested at the
              beginning of each flying duty period. To meet this aim, factors such as the length of duty cycles,
              periods of time off and cumulative duty hours are to be considered and balanced wherever
              possible.

7.1.3         Applicability

              The FTL scheme shall apply in relation to any duty carried out for the Company. These
              instructions apply to any pilot employed, either full or part time, by [                ] on flights for
              the purpose of offshore aerial survey. Account must be taken of all flying and other duties
              undertaken, whether professionally or privately, except for flying aircraft not exceeding 1600kgs
              which are not being operated for public transport or aerial work. (It is also aerial work where
              valuable consideration is given for flying instruction even if the pilot receives no reward.)

7.1.4         Responsibilities

7.1.4.1       The Company

              The Company will apply the content of the FTL scheme in the scheduling of flights and the
              allocation of rest periods. Due to the nature of the Company’s business the publication of a
              weekly or monthly roster is impractical, however the Company will endeavour to provide a
              specific day(s) off on request. The Company must be satisfied that crew members employed on
              an irregular basis are not in breach of the FTL scheme before offering a flying duty.

7.1.4.2       Crew Members

              To reiterate, it is the responsibility of all crew members to make optimum use of the opportunities
              and facilities for rest provided and to plan their rest periods properly in order to minimise the risk
              of fatigue. Crew members should not act as flight crew if they know, or suspect, that their
              physical or mental condition makes them unfit to operate, or if they know that they will infringe
              the FTL scheme. Crew members not in the regular employ of the Company must provide details
              of their previous 28 days’ totals of flying hours/duty periods to the Company before undertaking
              a flying duty.




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7.1.5         FTL Definitions

              (a) Days Off. Periods available for leisure and relaxation free from all aviation related duties. A
                  single day off shall include two local nights. Consecutive days off shall include a further local
                  night for each additional consecutive day off. A rest period may be included as part of a day
                  off.

              (b) Duty Period. Any continuous period during which a crew member carries out any task,
                  whether flying or otherwise, associated with the business of the Company.

              (c) Flight Duty Period (FDP). Any time during which a crew member operates an aircraft. This
                  starts when the crew member is required by the Company to report for duty and finishes
                  when he has completed all post-flight duties.

              (d) Local Night. A period of 8 hours falling between 2200 and 0800 hours local time.

              (e) Rest Period. A period of time before starting a FDP which is intended to ensure that crew
                  members are adequately rested before a flight.

              (f) Week. A period of 7 consecutive days starting at 0800 hours local time on a Monday.


7.2       FDP Limits

7.2.1         Flight Duty Periods

7.2.1.1       A single FDP shall not exceed 10 hours, except that this may be extended to a maximum of 12
              hours for the sole purpose of positioning the aircraft to or from the Company’s base.

7.2.1.2       A pilot shall not spend more than 7 hours at the controls in any one FDP. When positioning the
              aircraft the pilot may spend up to an additional 2 hours at the controls for the sole purpose of
              completing this task.

7.2.1.3       A pilot shall not be at the controls continuously for more than 5 hours on task.

7.2.1.4       During a FDP a pilot shall have breaks of not less than 30 minutes duration according to the
              following scale:

              FDP up to 3 hours           breaks totalling at least 30 minutes
              FDP from 3 to 6 hours       breaks totalling at least 1 hour
              FDP from 6 to 8 hours       breaks totalling at least 1 hour 30 minutes
              FDP over 8 hours            breaks totalling at least 2 hours

7.2.2         Rest Periods

              The minimum rest period before undertaking a flying duty shall be at least 12 hours

7.2.3         Days Off

7.2.3.1       The Company will, wherever possible, give 7 days notice of a day off. When this is not possible
              a pilot will be given the opportunity to request a particular day on/day off. The Company will
              comply with this request wherever possible. Having been allocated a day off, a subsequent duty
              required by the Company for that day will only be worked with the agreement of the individual
              concerned.

7.2.3.2       A pilot shall not fly more than 7 consecutive days between days off and will have a minimum of 7
              days off in any 4 consecutive weeks. If for any reason a pilot is requested to work 8 or 9
              consecutive days then 4 consecutive days off will follow.



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7.2.3.3       A pilot shall have an average of at least 8 days off in each consecutive 4 week period, averaged
              over 3 such periods.

7.2.4         Cumulative Duty and Flying Hours

              A pilot may be on duty for a maximum of 100 hours in any 4 consecutive weeks. All types of duty
              shall be counted in full.

7.2.5         Maximum Monthly Flying Hours

              The maximum number of flying hours which a pilot may undertake during any consecutive 28
              days is 100 hours.

7.2.6         Maximum Annual Flying Hours

              A person shall not act as a flight crew member if the total of his flight times in the period of 12
              months expiring at the end of the previous month exceeds 900 hours.

7.3       Records

7.3.1         Records must be kept showing the duty and rest periods of all flying staff, both permanent and
              temporary. These records shall include for each pilot:

             (a)    start, finish and duration of each duty and FDP and function performed during the duty;

             (b)    duration of each rest period prior to a flying duty;

             (c)    dates of days off;

             (d)    weekly totals of duty; and

             (e)    daily and weekly flying hours.

7.3.2         Records shall be retained for at least 3 years from the date of the last relevant entry.




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SECTION 8: OPERATING PROCEDURES

8.1       Flight Preparation Instructions

               The Commander shall not commence a flight unless he is satisfied that:

                    (a)   the aeroplane is airworthy;

                    (b)   the instruments and equipment are in operable condition except as provided in the
                          MEL;

                    (c)   those parts of this manual which are required to undertake the flight are available;

                    (d)   the documents, additional information and forms required in Para 8.1.9 are on board;

                    (e)   current maps, charts, route information, associated documents or equivalent data
                          and meteorological information for the route to be flown are available to cover the
                          intended operation of the aeroplane including any diversion which may reasonably be
                          expected;

                    (f)   ground facilities and services required for the planned flight are available and
                          adequate;

                    (g)   the provisions specified in this manual in respect of fuel and oil requirements,
                          minimum safe altitudes, aerodrome operating minima and availability of alternate
                          aerodromes, where required, can be complied with for the planned flight;

                    (h)   the load is properly distributed and safely secured;

                    (i)   the mass of the aeroplane, at the commencement of the take-off roll, will be such that
                          the flight can be conducted in compliance with Paras 8.1.1.2 to 8.1.1.5 and Part B
                          Sections 4 and 6; and

                    (j)   any operational limitation in addition to those covered by sub-paragraphs (h) and (i)
                          above can be complied with.

8.1.1         Minimum Flight Altitudes

8.1.1.1       General

              When an aeroplane is operated for the purpose of aerial work, the minimum altitude/flight level
              at which it is permitted to fly may be governed by national regulations, air traffic control
              requirements, or by the need to maintain a safe margin above or away from any significant
              terrain or obstacle en route. Whichever of these requirements produces the highest altitude/flight
              level for a particular route will determine the minimum flight altitude for that route or operating
              area. The procedures outlined in the following paragraphs are to be followed when calculating
              the minimum altitude for the safe avoidance of en route terrain and obstacles.

8.1.1.2       Minimum Off-route Altitude (MORA)

              MORA is calculated for an area bounded by every Lat/Long square on the Topographical
              Aeronautical Map, and for each square is the sum of:

                   (a)    the maximum terrain or obstacle elevation, whichever is the higher, plus:

                   (b)    1,000 ft for elevations up to and including 6,000 ft, or

                   (c)    2,000 ft for elevations above 6,000 ft




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8.1.1.3      Allowance for Wind Speed

             When operating within 20 nm of terrain whose maximum elevation exceeds 2,000 ft amsl,
             Commanders are to increase the standard MORA by the amounts given in the following table,
             according to the wind speed over the route:


                        Terrain                                    Wind speed in Knots
                       Elevation
                                                 0 – 30        31 – 50         51 – 70      More than
                                                                                               70

                   2000 – 8000 feet          + 500 ft          +1000 ft       +1500 ft        +2000 ft

                 More than 8000 feet         +1000 ft          +1500 ft       +2000 ft        +2500 ft



8.1.1.4       Multi-Engined Aeroplanes
              1.240(a)(2), 1.540(a) & (b)

              In the event of an engine failure en route, in the meteorological conditions expected for the flight
              and with the remaining engines operating within the specified maximum continuous power
              conditions, a Class B aeroplane must be capable of continuing the flight at or above the relevant
              minimum altitude for safe flight to a point 1000 ft above an aerodrome at which the performance
              requirements can be met. The aeroplane must not be assumed to be flying, with all engines
              operating within the specified maximum continuous power conditions, at an altitude exceeding
              that at which the rate of climb equals 300 ft per minute, and the assumed en route gradient with
              one engine inoperative shall be the gross gradient minus a gradient of 0.5%.

8.1.2        Criteria for Determining the Usability of Aerodromes

8.1.2.1      The Company will be responsible for ensuring that all aerodromes selected as destinations or
             alternates are adequate and suitable in all respects for the types of aeroplanes being used. In
             this context, ‘adequate’ infers that the runway dimensions and significant obstacles in the local
             area are such that the performance requirements for the nominated aeroplane type will be met
             at the weights at which the aeroplane is planned to land and take off, and in the conditions
             (including contaminated runways) which may be expected to exist at the time of operation.

8.1.2.2      Ancillary services, including ATS, appropriate aerodrome lighting, communications, navaids,
             weather reporting and emergency services as appropriate to the maximum total weight
             authorised, and/or maximum passenger seating configuration of the particular aeroplane type,
             are to be available.

8.1.2.3      When arrival at/departure from a particular aerodrome is intended to be carried out under Visual
             Flight Rules, minimum operating visibilities and cloud ceilings are to be clearly stated on the
             Commander’s flight brief. It is not acceptable for the brief simply to state ‘VFR’. Any particular
             hazards such as gliding activities at the aerodrome, or ‘free lane’ entries to an aerodrome
             surrounded by controlled airspace, are to be included in the brief.

8.1.3        Methods for the Determination of Aerodrome Operating Minima

8.1.3.1      General

             Company multi-engined aeroplanes are classified as being in Performance Class B. One of the
             prime requirements of this classification is that, in the event of an in-flight power unit failure, the
             aeroplane must be capable of continuing the flight to a point 1,000 ft above a place at which a
             safe forced landing can be made. This capability cannot be guaranteed unless the pilot has
             good ground contact at all times, and that, once clear of the aerodrome circuit, the aeroplane is
             flying significantly higher than 1,000 ft above ground level.


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8.1.3.2      In the circuit

             When operating in the circuit the minimum weather conditions shall be a cloud base, defined as
             the height above surface level of the lowest cloud in immediate vicinity of the aeroplane, of at
             least 1,100 ft and a visibility of no less than 3 km.


8.1.4        En route Operating Minima for VFR Flights

             The en route weather minima shall be such that:

              (a) the cloud base is at least 100 ft above the height required to achieve 1,000 ft above a place
                  at which a safe forced landing can be made in the event of a power unit failure;

              (b) the visibility is not less than 3 km; and

              (c) other forecast meteorological conditons must be satisfactory for the flight.


8.1.5        Determination of the Quantities of Fuel and Oil Carried

8.1.5.1      General

             Independent means are to be used to check the tank contents at the start of the day’s flying and
             whenever refuelling to less than full tanks has been carried out. The indicated readings of the
             aeroplane fuel gauges should not be used in isolation to assess the actual fuel contents.
             Accurate totals of fuel uplifts, and the consequent totals on board, are to be entered in the
             technical log at the time of refuelling, and are to be used in conjunction with the recorded flying
             hours to monitor the overall gross fuel consumption of each aeroplane.

8.1.5.2      Fuel Planning

             Based on the appropriate consumption figures for the stage of flight as contained in Part B of
             this manual for the specific aeroplane type, the fuel on board at the start of each flight must be
             sufficient to complete the task and land with fuel to fly for an additional 30 minutes (final reserve
             fuel).

8.1.5.3      Oil

             While the engine oil contents must obviously be sufficient to cover the same elements as those
             for the fuel, it will be sufficient for the Commander to ensure before flight that the engine oil
             contents have been topped up in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations, and
             between flights that no excess oil consumption has taken place.

8.1.5.4      Maintenance of Fuel and Oil Carriage and Consumption Records

              (a)   Fuel records will be retained with the flight paperwork and technical log sheets.

              (b)   Oil carriage and consumption will be recorded in the technical log and retained with same.




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8.1.6        Mass and Centre of Gravity

8.1.6.1      Definitions

              (a) Dry Operating Mass (DOM). The total mass of the aeroplane excluding all usable fuel, but
                  including equipment, crew (pilot and task specialist) and baggage.

              (b) Maximum Zero Fuel Mass. The maximum permissible mass of an aeroplane with no usable
                  fuel. The mass of the fuel contained in particular tanks must be included in the zero fuel
                  mass when it is explicitly mentioned in the Aeroplane Flight Manual limitations.

              (c) Maximum Structural Landing Mass. The maximum permissible total aeroplane mass upon
                  landing under normal circumstances.

              (d) Maximum Structural Take-Off Mass. The maximum permissible total aeroplane mass at the
                  start of the take-off run.


8.1.6.2      The mass and centre of gravity (C of G) of each Company aeroplane must be established by
             actual weighing before it is used. All aircraft are to be reweighed thereafter at intervals of four
             years. A basic aircraft mass and C of G position will be noted on the weighing report, or mass
             and centre of gravity schedule, as produced by the manufacturer or approved maintenance
             organisation. These will be used by the Company to calculate an aeroplane DOM and C of G for
             each aeroplane. The accumulated effects of modifications and repairs on mass and balance
             must be taken into account. Details are contained in Part B for the particular aeroplane type.

8.1.6.3      The mass of crew members (pilot and task specialist) and crew baggage to be included in the
             aeroplane DOM will be calculated using actual masses. The mass of engine oil has been
             included in the calculation of basic aeroplane mass and is included in the DOM. The effect of all
             the above items on the aeroplane C of G must be determined and taken into account.

8.1.6.4      Actual masses are to be used to confirm weight and C of G limits. The mass of the fuel load must
             be calculated using either actual density or standard density values of 0.71 for gasoline. The total
             mass of fuel on board must always be compared with the fuel remaining prior to refuel plus the
             volume of fuel uplifted in order to provide a gross error check.

8.1.6.5      Documentation

8.1.6.5.1    The Commander is responsible for ensuring that the aeroplane’s mass and balance are, and will
             remain, within the published limits throughout the flight. Mass and balance documentation is to
             be prepared and left on the ground before departure.

8.1.6.5.2    Part B1 contains detailed loading instructions and a sample mass and balance document for the
             particular aeroplane type.

8.1.6.5.3    Irrespective of whether mass and balance documentation is required, the Commander is to
             ensure that the aeroplane is loaded in accordance with the instructions contained in Part B1,
             Section 6.

8.1.6.5.4    In co-operation with the maintenance organisation’s chief engineer, the Chief Pilot is responsible
             for ensuring that up-to-date mass and centre of gravity schedules are available for each
             aeroplane. These will be used as the basis for an Aeroplane Prepared for Service (APS) mass
             and C of G position as given in Part B1, Section 6. These masses, together with the actual or
             notional masses of the pilot, “crew”, passengers, fuel and extraneous items, e.g. camera
             equipment, are to be used for all loading calculations. The mass of engine oil will be included in
             the aeroplane mass.




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8.1.7        ATS Flight Plan

8.1.7.1      An ATS Flight Plan is not required for those flights which will be conducted in accordance with
             the visual flight rules (VFR) and which are intended to take-off and land at the same aerodrome.

8.1.7.2      Details of flights such as local area training flights or those involving air tests of aeroplanes or
             their systems are to be passed to the ATS unit and the Company is to ensure that a nominated
             person on the ground is made responsible for monitoring the flight progress, and for alerting the
             emergency services if the aeroplane has not returned within an hour of its estimated time of
             return.

8.1.7.3      The Commander is responsible for ensuring that, where required, a flight plan has been filed,
             and that he is fully aware of the details.


8.1.8        Operator’s Aeroplane Technical Log

8.1.8.1      The aeroplane technical log is a system for recording defects and malfunctions discovered
             during the operation and for recording details of all maintenance carried out on the particular
             aeroplane to which the technical log applies whilst that aeroplane is operating between
             scheduled visits to the base maintenance facility. In addition, it is used for recording operating
             information relevant to flight safety and must contain maintenance data that the operating crew
             need to know.

8.1.8.2      The aeroplane technical log system covers all necessary details and consists of three sections:

              (a) The first section covers information relating to the actual flight: aeroplane type and
                  registration mark, date, time and place of take-off and landing and the running total of flying
                  hours such that the next scheduled maintenance can be determined;

              (b) The second section covers details of the fuel and oil uplifted at the beginning and end of
                  each flight and details of any ground de-icing or anti-icing carried out; and

              (c) The third section contains details of any defect to the aeroplane affecting airworthiness or
                  safe operation of the aeroplane including emergency systems known to the Commander.
                  Provision is made for the Commander to date and sign such entries, including, where
                  appropriate, the nil state for continuity of the record. Provision is made for a Certificate of
                  Release to Service following rectification of a defect or any deferred defect or maintenance
                  check carried out. Such a certificate readily identifies the defect(s) to which it relates or the
                  particular maintenance check as appropriate.

8.1.8.3      The aeroplane technical log is sub-divided into the following parts:

              (a)   Details of Registered Operator: Contains details of the registered name and address of
                    the operator.

              (b)   Date: Contains the date of the flight or flights. Each page must contain details of flights
                    carried out on a particular date and must be completed before flight. Different dates
                    cannot be used on the same technical log page;

              (c)   Aeroplane Type: Contains details of the aeroplane type. Must be completed before flight;

              (d)   Registration:    Contains the registration mark of the aircraft used. Must be completed
                    before flight;

              (e)   Callsign: Contains details of the radio callsign of the aircraft if not the registration number.
                    If registration mark used as a radio callsign, leave blank;

              (f)   SRP Serial Number: Contains the individual Sector Record Page number;



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              (g)   Check A/Daily Inspection: Contains details of: i) the time of the day that the ‘A’ Check was
                    carried out; ii) the signature of the pilot carrying out the ‘A’ check; and iii) his authorisation.
                    Must be completed before first flight of the day;

              (h)   Sector Ground Anti/De-Icing: Contains details of which sectors, if any, the aircraft
                    required ground anti/de-icing. If no ground anti/de-icing carried out circle ‘NIL’. If ground
                    anti/de-icing carried out then details of time commenced, time completed, fluid type used
                    and mix ratio of fluid to water required must be completed;

              (i)   Next Check: Contains details of the type of maintenance check next required, at what
                    total airframe hours the check is required and at what date. These details must reflect the
                    appropriate details of the Certificate of Release to Service (CRS). Must be completed on
                    every page;

              (j)   Sector Number: Contains the sector numbers (1 to 5) for sectors flown on a particular
                    day;

              (k)   Captain’s Name: Contains the name of the pilot in command of the intended flight. Must be
                    completed before flight;

              (l)   Captain’s Pre-Flight Acceptance Signature:           Contains the Captain’s signature of
                    acceptance that the aircraft is serviceable for the intended flight. Must be completed
                    before flight. Confirms correct completion of pre-flight inspection and ground anti/de-icing,
                    acceptance of aircraft and defect state and sufficient fuel and oil for the planned flight;

              (m) Pax: Contains the number of any passenger(s) carried on the particular sector. If nil leave
                  blank. Must be completed before flight;

              (n)   Co. Auth: Contains the signature of the Company Authorised Person required to sign for
                    the flight. This will normally be the pilot in command of the flight. Must be completed before
                    flight;

              (o)   Sector From: Contains the name of the airfield the sector flight begins from. Must be
                    completed before flight;

              (p)   Sector To: Contains the name of the intended airfield the sector flight ends at. Must be
                    completed before flight;

              (q)   Departure Time: Contains the time the aircraft took off on that sector flight. Must be
                    completed immediately after the flight. May also be used to record the tachometer reading
                    before departure, if required;

              (r)   Arrival Time: Contains the time the aircraft landed on that sector flight. Must be completed
                    immediately after the flight. May also be used to record the tachometer reading after
                    landing, if required;

              (s)   Total Hours: Contains details of the total sector tachometer time elapsed, if required;

              (t)   Sector Total Hours: Contains the total sector time elapsed. Must be completed after each
                    sector flown;

              (u)   Fuel Uplift litres: Contains details of the quantity of fuel uplifted before or after that sector
                    flown. Must be completed after that fuel uplift. If no fuel uplifted, leave blank;

              (v)   Depart Fuel: Contains details of the quantity of fuel available, in litres. Must be completed
                    before each flight. If aircraft full of fuel, FULL may be written;

              (w)   Uplift Time: Contains details of the time the fuel (if any) was uplifted. This information will
                    show whether the fuel (if any) was uplifted before or after the sector flown. If no fuel
                    uplifted, leave blank;


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              (x)   Oil Uplift: Contains details of the quantity of oil uplifted (if any) before or after the sector
                    flown. Must be completed after oil was uplifted. If no oil uplifted, leave blank;

              (y)   Captain’s Post Flight Signature and Defect Report: Contains the Captain’s signature after
                    each flight. Must be completed after each flight. If no defect reported write NIL. If a defect
                    or defects reported write a defect number for each defect (1, 2, 3, etc.) and describe
                    defect(s) reported next to corresponding defect number in (ab) and (ac) below;

              (z)   Hours Brought Forward From Last SRP: Contains the total aircraft flying hours brought
                    forward from the previous sector record page. Must be completed before first flight of the
                    day;

              (aa) Total Carried Forward To Next SRP: Contains the total aircraft flying hours carried forward
                   to the next technical log sheet. The hours shown must be the product of the hours in (z)
                   above and the sum of the flying hours carried out on the page in (t) above. Must be
                   completed before the next sector record page is started;

              (ab) Defect Number: Contains the individual defect number corresponding to the defect
                   number in (y) above. Must be completed after the flight during which the defect has been
                   found. If no defect reported, leave blank;

              (ac) Defect Report Details: Contains details of the defect reported in (ab) above. Must be
                   completed after the flight during which the defect has been found. If no defect reported,
                   leave blank;

              (ad) Captain’s Signature: Contains the signature of the Captain reporting the defect in (ac)
                   above. Must be signed after the defect has been reported in (ac) above after the flight
                   during which the defect has been found;

              (ae) Action Taken Details: Contains details of the action taken to repair defect reported in (ac)
                   above. Will be completed by the authorised person responsible for signing off the repair
                   after the repair has been completed. The defect may be deferred, if allowable, in which
                   case details of the defect must be transferred to the deferred defect report. If defect is to
                   be deferred in this way, write DEFERRED. Must be completed after the defect has been
                   repaired or deferred and before the next flight is carried out;

              (af) Signature: Contains the signature of the person authorised to sign off the repair described
                   in (ae) above. Must be completed after the defect has been repaired and signed off or
                   deferred and the aircraft is considered ready for release to service;

              (ag) Authority: Contains the authorisation details of the person authorised to sign off the repair
                   described in (ae) above. This will normally be an Authority stamp. Must be completed after
                   the defect has been repaired and signed off or deferred and the aircraft is considered
                   ready for release to service;

              (ah) Date: Contains the date of the signature of the person authorised to sign off the repair
                   described in (ae) above. Must be dated after the defect has been repaired and signed off
                   or deferred and the aircraft is considered ready for release to service; and

              (ai) Certificate of Release to Service: Certifies that the work specified, except as otherwise
                   specified, was carried out in accordance with JAR-145 and in respect to that work the
                   aircraft / aircraft component is considered ready for release to service.

8.1.8.4      The technical log is designed such that one copy of each page may remain on the aeroplane
             and one other copy may be retained on the ground until completion of the flight to which it
             relates.




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8.1.8.5      The sections of the technical log are divided to show clearly what is required to be completed
             after flight and what is required to be completed in preparation for the next flight.

8.1.8.6      Deferred Defect record Page. Contains details of all deferred defects that affect or may affect the
             safe operation of the aeroplane and should therefore be known to the aeroplane Commander.
             Each page will record the following information:

              (a)   Serial Number: Contains the individual deferred defect page serial number;

              (b)   Aircraft registration: Contains the registration mark of the aircraft to which the deferred
                    defect page refers;

              (c)   Number: Contains the cross reference for each deferred defect such that the original
                    defect can be identified in the particular sector record page;

              (d)   Sector Record Page (SRP) Number: Contains the individual SRP number to which the
                    deferred defect refers;

              (e)   Defect/Signed/Date: Contains a description of the defect, the signature of the person
                    approved to defer the defect and the date of deferral;

              (f)   Defect Deferred To: Contains the date, the number of flying hours or the next scheduled
                    maintenance check to which the defect may be deferred;

              (g)   Defect Cleared (SRP No./Signed/Date): Contains the individual SRP number to which the
                    deferred defect refers; the signature of the person approved to clear the defect and the
                    date on which the defect was cleared; and

              (h)   Before the Defect Cleared sections of the deferred defect report page are completed,
                    details of the deferred defect, its number, the SRP number, together with rectification
                    action, must be recorded and certified on the current SRP to provide a duplicate record.

8.1.8.7      The telephone number of the maintenance organisation approved to carry out maintenance on
             the aircraft will be kept with the aircraft technical log in order that the pilot may contact
             engineering support in the case of unscheduled maintenance required to be carried out on the
             aircraft while the aircraft is away from its maintenance base or home aerodrome.


8.1.9        List of documents, forms and additional information to be carried.

             The aeroplane Technical Log System can be either a paper or computer system or any
             combination of both methods.

              (a)   The following documents or copies thereof belonging to the respective aeroplane are to be
                    carried on each individual flight:

                    (i)     Certification of Registration;

                    (ii)    Certificate of Airworthiness;

                    (iii)   Noise Certificate (if applicable);

                    (iv)    Air Operator’s Certificate (If applicable);

                    (v)     Aircraft Radio Licence;

                    (vi)    Third Party Liability Insurance Certificate(s); and

                    (vii) Load Sheet (on flights planned to be longer than 60 minutes duration).


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              (b)   Each flight crew member shall carry a valid flight crew licence with the appropriate rating(s)
                    for the purpose of that flight.

              (c)   The following manuals are to be carried on each flight;

                    (i)     The Operations Manual. Those parts which are required for the conduct of a flight
                            must be easily accessible to the crew on board; and

                    (ii)    The current Aeroplane Flight Manual.

              (d)   On each positioning flight, in addition to the above the following information and forms,
                    relevant to the type and area of operation, are to be carried:

                    (i)     Aeroplane Technical Log containing at least the information required in Para 8.1.8;

                    (ii)    Details of the filed ATS flight plan, if applicable;.

                    (iii)   Appropriate NOTAM/AIS briefing documentation;

                    (iv)    Mass and balance documentation as specified in Para 8.1.6.5 2 – 4;

                    (v)     Current maps and charts and associated documents and appropriate meteorological
                            information as prescribed in Para 8.1 (d) and (e); and

                    (vi)    Forms to comply with the reporting requirements of the CAA and the operator.


8.2       Ground Handling Instructions

8.2.1         Fuelling Procedures

              Refuelling is not to be undertaken with any passengers on board.

8.2.1.1       At Base

              When operating from its base aerodrome, the Commander is to confirm with operations that the
              fuel quantity ordered is sufficient to meet his calculated requirements for the flight, and during
              the pre-flight inspection is to ensure that he, or a flight crew member nominated by him, confirms
              that:

              (a)   the correct type, grade and quantity of fuel has been loaded;

              (b)   the fuel drains are operated to check for water content, and left properly closed;

              (c)   where practical, a visual check of tank contents, or if specified in the checklists for smaller
                    aeroplanes, a dipstick check reveals the correct amount of fuel on board to be within
                    reasonable tolerances;

              (d)   all fuel tank caps are properly secured;

              (e)   the aeroplane fuel gauges indicate that the tanks have been filled to the required levels;
                    and

              (f)   details of the fuel uplift have been correctly entered in the technical log and a gross error
                    check carried out.




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8.2.1.2      En Route

             When operating away from base, a flight crew member is to be nominated by the Commander to
             be present during the refuelling, and in addition to confirming that the requirements of Para
             8.2.1.1 above are met, he is to ensure that:

              (a)   particular care is taken in advising the refuelling agency of the type, grade and fuel
                    quantity required, with special reference to the units of measurement quoted (litres, US.
                    gallons, pounds etc.); wide cut fuel shall not be used;

              (b)   the bowser or other fuel installation is earthed to the aeroplane structure before the hose is
                    extended, and remains so earthed until refuelling is complete;

              (c)   smoking is not permitted within 15 metres of the aeroplane while refuelling is in progress;

              (d)   the correct quantity of anti-freeze additive is dispensed into the fuel where specified by the
                    aeroplane manufacturer; and

              (e)   the fuel bowser/installation readings at the start and finish of refuelling reflect accurately
                    the fuel uplift as indicated on the aeroplane fuel quantity gauges, and a gross error check
                    is carried out.

8.2.2        Aeroplane and Passenger Handling Procedures Related to Safety

8.2.2.1      Passengers. The Chief Pilot is to ensure that a person is made responsible for escorting any
             additional passengers across the movement area to and from the aeroplane before and after
             flight. Particular care is to be taken to ensure that any passengers are seated in the aeroplane
             with their seat belts/harnesses fastened and the doors closed before any attempt is made to
             start the engine. Any passengers are to remain seated until the engine has been switched off
             after flight, and may not leave the aeroplane unless accompanied by the pilot or an independent
             escort provided by the Company.

8.2.3        De-icing and Anti-icing on the Ground

8.2.3.1      Operation in known icing conditions (ground or flight) is prohibited.

8.2.4        Stowage of Baggage and Cargo

8.2.4.1      The Commander shall ensure that any hand baggage or equipment taken into the cabin can be
             adequately and securely stored. Any baggage which may be likely to cause injury or damage or
             obstruct exits shall be securely placed in the baggage compartment.


8.3          Flight Procedures

8.3.1        VFR/IFR Policy

8.3.1.1      When flights are conducted in accordance with the visual flight rules (VFR), the forecast and
             latest actual weather conditions must indicate that at the proposed cruising altitudes, the
             requisite visibilities and clearances from cloud can be maintained. In order to allow visual course
             guidance navigation, the weather conditions prevailing at the time of any operation will be such
             that all obstacle and/or ground reference points can be seen and identified.

8.3.1.2      On a VFR flight the Commander shall not commence take-off unless current meteorological
             reports or a combination of current reports and forecasts indicate that the meteorological
             conditions along the route will be such as to allow the flight to commence wholly under VFR.

8.3.1.3      The VFR requirement is only applicable to the low level survey section of any flight. Transits,
             relocation and abandoning a low level survey can be conducted under IFR provided the crew is
             trained and the aircraft is suitably equipped for IFR operations.

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8.3.2        Navigation Procedures

8.3.2.1      Normal navigation will be by visual means and pilots are responsible for carrying their own
             topographical maps marked with the required tracks, distances and indicating areas within which
             the aeroplane may be manoeuvring for surveying/photographic purposes.

8.3.2.2      Reliance should not be placed on information derived from ground beacons until the appropriate
             coded signal has been identified. When equipment other than VOR, ADF and DME, with cockpit
             computer and keyboard installations are in use, particular care is to be taken to ensure that the
             correct numerical sequences are programmed when entering data from the pilot’s navigation log
             (Plog) into the installation. For single-pilot operations, a system of self-monitoring should be
             adopted to minimise the risk of error. In flight, other available navigation equipment should be
             selected and used to confirm the accuracy of the primary aid, and to be readily available for use
             if the primary equipment indicates inaccuracy or malfunction. Above all, flight crew members
             must remain alert to the possibility of errors in programming or performance, and be prepared to
             revert to the use of raw data provided by such standard VOR, ADF and DME equipment as are
             available.


8.3.3        Altimeter Setting Procedures

8.3.3.1      Serviceability Checks: The Altimeter is to be checked during the pre-flight phase as follows:

              (a)   the altimeter is to be set to the aerodrome QFE when available; it should indicate within
                    ±50 ft of zero;

              (b)   with the altimeter set on QNH, the difference between the reading taken at (a) should be
                    equivalent to the aerodrome altitude above mean sea level, to within 50 ft; and

              (b)   it must be ensured during checks (a) to (b) above that rotation of the setting knob on each
                    altimeter through ± 10mb produces a corresponding movement of the height indication
                    through approx. ± 300 ft in the appropriate direction.

8.3.3.2 Setting Procedures: Whenever a new setting is applied, the altimeter is to be set in accordance with
        Table 1 on the next page:




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              Table 1 – Altimeter Setting Procedures         QFE based operations

                    Flight Stage         Setting                                 Remarks

               Before Take-off        QNH               Aerodrome setting

               Climb and Cruise       QNH               If remaining below Transition Altitude. (See Note).

               Climb                  1013.2            When cleared to Flight Level. (See Note).

               En route               1013.2

               Low level Survey       QNH or QFE        Normally QNH offshore, but QFE may be used near an
                                                        airfield (e.g. in the Thames Estuary.)

               Descent                1013.2            When cleared to intermediate Flight Levels

               Descent                QNH               When cleared to an altitude and                 no    further
                                                        Flight Level reports are required by ATC

               Initial Approach       QNH               Aerodrome setting

               Final Approach         QNH               Aerodrome setting

               Missed Approach        QNH               Aerodrome setting

              When en route, the QNH used should be the appropriate Regional value, unless operating below
              a Terminal Area (TMA) when the Zone QNH, or Aerodrome QNH of an associated aerodrome
              should be set.

8.3.4     Policy and Procedures for In-Flight Fuel Management

8.3.4.1 The Commander must ensure that fuel checks are carried out at regular intervals throughout the
        flight. On flights of more than one hour duration, such checks are to be carried out at not more than
        hourly intervals. On flights of less than one hour, an intermediate check is to be made at a convenient
        time when the cockpit workload is low. At each check, the remaining fuel must be recorded and
        evaluated to:

              (a)    compare actual consumption with planned consumption;

              (b)    check that the fuel remaining will be sufficient to complete the flight; and

              (c)    determine the expected fuel remaining on arrival at the destination.

8.3.4.2       The Commander will declare an emergency when the actual usable fuel on board is less than
              final reserve fuel.


8.3.5         Adverse and Potentially Hazardous Atmospheric Conditions

8.3.5.1       Thunderstorms

              Flight through areas of thunderstorm activity should be avoided wherever possible.

8.3.5.2       Icing Conditions

              Flight into known icing conditions is prohibited.




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8.3.5.3      Turbulence

             If the weather conditions, cloud structure and route forecast indicate that turbulence is likely, any
             passengers should be pre-warned and told to keep their seat belts/harnesses securely fastened.
             Consideration must be given to flying at the turbulence speed recommended in the Aircraft Flight
             Manual.


8.3.5.4     Volcanic Ash

            This will normally be NOTAMed as a flight hazard. Advice should be sought before flying in areas
            notified by the Met Office as being contaminated with volcanic ash.


8.3.5.5     Wind shear

             Pilots must remain alert to the possibility of wind shear, and be prepared to make significant
             control movements and power changes to offset its effects. Immediately after take-off, the pilot’s
             choices of action will be limited, since he will normally have full power applied, and be at the
             recommended climb speed for the configuration. If the presence of shear is indicated by rapidly
             fluctuating airspeed or rate of climb, or, descent or both, the pilot is to ensure that full power is
             applied and must aim to achieve maximum lift and maximum clearance from the ground.
             Similarly, if the shear is encountered during the approach, positive application of the power and
             flying controls should be used to keep the speed and rate of descent within the normal limits; if
             there is any doubt, the approach should be abandoned and action taken as in the after take-off
             case above. Whenever wind shear is encountered, it should be reported to air traffic control as
             soon as possible.


8.3.6        Wake Turbulence

8.3.6.1      Wake turbulence tends to increase with the size and power of the aircraft, and can reach
             dangerous proportions in relation to smaller, following aircraft. These dangers are greatest
             during the critical stages of flight on take-off or landing, and it is essential that Commanders
             allow an adequate interval between their own and preceding heavier aircraft for any such
             turbulence to dissipate.

8.3.6.2     Although air traffic controllers will normally warn departing or arriving aircraft of the need to
            observe particular intervals when following aircraft of a higher wake turbulence category,
            Commanders should apply the separations contained in Aeronautical Information Circular AIC
            064/2009.


8.3.7        Crew Members at their Stations

8.3.7.1      Flight Crew

             Flight crew members are to occupy their assigned duty stations from the time the aeroplane first
             starts to move at the beginning of its flight until it is stationary on its allocated parking stand at
             the end of the flight.

8.3.8        Use of Safety Belts for Crew and Passengers

8.3.8.1      Crew

              (a)   During take-off, landing and all other phases of flight, flight crew members shall be at their
                    assigned crew stations, properly secured by the safety belts and harnesses provided. On
                    task, task specialists may unstrap as required for the satisfactory performance of their
                    duties.


The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual          Part A   General                   Page 39 of 48
8.3.8.2      Passengers

              (a)   The Commander shall ensure that any additional person on board is briefed before take-off
                    on how to fasten and unfasten his safety belt/harness.

              (b)   Any additional person is to be seated in the aeroplane with his seat belt/harness fastened
                    and the doors closed before any attempt is made to start an engine. The Commander shall
                    ensure that any additional person on board occupies a seat with his safety belt/harness
                    properly secured at all times.


8.3.9        Use of Vacant Crew Seats

             For single pilot operations in aeroplanes fitted with two pilot seats and dual controls, the second
             pilot’s seat may be occupied by a person who is not a member of the operating crew provided
             that the following conditions are complied with:

              (a)   the person has the permission of the Operations Manager and/or the aeroplane
                    Commander;

              (b)   the aeroplane Commander ensures that the person is properly briefed on safety
                    procedures and equipment, and relevant operating procedures;

              (c)   the aeroplane Commander emphasises the importance of avoiding contact with, or
                    operation of, any control or switch;

              (d)   multiple seat occupancy is not permitted;

              (e)   the person is briefed by the Commander on the use of the full harness, the occasions
                    when it remains fastened and the need for the lap restraint to remain fastened at all times;
                    and

              (f)   the person must be able to remain clear of all the flying controls while seated in a normal
                    position, so the person’s build may be critical.


8.3.10      Cabin Safety Requirements

8.3.10.1     The Commander will be responsible for cabin safety from the time the aeroplane is accepted for
             flight, until all persons have left the aircraft at the end of the flight.

8.3.10.2     The Commander will ensure that no person recklessly or negligently acts, or fails to act, or
             enters the aircraft under the influence of alcohol or drugs so as to endanger the aircraft or its
             occupants, or acts or fails to act so as to cause or permit an aircraft to endanger any person or
             property.

8.3.10.3     Post flight any additional persons should be instructed to remain seated with their seat belts
             fastened until the aeroplane has come to rest and the engines have been stopped. Normally a
             crew member is to open the aeroplane door(s) and remain in attendance with the passengers
             until an approved escort is available. The Commander is to ensure that local aerodrome
             procedures do not prohibit any pedestrian passengers from traversing the movement area.


8.3.11       Passenger Briefing Procedures

             The Commander is responsible for ensuring that any passengers are given the appropriate
             briefing, or equipment demonstration, for the various stages of flight, as outlined in the following
             paragraphs.

8.3.11.1     Pre-board Briefing Concerning Dangerous Goods


The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual         Part A   General                   Page 40 of 48
             Except as otherwise provided for in Para 9.1., dangerous goods must not be carried in or as
             passenger or crew checked or carry-on baggage. Security type attaché cases incorporating
             dangerous goods, e.g. lithium batteries or pyrotechnic material, are totally forbidden. The
             attention of any additional passengers will be drawn to this before each flight.

8.3.11.2     Pre-Take-off Briefing

             Passengers are to be verbally briefed on:

              (a)   the use, fastening and unfastening of safety belts/harnesses;

              (b)   restrictions on smoking;

              (c)   location and use of emergency exits;

              (d)   the need for the front seat passenger to remain clear of the flying controls, if fitted;

              (e)   stowage of carry-on baggage; and

              (f)   restrictions on the use of portable electronic devices.

8.3.11.3     In Flight

             Any passengers are to be advised as necessary throughout the flight whenever conditions
             require the fastening of seat belts.

8.3.11.4     Before Landing

             Before landing, any passengers are to be advised that:

              (a)   any baggage should be secured;

              (b)   seat belts/harnesses should be fastened;

              (c)   restrictions exist on the use of electronic devices.

8.3.11.5     After Landing

             After landing, any passengers are to be advised to remain seated, with safety belts/harnesses
             fastened until the aeroplane has come to rest, and to refrain from smoking until they have
             entered a clearly defined smoking area.

8.3.11.6    If an emergency occurs during flight any passengers are to be briefed on such emergency action
            as may be appropriate to the circumstances.


8.3.12      Additional Crew Members

             All flights will operate as single crew. The vacant pilot’s position may be occupied by a company
             employee or third party for the purpose of observing operations on condition the requirements of
             section 8.3.9 are adhered to.


8.4      Use of Minimum Equipment Lists and Configuration Deviation Lists

8.4.1        Unserviceabilities

             Occasions arise when certain items of installed aeroplane equipment may be unserviceable
             without adversely affecting the aeroplane’s fitness for a particular flight, or the required level of
             safety. The Company holds a permission from the competent Authority which allows its
             aeroplanes to operate with such items unserviceable, subject to the requirements of its Minimum

The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual           Part A   General                    Page 41 of 48
             Equipment List (MEL). The MEL is based on, but may not be less restrictive than the Master
             MEL which has been produced for the type by the aeroplane manufacturer, and approved by the
             relevant regulatory authority.

8.4.2        Minimum Equipment List

             The MEL lists all the equipment, systems and installations which must be serviceable before a
             particular flight is undertaken. Items which may be unserviceable are indicated, together with
             any additional limitations which may apply to flights with such items inoperative. The MEL
             provides the Commander with the authority to operate the aeroplane with specified items of
             equipment unserviceable. However, irrespective of the provisions of the MEL, he is not obliged
             to operate with a particular defect or defects if in his opinion these unserviceabilities could
             adversely affect the safety of a proposed flight. Furthermore, the MEL must take into account the
             area of operation including whether the aeroplane is being despatched from base or an
             outstation.

8.4.3        Configuration Deviation List (CDL)

             The CDL, if available for the aircraft type, lists the aeroplane panels and doors that may be
             missing for a particular operation and pictorially indicates areas of damage to the aeroplane
             skin/structure which are considered acceptable for flight.

8.4.4        Specific MEL

             MELs for Company aeroplanes are contained in Part B, Section 7 for the specific aeroplane
             type.


8.5     Oxygen Requirements

             Company aeroplanes are not equipped for the use of oxygen; therefore no flights may be
             conducted at levels above 10000 feet.


8.6     Aeroplane Maintenance

8.6.1        Company aeroplanes will be maintained and released to service under JAR-145 approval.


8.6.2        The airworthiness of the aeroplane and the serviceability of both operational and emergency
             equipment are to be ensured by:

              (a)   pre-flight inspections;

              (b)   rectification to an approved standard of any defect and damage affecting safe operation,
                    taking into account the MEL and CDL;

              (c)   accomplishment of all maintenance in accordance with the Company’s approved
                    aeroplane maintenance programme;

              (d)   completion of any operational directive, airworthiness directive and any other continued
                    airworthiness requirement mandated by the CAA; and

              (e)   completion of modifications to an approved standard.

8.6.3        The Company will ensure that the Certificate of Airworthiness for each aeroplane operated
             remains valid in terms of any calendar expiry date specified in the Airworthiness Renewal
             Certificate (ARC), the requirements in 8.6.2 above and any other maintenance condition
             specified in the ARC.



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SECTION 9: DANGEROUS GOODS AND WEAPONS

9.1     Policy on the Transport of Dangerous Goods

9.1.1        Dangerous goods can only be carried according to the ICAO’s Technical Instructions for the
             Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air, even if the flight is wholly within the territory of a
             State. The Technical Instructions contain a comprehensive list of what dangerous goods a
             passenger may have and in what circumstances. An approval must be granted by the CAA
             before dangerous goods can be carried on an aircraft, except as identified in 9.1.2 and 9.1.3
             below.

9.1.2        An approval is not required for dangerous goods which are required to be aboard the aircraft as
             items for airworthiness or operating reasons. Articles and substances intended as replacements
             for these must be carried in accordance with the Technical Instructions.

9.1.3        An approval is not required for those dangerous goods which, according to the Technical
             Instructions, can be carried by any passengers or crew members; these include:

              (a)   alcoholic beverages not exceeding 70% alcohol by volume, when packed in receptacles of
                    less than 5 litres;

              (b)   non-radioactive medicinal or toilet articles (including aerosols, hair sprays, perfumes,
                    medicines containing alcohol); the net quantity of each single article must not exceed 0.5
                    litre or 0.5 kg and the total net quantity of all articles must not exceed 2 litres or 2 kg;

              (c)   safety matches or a lighter for the person’s own use and when carried on him. ‘Strike
                    anywhere’ matches, lighters containing unabsorbed liquid fuel (other than liquefied gas),
                    lighter fuel and lighter refills are not permitted;

              (d)   small carbon dioxide gas cylinders worn for the operation of mechanical limbs;

              (e)   radioisotopic cardiac pacemakers or other devices (including those powered by lithium
                    batteries) implanted in a person, or radio-pharmaceuticals contained within the body of a
                    person as a result of medical treatment; and

              (f)   when carriage is allowed by the operator, small gaseous oxygen or air cylinders for
                    medical use.

9.1.4        Packages containing dangerous goods can be identified by labels. These labels indicate the
             hazard of the goods by their class or division; these are:

              Class 1            –    Explosives generally not permitted on a helicopter but usually permitted
                                      on an aircraft
              Class 1            –     Explosives generally not permitted on an aircraft (with bomb symbol)
              Division 2.1       –     Flammable gases
              Division 2.2       –     Non-flammable, non-toxic gases
              Division 2.3       –     Toxic gases
              Class 3            –     Flammable liquids
              Division 4.1       –     Flammable solids
              Division 4.2       –     Spontaneously combustible substances
              Division 4.3       –     Water reactive substances
              Division 5.1       –     Oxidising substances
              Division 5.2       –     Organic peroxides
              Division 6.1       –     Toxic substances

The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual         Part A   General                  Page 43 of 48
              Division 6.2       –     Infectious substances
              Class 7            –     Radioactive materials
              Class 8            –     Corrosive substances
              Class 9            –     Miscellaneous dangerous goods

9.1.5        Weapons of war and munitions of war shall not be carried in Company aircraft.

9.1.6        Sporting weapons and ammunition shall not be carried in Company aircraft.


9.2     Duties of all personnel involved

9.2.1        The duties of all personnel involved are to ensure that the provisions concerning dangerous
             goods are complied with. The Chief Pilot will ensure that all appropriate personnel are briefed on
             their responsibilities concerning dangerous goods as per CAP 699.


9.3     Acceptance of Dangerous Goods

9.3.1        The Company shall not accept dangerous goods for transport except items listed in 9.1.2 and
             9.1.3 above.

9.3.2        Any items listed in 9.1.3 above and carried on a Company aeroplane may be inspected for
             leakage or damage. Any leaking or damaged packages containing these items will be removed
             from the aircraft immediately.

9.3.3        Crew members will be made aware of the hazards associated with the carriage of dangerous
             goods and how to identify them.




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SECTION 10: SECURITY

10.1     General

10.1.1       The Company shall ensure that all appropriate Company personnel are familiar with and comply
             with the relevant requirements of the national aviation security programme.

10.1.2       The Company has nominated a Security Officer and he has overall responsibility for matters
             affecting security. He will report directly to [the relevant manager]. In addition he will establish
             and maintain security procedures within the Company. The Security Officer will keep the
             operations department informed of all relevant security matters.

10.1.3       The Senior Operations Officer on duty is responsible for informing the Security Officer of any
             security related matter and is also responsible for ensuring that all aeroplane Commanders are
             kept fully informed of any security matter related to that aeroplane Commander’s current
             operation and/or duties.

10.1.4       Following any act of unlawful interference concerning a Company aeroplane or Company
             premises the Commander shall submit a report of such an act to the police and the CAA.

10.1.5       If the Commander suspects that concealed weapons, explosives or other dangerous devices
             have been hidden on board the aircraft, he will instigate an immediate search of the aircraft.




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual         Part A   General                   Page 45 of 48
SECTION 11: HANDLING OF ACCIDENTS AND OCCURRENCES


11.1     Events

11.1.1       Accidents

             An aeroplane accident should be reported by the Commander, unless he is killed or
             incapacitated, in which case the Company should report the circumstances to the Chief
             Inspector of the Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB). If the accident occurs on or near an
             aerodrome, the aerodrome authority should also report it to the AAIB.

11.1.2       Occurrences

             All aeroplane occurrences should be reported to the CAA Safety Data Department in
             accordance with the Mandatory Occurrence Reporting (MOR) scheme, which is mandatory for
             aeroplanes of more than 2300 kg MTOM, and voluntary for aeroplanes of lower weights.

11.1.3       Airmisses

             An airmiss should be reported by radio to the ATS Unit with which the Commander is in
             communication, or if this has not been possible, the report should be passed by telephone to an
             Air Traffic Control Centre as soon as possible after landing.

11.1.4       Birdstrikes

             Birdstrikes on aeroplanes, or bird carcasses found on aerodromes where they appear to have
             been struck by aeroplanes should be reported to the CAA R&AD with damage photographs if
             possible.

11.1.5       Wake Turbulence

             Wake turbulence should be reported as an unusual occurrence in the normal way.

11.1.6       Confidential Human Factors Incident Reports (CHIRPs)

             Reports of incidents or occurrences involving human factors and/or errors which the reporter
             wishes to remain confidential should be sent to the Defence Research Agency Centre for
             Human Studies at Farnborough.

11.1.7       Notification to The Crown Estate

             Any report in Section 11, excluding CHIRPS, should be copied to The Crown Estate for
             information. The Crown Estate report copy can be in general terms and disidentified where
             considered appropriate.



11.2        Dangerous Goods Accidents/Occurrences

11.2.1       In the event of a dangerous goods accident or dangerous goods incident occurring a report must
             be sent to the CAA within 72 hours, unless exceptional circumstances prevent this. Any type of
             accident or incident must be reported even when the dangerous goods are in passengers’
             baggage or crew baggage. The initial report may be made by any means but a written report
             must be made as soon as possible by the Operations Manager and must contain all the
             information known, including:

                  (a)      the date and location;

                  (b)      a description of the goods, including the proper shipping name and UN number,
                           class/division and any subsidiary risk;
The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual       Part A   General                 Page 46 of 48
                  (c)      the name and address of the person involved;

                  (d)      the suspected cause of the accident or incident;

                  (e)      the action taken, if any;

                  (f)      any other reporting action taken;

                  (g)      any other relevant details; and

                  (h)      the name, title, address and contact number of the person making the report.

             Copies of the relevant documents and any photographs taken must be attached to the report.


11.3    Confidentiality

             Staff are not to discuss the circumstances concerning any accident or incident with anyone
             outside the Company other than authorised investigators.


11.4    Links to Online Reporting


              A   Form CA 1094 – Airprox Report

              B   Birdstrike Occurrence Report

              C   Form SRG/1601– Occurrence Report

              D   Form SRG/1423 – Wake Turbulence Report

              E   Confidential Human Factors Incident Reporting Programme (CHIRP)




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual         Part A   General                Page 47 of 48
SECTION 12: RULES OF THE AIR

12.1    Refer to the current Rules of the Air Regulations which can be found in CAP 393 Section 2 ‘Rules
        of the Air Regulations’ held by the Chief Pilot and electronically available.




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual       Part A   General                 Page 48 of 48
     Part B1

     Operating Details – [aircraft type]...............................................................................3

     Section 1 Limitations .................................................................................................3
       1.1   Engine Type and Limitations ...........................................................................3
       1.1.1 Engine/s [ Manufacturer and Model ] ........................................................3
       1.1.2 Engine limits For all operations – [                   ] RPM, [             ] BHP...........................3
       1.1.3 Fuel [       ] minimum octane aviation gasolene............................................3
       1.1.4 Propeller/s [ Manufacturer and Model ]........................................................3
       1.1.5 Cowl flaps [ Fitted/Not fitted ] .......................................................................3
       1.2   Airspeed Limitations ........................................................................................3
       1.3   Flight Manoeuvring Load Factors at Gross Weight..........................................3
       1.4   Maximum Masses............................................................................................4
       1.6   Loading Limits .................................................................................................4
       1.7   Handling Limitations ........................................................................................4

     Section 2.0 Emergency Procedures ..........................................................................5
       2.1   Air Speeds for Emergency Operation ..............................................................5
       2.2   Altitude Loss During a Stall..............................................................................5
       2.3   Engine Failure during Take-Off Roll.................................................................5
       2.4   Engine Failure Immediately After Take-Off......................................................5
       2.5   Engine Failure In The Cruise (Re-start procedures) ........................................6
       2.6   Emergency Landing Without Power.................................................................6
       2.7   Precautionary Landing With Power..................................................................7
       2.8   Ditching............................................................................................................8
       2.9   Engine Fire On Ground During Start................................................................9
       2.10 Fire In Flight...................................................................................................10
       2.11 Static Source Blockage..................................................................................11
       2.12 Landing with a Flat Main Tyre........................................................................11
       2.13 Landing with a Flat Nose Tyre .......................................................................11
       2.14 Ammeter shows excessive rate of charge (full scale deflection)....................12
       2.15 Low voltage illuminates during flight ..............................................................12
       2.16 Radio Failure .................................................................................................12

     Section 3 Normal Procedures .................................................................................13
       [Example given is a Cessna 172: insert own aircraft checklist] ................................13
       3.1   General/Documents.......................................................................................13
       3.2   Cockpit Pre-External Check...........................................................................13
       3.3   External Checks.............................................................................................14
       3.4   Transit Checks...............................................................................................15
       3.5   Internal Checks..............................................................................................15
       3.6   Starting Engines ............................................................................................16
       3.7   After Engine Starting......................................................................................16
       3.8   Taxying Checks .............................................................................................16
       3.9   Power Checks ...............................................................................................17
       3.10 Normal Take-Off ............................................................................................17
       3.11 Short Field Take-Off ......................................................................................17
       3.12 Enroute Climb................................................................................................17
       3.13 Cruise ............................................................................................................18

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        3.14      Descent .........................................................................................................18
        3.15      Before Landing ..............................................................................................18
        3.16      Normal Landing .............................................................................................18
        3.17      Short Field Landing........................................................................................18
        3.18      Baulked Landing............................................................................................18
        3.19      After Landing .................................................................................................18
        3.20      Shut down......................................................................................................18
        3.21      Recommended Speed Settings .....................................................................19
        3.22      Limiting Speeds .............................................................................................19

     Section 4 Performance.............................................................................................20
       4.0    General..........................................................................................................20
       4.1    Performance Group .......................................................................................20
       4.2    Take-Off and Landing Distance Required - Negative value indicates runway
       unsuitable for conditions...........................................................................................20
       4.3    Performance Charts and Graphs [Insert Specific Aircraft Charts]..................21
     Section 5 Flight Planning.........................................................................................30
       5.1    Fuel Planning and Management....................................................................30

     Section 6 Mass and Balance....................................................................................31
       6.1   General..........................................................................................................31
       6.1.2 Mass and Centre of Gravity ...........................................................................31
       6.1.3 Documentation ..............................................................................................32
       6.2   Useful Load Chart..........................................................................................32

     Section 7.0 Minimum Equipment List .....................................................................34

     Section 8 Instruments and Equipment ...................................................................35
       8.1   General..........................................................................................................35
       8.2   Circuit Protection Devices..............................................................................35
       8.3   Aeroplane Operating Lights ...........................................................................35
       8.4   Flight and Navigational Instruments...............................................................35
       8.5   Seats and Safety Belts ..................................................................................35
       8.6   First Aid Kits ..................................................................................................35
       8.7   Supplemental Oxygen ...................................................................................36
       8.8   Hand Fire Extinguishers ................................................................................36
       8.9   Life Jackets....................................................................................................36
       8.10 Liferaft............................................................................................................36
       8.10 Radio Equipment ...........................................................................................36




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual                      Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 2 of 36
Part B1 Operating Details – [aircraft type]

Section 1       Limitations                                             * Note: units are illustrative – use
1.1 Engine Type and Limitations                                         appropriate Flight Manual units

1.1.1   Engine/s                                   [   Manufacturer and Model ]

1.1.2   Engine limits                     For all operations – [     ] RPM, [      ] BHP

1.1.3   Fuel                              [      ] minimum octane aviation gasolene

1.1.4   Propeller/s                       [   Manufacturer and Model ]

1.1.5   Cowl flaps                        [   Fitted/Not fitted ]

1.1.6   Oil Temperature                   Green arc (normal operating range)         [     ] °F to [      ] °F *
                                          Red arc (maximum)                          [     ] °F

1.1.7   Oil Pressure                      Green arc (normal operating range)         [     ] to [      ] psi
                                          Red arc (minimum)                          [     ] psi
                                          Red arc (maximum)                          [     ] psi

1.1.8   Tachometer                        Green arc (normal operating range)         [     ] to [      ] RPM
                                          Red line (maximum)                         [     ] RPM

1.1.9   Fuel Flow                         Green arc (normal operating range)         0 to [     ] GPH
                                          Red line (maximum at sea level)            [      ] GPH

1.2 Airspeed Limitations

1.2.1   Never Exceed (smooth air)         Red line (maximum)                         [     ] KNOTS

1.2.2   Caution Range (smooth air)                                                   [     ] to [      ] KNOTS

1.2.3   Normal Operating Range                                                       [     ] to [      ] KNOTS

1.2.4   Flap Extended Range                                                          [     ] to [      ] KNOTS

1.2.5   Flap    0 deg – 10 deg                                                       [     ] KNOTS

1.2.6   Flap    10 deg – 30 deg                                                      [     ] KNOTS

1.2.7   Maximum Cruising Speed                                                       [     ] KNOTS

1.2.11 Stalling Speed                     flaps up                                   [     ] KNOTS
                                          flaps down                                 [     ] KNOTS

1.3 Flight Manoeuvring Load Factors at Gross Weight

1.3.1   Maximum – flaps up                                                           +[     ]g, -[      ]g

1.3.2   Maximum – flaps down                                                         +[     ]g


The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual              Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 3 of 36
1.4 Maximum Masses

1.4.1   Maximum landing weight                                                           [     ] lbs

1.4.2   Maximum take-off weight                                                          [     ] lbs

1.4.3   Maximum ramp weight                                                              [     ] lbs


1.5 Centre of Gravity Limits

        Reference datum: [                  location                  ]


1.6 Loading Limits

1.6.1   Forward:         [     ] inches aft of datum at [      ] Ibs. or less, with straight line variation to [
                         ] inches aft of datum at [     ] Ibs.

        Aft:             [     ] inches aft of datum at all weights

        Straight line variation between the points.


1.7 Handling Limitations

        AEROBATIC MANOEUVRES (INCLUDING SPINS) ARE PROHIBITED




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual               Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 4 of 36
Section 2.0 Emergency Procedures
2.1     Air Speeds for Emergency Operation

        Engine Failure after take-off
                Wing Flaps Up                       [      ] KIAS
                Wing Flaps Down                     [      ] KIAS
        Manoeuvering Speed
                [    ] Ibs.                         [      ] KIAS
                [    ] lbs.                         [      ] KIAS
                [    ] Ibs.                         [      ] KIAS
        Maximum Glide                               [      ] KIAS
        Precautionary Landing with Power            [      ] KIAS
        Landing Without Engine Power
                Flaps Up                            [      ] KIAS
                Flaps Down                          [      ] KIAS

2.2     Altitude Loss During a Stall

        Loss of altitude during a power off stall, with flaps retracted, is [   ] feet. Other stall
        configurations result in less loss of altitude

2.3     Engine Failure during Take-Off Roll

        Immediately:

        a)       THROTTLES                          IDLE

        b)       BRAKES                             APPLY MAXIMUM

        c)       WING FLAPS                         RETRACT

        d)       MIXTURE                            IDLE CUT OFF

        e)       INGITION SWITCH                    OFF

        f)       MASTER SWITCH                      OFF

2.4     Engine Failure Immediately After Take-Off

        Immediately:

        a)       AIRSPEED                           FLAPS UP – [         ] KIAS, FLAPS DOWN [         ] KIAS

        a)       MIXTURE                            IDLE CUT OFF

        b)       FUEL CUT OFF VALVE                 OFF (PULL FULL OUT)

        c)       INGITION SWITCH                    OFF

        c)       WING FLAPS                         AS REQUIRED

        d)       MASTER SWITCH                      OFF

        e)       CABIN DOOR                         [               ]

        f)       LAND                               STRAIGHT AHEAD



The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual               Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 5 of 36
2.5     Engine Failure In The Cruise (Re-start procedures)

        Immediately:

        a)      SPEED                     [      ] KIAS

        b)      Fuel shut-off value ON

        c)      Fuel Selector Valve BOTH

        d)      Auxiliary Fuel Pump Switch ON

        e)     Mixture RICH (if restart has not occurred)

        f)     Ignition Switch – both (or start if propeller is stopped)


2.6     Emergency Landing Without Power

        Immediately:

        a)      PASSENGER SEAT BACKS               MOST UPRIGHT POSITION

        b)      SEATS AND SEAT BELTS               SECURE

        c)      AIRSPEED                           FLAPS UP – [         ] KIAS, FLAPS DOWN [           ] KIAS

        d)      MIXTURE                            IDLE CUT OFF

        e)      FUEL CUT OFF VALVE                 OFF

        f)      INGITION SWITCH                    OFF

        g)      FLAPS                              AS REQUIRED

        h)      MASTER SWITCH                      OFF (When landing is assured)

        i)      DOORS                              [      ]

        j)      TOUCHDOWN                          [   tail low?   ]

        k)      BRAKES                             [               ]




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual                Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 6 of 36
2.7     Precautionary Landing With Power

        Immediately:

        a)      PASSENGER SEAT BACKS             MOST UPRIGHT POSITION

        b)      SEATS AND SEAT BELTS             SECURE

        c)      AIRSPEED                         [     ] KIAS

        d)      FLAPS                            [     ] DEG

        e)      SELECTED FIELD                   FLY OVER noting terrain and obstructions, then retract
                                                 flaps upon reaching a safe altitude and airspeed

        f)      ELECTRICAL                       AVIONICS MASTER AND ELECTRICAL SWITCHES
                                                 OFF

        g)      WING FLAPS                       [     ] DEGS (on final approach)

        h)      AIRSPEED                         [     ] KIAS

        i)      MASTER SWITCH                    OFF

        j)      DOORS                            [     ]

        k)      TOUCHDOWN                        [     ]

        l)      INGITION SWITCH                  OFF

        m)      BRAKES                           [     ]




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual             Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 7 of 36
2.8     Ditching

2.8.1   Prepare for ditching by securing or jettisoning heavy objects located in the baggage area.
        Collect folded coats and cushions for protection of occupants’ faces at touchdown. Transmit
        MAYDAY message on 121.5 giving location or appropriate ATC unit if under positive control.

        SQUAWK 7700

2.8.2   Plan approach into wind (if wind is high and swell heavy) or parallel to swells (if wind is light and
        swell heavy).

2.8.3   During approach:


        a)       PASSENGER SEAT BACKS              MOST UPRIGHT POSITION

        b)       SEATS AND SEAT BELTS              SECURE

        c)       FLAP                              [     ] to [      ] DEGREES

        d)       IF POWER AVAILABLE                ESTABLISH [           ] FT/MIN DESCENT / [         ] KIAS

        e)       IF NO POWER AVAILABLE             APPROACH [            ] KIAS NO FLAP
                                                   or
                                                   APPROACH [              ] KIAS WITH [          ] DEGS OF
        FLAP

        f)       CABIN DOOR                        UNLATCH

        g)       TOUCHDOWN                         LEVEL ATTITUDE AT ESTABLISHED RATE OF
                                                   DESCENT

        f)       PASSENGER(S)                      BRACE

2.8.4   After touchdown:

        a)       EVACUATE                          THROUGH CABIN DOOR/EMERGENCY EXIT

        b)       LIFE JACKETS AND RAFT             INFLATE (ONLY OUTSIDE AIRCRAFT)

        c)       LIFE RAFT                         BOARD

            The aircraft may only float for a few minutes.

            It may be necessary to allow the cabin to flood before doors can be opened if aircraft has
             started to sink.




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual                Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 8 of 36
2.9     Engine Fire On Ground During Start

2.9.1   Continue cranking engine in an attempt to start

2.9.2   If start is successful

        a)      POWER                            Run at [        ] RPM for two minutes

        b)      ENGINE                           Shutdown and inspect for damage

2.9.3   If start is unsuccessful

        a)      THROTTLE                         OPEN FULL

        b)      MIXTURE                          IDLE CUT OFF

        c)      CRANKING                         CONTINUE

        d)      FUEL CUT OFF VALVE               OFF (PULL FULL OUT)

        e)      AUXILIARY FUEL PUMP              OFF

        f)      MASTER SWITCH                    OFF

        g)      INGITION SWITCH                  OFF

        h)      PARKING                          BRAKE RELEASE

        i)      AIRPLANE                         EVACUATE

        j)      FIRE                             EXTINGUISH

        k)      FIRE DAMAGE                      INSPECT




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual              Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 9 of 36
2.10    Fire In Flight

2.10.1 Engine Fire

        The pilot shall immediately adopt the following action:

        a)      MIXTURE                          IDLE CUT-OFF

        b)      FUEL CUT OFF VALVE               OFF (PULL FULL OUT)

        c)      AUXILIARY FUEL PUMP              OFF

        d)      MASTER SWITCH                    OFF

        e)      CABIN HAET AND AIR               OFF (except overhead vents)

        f)      AIRSPEED                         [      ] KIAS (If fire not extinguished, increase glide
                                                 speed to find an airspeed, within limits, which will force
                                                 an incombustible mixture.

        g)      FORCED LANDING                   As 2.6

2.10.2 Electrical Fire

        The pilot shall immediately:

        a)      MASTER SWITCH                    OFF

        b)      VENTS, CABIN AIR, HEATER CLOSED

        c)      FIRE EXTINGUISHER                USE AS REQUIRED

        d)      AVIONICS MASTER SWITCH OFF

        e)      ALL OTHER SWITCHES               OFF (except ignition)

        f)      VENTS/CABIN AIR/HEAT             OPEN (when certain that the fire is completely
                                                 extinguished)

        g)      MASTER SWITCH                    ON

        h)      CIRCUIT BREAKERS                 CHECK for faulty circuit, do not reset

        i)      RADIO SWITCHES                   OFF

        j)      AVIONICS MASTER SWITCH ON

        k)      RADIO/ELEC SWITCHES              ON one at a time, with delay after each, until short
                                                 circuit is localised




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual            Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 10 of 36
2.10.3 Cabin Fire

        The pilot shall immediately:

        a)      MASTER SWITCH                    OFF

        b)      VENTS, CABIN AIR, HEATER CLOSED

        c)      FIRE EXTINGUISHER                USE AS REQUIRED

        d)      VENTS/CABIN AIR/HEAT             OPEN (when it is certain that fire is completely
                                                 extinguished)

        e)      LAND                             AS SOON AS POSSIBLE


2.10.4 Wing Fire

        Immediately:

        a)      LANDING TAXI-LIGHT SWITCHES                      OFF

        b)      NAVIGATION LIGHT                                 OFF

        c)      STROBE LIGHT SWITCH                              OFF

        d)      PITOT SWITCH                                     OFF

        Perform sideslip to keep the flames away from the fuel tank and cabin. Land as soon as
        possible using flaps only as required for final approach.


2.11    Static Source Blockage

        a)      STATIC PRESSURE ALTERNATE SOURCE VALVE                    [     ]


2.12    Landing with a Flat Main Tyre

        a)      APPROACH                         NORMAL

        b)      WING FLAPS                       [     ] DEGS

        c)      TOUCHDOWN                        GOOD MAIN TYRE FIRST, hold aircraft off flat tyre for
                                                 as long as possible with aileron control.

        d)      DIRECTIONAL CONTROL              Maintain using brake on good wheel as required.

2.13    Landing with a Flat Nose Tyre


        a)      APPROACH                         NORMAL

        b)      WING FLAPS                       AS REQUIRED

        c)      TOUCHDOWN                        ON MAINS, hold nose wheel off ground
                                                 as long as possible.

        d)      When aircraft touches down, maintain full up elevator as airplane slows to a stop



The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual           Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 11 of 36
2.14    Ammeter shows excessive rate of charge (full scale deflection)

        a)      ALTERNATOR                                              OFF

        b)      NON ESSENTIAL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT                      OFF

        c)      TERMINATE FLIGHT AS SOON AS PRACTICAL


2.15    Low voltage illuminates during flight

        a)      AVIONICS MASTER SWITCH                  OFF

        b)      ALTERNATOR CIRCUIT BREAKER              CHECK IN

        c)      MASTER SWITCH                           OFF (BOTH SIDES)

        d)      MASTER SWITCH                           ON

        e)      LOW VOLTAGE ANNUCIATOR                  CHECK OFF

        F)      AVIONICS MASTER SWITCH                  ON

        If low voltage light illuminates again

        a)      ALTERNATOR                              OFF

        b)      NON ESSENTIAL RADIOB/ELEC EQUIPMENT                     OFF

        c)      FLIGHT                                  TERMINATE AS SOON AS PRACTICAL


2.16    Radio Failure

2.16.1 Pilots should initially check:

        a)      RADIO(S)                         CHECK
                                                 Frequency, volume, on/off switch, squelch, avionics
                                                 switches

        b)      HEADSET(S)                       CHECK
                                                 Plugs secure,   change    headsets,    use   hand-held
                                                 microphone

        c)      ELECTRICS                        CHECK
                                                 Ammeter, master switch, circuit breakers – reset once
                                                 only

2.16.2 If radio cannot be restored squawk 7600 and land at base or suitable airfield if VFR, but do not
       enter controlled airspace unless clearance to enter has already been given.




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual          Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 12 of 36
Section 3 Normal Procedures


3.1      General/Documents

NOTE: CHECK A comprises 3.1.1 to 3.4.11

3.1.1    Note: If there is any difference between this Check List and the aircraft Flight Manual, then the
         FLIGHT MANUAL is to be regarded as the authoritative document

3.1.2    Check aircraft documents.

3.1.3    Ensure all loose equipment is correctly stowed and the aircraft is free of extraneous items.
         Inspect seat belts and harnesses for satisfactory condition and operation.

3.1.4    If the aircraft has not been regularly used ensure that either the engine has been turned
         weekly, run fortnightly or the manufacturer's recommendations have been complied with and
         compression appears normal when turned by hand.

3.1.5    Previous reported defects have been rectified or are allowed in the MEL.


[Example given is a Cessna 172: insert own aircraft checklist]
3.2      Cockpit Pre-External Check

3.2.1    Ground surface at aircraft                General condition, free of ice.
3.2.2    Parking Brake                             Set.
3.2.3    Fire extinguisher                         Check.
3.2.4    First Aid kit                             Check.
3.2.5    Control Locks                             Removed & stowed.
3.2.6    Ignition Switch                           Off.
3.2.7    Avionics Master Switch                    Off.
3.2.8    Master Switch                             On.
3.2.9    Fuel Quantity Indicators                  Check Quantity
3.2.10   Low Fuel Annunciators                     Off
3.2.11   Avionics Master Switch                    On.
3.2.12   Avionics Cooling Fan                      Check audibly for operation.
3.2.13   Avionics Master Switch                    Off.
3.2.14   Static Pressure Alternate Source Valve    Off
3.2.15   Annunciator Panel Switch                  Hold in TST, All red/amber annunciators illuminate.
3.2.16   Annunciator Panel Test Switch             Release. Check appropriate annuciators remain on
3.2.17   Fuel selector Valve                       Both.
3.2.18   Fuel Shutoff Valve                        On (Push Full In)
3.2.19   Flaps                                     Extend
3.2.20   Pitot Heat                                On Check warm to touch within 30 seconds.
3.2.21   Pitot Heat                                Off.
3.2.22   Landing/Navigation Lights                 Check, then off.
3.2.23   Master switch                             Off.
3.2.24   Baggage Door and Contents                 Check




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual             Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 13 of 36
3.3     External Checks

        Clockwise walkround, checking for condition, security, freedom from ice, fluid levels and
        contamination.

3.3.1   Rear fuselarge
        Tail Tie Down                            Disconnect
        Control Surfaces                         Check freedom of movement and security
        Trim Tab                                 Check Security
        Antennas & Static Wick Discharges        Check for security of attachment and general condition

3.3.2   Starboard Wing
        Flap                                     Check for security and condition
        Aileron                                  Check freedom of movement and security
        Fuel Tank Sump Quick Drain Valves        Drain
        Wing Tie Down                            Disconnect
        Main Wheel Tyre                          Check
        Fuel Quantity                            Check Visually
        Fuel Filler Cap                          Secure and vent unobstructed
        Strut                                    Check

3.3.3   Nose
        Fuel Drain Valves                        Drain
        Engine Oil Dipstick/Filler Cap           Check and secure
        Engine Cooling Air Inlets                Clear
        Propeller and Spinner                    Check
        Air Filter                               Check
        Nose Wheel Strut and Tyre                Check
        Left Static Source Opening               Check

3.3.5   Port Wing
        Fuel Quantity                            Check Visually
        Fuel Filler Cap                          Secure and vent unobstructed
        Fuel tank Vent Opening                   Check
        Stall Warning                            Check, suck on vent opening, horn will sound if OK
        Wing Tie Down                            Disconnect
        Landing/Taxi Lights                      Check Condition
        Pitot head.                              Check
        Aileron                                  Check freedom of movement and security
        Flap                                     Check for security and condition
        Main Wheel Tyre                          Check
        Fuel Tank Sump Quick Drain Valves        Drain
        Strut                                    Check




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual           Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 14 of 36
3.4      Transit Checks
3.4.1    Ground surface & extinguisher           Check.
3.4.2    Control locks & pitot cover             Removed.
3.4.3    Mixture controls                        lCO.
3.4.4    Magnetos & electrics                    All OFF.
3.4.5    Airframe general                        Check.
3.4.6    Fuel & oil                              Visual check.
3.4.7    Propellers                              Check.
3.4.8    Undercarriage                           Check .

3.5      Internal Checks
3.5.1    Preflight Inspection                    Complete.
3.5.2    Passenger Briefing                      Complete
3.5.3    Seats and Seat Belts                    Adjust and Lock, Check Inertia reel locking
3.5.4    Brakes                                  Test and Set
3.5.5    Circuit Breakers                        Check In.
3.5.6    Electrical Equipment                    Off
3.5.7    Avionics Master Switch Off              Off
3.5.8    Fuel Selector Valve                     Both.
3.5.9    Fuel Shutoff Valve                      On.
3.5.10   Avionics Circuit Breakers               Check In
3.5.11   Instruments                             Legible, Servicable, reading within limits
3.5.12   Controls                                Full and Free Movement




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual   Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 15 of 36
3.6      Starting Engines

3.6.1 With Battery
3.6.1.1 Throttle                                 Open ¼ inch.
3.6.1.2 Mixture                                  Idle Cut off
3.6.1.3 Propeller Area                           Clear
3.6.1.4 Master Switch                            On
3.6.1.5 Circuit Breakers                         Check In
3.6.1.6 Beacon                                   On
3.6.1.7 Auxiliary Fuel Pump Switch               On
3.6.1.8 Mixture (only if engine is cold)         Advance to Obtain 3 to 5 GPH then idle cutoff
3.6.1.9 Ignition Switch                          Start, release when engine starts
3.6.1.10 Mixture                                 Advance smoothly to rich when engine starts
3.6.1.11 R.P.M                                   1000 R.P.M

3.6.2 With External Power
3.6.2.1 Throttle                                 Open ¼ inch.
3.6.2.2 Mixture                                  Idle Cut off
3.6.2.3 Propeller Area                           Clear
3.6.2.4 External Power                           Connect
3.6.2.5 Master Switch                            On
3.6.2.6 Circuit Breakers                         Check In
3.6.2.7 Beacon                                            On
3.6.2.8 Auxiliary Fuel Pump Switch               On
3.6.2.9 Mixture (only if engine is cold)         Advance to Obtain 3 to 5 GPH then idle cutoff
3.6.2.10 Ignition Switch                         Start, release when engine starts
3.6.2.11 Mixture                                 Advance smoothly to rich when engine starts
3.6.2.12 R.P.M                                   1000 R.P.M

3.7      After Engine Starting
3.7.1    Starter Warning Light                   Out
3.7.2    Oil Pressure                            Rising to green within 30 secs.
3.7.3    External Power                          Disconnect (If applicable)
3.7.4    Auxillary Fuel Pump                     Off
3.7.5    Beacon                                  On
3.7.6    Ammeter                                 Charging
3.7.7    Suction                                 Registering
3.7.8    Magnetos                                Check
3.7.9    Avionics Master Switch                  On.
3.7.10   Radios                                  On and tuned
3.7.11   Flaps                                   Check operation, leave UP.
3.7.12   Instruments                             Set as required
3.7.13   Radios                                  All on.

3.8      Taxying Checks
3.8.1    Brakes                                  Check.
3.8.2    Rudder                                  Check.
3.8.3    Flight instruments                      Check.




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual   Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 16 of 36
3.9      Power Checks
3.9.1    Postion                                 Into wind, check clear all around especially behind
3.9.2    Parking Brake                           On1200 RPM set
3.9.3    Fuel                                    Check both selected
3.9.4    Engine Temperature and Pressures        Within Limits
3.9.5    RPM                                     Set 1800 RPM – check brakes holding
3.9.6    Magnetos                                Check Left and Right (Max drop 150 RPM,
                                                 Max difference 50 RPM)
3.9.7 Suction                                    Check
3.9.8 Ammeter                                    Check
3.9.9 Engine Temperature and Pressure            Within Limits
3.9.10 Annunciator Panel                         No indications
3.9.11 RPM                                       Check Idle 575-625, reset 1200 RPM
Pre take off vital Actions
3.9.12 Trim                                      Set for take off
3.9.13 Throttle Friction                         Set finger tight
3.9.14 Mixture                                   Fully Rich
3.9.15 Magnetos                                  On both
3.9.16 Master Switch                             On
3.917 Pitot Heat                                 As required
3.9.18 Flaps                                     As required (see POH)
3.9.19 Flight Instruments                        Set and Checked
3.9.20 Engine Instruments                        Within Limits
3.9.21 Radios and Avionics                       Set as required
3.9.22 Autopilot                                 Off
3.9.23 Hatches                                   Closed and Locked
3.9.24 Harness                                   Belts and Seats Upright Position
3.9.25 Flying Controls                           Full and free movement
Lining Up
3.9.26 Strobes                                   On
3.9.27 Pitot Heat                                As required
3.9.28 Transponder                               On
3.9.29 Landing Light                             On

3.10     Normal Take-Off
3.10.1   Wing Flaps                              0-10 deg
3.10.2   Mixture                                 Rich
3.10.3   Throttle                                Full Open
3.10.4   Elevator control                        Lift Nose Wheel at 55 KIAS
3.10.5   Climb Speed                             70-80 KIAS

3.11     Short Field Take-Off
3.11.1   Wing Flaps                              10 deg.
3.11.2   Brakes                                  Apply.
3.11.3   Mixture                                 Rich
3.11.4   Throttle                                Full open
3.11.5   Brakes                                  Release
3.11.6   Elevator Control                        Slightly Tail Low
3.11.7   Climb Speed                             56 KIAS (until clear of obstacles)

3.12     Enroute Climb
3.12.1   Airpseed                                70-85 KIAS
3.12.2   Mixture                                 Rich (above 3000 ft lean for max RPM)
3.12.3   Throttle                                Full open




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual   Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 17 of 36
3.13     Cruise
3.13.1   Power                                   2100-2700 RPM-No more than 75%recommended
3.13.2   Elevator Trim                           Adjust
3.13.3   Mixture                                 Lean

3.14     Descent
3.14.1   Power                                   As Desired
3.14.2   Mixture                                 Adjust (full rich for idle power).
3.14.3   Fuel Selector Valve                     Both

3.15    Before Landing
3.15.1 Brakes                                    Off
3.15.2 Undercarriage                             Fixed down
3.15.3 Mixture                                   Rich
3.15.5 Fuel                                      On both
3.15.6 Engine                                    Temp and press, check ammeter and suction
3.15.7 Direction                                 DI synchroised with compass
3.15.8 Hatches and Harness                       Secured, fastened and most upright position.
3.15.9 Altimeter                                 QNH/QFE set as required
3.15.10 Autopilot                                Off

3.16   Normal Landing
3.16.1 Airpseed                                  65-75 KIAS (flaps up)
3.16.2 Wing Flaps                                As Desired (0-10deg below 110 KIAS, 10-30 deg
                                                 below 85 KIAS)
3.16.3   Airspeed                                60-70 KIAS (flaps down)
3.16.4   Touchdown                               Main Wheels First
3.16.5   Landing Roll                            Lower Nose Wheel Gently
3.16.6   Braking                                 Minimum Required

3.17     Short Field Landing
3.17.1   Airspeed                                65-75 KIAS (flaps up)
3.17.2   Wing Flaps                              Full Down (30 deg)
3.17.3   Airspeed                                61 KIAS (until flare)
3.17.4   Power                                   Reduce to idle after clearing obstacle
3.17.5   Touchdown                               Main Wheels First
3.17.6   Brakes                                  Apply Heavily
3.17.7   Wing Flaps                              Retract

3.18     Baulked Landing
3.18.1   Throttle                                Fully Open
3.18.2   Wing Flaps                              Retract to 20 deg
3.18.3   Climb Speed                             60 KIAS
3.18.4   Wing Flaps                              10 deg until obstacles are cleared. Retract after
                                                 reaching a safe altitude and 65 KIAS
3.19     After Landing
3.19.1    Flaps                                  Up
3.19.2   Trimmers                                Neutral
3.19.3   Throttle Friction                       Lossen
3.19.4   Electrics                               Non essential off
3.19.5   Radios                                  Non essential off
3.20     Shut down
3.20.1   Position                                Into Wind, nose wheel straight
3.20.2   Parking Brake                           Set
3.20.3   Magnetos                                Check
3.20.4   Avionics Master Switch                  Off.
3.20.5   Electrical Equipment                    Off.
3.20.6   Throttle                                Closed
3.20.7   Mixture                                 Idle Cut Off
3.20.8   Ignition Switch                         Off


The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual   Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 18 of 36
3.20.9 Master Switch                                         Off
3.20.10 Control Lock                                         Install
3.20.11 Fuel Selector Valve                                  Left OR Right to prevent cross feeding
3.20.12 Aircraft                                               Secured as appropiate


3.21    Recommended Speed Settings

Unless stated speeds are based on maximum weight of 2550 Ibs

Take Off:
                Normal Climb Out…………………………………………………….. [                                     ] KIAS
                Short Field Take Off, Flpas 10 deg, Speed at 50 feet……………. [                 ] KIAS
Enroute Climb, Flaps Up:
                Normal, Sea Level……………………………………………………. [                                     ] KIAS
                Normal, 10,000 feet…………………………………………………... [                                  ] KIAS
                Best Rate-of-Climb, Sea Level………………………………………. [                              ] KIAS
                Best Rate-of-Climb, 10,000 feet…………………..………………… [                            ]KIAS
                Best Angle-of-Climb, Sea Level…………………………………….. [                             ] KIAS
                Best Angle of Climb, 10,000 feet…………………………………… [                             ] KIAS
Landing Approach:
                Normal Approach, Flaps Up………………………………………… [                                  ] KIAS
                Normal Approach, Flaps 30 deg…………………………….……… [                               ] KIAS
                Short Field Approach, Flaps 30 deg……………………………….. [                           ] KIAS
Baulked Landing:
                Maximum Power, Flaps 30 deg…………………………………….. [                                ] KIAS
Maximum Recommended Turbulent Air Penetration Speed:
                [      ] Lbs……………………………………………………………. [                                       ] KIAS
                [      ] Lbs……………………………………………………………. [                                       ] KIAS
                [      ] Lbs……………………………………………………………. [                                       ] KIAS
Maximum Demonstrated Crosswind Velocity:
                Takeoff or Landing…………………………………………………… [                                     ] Knots
3.22    Limiting Speeds

    Symbol             Speed                KCAS         KIAS        Remarks
      VNE      Never exceed Speed           [    ]       [       ] Do Not exceed this speed in any
                                                                     operation
       VNO     Maximum Structural           [    ]       [       ] Do not exceed this speed except in
               Cruising Speed                                        smooth air, and then only with
                                                                     caution.
       VA      Manoeuvring Speed:           [    ]       [       ]
               2550 Lbs                                              Do not make full or abrupt control
               2200 Lbs                                              movements above this speed
               1900 Lbs
       VFE     Maximum Flap Extended        [    ]       [       ]
               Speed:                                                Do not exceed this speed with
               Flaps 10 deg                                          flaps down
               Flaps 10 to 30 deg
               Maximum Window Open          [        ]   [       ] Do not exceed this speed with
               Speed                                                 window open




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual               Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 19 of 36
Section 4       Performance

4.0          General

            The aircraft will be operated in accordance with the flight manual. The operator will ensure the
            aircraft is correclty configured for the intended flight with all relevant operational data accounted
            for in the calculation of performance criteria.



4.1          Performance Group

4.1.1        The [      ] is classified in Performance Group [      ].

4.1.2        Steep Approach Procedures

             Steep approach procedures are not required for operation into the nominated aerodromes.

4.1.3        Short Landing Operations

             Short landing operations are not required at the nominated aerodromes



4.2     Take-Off and Landing Distance Required - Negative value indicates runway unsuitable for
        conditions.


4.2.1   Runway selection at [    Aerodrome         ] for take-off and to reach an obstacle clearance height of
        50 feet

        Runways [             ] are available if the OAT is less than [ temp     ] °C with nil head wind


4.2.2   Runway selection at [ Aerodrome            ]for Landing and for obstacle clearance height of 50 feet
        and assuming 70% of runway available

        Runways [             ] are available if the OAT is less than [ temp     ] °C with nil head wind




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual             Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 20 of 36
4.3     Performance Charts and Graphs                     [Insert Specific Aircraft Charts]

                     4.3.1   Stall Speeds at [     ] Pounds
                     4.3.2   Short Field Takeoff Distance at [     ] Pounds
                     4.3.3   Maximum Rate-of-Climb at [        ] Pounds
                     4.3.4   Time, Fuel and Distance to Climb at [      ] Lbs
                     4.3.5   Cruise Performance
                     4.3.6   Range Profile
                     4.3.7   Endurance Profile
                     4.3.8   [     Aircraft    ] Loading Chart




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual            Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 21 of 36
4.3.1   Stall Speeds at[      ] Pounds




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual   Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 22 of 36
4.3.2   Short Field Takeoff Distance at [        ] Pounds




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual              Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 23 of 36
4.3.3   Maximum Rate-of-Climb at [          ] Pounds




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual         Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 24 of 36
4.3.4   Time, Fuel and Distance to Climb at [    ] Lbs




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual       Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 25 of 36
4.3.5   Cruise Performance




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual   Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 26 of 36
4.3.6   Range Profile




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual   Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 27 of 36
4.3.7   Endurance Profile




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual   Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 28 of 36
4.3.8   [ Aircraft   ] Loading Chart See B2-36




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual   Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 29 of 36
Section 5       Flight Planning

5.1          Fuel Planning and Management

5.1.1        The Commander of the aircraft must ensure that the fuel carried is adequate:

             a) for the proposed flight;

             b) for flight from the destination airfield to the alternate airfield; and

             c) for holding at the alternate airfield for 45 minutes.

             Fuel carried must also include a 10% contingency of a) and b) above.

5.1.2   The following chart will be used to calculate fuel burn during busy periods when it is impractical for a visual fuel contents check to be made before
        every flight. It is based on a fuel burn of 35 litres per hour at 2450 RPM cruise setting which takes into account taxiing and climb and extra
        contingency of same:

                  Fuel Consumption [ Aircraft      ] /Max Fuel Capacity [      ] Litres
                        Sector Times                                   Fuel Burn
                          5 Minutes                                  [     ] litres
                         10 Minutes                                  [     ] litres
                         15 Minutes                                  [     ] litres
                         20 Minutes                                  [     ] litres
                         25 Minutes                                  [     ] litres
                         30 Minutes                                  [     ] litres
                         35 Minutes                                  [     ] litres
                         40 Minutes                                  [     ] litres
                         45 Minutes                                  [     ] litres
                         50 Minutes                                  [     ] litres
                         55 Minutes                                  [     ] litres
                         60Minutes                                   [     ] litres




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual               Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 30 of 36
Section 6         Mass and Balance

6.1          General

6.1.1        The loading, mass and centre of gravity of the aeroplane shall comply with the limitations specified in the approved Aeroplane Flight Manual, or
             the Operations Manual if more restrictive. The mass and centre of gravity of the aeroplane will be established by actual weighing prior to initial
             entry into service and thereafter at intervals of every 4 years. Aeroplanes must also be reweighed if the effect of modifications on the mass and
             balance is not accurately known.

6.1.2        Mass and Centre of Gravity

6.1.2.1      Definitions

              (a) Dry Operating Mass (DOM). The total mass of the aeroplane excluding all usable fuel, traffic load but including crew and baggage.

              (b) Maximum Zero Fuel Mass. The maximum permissible mass of an aeroplane with no usable fuel. The mass of the fuel contained in
                  particular tanks must be included in the zero fuel mass when it is explicitly mentioned in the Aeroplane Flight Manual limitations.

              (c) Maximum Structural Landing Mass. The maximum permissible total aeroplane mass upon landing under normal circumstances.

              (d) Maximum Structural Take-Off Mass. The maximum permissible total aeroplane mass at the start of the take-off run.

              (e) Traffic Load. The total mass of passengers and any baggage.

6.1.2.2      The mass and centre of gravity (C of G) of each company aeroplane must be established by actual weighing before it is used for the purpose of
             commercial air transport. All aircraft are to be reweighed thereafter at intervals of four years. A basic aircraft mass and C of G position will
             normally be noted on the weighing report, or mass and centre of gravity schedule, as produced by the manufacturer or approved maintenance
             organisation. These will be used by the Company to calculate an aeroplane DOM and C of G for each aeroplane. The accumulated effects of
             modifications and repairs on mass and balance must be taken into account. Details are contained below for the particular aeroplane type.

6.1.2.3      The mass of crew members and crew baggage to be included in the aeroplane DOM are achieved using actual masses. Actual masses must be
             used for all other operating items to be included in the DOM. If the mass of engine oil has not been included in the calculation of basic aeroplane
             mass it must be included in the DOM. The effect of all the above items on the aeroplane C of G must be determined and taken into account.

6.1.2.4      Before the commencement of any flight the method of mass calculation must be stated and if ACTUAL masses rae used all masss must be
             weighed and the appropariate mass and balance calculations performed.




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual           Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 31 of 36
6.1.2.5      The total mass of fuel on board must always be compared with the fuel remaining prior to refuel plus the volume of fuel uplifted in order to
             provide a gross error check.

6.1.2.6      Operations are within the definition of the area for flights within the European Region as defined in Appendix 1 Eu-OPS 1.620(f) and limited to
             England, Scotland, Wales and the Channel Islands.


6.1.3        Documentation

6.1.3.1      The Commander is responsible for ensuring that the aeroplane’s mass and balance are, and will remain, within the published limits throughout
             the flight. Mass and balance documentation as per 6.2.4 is to be prepared and left on the ground before departure.

6.1.3.2      Detailed loading instructions and a sample mass and balance document for the particular aeroplane type can be found below. Passengers will
             be loaded by seat ref F1,R1,R2 where F=Front, R=Rear, 1=Starboard side, 2=Port side as per the loading schedule.

6.1.3.3      The Commander is to ensure that the aeroplane is loaded in accordance with these instructions. In co-operation with the maintenance
             organisation’s chief engineer, the chief pilot is responsible for ensuring that up-to-date mass and centre of gravity schedules are available for
             each aeroplane. These will be used as the basis for an dry operating mass and centre of gravity (CG) position as given below. These masses
             together with the actual or notional masses of the pilot, passengers, fuel and extraneous items, e.g. camera equipment, are to be used for all
             loading calculations. The mass of engine oil will be included in the aeroplane mass.

6.1.3.4      Detailed loading instructions and a sample mass and balance document for the particular aeroplane type can be found below.


6.2         Useful Load Chart

6.2.1       The [Aircraft] has two weight limitations

            a. Maximum allowable landing weight                  [   ] lbs
            b. Maximum allowable take-off weight                 [   ] lbs

6.2.2        Mass values for crew and additional passengers.

            All masses will be actual masses




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual           Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 32 of 36
[Insert Mass and balance chart for aircraft]




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual   Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 33 of 36
Section 7.0       Minimum Equipment List


        [Insert MEL for aircraft]




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual   Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 34 of 36
Section 8 Instruments and Equipment

8.1          General

8.1.1        A flight will not commence unless all the aircraft instruments and equipment are in operable
             condition (except as provided in the Minimum Equipment List), are approved where appropriate
             and installed in accordance with the requirements applicable to them.

8.2          Circuit Protection Devices

8.2.1        The aircraft will not be operated unless there are spare fuses available for use in flight equal to
             at least 10% of the number of fuses of each rating or three of each rating, whichever is the
             greater.

8.3           Aeroplane Operating Lights

8.3.1        The aircraft will not be operated unless it is equipped with adequate instrument and cabin
             illumination.

8.4          Flight and Navigational Instruments

8.4.1        Flights will be equipped with the following instrumentation:

             A stabilised direction indicator

             an outside air temperature gauge calibrated in degrees Celsius;

             a turn and slip indicator (or a turn co-ordinator incorporating a slip indicator, or an attitude
             indicator and a slip indicator);

             an air temperature gauge calibrated in degrees Celsius;

             a vertical speed indicator;

             an airspeed indicator;

             a sensitive pressure altimeter calibrated in feet with a sub-scale setting, calibrated in millibars,
             adjustable for any barometric pressure likely to be set during flight;

             an accurate timepiece showing the time in hours, minutes and seconds; and

             a magnetic compass.

8.5          Seats and Safety Belts

8.5.1        The aircraft will not be operated unless a seat with a safety belt or a safety harness is available
             for each passenger.

8.6          First Aid Kits

8.6.1        The aircraft will not be operated unless it is equipped with a first aid kit, readily accessible for
             use, and inspected and replenished regularly as necessary.




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual             Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 35 of 36
8.7          Supplemental Oxygen

8.7.1        The aircraft will not be operated above 10000 feet. Supplemental oxygen will not be required.

8.8          Hand Fire Extinguishers

8.8.1        The aircraft will not be operated unless it is equipped with a readily accessible hand fire
             extinguisher.

8.9          Life Jackets

8.9.1        The aircraft will not be operated when flying offshore for the purpose of aerial surveying, or in
             the event of a mishap whilst taking off or landing there is a likelihood of a ditching, unless it is
             equipped with a serviceable life jacket equipped with a survivor locator light for each person on
             board.


8.10         Liferaft

8.10.1       The aircraft will not be operated when flying offshore for the purpose of aerial surveying, unless
             it is equipped with a serviceable liferaft equipped with sufficient capacity for all persons on
             board the aircraft.

8.10         Radio Equipment

8.10.1       A flight will not commence unless all the aircraft radio equipment is approved and installed in
             accordance with the requirements applicable to them and in operable condition for the kind of
             operation being conducted except as provided in the Minimum Equipment List. The radio
             equipment fitted must provide for communications on the aeronautical emergency frequency
             121.5 MHz.

8.10.2       A flight will not commence in VFR over routes that can be navigated by reference to visual
             landmarks unless the aircraft is equipped with radio equipment necessary under normal
             operating conditions to fulfil the following:

             communicate with appropriate ground stations;

             receive meteorological information; and

             reply to SSR interrogations as required for the route being flown.




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual             Part B2 Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 36 of 36
Part B Aeroplane Operating Matters – Type Related

Section 0    General Information and Units of Measurement

              0.1   General                                                           B-2
              0.2   Units of measurement                                              B-2



PART B1 – [Aircraft 1]

PART B2 – [Aircraft 2]




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual        Part B Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 1 of 2
Section 0       GENERAL INFORMATION AND UNITS OF MEASUREMENT

0.1     General

             This Section contains information taken from from the aeroplane flight manual and external
             sources with information specific to the [aircraft type] and [Registration].

0.2     Units of Measurement

0.2.1        Aircraft weghts are measured in lb. To convert lb to kg multiply by 0.45359. To convert kg
             to lb multiply by 2.20462.

0.2.2        Distances are measured in nautical miles (nm). To convert nm to statute miles (st) multiply
             by 1.15078. To convert st to nm multiply by 0.868976.

0.2.3        Temperatures are measured in degrees Fahrenheit.

0.2.4        Metric and imperial measurements are used for other distances. To convert metres to feet
             multiply by 3.28084. To convert feet to metres multiply by 0.3048

0.2.5        Fluid volume is usually measured in litres. The following conversions apply:

             Litres to Imperial Gallons (IG):            multiply by 0.219975
             Litres to U.S.gallons (USG):                multiply by 0.264179
             Imperial Gallons to litres:                 multiply by 4.54596
             U.S.gallons to litres:                      multiply by 3.78541
             Imperial Gallons to U.S.gallons:            multiply by 1.20095
             U.S.gallons to Imperial Gallons:            multiply by 0.832674

0.2.6   Air pressure is measured in millibars (mb). To convert mb to inches multiply by 0.0295. To
        convert inches to mb multiply by 33.86.

0.2.7   To convert AVGAS 100LL lbs to litres divide lbs by 1.585




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual              Part B Aeroplane Operating Matters Page 2 of 2
Part C            Route and Aerodrome Instructions and
                  Information

This Part contains instructions and information relating to communication, navigation and
aerodromes including:


    Section 0        Minimum Flight Level/Altitude .............................................2

    Section 1        Operating Minima..................................................................3

    Section 2        Communication Facilities and Navaids ..............................4

    Section 3        Runway data and aerodrome facilities................................5

    Section 4        Approach, Missed Approach and Departure Procedures
                      including Noise Abatement Procedures, ..........................6

    Section 5        Communication Failure Procedures ...................................7

    Section 6        Search and Rescue Facilities in the Area over which the
                      aeroplane is to be flown .....................................................8

    Section 7        Maps and Charts ...................................................................9

    Section 8        Aeronautical Information and Meteorological Services ..10

    Section 9        En-Route Com/Nav Procedures.........................................11

    Section 10 Aerodrome Categorisation for Flight Crew Competence
                Qualification ......................................................................12

    Section 11 Special Aerodrome Limitations .........................................13
.




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual              Part C Route and Aerodrome Page 1 of 13
Section 0    Minimum Flight Level/Altitude

0.1          The minimum altitude in the cruise is governed by the requirement to be able to
             continue the flight at an altitude above the specified Minimum Off Route Altitude
             (MORA) in order to reach an adequate forced landing site on land at not below
             1,000 ft agl in the event of an engine failure. For planning purposes, it may be
             assumed that, at the recommended gliding speed in still air, the aeroplane will
             cover not more than 2 nm per thousand ft of height loss.

0.2          On leaving the circuit, the aeroplane is to be climbed to not less than MORA or
             1,500 ft agl, whichever is the higher. Depending on the terrain, obstacles and
             the proximity of ‘congested areas’, altitude should be increased to ensure that
             the requirement at Para 0.1 above are met.




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual        Part C Route and Aerodrome Page 2 of 13
Section 1    Operating Minima

1.1          Company aeroplanes are classified as being in Performance Class C and E and
             the Operating Minima shall be as follows:


                Phase of Flight        Minimum weather (Note 1)         Minimum operating height
                     (a)                        (b)                               (c)

               Aerodrome circuit     Minimum cloud base (Note 2)       Not relevant
                                     1,100 ft, minimum visibility
                                     3 km

               En-route              Minimum cloud base at least       Minimum height of 1,500 ft
                                     100 ft above the height           agl or the height required to
                                     required to satisfy column (c)    descend, following power
                                                                       failure, to a height of 1,000 ft
                                                                       above a place at which a safe
                                                                       forced landing can be made,
                                                                       whichever is the higher. Such
                                                                       a place shall be outside a
                                                                       congested area.

               Flights in and        Minimum cloud base of 4,500 ft    Minimum height of 1,500 ft
               around UK             with stable or improving          agl or the height required to
               mountain areas        weather conditions forecast for   descend, following power
                                     the duration of the flight.       failure, to a height of 1,000 ft
                                                                       above a place at which a safe
                                                                       forced landing can be made,
                                                                       whichever is the higher. Such
                                                                       a place shall be outside a
                                                                       congested area.

              All survey flights shall be conducted in accordance with VFR when in the
              designated survey area and the flight crew shall retain continuous visual
              contact with the surface. If contact is lost with the surface, recovery to base or
              a diversion airfield can be made under IFR.

              Cloud base is defined as the height above surface level of the lowest cloud in
              the immediate vicinity of the aeroplane.


1.2          Take-off, Landing and Approach Minima:

              The Commander is to ensure before commencing a take-off or
              approach/landing that the minimum requirements have been satisfied.




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual         Part C Route and Aerodrome Page 3 of 13
Section 2    Communication Facilities and Navaids

2.1          On leaving the aerodrome circuit, commanders are to change frequency to, and
             listen out on, whichever of the following is considered to be the best source of
             traffic information and/or surveillance for the planned route (Air Traffic Services
             shall be used for all flights whenever available):

              (a)   [                  ] MHz

              (b)   [                  ] MHz

              (c)   [                  ] MHz

2.2          The following radio navigation aids are within range under normal operating
             conditions and should be used to confirm the accuracy of the visual navigation:

                                 c/s                freq

              (a)   TACAN        [     ]            [      ]

              (b)   NDB          [     ]            [      ]




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual          Part C Route and Aerodrome Page 4 of 13
Section 3     Runway data and aerodrome facilities

3.1         The Company’s home base is the aerodrome at:

              (a)   [            ]

                                 Radio [         ] MHz

              Elev.[ ] ft        RWY [       ]              Grass/Asphalt [     ]m x [ ]m
                                 RWY [       ]              Grass/Asphalt [     ]m x [ ]m

              The following aerodromes are to be used as alternate or diversion aerodromes
              should the need arise.

              (b)   [       ]

                                 LARS [          ] MHz
                                 Radar [         ] MHz
                                 Tower [          ] MHz


              Elev.[ ] ft        RWY [       ]              Grass/Asphalt [     ]m x [ ]m
                                 RWY [       ]              Grass/Asphalt [     ]m x [ ]m


              (c)   [       ]

                                 LARS [      ] MHz
                                 Radar [      ] MHz
                                 Tower [       ] MHz


              Elev.[ ] ft        RWY [       ]              Grass/Asphalt [     ]m x [ ]m
                                 RWY [       ]              Grass/Asphalt [     ]m x [ ]m


3.2           In the event of an in-flight emergency, the Commander should attempt to land at
              the nearest suitable aerodrome.

3.3           The Company will only authorise the use of aerodromes that are adequate for
              the types of aircraft and operations concerned.




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual            Part C Route and Aerodrome Page 5 of 13
Section 4 Approach, Missed Approach and Departure Procedures including Noise
          Abatement Procedures,


4.1          As far as possible Commanders are to make use of any noise preferential routes
             which have been established to ensure that departing and arriving aeroplanes
             avoid overflying noise sensitive areas in the vicinity of the aerodrome.

4.2          Before commencing a take off, the Commander must satisfy himself that,
             according to the information available, the weather at the aerodrome and the
             condition of the runway intended to be used should not prevent a safe take-off
             and departure.

4.3          Before commencing take-off, the Commander must satisfy himself that the
             visibility in the take-off direction of the aeroplane is equal to or better than the
             applicable minimum.

4.4          Before commencing an approach to land, the Commander must satisfy himself
             that, according to the information available to him, the weather at the aerodrome
             and the condition of the runway intended to be used should not prevent a safe
             approach, landing or missed approach, having regard to the performance
             information contained in Part B Section 4 of this manual.




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual         Part C Route and Aerodrome Page 6 of 13
Section 5    Communication Failure Procedures

5.1          In the event of radio communication failure, the Commander is to return to base
             and land as soon as traffic conditions permit. Blind radio calls should be made
             and on transponder equipped aeroplanes the appropriate radio failure code
             (7600) is to be selected.




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual       Part C Route and Aerodrome Page 7 of 13
Section 6    Search and Rescue Facilities in the Area over which the aeroplane is to be
             flown

6.1          Commanders should be familiar with the contents of the United Kingdom
             Aeronautical Information Publication Section GEN 3.6 SAR (Search and
             Rescue).

6.2          A list containing information on the emergency and survival equipment carried
             on board the aircraft will be available in Operations and will be made available to
             the rescue coordination centre when requested. Information included in the list
             shall include number, colour and type of life raft (if carried), details of emergency
             medical supplies carried and details of any emergency portable radio equipment
             carried.




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual          Part C Route and Aerodrome Page 8 of 13
Section 7    Maps and Charts

7.1          A copy of the current issue of the 1:500,000 or 1:250,000 scale topographic map
             of the area is to be carried.

7.2          Written details of airspace restrictions, radio communication and navigation aid
             frequencies will be available in the aeroplane in the form of an Aerad manual.




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual       Part C Route and Aerodrome Page 9 of 13
Section 8    Aeronautical Information and Meteorological Services

8.1          During the duration of the flight Aeronautical information will be available from
             the [……………] on frequency […..] MHz.

8.2          Weather reports from selected aerodromes may be obtained by listening out on
             the following frequencies:

              (a)   Volmet on [……] MHz

              (b)   [……]




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual        Part C Route and Aerodrome Page 10 of 13
Section 9    En-Route Com/Nav Procedures

[specific company detail required]




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual   Part C Route and Aerodrome Page 11 of 13
Section 10 Aerodrome Categorisation for Flight Crew Competence Qualification


10.1        Category A Aerodromes

10.1.1       Category A aerodromes are defined as aerodromes with no special problems
             which require only the Commander to be area qualified. These aerodromes are
             as follows:

             [……..] (the Company Base Aerodrome)

              [……..] (a Company Diversion Aerodrome)

             [……..] (a Company Diversion Aerodrome)




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual     Part C Route and Aerodrome Page 12 of 13
Section 11 Special Aerodrome Limitations

11.1         [Any special limitations e.g. performance limitations and operating procedures
             for specific aerodromes]




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual      Part C Route and Aerodrome Page 13 of 13
Part DTraining
                                                                                                                                       Page No.

  Section 1          Training Syllabuses and Checking Programmes .................................................... 2

  Section 2          Training Syllabuses and Checking ........................................................................... 3
    2.1.1            Line Training ................................................................................................................. 3
    2.1.2            Differences Training and Familiarisation Training ........................................................ 3
    2.1.3            Recurrent Training and Checking ................................................................................. 4
     2.2             Operations Personnel other than Crew Members ........................................................ 6

  Section 3        Procedures .................................................................................................................. 7
    3.1          Procedures for Training and Checking.............................................................................. 7
    3.2          Personnel not Reaching or Maintaining the Required Standards ..................................... 7
    3.3          Simulation of Abnormal Situations .................................................................................... 7
    3.4          Simulated Engine Failures, Shut Downs and Single Engine Go-arounds. ....................... 7

  Section 4          Documentation and Storage ...................................................................................... 8

  Annex A      Pilot’s Personal Record................................................................................................. 9
  Annex B      Emergency and Safety Equipment Check .................................................................. 10
  Annex C      Operator Proficiency Check ........................................................................................ 11
  Annex D - Line Check        .............................................................................................................. 12
  Annex D      Line Check .................................................................................................................. 13
  Annex E      Summary of Ground and Flying Training .................................................................... 14
  Annex F - Syllabus of Ground and Flying Training........................................................................... 15




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual                                                          Part D Training Page 1 of 16
Section 1   Training Syllabuses and Checking Programmes


1.1         General

            This part of the manual is intended for the use and guidance of the Company’s training
            staff. It may be necessary for non-company personnel to carry out training and testing on
            the Company’s behalf.

1.2         Responsibilities

1.2.1       Training staff are responsible to the Chief Pilot for ensuring that all the conversion
            training and testing requirements specified below are met as appropriate to the
            experience level of the pilot being trained or tested. The aim should be to encourage the
            development of high standards of professional knowledge, aeroplane handling and
            operating skills. Emphasis should be placed on the use of standard drills and procedures
            and on the need to adhere closely to the recommended operating techniques.


1.3         Scope of Training Requirements

1.3.1       This manual is limited in operation to the [aircraft type/s]. Flight crew will be conversant
            with its operations and systems and be current on type in the preceding 3 months prior
            to operational conversion and line training.




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual                          Part D Training Page 2 of 16
Section 2   Training Syllabuses and Checking


2.1         Flight Crew

2.1.1       Line Training

2.1.1.1     A flight crew member shall complete a line training course before commencing
            unsupervised line flying:

2.1.1.2     The line training will be conducted by the Training Captain.

2.1.1.3     The line training course shall contain:

            (a)   ground training and checking including aeroplane systems, normal, abnormal and
                  emergency procedures;

            (b)   emergency and safety equipment training and checking which must be completed
                  before aeroplane training commences;

            (c)   Crew Resource Management training;

            (d)   aeroplane training and checking;

            (e)   line flying under supervision and line check; and

            (f)   route and aerodrome competence check.

2.1.1.4      The line training course shall be conducted in the order set out in Para 2.1.1.3 above.

2.1.2       Differences Training and Familiarisation Training

2.1.2.1     Differences Training

            A flight crew member shall complete differences training when:

            (a)   operating another variant of an aeroplane of the same type or another type of the
                  same class currently operated; or

            (b)   a change of equipment and/or procedures on types or variants currently operated
                  requires additional knowledge.

2.1.2.2     Familiarisation Training

            A flight crew member shall complete familiarisation training when:

            (a)   operating another aeroplane of the same type or variant; or

            (b)   a change of equipment and/or procedures on the type or variant currently operated
                  requires additional knowledge.

2.1.2.3     Differences training will not be required as long as the Company operates only one type
            of aircraft.




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual                         Part D Training Page 3 of 16
2.1.3       Recurrent Training and Checking

2.1.3.1     Recurrent Training

            Recurrent training shall comprise:

            (a)   ground and refresher training;

            (b)   aeroplane training;

            (c)   Emergency and Safety equipment training; and

            (d)   Crew Resource Management training.

2.1.3.1.1   Ground and Refresher Training

            The ground and refresher training shall include:

            (a)   aeroplane systems;

            (b)   operational procedures and requirements; and

            (c)   accident/incident and occurrence review.

2.1.3.1.2   Aeroplane Training

            Aeroplane training shall ensure that:

            (a)   all major failures of aeroplane systems and associated procedures will have been
                  covered in the preceding 3 year period;

            (b)   when engine out manoeuvres are carried out, the engine failure is simulated; and

            (c)   aeroplane training may be combined with the operator proficiency check.

2.1.3.1.3   Emergency and Safety Equipment Training

            The emergency and safety equipment training programme:

            (a)   may be combined with emergency and safety equipment checking and shall be
                  conducted in an aeroplane or a suitable alternative training device;

            (b)   must include the following every year:

                  (i)     donning of a life jacket, where fitted;

                  (ii)    handling of fire extinguishers;

                  (iii)   instruction on the location and use of all emergency and safety equipment
                          carried on board;

                  (iv)    instruction on the location and use of all types of exits; and

                  (v)     security procedures;

            (c)   must include the following every three years;

                  (i)     actual operation of all types of exits;

The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual                              Part D Training Page 4 of 16
                    (ii)    fire fighting using equipment representative of that carried in the aeroplane
                            on an actual or simulated fire;

                    (iii)   the effects of smoke in an enclosed area and actual use of all relevant
                            equipment in a simulated smoke filled environment;

                    (iv)    handling of pyrotechnics, real or simulated, where fitted; and

                    (v)     demonstration in the use of life rafts.

2.1.3.1.4     Crew Resource Management Training

2.1.3.1.4.1   All company pilots will be trained in Crew Resource Management irrespective of the type
              of flying to be undertaken.

2.1.3.1.4.2   CRM training is designed to reflect the nature of company operations, and non-
              assessable elements of recurrent training are to be provided annually for all crew
              members to cover the major elements of the full initial course over a four year cycle.

2.1.3.2       Recurrent Checking

              Recurrent checking shall comprise:

              (a)   operator proficiency checks;

              (b)   emergency and safety equipment checks; and

              (c)   line checks.

2.1.3.2.1     Operator Proficiency Check

              Where applicable, operator proficiency checks shall include the manoeuvres detailed in
              Annex C. The proficiency check shall be valid for 6 calendar months following the
              remainder of the month of issue. If issued within the final 3 calendar months of validity
              of a previous operator proficiency check, the period of validity shall extend from the date
              of issue until 6 calendar months from the expiry date of that previous operator
              proficiency check.

2.1.3.2.2     Emergency and Safety Equipment Check

              The emergency and safety equipment check shall include the items detailed in Annex B.
              All flight crew will have completed an initial wet drill before operating Company aircraft
              over water. A wet drill completed by a crew member whilst employed with a different
              company will be recognised provided that there is written proof of such drill. The
              emergency and safety equipment check shall be valid for 12 calendar months following
              the remainder of the month of issue. If issued within the final calendar 3 months of
              validity of a previous emergency and safety equipment check, the period of validity shall
              extend from the expiry date of that previous emergency and safety equipment check.




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual                              Part D Training Page 5 of 16
2.1.3.2.3   Line Check

            Line checks must establish the ability to perform satisfactorily a complete line operation
            including pre-flight and post-flight procedures and use of the equipment provided. A
            specimen check form is at Annex D. The line check shall be valid for 12 calendar months
            following the remainder of the month of issue. If issued within the final 3 calendar
            months of validity of a previous line check, the period of validity shall extend from the
            date of issue until 12 calendar months from the expiry date of that previous line check.


2.2         Operations Personnel other than Crew Members

2.2.1       If a person other than a “crew” member will be responsible for any aspect of flying in
            relation to this operation, i.e. passenger briefing, ground handling, etc. The Training
            Captain is to be satisfied that that person is competent to perform their duties before
            commencing any operation.




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual                         Part D Training Page 6 of 16
Section 3   Procedures


3.1         Procedures for Training and Checking

3.1.1       Before a pilot flies for the Company, the Chief Pilot will ensure that a training folder is
            opened for him. The folder will contain a personal record sheet giving details of his
            licence, qualifications and previous experience, together with all the training and test
            forms that are relevant to his training requirements. A specimen personal record sheet
            is at Annex E.

3.1.2       Whenever any training is to be carried out, the Training Captain is to be given the folder
            referred to in Para 3.1.1 above as a guide to the pilot’s requirements, and is to complete
            the relevant form(s) at the end of every detail. In addition to the training and check forms
            already discussed, this will include a summary of ground and flying training and test
            record which will record the pilot’s progress if there has been a break in training or a
            change in Training Captain. A specimen summary of ground and flying training is at
            Annex F.

3.1.3       When the final line check has been satisfactorily carried out, and Annex F has been
            completed, the Chief Pilot is to confirm that all the necessary training and testing has
            been completed, and that the pilot is considered by the Company to be competent to
            carry out the relevant duties.

3.1.4       Commanders whose duties require them to operate in the right-hand seat (i.e. during
            certain aerial photography details) must carry out the Operator Proficiency Check drills
            and checks from the right-hand seat as laid down in Annex B before operating from the
            right hand seat. The Commander’s left-hand seat checks must, in addition, be valid and
            current.

3.2         Procedures in the Event of Personnel not Reaching or Maintaining the Required
            Standards

3.2.1       If at any stage of training, or as a result of a test, it is apparent that the pilot has not
            reached the necessary standard, the Training Captain will refer the case to the Chief
            Pilot for a decision on whether further training should be given, or whether it should be
            discontinued until the pilot has accumulated more flying experience.

3.3         Simulation of Abnormal Situations

3.3.1       Abnormal or emergency situations requiring the application of part, or all, of abnormal or
            emergency procedures and simulation of Instrument Flying by artificial means will not be
            simulated during flights where additional passengers are carried other than the pilot/s
            and camera operator.


3.4         Simulated Engine Failures, Engine Shut Downs and Single Engine Go-arounds.

3.3.1       Simulated engine failures, including single engine go-arounds, are to be demonstrated in
            accordance with the aircraft type manual.

3.3.2       Engine shut downs must not be demonstrated below 3000 feet above the surface.




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual                          Part D Training Page 7 of 16
Section 4   Documentation and Storage


4.1         The following information/documentation is to be stored in an appropriate form,
            accessible to The Crown Estate or its representatives for the periods shown in the
            following table:


                               Flight crew records

             Conversion training and checking           3 years

             Recurrent training and checking            3 years

             Recency                                    15 months

             Route and aerodrome competence             3 years

             Dangerous goods training as appropriate    3 years




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual                      Part D Training Page 8 of 16
Annex A                  Pilot’s Personal Record


Name (in full) ................................................................           Date of Birth .................................................


Address ...................................................................................................................................................

.................................................................................................................................................................

Telephone Number .................................................................................................................................

Next of Kin ....................................................................          Relationship .................................................

Address ...................................................................................................................................................

.................................................................................................................................................................

Telephone Number .................................................................................................................................

Date Joined Company .............................................................................................................................

Licence Type ...............................             No .......................................        Expiry Date .................................

Medical Expiry Date ................................................................................................................................

Aircraft Types in Part 1 ............................................................................................................................

Total Hours Flown ........................................................                Total Hours P.1 ............................................

Other Qualifications (e.g. AFI) ................................................................................................................

Previous flying experience and appointments ........................................................................................

.................................................................................................................................................................

.................................................................................................................................................................




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual                                                                    Part D Training Page 9 of 16
Annex B                 Emergency and Safety Equipment Check

Name .........................................      Licence No .............................           Aeroplane Type ....................



 Part 1       Initial Test Only, if applicable

 Item                                                                               Completion Date                         Examiner’s
                                                                                                                             Signature

 (a)     ‘Wet’ life-jacket drill.




 Part 2       Initial Test and Every 3 Years

 Item                                                                                          Date                         Examiner’s
                                                                                                                             Signature

 (a)     Actual removal of emergency exits if applicable
         to type.

 (b)     Actual use of fire extinguisher on a fire.

 Part 3       Initial and Recurrent

 Item                                                                                          Date                         Examiner’s
                                                                                                                             Signature

 (a)     Operation of normal and emergency exits.

 (b)     Emergency escape procedures.

 (c)     Location, contents and use of first aid kit and
         knowledge of handbook.

 (d)     Type(s), operation and serviceability checks of
         fire extinguishers.

 (e)     Location, donning, inflation and use of
         lifejackets, where fitted.



Part 4

I certify that the above-named pilot has satisfactorily completed all the appropriate Parts as indicated,
and is competent in the use of the emergency and life-saving equipment carried, and in the
completion of his duties in an emergency.


Signed .....................................................................   Date ..................................................................
      Chief Pilot




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual                                                         Part D Training Page 10 of 16
Annex C         Operator Proficiency Check


Name                          Licence No.                   Right Hand Seat Check (Tick if Yes)….

Aircraft Type                 Date of Test

Check Captain                 Flight Duration




Check Captain’s Name                            Signature                        Date…………….




OPERATOR’S CERTIFICATE

Having examined this report, I am satisfied that Captain ……………………………..
is competent to act as commander of ……………………. type aircraft.

Signed …………………………..Appointment ……………………………………….

Name (Block Capitals) …………………… ...............         Date ………………….




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual                      Part D Training Page 11 of 16
Annex D - Line Check                                                              Page 1 of 2

Name                                                  Licence No.

Aircraft Type                                         Date of Test

Check Captain                                         Flight Duration



 Part 1   Pre-Flight                                  Pass/Fail                 Remarks
                                                     Pass/Fail
 (a)   Weather, flight planning, use of AIS

 (b)   Fuel planning                                 Pass/Fail

 (c)   Loading, C of G, load sheet as required       Pass/Fail

 (d)   Tech. log and CMR                             Pass/Fail

 (e)   Passenger briefing                            Pass/Fail

 Part 2   Departure
                                                     Pass/Fail
 (a)   External and Internal Checks

 (b)   Starting                                      Pass/Fail

 (c)   Use of Check Lists                            Pass/Fail

 (d)   R/T procedure and liaison with ATC            Pass/Fail

 (e)   After start checks and taxiing                Pass/Fail

 (f)   Power and pre-take-off checks                 Pass/Fail

 (g)   Take-off and climb                            Pass/Fail
 Part 3   Cruise

       Normal cruise, power settings, general
 (a)                                                 Pass/Fail
       handling and standard route(s) if used.
 (b)   Slow-speed flight, use of flap and handling   Pass/Fail

 (c)   R/T procedure and use of navigation aids      Pass/Fail

 (d)   Pilot navigation                              Pass/Fail

 (e)   Fuel checks                                   Pass/Fail

 (f)   Awareness of minimum altitude                 Pass/Fail
       requirements

 (g)   Practice diversion (selection of alternate,   Pass/Fail
       and initiation only)




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual                          Part D Training Page 12 of 16
Annex D           Line Check                                           Page 2 of 2



 Part 4   Airfield Joining and Post Flight

 (a)   Descent self brief                        Pass/Fail

 (b)   Attention to weather minima               Pass/Fail

 (b)   Altimeter settings and MSA                Pass/Fail

 (c)   Passenger Care                            Pass/Fail

 (d)   Closing Down Checks                       Pass/Fail

 (e)   Passenger briefing care                   Pass/Fail

 (f)   In flight radio failure                   Pass/Fail

 (g)   ATC liaison                               Pass/Fail
 (h)   Use of checklist                          Pass/Fail




Having examined this report, I am satisfied that Captain ……………………………..
Is competent to act as commander of ……………………. type aircraft.

Signed …………………………..Appointment ……………………………………….

Name (Block Capitals) …………………… ...............      Date ………………….




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual               Part D Training Page 13 of 16
Annex E                Summary of Ground and Flying Training


Name                                           Aircraft Type



 Items                                                       Flying Hours             Date Completed                 Training Captain’s
                                                                                                                         Signature

 1       Emergency/Survival Training
         and Test

 2       Wet drill, if applicable

 3       Aircraft Type ground Training
         and Test

 4       Operator Proficiency Check

 5       Line Training

 6       Line Check and Area Clearance

 7       Mandatory Landings (3 in last
         3 months, 1 in last 28 days,
         on type).

                                    Total Hours




Training Captain’s Certificate.

I certify that the above named pilot has completed all the appropriate training and tests as indicated
above, and is recommended for unsupervised flying duties as commander on type aircraft for the
purpose of aerial survey.

Chief Pilot’s Certificate: Having examined the above report, and checked the pilot’s licence and
medical validity dates, I certify that the above-named pilot is cleared for unsupervised flying duties as
commander on ................................................................................................ type aircraft.


Signed .......................................................................... Date .............................................................
      Chief Pilot/Training Captain (delete as necessary)




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual                                                         Part D Training Page 14 of 16
Annex F - Syllabus of Ground and Flying Training


                                                            Applicable
Ref Section            Details             Test method                    Venue         Trainer
                                                               to

1.0
                                     Emergency and Survival Training
1.1             First aid training       H & S Executive   Flight and               St Johns
                                         First Aid         ground                   Ambulance
                                         Qualification     Crew
1.2             Location and             Oral Exam         Flight Crew              Training
                knowledge of                                                        Captain
                contents of aircraft
                First aid equipment
1.3             Fire Fighting            CAT 1 Airport     Flight and               Fire Service
                training                 fire-fighting     ground
                                         Qualification     Crew
1.4             Location and             Oral Exam         Flight Crew              Training
                knowledge of                                                        Captain
                aircraft Fire-fighting
                equipment
1.5             Location and use       Practical and       Flight Crew              Training
                of aircraft            oral exam                                    Captain
                emergency exits
1.6             Life jacket drill      CAA approved        Flight crew
                                       course
1.7             Location of aircraft Oral exam             Flight crew              Training
                life jackets and use                                                Captain




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual                Part D Training Page 15 of 16
 Ref     Section         Details           Test method       Applicable to Venue           Trainer


2.0                                                  OPC

2.1     Ground      Aircraft            Oral exam            Flight crew                Training
                    limitations                                                         Captain
2.2     Ground      Aircraft systems    Oral exam            Flight crew                Training
                                                                                        captain
2.3     Ground      Emergency           Oral exam            Flight crew                Training
                    procedures                                                          captain
2.4     Ground      Offshore Aerial     Oral exam            Flight crew                Training
                    Survey Manual                            and                        captain
                    contents                                 Operations
                                                             staff
2.5     Ground      C.R.M Topics        Oral exam            Flight crew                Training
                                                             operations                 captain
2.6     Flight      Normal Take-off     Practical            Flight crew                Training
                                                                                        Captain
2.7     Flight      Visual circuit      Practical            Flight crew                Training
                                                                                        Captain
2.8     Flight      Normal full-stop    Practical            Flight crew                Training
                    landing                                                             Captain
2.9     Flight      Simulated           Practical            Flight crew                Training
                    engine failure                                                      Captain
                    after take-off
2.10    Flight      Go-around           Practical            Flight crew                Training
                    procedure                                                           Captain
2.11    Flight      Simulated           Practical            Flight crew                Training
                    engine fire                                                         Captain
3.0                                              Line Training

3.1                 Pre-Flight          Practical            Flight crew                Training
                                                                                        Captain
3.2                 Departure           Practical            Flight crew                Training
                                                                                        Captain
3.3                 Cruise              Practical            Flight crew                Training
                                                                                        Captain




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual                   Part D Training Page 16 of 16
Part E Audit

ANNEX A ..............................................................................................2
Quality Audit Schedule ................................................................................................. 2

ANNEX B ..............................................................................................3
Safety Management System Audit Protocol ................................................................. 3

Detailed Audit Protocol .........................................................................4
Flight Operations .......................................................................................................... 8
Aircraft Maintenance Requirements ........................................................................... 14
Maintenance Control System ..................................................................................... 14

In Flight Inspection Check List ............................................................17

ANNEX C............................................................................................19
Audit Completion Certificate ....................................................................................... 19

ANNEX D............................................................................................20
Non-Conformance Report .......................................................................................... 20

ANNEX E ............................................................................................21
Corrective Action Report ............................................................................................ 21




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual                                 Part E Audit                                      Page 1 of 22
ANNEX A

Quality Audit Schedule

                   Month                 Routine Audit                      Follow-up Audit

            January                  Approval Inspection

            February

            March

            April

            May

            June                         Internal Audit

            July

            August

            September                    Audit Review

            October

            November

            December



Note 1: Follow-up audits may be programmed by the Safety Manager as a result of non-
        conformances found during routine audits
Note 2: Timing in the above table is for illustration only to show the spread of annual auditing.
        Actual Approval Inspection dates will be subject to auditor availability




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual            Part E Audit                      Page 2 of 22
     ANNEX B



     Safety Management System Audit Protocol

     This form is used by auditors to summarise the results of the evaluation of the Operator’s
     Safety Management System. It is accompanied by the detailed audit protocols that were used
     in the audit.


Operator:

Address:

Accountable Manager:

Safety Manager:

Auditor:
Date:

                               Good - Poor
         Item           Good    Average    Poor                       Comments
1.   Policy
2.   Authorities
3.   Risk Management
4.   Involvement
5.   Technical
     Document Control
6.   Training
7.   Ops Manual
8.   Safety data
9.   Occurrence
10. Evaluation
11. Safety Assurance
12. SMS Docs


     Comments:




     The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual    Part E Audit                     Page 3 of 22
        Safety Management System Audit


        Detailed Audit Protocol

         Note:    Tick “N/A” if a requirement does not apply
                  Tick “N” to indicate a shortfall
Element         1. Safety Management System
1.1 Safety Management System Requirements
  Ref                   Requirement                      Y   N    N/A           Comment
1.2.1      Safety Policy and Objectives
           Does the Operations Manual contain
           provisions for:
           a. Management commitment and
           responsibility?
           b. Safety accountabilities?
           c. Appointment of key safety
           personnel?
           d. Coordination of emergency
           response planning?
           e. Complete documentation of the
           SMS?
1.2.2      Safety Risk Management
           Has the company developed and
           maintained procedures for:
           a. Hazard identification?
           b. Risk assessment and mitigation?
1.2.3      Safety Assurance
           Has the company developed and
           maintained a means of:
           a. Monitoring and measuring safety
           performance?
           b. Identifying and managing
           organizational changes that may
           affect safety?
           c. Ensuring continuous SMS
           improvement?
1.2.4      Safety Promotion
           Has the company developed and
           maintained:
           a. Safety training programmes that
           ensure that personnel are competent
           to perform their SMS duties?
           b. A formal means of safety
           communication?
1.2.5      Compliance Monitoring
           Has the operator established and
           maintained a system for identifying
           applicable regulations, standards,
           approvals and exemptions and
           demonstrating compliance with them?




        The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual           Part E Audit             Page 4 of 22
Element         2. Organisation and Personnel Requirements
2.1 Organisation and Personnel
  Ref                   Requirement                      Y   N    N/A           Comment
2.1.1      Does the operator have an
           organisation structure that clearly
           defines duties, authorities &
           accountabilities and have a qualified:
           a. flight department manager;
           b. chief pilot; and
           c. a person responsible for
               maintenance?
2.1.2      Where the company has more than
           one operating base, has the
           management structure addressed the
           exercise of the above responsibilities
           at all locations?
2.1.3      Has the company identified the
           responsibilities and functions of a
           safety manager (if assigned)?
2.1.4   Have the company structure and
        personnel demonstrated their
        effectiveness in managing the
        operation and ensuring that all
        requirements have been met?
2.2 Aircraft Crew Member Duties and Responsibilities
2.2.1      Does the operator have a procedure
           to ensure that the minimum number of
           flight crew as specified in the aircraft
           flight authority and the minimum
           number of cabin crew members as
           required by State of Registry
           regulations are assigned?
2.2.2      Does the operator have procedure for
           designation of a pilot-in-command and
           other aircraft crew positions?
2.2.3      Have the duties and responsibilities of
           the PIC been specified?
2.2.4      Have the duties and responsibilities of
           the SIC, if required, been specified?
2.2.5      Have the duties and responsibilities of
           other crew members assigned
           onboard duties been specified?




        The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual           Part E Audit             Page 5 of 22
  Ref                   Requirement                      Y   N    N/A           Comment
2.3 Crew Member Qualifications
2.3.1  Are there procedures to ensure that
       all aircraft crew members:
       a. hold valid licences and certificates
            and that they meet ICAO licence,
            medical and rating requirements,
       b. meet ICAO language proficiency
            requirements.
       c. meet all recency requirements;
       d. have fulfilled the operator’s
            training and proficiency
            requirements? Have they been
            effective?
2.4 Maintenance Personnel Qualifications
2.4.1  Do the maintenance personnel hold
       the licences and ratings required by
       the State of Registry of the aircraft?
2.5 Other Personnel
2.5.1      Are duties, authorities and
           responsibilities for other personnel
           described within the company
           operations manual?


  Ref                   Requirement                      Y   N    N/A           Comment
Element               3. Training and Proficiency
3.1 Training Programs
3.1.1        Does the operator have a training
             programme that ensures that
             personnel are trained and
             competent to perform their assigned
             duties?
3.1.2        Is the training syllabus included or
             referenced, in the company
             operations manual?
3.1.3        Do the training programs include the
             following for flight crew members:
                  i. initial and annual aircraft
                       type and systems training,
                  ii. initial and every two years
                       thereafter:
                      A. emergency procedures
                          training, and
                      B. aircraft surface
                         contamination training; and
                      C. dangerous goods training
                  iii. upgrading training
                       A. Recommended first aid
                           training for flight crew
                           members
                       (Recommended practice)
3.1.4        Is there training for other personnel



        The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual           Part E Audit             Page 6 of 22
              assigned to perform duties
              onboard an aircraft during flight?
3.1.5         a. Has the operator established a
                 programme that ensures that
                 the company maintenance
                 personnel have the knowledge
                 and skills appropriate to the
                 level of maintenance
                 performed?
              b. Is the syllabus of the training
                 programme referenced in the
                 company operations manual?
              c. Does the training programme
                 include both initial and
                 recurrent training appropriate
                 to the aircraft group, type or
                 system and the related
                 procedures for which a
                 maintenance release is to be
                 signed?


3.2 Crew Resource Management/Human Factors Training
3.2.1        Does the operator have a crew
             resource management (CRM) and
             Human Factors training program
             and have aircraft crew members
             received training?
3.2.2        Have maintenance personnel,
             operations staff and others received
             CRM or Human Factors training?
             (Recommended Practice)


3.3 Emergency and Safety Procedures Training
Ref          Requirement                              Y   N   N/A     Comment
3.3.1        Are there initial and recurrent
             Emergency Procedures training
             requirements established and have
             all aircraft crew members received
             their training for:
             a. fire in the air and ground,
             b. use of fire extinguishers,
             c. operation/use of emergency
                 exits,
             d. preparation for landing and
                 ditching,
             e. emergency evacuation
                 procedures,
             f. donning/inflation of life
                 preservers,
             g. deploying, inflating, and boarding
                 life rafts,
             h. pilot incapacitation,
             i. unlawful interference, bomb
                 threat, other security procedures,
3.3.2        Are there initial and recurrent Safety
             Procedures training programmes for
             all flying crew members?



        The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual        Part E Audit      Page 7 of 22
3.4 Training and Qualification Records
Ref          Requirement                                Y   N   N/A     Comment
3.4.1      Does the operator have a system to
           record licensing, training and
           qualifications information for each
           person who is required to receive
           training?
3.4.2      Are records retained for the required
           period?
3.4.3      If the operator has electronic records,
           are procedures in place to protect
           their integrity and to verify the
           records? (Recommended Practice)


Element               4 Flight Operations
4.1 Flight Planning Requirements
Ref          Requirement                                Y   N   N/A     Comment
4.1.1.     Does the operator have a requirement
           and procedures for the PIC to be
           familiar with the available information
           appropriate for the flight and to ensure
           that the facilities and services are
           adequate for the safe operation of the
           aircraft?
4.1.2      Does the operator have a requirement
           and procedures for the PIC to:
           a. be familiar with all available
           meteorological information; and
           b. to plan an alternative course of
           action for the eventuality that the flight
           cannot be completed because of
           weather conditions?
4.1.3      Does the operator have procedures
           for VFR flight operations?
4.1.4      Does the operator have requirements
           and procedures for IFR operations
           with and without destination alternate
           aerodromes?
4.1.5      Does the operator have requirements
           and procedures for determination of
           fuel and oil supply requirements?
4.1.6      Does the operator have requirements
           that meet the aircraft performance
           standards of this section?




        The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual          Part E Audit      Page 8 of 22
4.2 Operational Control
Ref          Requirement                             Y   N   N/A     Comment
4.2.1      Does the company operations manual
           contain an operational control system
           that at least consists of a pilot self
           dispatch system that:
           a. identifies the person responsible
                for release of the flight;
           b. specifies flight planning
                requirements; and
           c. specifies when the pilot must
                advise the operator of the
                aircraft’s departure and arrival
                and the associated procedures?
4.2.2      Does the operational control system
           include procedures for ensuring that:
           a. all operating requirements
                specified in the company
                operations manual have been
                met,
           b. the aircraft is operated within
                weight/mass and balance limits,
           c. the names of persons on board
                the aircraft are recorded or
                otherwise know by the operator,
                and
           d. the pilot-in-command has
                available on board the aeroplane
                all the essential information
                concerning the search and rescue
                services in the area over which
                the aeroplane will be flown, and
           e. SAR authorities are notified on a
                timely basis should an aircraft be
                overdue?

4.3 Weather Minima
4.3.1      Does the operator have procedures
           defining the weather minima used for
           IFR departures and approaches?
4.3.2      Does the operator have procedures in
           their operations manual for the
           determination of take-off minima from
           runways where no take-off minima is
           specified? Does it include a risk
           analysis?
4.3.3      Does the operator have a policy not to
           use operating minima lower than
           those which may be established for
           that aerodrome by the State in which
           it is located, except with the specific
           approval of that State?




        The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual       Part E Audit      Page 9 of 22
4.3.4      Does the operator have a policy not to
           continue towards the aerodrome of
           intended landing unless the latest
           available meteorological information
           indicates that conditions at that
           aerodrome, or at least one destination
           alternate aerodrome, will, at the
           estimated time of arrival, be at or
           above the specified aerodrome
           operating minima?
4.3.5      Does the operator have a policy not to
           continue an approach-to-land beyond
           a point at which the limits of the
           aerodrome operating minima would be
           infringed?
4.3.6      Does the operator have a policy to
           adhere to the minimum safe altitudes
           while in transition or on approach?
4.3.7      Does the operator have a policy and
           procedures for operating in known or
           expected icing conditions? Are they
           appropriate to the aeroplane’s
           certification and equipment?

4.4 Aircraft Operating Requirements
Ref          Requirement                               Y   N   N/A     Comment
4.4.1      Does the operator have a process for
           identifying and complying with all
           aircraft operating rules that the
           operator is subject to, as required by
           the civil aviation authority of the State
           of Registry and the States in whose
           airspace the operations are being
           conducted?

4.5 Noise Certification
4.5.1      Is there a documentary proof from the
           State of Registry attesting noise
           certification of the aircraft, carried on
           board the aircraft [as required] when
           such a document has been issued?
4.5.2      Does the operator have procedures to
           ensure that aircraft adhere to
           published noise abatement
           procedures consistent with safety?

4.6 Aircraft Airworthiness
4.6.1      Does the operator have procedures to
           ensure that aircraft are maintained
           and operated in accordance with their
           C of A and the provisions of the
           company maintenance program?




        The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual         Part E Audit      Page 10 of 22
4.7 Use of Checklists
4.7.1      Is there a checklist for each type of
           aircraft operated that covers normal,
           abnormal and emergency operations
           and is it available to crew members?
           Is the checklist consistent with the
           aircraft flight manual and any
           company SOP?
           Does it have a date of issue that
           reflects this consistency?
4.7.2      Does the operator have procedures to
           ensure that every crew member
           follows the checklist in the
           performance of their assigned duties?

4.8 Flight and Duty Time Fatigue Countermeasure
Ref          Requirement                             Y   N   N/A     Comment
4.8.1      Does the operator have a flight and
           duty time program that ensures that
           all personnel involved in the operation
           do not carry out their duties when they
           are fatigued?
4.8.2      If deviations from the flight and duty
           time limitations are permitted, does
           the system include:
           a. a risk assessment process;
           b. the identification of the
                management person authorised
                to approve the deviation; and
           c. a record of the deviation, risk
                assessment and mitigation?
4.8.3      Do deviations require the approval of
           all personnel involved?

Element         5 Aircraft Equipment Requirements
5.1 General Requirements
5.1.1      Are the operator’s aircraft equipped in
           accordance with the requirements set
           out in ICAO Annex 6, Part II for VFR,
           IFR and night operations?
5.1.2      Is all required aircraft equipment
           approved or do they otherwise meet
           the technical specifications prescribed
           by the State of Registry?

5.2 Comm and Nav Equipment
5.2.1      Are all aircraft equipped with comm
           and nav equipment and redundancy
           appropriate for the area of operation?
5.2.2      Does the operator have procedures to
           ensure that electronic data bases are
           compatible with the intended function
           of the equipment and are current?



        The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual       Part E Audit      Page 11 of 22
5.3 Operational Information
Ref          Requirement                              Y   N   N/A     Comment
5.3.1      Is the following documentation or
           information available on the flight
           deck:
           a. pertinent aeronautical charts;
           b. pertinent en route, terminal area,
                and instrument approach
                procedure charts;
           c. aircraft performance data;
           d. aircraft checklists;
           e. the operator’s operations manual;
           f. SOP manual (where established)
           g. the aircraft flight manual;
           h. the aircraft minimum equipment
                list (MEL) if aircraft is being
                operated in accordance with a
                MEL;
           i. aircraft C of A or other flight
                authority and C of R;
           j. aircraft radio licence;
           k. insurance certificate;
           l. Documentation required for the
                area of operation;
           m. Interception procedures; and
           n. For international commercial air
                transport operations, a certified
                true copy of the air operator
                certificate?

5.4 Seats, Safety Belts and Shoulder Harnesses
5.4.1   Are all aircraft equipped with:
        a. a seat for each occupant of the
            aircraft,
        b. a safety belt, having a metal-to-
            metal latching device, for each
            person on board;
        c. a shoulder harness for each flight
            crew member and any other
            person occupying a flight deck
            seat or a sideways facing seat?

5.5 Emergency Equipment - General
Ref         Requirement                               Y   N   N/A     Comment
5.5.1      Are all aircraft equipped with at least:
           a. first aid kit;
           b. fire extinguishers for use in the
               crew, passenger and cargo
               compartments?




        The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual        Part E Audit      Page 12 of 22
5.6 Flight Over Water
5.6.1      If aircraft are operated on extended
           flights over water are they equipped
           with a life preserver or flotation device
           for each occupant of the aircraft?
5.6.2      Does the operator have a process to
           determine survival risks involved in
           extended flights over water?
           a. Based on the risk assessment are
              life rafts available in sufficient
              numbers to carry all persons on
              board carried in the aircraft?
           b. Are these life rafts provided with life
              saving equipment, including a
              means of sustaining life,
              appropriate to the flight to be
              undertaken?

5.7 Icing Protection and Weather Detection Equipment
5.7.1      Has the operator ensured that only
           aircraft that are certified and equipped
           to cope with such conditions are
           operated into known or forecast icing
           conditions?

5.10 ELT
5.10.1     Are the operator’s aircraft equipped
           with ELTs?

5.11 Ground Proximity Warning System (GPWS)
5.11.1     Are the operator’s aircraft equipped
           with a GPWS?
5.11.2       a. Does the operator have a
                process to ensure that the data
                base for GPWS is current?
             b. Are the pilots trained in use of
                the system?

5.12 MEL
Ref          Requirement                                Y   N   N/A     Comment
5.12.1     Where a master minimum equipment
           list (MMEL) is established for the
           type(s) or aircraft used, has the
           operator devised a MEL approved by
           the State of Registry?
5.12.2     Are flight crews and maintenance
           personnel trained in its use?
5.12.3     Is a copy of the MEL carried on board
           the aircraft?




        The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual          Part E Audit      Page 13 of 22
Element         6 Aircraft Maintenance Requirements
6.1 Maintenance Control System
Ref          Requirement                             Y   N   N/A     Comment
6.1.1      Does the operator have a
           maintenance control system that is
           appropriate to the type and number of
           aircraft operated and the manner in
           which the maintenance is conducted?
6.1.2      Is the maintenance control system
           described in the company operations
           manual?

6.2        Maintenance Agreements
6.2.1      Does the operator have a system that
           ensures that no person performs
           maintenance on operator aircraft
           unless the person is an employee of
           the operator or has been authorised
           to perform the work under the terms
           of a written maintenance agreement
           or other form of authorization
           specified in the company operations
           manual?
6.2.2      Has the operator included provisions
           in the company operations manual for
           flight crew to obtain maintenance
           services when away from home
           base?

6.3 Person Responsible for Maintenance
6.3.1      Has the operator appointed a person
           to be responsible for its maintenance
           control system?




        The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual       Part E Audit      Page 14 of 22
Element             7 Company Operations Manual
Ref       Requirement                              Y   N   N/A     Comment
7.1       Does the operator provide each
          person concerned with an operations
          manual containing all the instructions
          and information necessary for
          personnel to perform their duties?
          Is the manual amended or revised as
          necessary to ensure that the
          information contained in it is kept up
          to date?
          Are all amendments or revisions
          issued to all personnel that are
          required to use the manual?
          Does the manual contain at least the
          following:
           a. table of contents;
           b. amendment control page and list
               of effective pages;
           c. duties, responsibilities and
               succession of management and
               operating personnel;
           d. operator safety management
               system;
           e. operational control system;
           f. MEL procedures (where
               applicable);
           g. normal flight operations;
           h. SOPs (may be a separate
               manual for each aircraft type);
           i. weather limitations;
           j. flight and duty time limitations;
           k. emergency operations;
           l. accidents/incidents
               consideration;
           m. personnel qualifications and
               training;
           n. record keeping;
           o. a description of the maintenance
               control system;
           p. security procedures;
           q. performance operating
               limitations; and
           r. handling of dangerous goods?




      The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual       Part E Audit      Page 15 of 22
Ref       Requirement                                Y    N   N/A     Comment
7.2       Does the company operations manual
          contain a description of the process to
          allow deviations (if deviations are
          allowed) from the provisions
          contained in it and specify the person
          who may approve such deviations?
          Do deviations identify the associated
          conditions under which they are
          permitted or required?
          Are deviations based on a risk
          assessment process?

Element              8 Transportation of Dangerous Goods
8.1.      Has the operator ensured that
          dangerous goods are not transported
          except where authorised and in
          accordance with ICAO Technical
          Instructions for the Safe Transport of
          Dangerous Goods or the IATA
          Dangerous Goods Regulations?
8.2       Has the operator taken steps to
          advise passengers as to what
          constitutes dangerous goods, and
          whether and how those goods can be
          carried on aircraft?
8.3       Does the operator train aircraft crew
          members on these procedures at least
          every two years?

Element             9 Audit Summary and Comments




Element             10 Corrective Actions Summary
                                                                                        Action     Target
Audit Ref        Defect or observation noted        Required Action          Priority
                                                                                        Owner      Date




       The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual         Part E Audit                   Page 16 of 22
          In Flight Inspection Check List

Element                     In-Flight Inspection

Flying with the crew is not a requirement of a Crown Estate audit. However, should it be
agreed with the operator that an auditor can or should fly, the following check list may
be used.
The objective of such a flight is to observe compliance with the company operations
manual, SOPs and relevant company directives, as well as with safe operating
procedures.

Flight Operations
                       Event                 Y     N   N/A                  Comments

1.        Flight Preparation

     a. Weather Briefing

     b. NOTAMs

     c.    Other Flight Planning Info

     d. Flight & Duty Time

2.        Flight Planning

 a.        Route Analysis

 b.        Fuel Consumption

 c.        Alternates

 d.        Weights and Performance

3.        Weight & Balance

4.        Aircraft Servicing & Ramp

 a.        Fuelling Procedures

 b.        Load Security

 c.        Ground Handling

 d.        Aircraft Parking

5.        Pre-Flight

 a.        External Inspection

 b.        Cabin [& Flight Deck]

6.        Passenger Safety Briefing

7.        Pre-Start

8.        Start & After Start

9.        Taxi & Take-off

10. Radio Procedures & ATC




          The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual     Part E Audit              Page 17 of 22
11. Departure Procedures

 a.    Engine handling

 b.    ATC Procedures

 c.    Lookout

 d.    Checks

 e.    Radio Procedures

12. Climb Procedures

13. Cruise Procedures

 a.    En route Comms

 b.    Navigation

 c.    Flight Management

14. Approach Procedures

 a.    Planning

 b.    Descent

 c.    Final Approach

 d.    Landing & Taxiing

15. Shutdown

16. Flight Log, Aircraft Log & Defect
   Recording

17. Crew Resource Management

18. Crew Discipline



Aircraft
1.    Manuals & Related Documents

2.    MEL

3.    C of A & C of R and AOC, if
      required

4.    Aircraft Log

5.    Maintenance Release

6.    Aircraft Equipment

7.    Emergency Equipment




      The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual   Part E Audit   Page 18 of 22
ANNEX C

Audit Completion Certificate


Audit Checklist:
Completion Date:                                 Reference Number:
Auditors:
Non-Conformances:




                                                     ………….……………………………
                                                     Auditor(s)
Corrective Action Agreed:




Agreed Completion Date:
Signed:
                ……………………………….. Safety Manager
                ……………………………….. Responsible Manager




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual    Part E Audit       Page 19 of 22
ANNEX D

Non-Conformance Report



Reported by:                                     Date:            Reference:
Nature of Non-conformance:




Recommended Corrective Action:




                                                      ………………………………. Safety Manager
Corrective Action Agreed
                                                    ………………..…………Accountable Manager
Follow-up Audit completed (date):
Remarks:




                                                         ……………………………… Safety Manager
Closure Agreed
                                                    ………………..…………Accountable Manager




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual   Part E Audit                  Page 20 of 22
ANNEX E

Corrective Action Report

Audit completion Report Ref. No.:                Date:
Corrective Action Completed:




                                                   ………………………….. Responsible Manager
Follow-up completed (Date):
Remarks




Closure Recommended (Y/N)……………………………… Safety Manager
Comments by Accountable Manager




                                                 Closure Agreed (Y/N)………………………………..




The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual   Part E Audit           Page 21 of 22
The Crown Estate Offshore Aerial Survey Manual   Part E Audit   Page 22 of 22

				
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